National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrophobic coating shc

  1. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branson, Eric D.; Shah, Pratik B.; Singh, Seema; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  2. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  3. Application of Super-Hydrophobic Coating for Enhanced Water Repellency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Enhanced Water Repellency of Ballistic Fabric Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Super-Hydrophobic Coating for Enhanced Water Repellency of ...

  4. Tunable hydrophilicity on a hydrophobic fluorocarbon polymer coating on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolari, K.; Hokkanen, A. [VTT Information Technology, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    An efficient, economic, reliable, and repeatable patterning procedure of hydrophobic surfaces was developed. A fluorocarbon polymer derived from the C{sub 4}F{sub 8} gas in an inductively coupled plasma etcher was used as the hydrophobic coating. For a subsequent patterning of hydrophilic apertures on the polymer, a short O{sub 2} plasma exposure through a silicon shadow mask was utilized. The overall hydrophilicity of the patterned surface can be tuned by the duration of the O{sub 2} plasma exposure, and also by the density and the size of the hydrophilic apertures. The laborious photolithography and tricky lift-off procedures are avoided. Optimization of the whole patterning process is explained thoroughly and supported with experimental data. The hydrophilic adhesion of the patterned polymer was evaluated with aqueous droplets, which were studied on matrices of the hydrophilic apertures of different sizes. The deposition parameters of the fluorocarbon polymer, the size of the droplet required to enable rolling on the patterned surface, and the duration of the O{sub 2} plasma exposure were considered as the main parameters. To determine the achievable resolution of the patterning procedure, the subsurface etching beneath the shadow mask was evaluated. The results show that a resolution of less than 10 {mu}m can be achieved. The simple hydrophilic patterning procedure described here can be used for the production of on-plane microfluidics, where a controlled adhesion or decohesion of 8-50 {mu}l droplets on the surface with a variable hydrophilicity from one location to another can be achieved.

  5. Fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on aluminum alloy substrates by RF-sputtered polytetrafluoroethylene coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Hai Feng Zhou, Zhi Ping

    2014-03-15

    In this work, we present a method of fabricating super-hydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy substrate. The etching of aluminum surfaces has been performed using Beck's dislocation etchant for different time to create micrometer-sized irregular steps. An optimised etching time of 50 s is found to be essential before polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, to obtain a highest water contact angle of 1652 with a lowest contact angle hysteresis as low as 52. The presence of patterned microstructure as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the low surface energy ultrathin RF-sputtered PTFE films renders the aluminum alloy surfaces highly super-hydrophobic.

  6. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Beth L; Pawel, Steven J; Hunter, Scott Robert; Haynes, James A; Hillesheim, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

  7. Application of Super-Hydrophobic Coating for Enhanced Water Repellency of Ballistic Fabric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Barton; Rajic, Slobodan; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate that a superhydrophobic coating technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) increases the water repellency of ballistic fabric beyond that provided by existing water repellency treatments. This increased water repellency has the potential to provide durable ballistic fabric for body armor without adding significant weight to the armor or significant manufacturing cost. Specimens of greige and scoured ballistic fabric were treated with a superhydrophobic coating and their weights and degree of water repellency were compared to specimens of untreated fabric. Treatment of both greige and scoured ballistic fabrics yielded highly water repellent fabrics. Our measurements of the water droplet contact angles gave values of approximately 150 , near the lower limit of 160 for superhydrophobic surfaces. The coatings increased the fabric weights by approximately 6%, an amount that is many times less than the estimated weight increase in a conventional treatment of ballistic fabric. The treated fabrics retained a significant amount of water repellency following a basic abrasion test, with water droplet contact angles decreasing by 14 to 23 . Microscopic analysis of the coating applied to woven fabrics indicated that the coating adhered equally well to fibers of greige and scoured yarns. Future evaluation of the superhydrophobic water repellent treatment will involve the manufacture of shoot packs of treated fabric for ballistic testing and provide an analysis of manufacturing scale-up and cost-to-benefit considerations.

  8. SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up

  9. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA[sup [minus

  10. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  11. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA{sup {minus}} system was also initiated (Task 2.1.2). In Task 3, the mixing/coagulation characteristics of a small Kenics static mixer/agitation system have been investigated (Task 3.2.1), a lamella thickener for the recovery of coagula has been built (Task 3.3.1), and the test program for the recovery of coagula by column flotation has been initiated (Task 3.3.4).

  12. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  13. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  14. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Coronado, P.R.

    1999-12-21

    A method is described for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  15. Salvianolic acid A preconditioning confers protection against concanavalin A-induced liver injury through SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yan; Zhai, Xiaohan; Lin, Musen [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Chen, Zhao; Tian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feng [Department of General Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Gao, Dongyan; Ma, Xiaochi [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Lv, Li, E-mail: lv_li@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yao, Jihong, E-mail: Yaojihong65@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Salvianolic acid A (SalA) is a phenolic carboxylic acid derivative extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza. It has many biological and pharmaceutical activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SalA on concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatic injury in Kunming mice and to explore the role of SIRT1 in such an effect. The results showed that in vivo pretreatment with SalA significantly reduced ConA-induced elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and decreased levels of the hepatotoxic cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-?) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?). Moreover, the SalA pretreatment ameliorated the increases in NF-?B and in cleaved caspase-3 caused by ConA exposure. Whereas, the pretreatment completely reversed expression of the B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL). More importantly, the SalA pretreatment significantly increased the expression of SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, which was known to attenuate acute hypoxia damage and metabolic liver diseases. In our study, the increase in SIRT1 was closely associated with down-regulation of the p66 isoform (p66shc) of growth factor adapter Shc at both protein and mRNA levels. In HepG2 cell culture, SalA pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression in a time and dose-dependent manner and such an increase was abrogated by siRNA knockdown of SIRT1. Additionally, inhibition of SIRT1 significantly reversed the decreased expression of p66shc, and attenuated SalA-induced p66shc down-regulation. Collectively, the present study indicated that SalA may be a potent activator of SIRT and that SalA can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis through SIRT1-mediated repression of the p66shc pathway. - Highlights: We report for the first time that SalA protects against ConA-induced hepatitis. We find that SalA is a potential activator of SIRT1. SalA's protection against hepatitis involves SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc.

  16. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  17. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  18. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  19. Composition for forming an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T.; Lewis, Linda A.

    2015-12-29

    A composition for producing an optically clear, well bonded superhydrophobic coating includes a plurality of hydrophobic particles comprising an average particle size of about 200 nm or less, a binder at a binder concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.5 wt. %, and a solvent. The hydrophobic particles may be present in the composition at a particle concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 1 wt. %. An optically transparent, superhydrophobic surface includes a substrate, a plurality of hydrophobic particles having an average particle size of about 200 nm or less dispersed over the substrate, and a discontinuous binder layer bonding the hydrophobic particles to the substrate, where the hydrophobic particles and the binder layer form an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating.

  20. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  1. Aluminide coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  2. COATED ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  3. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated gold surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.

  4. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated goldmore » surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.« less

  5. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. ... the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. ...

  6. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  7. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  8. Switching phase separation mode by varying the hydrophobicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switching phase separation mode by varying the hydrophobicity of polymer additives in solution-processed semiconducting small-moleculepolymer blends Citation Details In-Document ...

  9. COATING METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  10. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and

  11. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV

  12. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  13. Anti-stiction coating for microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hankins, Matthew G.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2006-05-16

    A method for depositing an anti-stiction coating on a MEMS device comprises reacting the vapor of an amino-functionalized silane precursor with a silicon surface of the MEMS device in a vacuum chamber. The method can further comprise cleaning the silicon surface of the MEMS device to form a clean hydroxylated silicon surface prior to reacting the precursor vapor with the silicon surface. The amino-functionalized silane precursor comprises at least one silicon atom, at least one reactive amino (or imine) pendant, and at least one hydrophobic pendant. The amino-functionalized silane precursor is highly reactive with the silicon surface, thereby eliminating the need for a post-process anneal step and enabling the reaction to occur at low pressure. Such vapor-phase deposition of the amino-functionalized silane coating provides a uniform surface morphology and strong adhesion to the silicon surface.

  14. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  15. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  16. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanomanufacturing: Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings nanostructuredsuperhydrophobiccoatings.pdf More...

  17. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  18. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  19. Apparatus for coating powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Kerns, John A.; Alford, Craig S.; McKernan, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

  20. Optically transparent and environmentally durable superhydrophobic coating based on functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schaeffer, Daniel A.; Polizos, Georgios; Smith, D. Barton; Lee, Dominic F.; Hunter, Scott R.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-01-09

    Optical surfaces such as mirrors and windows that are exposed to outdoor environmental conditions are susceptible to dust buildup and water condensation. The application of transparent superhydrophobic coatings on optical surfaces can improve outdoor performance via a self-cleaning effect similar to the Lotus effect. The contact angle (CA) of water droplets on a typical hydrophobic flat surface varies from 100° to 120°. Adding roughness or microtexture to a hydrophobic surface leads to an enhancement of hydrophobicity and the CA can be increased to a value in the range of 16≥0° to 175°. This result is remarkable because such behavior cannotmore » be explained using surface chemistry alone. When surface features are on the order of 100 nm or smaller, surfaces exhibit superhydrophobic behavior and maintain their optical transparency. In this work we discuss our results on transparent superhydrophobic coatings that can be applied across large surface areas. We have used functionalized silica nanoparticles to coat various optical elements and have measured the contact angle and optical transmission between 190 to 1100 nm on these elements. The functionalized silica nanoparticles were dissolved in a solution of the solvents isopropyl alcohol and 4-chlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF) and a proprietary ceramic binder (Cerakote ). Finally, this solution was spin-coated onto a variety of test glass substrates, and following a curing period of about 30 minutes, these coatings exhibited superhydrophobic behavior with a static CA ≥160°.« less

  1. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  2. Origin of Entropy Convergence in Hydrophobic Hydration and Protein Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garde, S.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Paulaitis, M.E.; Pratt, L.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); [Center for Molecular and Engineering Thermodynamics, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); [Department of Chemical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    An information theory model of hydrophobic effects is used to construct a molecular explanation why hydrophobic solvation entropies of protein unfolding measured by high sensitivity calorimetry converge to zero at a common convergence temperature. The entropy convergence follows directly from the weak temperature dependence of occupancy fluctuations {l_angle}{delta}{ital n}{sup 2}{r_angle} for molecular-scale volumes in water. The macroscopic expression of the contrasting entropic behavior of water relative to common organic solvents is the {ital relative} temperature insensitivity of the water isothermal compressibility compared to hydrocarbon liquids. The information theory model used provides a quantitative description of small molecule hydration and, in addition, predicts that the value of the entropy at convergence is slightly {ital negative}. Interpretations of entropic contributions to protein folding should account for this result. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. METHOD FOR TESTING COATINGS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johns, I.B.; Newton, A.S.

    1958-09-01

    A method is described for detecting pin hole imperfections in coatings on uranium-metal objects. Such coated objects are contacted with a heated atmosphere of gaseous hydrogen and imperfections present in the coatings will allow the uranlum to react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride. Since uranium hydride is less dense than uranium metal it will swell, causing enlargement of the coating defeot and rendering it visible.

  4. Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, Ian; Snyder, Mark A.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2014-11-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ? 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f < 0.4, and almost no change in flux for higher f values, similar to the change in water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

  5. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  6. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  7. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  8. Electrowetting on plasma-deposited fluorocarbon hydrophobic films for biofluid transport in microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayiati, P.; Tserepi, A.; Petrou, P. S.; Kakabakos, S. E.; Misiakos, K.; Gogolides, E. [Institute of Microelectronics-NCSR 'Demokritos', POB 60228, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products-NCSR 'Demokritos', POB 60228, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Institute of Microelectronics-NCSR 'Demokritos', POB 60228, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)

    2007-05-15

    The present work focuses on the plasma deposition of fluorocarbon (FC) films on surfaces and the electrostatic control of their wettability (electrowetting). Such films can be employed for actuation of fluid transport in microfluidic devices, when deposited over patterned electrodes. Here, the deposition was performed using C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and the plasma parameters that permit the creation of films with optimized properties desirable for electrowetting were established. The wettability of the plasma-deposited surfaces was characterized by means of contact angle measurements (in the static and dynamic mode). The thickness of the deposited films was probed in situ by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry, while the surface roughness was provided by atomic force microscopy. These plasma-deposited FC films in combination with silicon nitride, a material of high dielectric constant, were used to create a dielectric structure that requires reduced voltages for successful electrowetting. Electrowetting experiments using protein solutions were conducted on such optimized dielectric structures and were compared with similar structures bearing commercial spin-coated Teflon registered amorphous fluoropolymer (AF) film as the hydrophobic top layer. Our results show that plasma-deposited FC films have desirable electrowetting behavior and minimal protein adsorption, a requirement for successful transport of biological solutions in 'digital' microfluidics.

  9. Sol-gel optical coatings for lasers, 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Priotton, J.J.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-11-01

    There are three basic types of antireflective (AR) coatings. The first is a single-layer coating in which the coating index is equal to the square root of the index of the substrate, assuming air is the external medium. The second type is a system of two or more layers of different indexes. The third type is a graded-index system, where the index is uniformly and continuously graded from the substrate to the external medium. Low reflection ranges from narrow for the single-layer to broad for the graded-layer and multilayered with a large number of layers. Four types of sol-gel AR coatings have been developed at CEL-V. They are based on single-layer or multilayer designs. They consist mainly of amorphous silica in the polymeric and/or colloidal state, combined in certain cases with other metallic oxides, binders, fillers, hydrophobic and lubricating agents, and adhesion promoters. These antireflective sol-gel-derived optical coatings have been prepared and tested for the proposed French megajoule neodymium-glass laser.

  10. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  11. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  12. COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

  13. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  14. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  15. Optically transparent and environmentally durable superhydrophobic coating based on functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaeffer, Daniel A.; Polizos, Georgios; Smith, D. Barton; Lee, Dominic F.; Hunter, Scott R.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-01-09

    Optical surfaces such as mirrors and windows that are exposed to outdoor environmental conditions are susceptible to dust buildup and water condensation. The application of transparent superhydrophobic coatings on optical surfaces can improve outdoor performance via a self-cleaning effect similar to the Lotus effect. The contact angle (CA) of water droplets on a typical hydrophobic flat surface varies from 100° to 120°. Adding roughness or microtexture to a hydrophobic surface leads to an enhancement of hydrophobicity and the CA can be increased to a value in the range of 16≥0° to 175°. This result is remarkable because such behavior cannot be explained using surface chemistry alone. When surface features are on the order of 100 nm or smaller, surfaces exhibit superhydrophobic behavior and maintain their optical transparency. In this work we discuss our results on transparent superhydrophobic coatings that can be applied across large surface areas. We have used functionalized silica nanoparticles to coat various optical elements and have measured the contact angle and optical transmission between 190 to 1100 nm on these elements. The functionalized silica nanoparticles were dissolved in a solution of the solvents isopropyl alcohol and 4-chlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF) and a proprietary ceramic binder (Cerakote ). Finally, this solution was spin-coated onto a variety of test glass substrates, and following a curing period of about 30 minutes, these coatings exhibited superhydrophobic behavior with a static CA ≥160°.

  16. Effect of morphology of hydrophobic surfaces on cavitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUZAR,ALENKA; LEUNG,KEVIN

    2000-04-24

    Cavitation has been suggested to be a possible source of long range interactions between mesoscopic hydrophobic surfaces. While evaporation is predicted by thermodynamics, little is known about its kinetics. Glauber dynamics Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice gas close to liquid-gas coexistence and confined between partially drying surfaces are used to model the effect of water confinement on the dynamics of surface-induced phase transition. Specifically, they examine how kinetics of induced evaporation change as the texture of hydrophobic surfaces is varied. Evaporation rates are considerably slowed with relatively small amount of hydrophilic coverage. However, the distribution of hydrophilic patches is found to be crucial, with the homogeneous one being much more effective in slowing the formation of vapor tubes which triggers the evaporation process. They estimate the free energy barrier of vapor tube formation via transition state theory, using a constrained forward-backward umbrella sampling technique applied to the metastable, confined liquid. Furthermore, to relate simulation rates to experimental ones, they perform simulations using the mass-conserving Kawasaki algorithm. They predict evaporation time scales that range from hundreds of picoseconds in the case of mesoscopic surfaces {approximately} 10{sup 4} nm{sup 2} to tens of nanoseconds for smaller surfaces {approximately} 40 nm{sup 2}, when the two surfaces are {approximately} 10 solvent layers apart. The present study demonstrates that cavitation is kinetically viable in real systems and should be considered in studies of processes at confined geometry.

  17. Superoleophilic particles and coatings and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T; D& #x27; Urso, Brian

    2013-07-30

    Superoleophilic particles and surfaces and methods of making the same are described. The superoleophilic particles can include porous particles having a hydrophobic coating layer deposited thereon. The coated porous particles are characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m and a plurality of nanopores. Some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity. The superoleophilic particles also include oil pinned within the nanopores of the porous particles The plurality of porous particles can include (i) particles including a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features comprising a contiguous, protrusive material, (ii) diatomaceous earth particles, or (iii) both. The surfaces can include the superoleophilic particles coupled to the surface.

  18. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  19. Thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  20. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  1. Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To

  2. Temperature and length scale dependence of hydrophobic effects and their possible implications for protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, David M.; Chandler, David

    2000-04-01

    The Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory of hydrophobicity [J. Phys. Chem. 103, 4570 (1999)] is applied to treat the temperature dependence of hydrophobic solvation in water. The application illustrates how the temperature dependence for hydrophobic surfaces extending less than 1nm differs significantly from that for surfaces extending more than 1nm. The latter is the result of water depletion, a collective effect, that appears at length scales of 1nm and larger. Due to the contrasting behaviors at small and large length scales, hydrophobicity by itself can explain the variable behavior of protein folding.

  3. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  4. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  5. Super-hydrophobic bandages and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T.; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2012-06-05

    A bandage that includes a material, which can be breathable, having a first surface, and a plurality of superhydrophobic particles attached to the first surface. The plurality of superhydrophobic particles ranging in size from about 100 nanometers to about 10 micrometers. The superhydrophobic particles including a protrusive material defining a plurality of nanopores and a plurality of spaced apart nanostructures that define an external boundary of the hydrophobic particles. The nanopores providing a flow through porosity. The first surface can be rendered superhydrophobic by the attached superhydrophobic particles. The material can have a second surface opposite the first surface that is hydrophilic. The superhydrophobic particles can be adhered to the first surface by a binder. Also included is a method of making the bandages described herein.

  6. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negativelymore » charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.« less

  7. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negatively charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.

  8. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  9. Amphiphilic Surface Active Triblock Copolymers with Mixed Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Side Chains for Tuned Marine Fouling-Release Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, D.; Weinman, C; Finlay, J; Fletcher, B; Paik, M; Sundaram, H; Dimitriou, M; Sohn, K; Callow, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Two series of amphiphilic triblock surface active block copolymers (SABCs) were prepared through chemical modification of two polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polyisoprene ABC triblock copolymer precursors. The methyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) [M{sub n} {approx} 550 g/mol (PEG550)] and a semifluorinated alcohol (CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 9}(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}OH) [F10H10] were attached at different molar ratios to impart both hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups to the isoprene segment. Coatings on glass slides consisting of a thin layer of the amphiphilic SABC deposited on a thicker layer of an ABA polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene thermoplastic elastomer were prepared for biofouling assays with algae. Dynamic water contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements were utilized to characterize the surfaces. Clear differences in surface structure were realized as the composition of attached side chains was varied. In biofouling assays, the settlement (attachment) of zoospores of the green alga Ulva was higher for surfaces incorporating a large proportion of the hydrophobic F10H10 side chains, while surfaces with a large proportion of the PEG550 side chains inhibited settlement. The trend in attachment strength of sporelings (young plants) of Ulva did not show such an obvious pattern. However, amphiphilic SABCs incorporating a mixture of PEG550 and F10H10 side chains performed the best. The number of cells of the diatom Navicula attached after exposure to flow decreased as the content of PEG550 to F10H10 side chains increased.

  10. Vanadium Carbide Coating Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Traditional methods of coating steel surfaces with a layer of hard metal carbide require large capital investment, produce toxic and hazardous gases, are costly to operate, and require multiple...

  11. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  12. Aluminum phosphate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sambasivan, Sankar; Steiner, Kimberly A.; Rangan, Krishnaswamy K.

    2007-12-25

    Aluminophosphate compounds and compositions as can be used for substrate or composite films and coating to provide or enhance, without limitation, planarization, anti-biofouling and/or anti-microbial properties.

  13. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  14. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  15. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  16. Spin coating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  17. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  18. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  19. Multibody correlations in the hydrophobic solvation of glycine peptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Robert C.; Drake, Justin A.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-12-14

    Protein collapse during folding is often assumed to be driven by a hydrophobic solvation energy (ΔG{sub vdw}) that scales linearly with solvent-accessible surface area (A). In a previous study, we argued that ΔG{sub vdw}, as well as its attractive (ΔG{sub att}) and repulsive (ΔG{sub rep}) components, was not simply a linear function of A. We found that the surface tensions, γ{sub rep}, γ{sub att}, and γ{sub vdw}, gotten from ΔG{sub rep}, ΔG{sub att}, and ΔG{sub vdw} against A for four configurations of deca-alanine differed from those obtained for a set of alkanes. In the present study, we extend our analysis to fifty decaglycine structures and atomic decompositions. We find that different configurations of decaglycine generate different estimates of γ{sub rep}. Additionally, we considered the reconstruction of the solvation free energy from scaling the free energy of solvation of each atom type, free in solution. The free energy of the isolated atoms, scaled by the inverse surface area the atom would expose in the molecule does not reproduce the γ{sub rep} for the intact decaglycines. Finally, γ{sub att} for the decaglycine conformations is much larger in magnitude than those for deca-alanine or the alkanes, leading to large negative values of γ{sub vdw} (−74 and −56 cal/mol/Å{sup 2} for CHARMM27 and AMBER ff12sb force fields, respectively). These findings imply that ΔG{sub vdw} favors extended rather than compact structures for decaglycine. We find that ΔG{sub rep} and ΔG{sub vdw} have complicated dependencies on multibody correlations between solute atoms, on the geometry of the molecular surface, and on the chemical identities of the atoms.

  20. Fiber coating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  1. Fiber coating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  2. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  3. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process: Air-promoted oil agglomeration of moderately hydrophobic coals. 2: Effect of air dosage in a model mixing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-07-01

    In a selective oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal, fine-size particles are suspended in water and treated with a water-immiscible hydrocarbon which can range from pentane to heavy fuel oil. Vigorous agitation is applied to disperse the oil and to produce frequent contacts between oil-coated particles. In Part 1 of this series of papers, it was shown that a definite amount of air had to be present in a laboratory mixing unit which produced a moderate shear rate in order to form compact, spherical agglomerates in an aqueous suspension of moderately hydrophobic coal using heptane or hexadecane as an agglomerate. In this paper, the effects of different amounts of air including dissolved air are discussed. The results indicate that a small amount of air will trigger the process of agglomeration, and even the air dissolved in water under equilibrium conditions at room temperature and pressure is sufficient to promote agglomeration provided it is released from solution.

  4. AntiReflection Coating D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    1999-09-23

    Analytical expressions used to optimize AR coatings for single junction solar cells are extended for use in monolithic, series interconnected multi-junction solar cell AR coating design. The result is an analytical expression which relates the solar cell performance (through J{sub sc}) directly to the AR coating design through the device reflectance. It is also illustrated how AR coating design be used to provide an additional degree of freedom for current matching multi-junction devices.

  5. Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings Development of ...

  6. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  7. Coating method for graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  8. Biodegradation of polymer coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.R.; Walch, M.; Jones-Meehan, J.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional paint removal methods include chemical stripping with VOCs blasting with plastic media, and delamination with high pressure water. These methods have many limitations, in that they are labor intensive, pose human health risks, are relatively expensive and pose significant waste disposal problems. However, polymeric coatings are known to contain structural components, such as ester, amide and urea linkages, that can be degraded biologically. The authors are working to develop a stable, enzyme-based, non-toxic paint stripping strategy that will be environmentally safe and cost effective. The specific objectives are to identify and characterize microbial systems capable of degrading polymeric coatings, to develop a quantitative degradation assay and to optimize activity levels for subsequent purification and concentration of the biological products required for rapid degradation of coatings. A water-dispersed colloid of an ester-based polyurethane polymer has been used in solid growth medium to screen about 100 different bacteria for microbial degradation activity. Those with demonstrable activity have been grown in the presence of epoxy-polyamide paint- and polyester polyurethane paint-coated aluminum coupons. The authors have demonstrated delamination under certain conditions and have developed a spectrophotometric method for quantitating degradation activity as a function of dye release.

  9. Coating method for graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  10. Low friction and galling resistant coatings and processes for coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Roger N.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention describes coating processes and the resultant coated articles for use in high temperature sodium environments, such as those found in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and their associated systems. The substrate to which the coating is applied may be either an iron base or nickel base alloy. The coating itself is applied to the substrate by electro-spark deposition techniques which result in metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. One coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and an aluminum electrode. Another coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and a nickel-base hardfacing alloy electrode.

  11. Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.; Vance, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

  12. Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhi Heng; McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2003-01-21

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

  13. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  14. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brophy, Brenor L.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Maghsoodi, Sina; Colson, Thomas E.; Yang, Yu S.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.

    2016-04-19

    Disclosed is a coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly, systems and methods for curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using high temperature air-knives, infrared emitters and direct heat applicators are disclosed.

  15. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  16. Hydrophobic force field as molecular alternative to surface-area models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummer, G.

    1999-07-07

    An effective force field for hydrophobic interactions is developed based on a modified potential-of-mean-force (PMF) expansion of the effective many-body interactions between nonpolar molecules in water. For the simplest nonpolar solutes in water, hard particles, the modified PMF expansion is exact in both limiting cases of infinite separation and perfect overlap. The hydrophobic interactions are parametrized by using the information-theory model of hydrophobic hydration. The interactions between nonpolar solutes are short-ranged and can be evaluated efficiently on a computer. The force field is compared with simulation data for alkane conformational equilibria in water as well as a model for the formation of a hydrophobic core of a protein. The modified PMF expansion can be extended to solutes with attractive interactions. The observed accuracy, computational efficiency, and atomic detail of the model suggest that this simple hydrophobic force field can lead to a molecular alternative for phenomenological surface-area models with applications in ligand-binding and protein-folding studies.

  17. Dense protective coatings, methods for their preparation and coated articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tulyani, Sonia; Bhatia, Tania; Smeggil, John G.

    2015-12-29

    A method for depositing a protective coating on a complex shaped substrate includes the steps of: (1) dipping a complex shaped substrate into a slurry to form a base coat thereon, the slurry comprising an aqueous solution, at least one refractory metal oxide, and at least one transient fluid additive present in an amount of about 0.1 percent to 10 percent by weight of the slurry; (2) curing the dipped substrate; (3) dipping the substrate into a precursor solution to form a top barrier coat thereon; and (4) heat treating the dipped, cured substrate to form a protective coating.

  18. Computer simulation of protein solvation, hydrophobic mapping, and the oxygen effect in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Hydrophobic effects are central to the structural stability of biomolecules, particularly proteins, in solution but are not understood at a molecular level. This project developed a new theoretical approach to calculation of hydrophobic effects. This information theory approach can be implemented with experimental, including computer simulation-experimental, information. The new theory is consistent with, builds upon, and subsumes previous integral equation and scaled particle statistical thermodynamic modes of hydrophobic effects. the new theory is sufficiently simple to permit application directly to complex biomolecules in solution and to permit further expansion to incorporate more subtle effects.

  19. Importance of hydrophobic traps for proton diffusion in lyotropic liquid crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-03-04

    The diffusion of protons in self-assembled systems is potentially important for the design of efficient proton exchange membranes. In this work, we study proton dynamics in a low-water content, lamellar phase of an sodium-carboxylate gemini surfactant/water system using computer simulations. The hopping of protons via the Grotthuss mechanism is explicity allowed through the multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method. We find that the hydronium ion is trapped on the hydrophobic side of the surfactant-water interface, and proton diffusion then proceeds by hopping between surface sites. The importance of hydrophobic traps is surprising, because one would expect the hydronium ions tomore » be trapped at the charged head-groups. Finally, the physics illustrated in this system should be relevant to the proton dynamics in other amphiphilic membrane systems, whenever there exists exposed hydrophobic surface regions.« less

  20. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-09-09

    The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

  1. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications ITP Nanomanufacturing: Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors PowerPoint ...

  2. Surface coatings. Science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book covers the coating field from the latest industry developments to current energy and pollution regulations. It explains the composition of coatings, how they are prepared and applied and the factors that control their ultimate performance. The author discusses the synthesis of polymeric binders, industrial resins, pigments, paints and paint properties, types of coatings, and new technologies. CONTENTS: Binders: Synthesis of Polymeric Binders; Industrial Resins; Pigments; Paints and Paint Properties: Pigment Dispersion; Surface Preparation and Paint Application; Paint Properties and Their Evaluation; Types of Coatings; New Technolgies.

  3. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  4. Concentrating Solar Power Mirror Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features Cheryl Kennedy, a senior scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. She holds a sample of an experimental mirror coating to increase the efficiency of...

  5. Carbonaceous film coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon

    1989-01-01

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris[1,3,2]diazaborine[1,2-a:1'2'-c:1"2"-e]borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

  6. Carbonaceous film coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

  7. XeroCoat Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: XeroCoat Inc Place: California Product: US manufacturer of anti-reflective coatings for PV systems. References: XeroCoat Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  8. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal...

  9. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  10. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Haas, Terry; Wong, Kwok-Keung; Seward, George

    1989-01-01

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  11. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Atsushi Maeda, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-15

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub a}=−21×10{sup −6} K{sup −1} and α{sub c}=79×10{sup −6} K{sup −1}) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF.

  12. Water around fullerene shape amphiphiles: A molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varanasi, S. R. E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de; John, A.; Guskova, O. A. E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de; Sommer, J.-U.

    2015-06-14

    Fullerene C{sub 60} sub-colloidal particle with diameter ?1 nm represents a boundary case between small and large hydrophobic solutes on the length scale of hydrophobic hydration. In the present paper, a molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate this complex phenomenon for bare C{sub 60} fullerene and its amphiphilic/charged derivatives, so called shape amphiphiles. Since most of the unique properties of water originate from the pattern of hydrogen bond network and its dynamics, spatial, and orientational aspects of water in solvation shells around the solute surface having hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are analyzed. Dynamical properties such as translational-rotational mobility, reorientational correlation and occupation time correlation functions of water molecules, and diffusion coefficients are also calculated. Slower dynamics of solvent moleculeswater retardationin the vicinity of the solutes is observed. Both the topological properties of hydrogen bond pattern and the dangling OH groups that represent surface defects in water network are monitored. The fraction of such defect structures is increased near the hydrophobic cap of fullerenes. Some dry regions of C{sub 60} are observed which can be considered as signatures of surface dewetting. In an effort to provide molecular level insight into the thermodynamics of hydration, the free energy of solvation is determined for a family of fullerene particles using thermodynamic integration technique.

  13. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    Water’s behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub p}) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated α{sub p} peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  14. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed thatmore » the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.« less

  15. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  16. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  17. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egert, C.M.

    1997-08-05

    An enhanced protective coating is disclosed to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C{trademark}) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers. 4 figs.

  18. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egert, Charles M.

    1997-01-01

    An enhanced protective coating to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C.TM.) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers.

  19. Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd. Place: Malvern, England, United Kingdom Zip: WR14 3SZ Product: Coated Conductors Consultancy Ltd. (3-Cs)...

  20. Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment ...

  1. Reduced AC losses in HTS coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2004-10-05

    Methods for reducing hysteresis losses in superconductor coated ribbons where a flux distribution is set into the superconductor coated ribbon prior to the application of alternating current.

  2. North American Coating Laboratories | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coating Laboratories Jump to: navigation, search Name: North American Coating Laboratories Address: 9450 Pineneedle Drive Place: Mentor, Ohio Zip: 44060 Sector: Services, Solar...

  3. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  4. Coated substrates and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Wei-kan; Childs, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a coated substrate and a process for forming films on substrates and for providing a particularly smooth film on a substrate. The method of this invention involves subjecting a surface of a substrate to contact with a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient force and energy to substantially change the surface characteristics of said substrate, and then exposing a film-forming material to a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient energy to vaporize the atoms of said film-forming material and to transmit the vaporized atoms to the substrate surface with sufficient force to form a film bonded to the substrate. This process is particularly useful commercially because it forms strong bonds at room temperature. This invention is particularly useful for adhering a gold film to diamond and forming ohmic electrodes on diamond, but also can be used to bond other films to substrates.

  5. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  6. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G.

    1997-01-01

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  7. Metasurface optical antireflection coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Boyang; Hendrickson, Joshua; Nader, Nima; Chen, Hou -Tong; Guo, Junpeng

    2014-12-15

    Light reflection at the boundary of two different media is one of the fundamental phenomena in optics, and reduction of reflection is highly desirable in many optical systems. Traditionally, optical antireflection has been accomplished using single- or multiple-layer dielectric films and graded index surface structures in various wavelength ranges. However, these approaches either impose strict requirements on the refractive index matching and film thickness, or involve complicated fabrication processes and non-planar surfaces that are challenging for device integration. Here, we demonstrate an antireflection coating strategy, both experimentally and numerically, by using metasurfaces with designer optical properties in the mid-wave infrared. Our results show that the metasurface antireflection is capable of eliminating reflection and enhancing transmission over a broad spectral band and a wide incidence angle range. The demonstrated antireflection technique has no requirement on the choice of materials and is scalable to other wavelengths.

  8. Metasurface optical antireflection coating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Boyang; Hendrickson, Joshua; Nader, Nima; Chen, Hou -Tong; Guo, Junpeng

    2014-12-15

    Light reflection at the boundary of two different media is one of the fundamental phenomena in optics, and reduction of reflection is highly desirable in many optical systems. Traditionally, optical antireflection has been accomplished using single- or multiple-layer dielectric films and graded index surface structures in various wavelength ranges. However, these approaches either impose strict requirements on the refractive index matching and film thickness, or involve complicated fabrication processes and non-planar surfaces that are challenging for device integration. Here, we demonstrate an antireflection coating strategy, both experimentally and numerically, by using metasurfaces with designer optical properties in the mid-wave infrared.more » Our results show that the metasurface antireflection is capable of eliminating reflection and enhancing transmission over a broad spectral band and a wide incidence angle range. The demonstrated antireflection technique has no requirement on the choice of materials and is scalable to other wavelengths.« less

  9. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  10. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  11. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  14. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  15. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  16. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  17. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  18. SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o

  19. Molecular theory and the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; Asthagiri, D.; Tan, L.; Pratt, L. R.

    2015-12-22

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar–Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for themore » effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar–Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2’s also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. Furthermore, this is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.« less

  20. Molecular theory and the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; Asthagiri, D.; Tan, L.; Pratt, L. R.

    2015-12-22

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar–Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar–Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2’s also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. Furthermore, this is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.

  1. Acceleration of Amide Bond Rotation by Encapsulation in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Water-Soluble Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-08

    The hydrophobic interior cavity of a self-assembled supramolecular assembly exploits the hydrophobic effect for the encapsulation of tertiary amides. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments reveal that the free energy barrier for rotation around the C-N amide bond is lowered by up to 3.6 kcal/mol upon encapsulation. The hydrophobic cavity of the assembly is able to stabilize the less polar transition state of the amide rotation process. Carbon-13 labeling studies showed that the {sup 13}C NMR carbonyl resonance increases with temperature for the encapsulated amides which suggests that the assembly is able to favor a twisted for of the amide.

  2. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwala, R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Batzoglou, S. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Dancik, V. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  3. Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Kerns, John A.; Alford, Craig S.; McKernan, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

  4. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  5. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  6. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

  7. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  8. YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2010-01-01

    carefully aligning the grains in YBCO films, low angle boundaries between superconducting YBCO grains allow more current to flow. In fact below a critical misalignment angle of 4 , the critical current density approaches that of YBCO films grown on single crystal substrates [10]. Typically, 2G HTS wires have three components, flexible metal substrate, buffer layers, and REBa2Cu3O7- (REBCO: RE = Rare Earth) superconductor layers [1-7]. Several methods were developed to obtain biaxially textured templates suitable for fabricating high-performance YBCO coated conductors. They are Ion-Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) and Inclined-Substrate Deposition (ISD). Compared to 1G wire, for producing 2G wires using RABiTS or IBAD process, silver is replaced by a low cost nickel alloy, which allows for fabrication of less expensive HTS wires.

  9. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwala, R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Batzoglou, S. [MIT Lab. for Computer Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Dancik, V. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    A long standing problem in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein, given its amino acid sequence. A variety of simplifying models have been proposed abstracting only the {open_quotes}essential physical properties{close_quotes} of real proteins. In these models, the three dimensional space is often represented by a lattice. Residues which are adjacent in the primary sequence (i.e. covalently linked) must be placed at adjacent points in the lattice. A conformation of a protein is simply a self-avoiding walk along the lattice. The protein folding problem STRING-FOLD is that of finding a conformation of the protein sequence on the lattice such that the overall energy is minimized, for some reasonable definition of energy. This formulation leaves open the choices of a lattice and an energy function. Once these choices are made, one may then address the algorithmic complexity of optimizing the energy function for the lattice. For a variety of such simple models, this minimization problem is in fact NP-hard. In this paper, we consider the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) Model introduced by Dill. The HP model abstracts the problem by grouping the 20 amino acids into two classes: hydrophobic (or non-polar) residues and hydrophilic (or polar) residues. For concreteness, we will take our input to be a string from (H,P){sup +}, where P represents polar residues, and H represents hydrophobic residues. Dill et.al. survey the literature analyzing this model. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Coated woven materials and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCreary, W.J.; Carroll, D.W.

    Coating of woven materials so that not only the outer surfaces are coated has been a problem. Now, a solution to that problem is by coating with materials, with metals or with pyrolytic carbon. Materials are deposited in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CND) reactions using a fluidized bed so that the porosity of the woven materials is retained and the tiny filaments which make up the strands which are woven (including inner as well as outer filaments) are substantially uniformly coated.

  11. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  12. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, Arthur T.; Hosford, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simultaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure 12 comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets 16 is machined out to form a dimple 11. Glass microballoons, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  13. Rework of parylene coated printed wiring assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.O.

    1991-04-01

    This document describes the recommended method for reworking parylene coated Printed Wiring Assemblies (PWAs). Special training is required to successfully rework PWAs that are parylene coated. Parylene coating rework should not be attempted on production units unless successful parylene coating removal has been completed on non-production assemblies. The rework procedures described in this document are recommended for normal parylene rework. Special situations may dictate slight deviation from the methods described herein. 4 figs.

  14. Water-based coatings pass recycling test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, L.

    1990-11-01

    Water based coatings can greatly enhance the natural water resistance, grease resistance, MVTR, and many other properties of corrugated board.

  15. Friction- and wear-reducing coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim

    2011-10-18

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

  16. Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Dischargin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faster Battery Charging, Discharging Technology available for licensing: Coating increases electrical conductivity of cathode materials Coating does not hinder battery ...

  17. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak -Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. However we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  18. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak -Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and whenmore » exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. However we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.« less

  19. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shillingford, C; MacCallum, N; Wong, TS; Kim, P; Aizenberg, J

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e. g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. Herein we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  20. Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong Hee

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound

  1. Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, J.H.

    1998-06-23

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. 2 figs.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  3. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  4. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

  5. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-15

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  6. The hydrophobic effect and the influence of solute-solvent attractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, David M.; Chandler, David

    2001-08-25

    We have studied the effect of weak solute-solvent attractions on the solvation of nonpolar molecules in water at ambient conditions using an extension and improved parameterization of the theory of solvation due to Lum, Chandler, and Weeks [J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 4570]. With a reasonable strength of alkane-water interactions, an accurate prediction of the alkane-water interfacial tension is obtained. As previously established for solutes with no attractive interactions with water, the free energy of solvation scales with volume for small solutes and with surface area for large solutes. The crossover to the latter regime occurs on a molecular length scale. It is associated with the formation of a liquid-vaporlike interface, a drying interface,between the large hydrophobic solute and liquid water. In the absence of attractions, this interface typically lies more than one solvent molecular diameter away from the hard sphere surface. With the addition of attractive interactions between water and the hard sphere, the average separation of the interface and solute surface is decreased. For attractive force strengths typical of alkane-water interactions, we show that the drying interface adjacent to a large hydrophobic solute remains largely intact, but is moved into contact with the solute surface. This effect results from the ''soft modes'' characterizing fluctuations of liquid-vapor interfaces. We show that attractive interactions are of almost no consequence to the temperature dependence of the solvation free energies relevant to protein folding.

  7. Corrosion prevention by protective coatings, Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, C.G.; Vincent, L.D.

    1999-07-01

    This much-used and relied upon book has been revised and updated by Louis D. Vincent to create the second edition. The comprehensive text covers all aspects of the use of high-performance coatings, including an introduction to corrosion as related to coatings, coating characteristics, influence of substrates, organic and zinc coatings, inspection, training, and others. Two new chapters, on elastomeric linings and computer-assisted coatings project management programs, treat new technology developed since the first edition was published. The book is a comprehensive reference tool for engineers, paint superintendents, and maintenance personnel.

  8. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; McHugh, Kevin M

    2013-10-08

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  9. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Lillo, Thomas M.; McHugh, Kevin M.

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  10. Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

  11. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered

  12. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  13. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry N.; Patterson, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  14. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Rais, J.

    1997-09-09

    Preparation and use is described for polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

  15. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.; Mason, Caroline F. V.; Rais, Jiri

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

  16. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G.

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  17. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao

  18. Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

    1997-12-31

    Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

  19. Outdoor durability of radiation-cured coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, R.; Kennedy, R.

    1997-12-31

    Radiation cured coatings are used almost exclusively on products which have little or no exposure to moisture or the weather; inks, furniture varnishes, floor varnishes and coatings for electronic components. However there is considerable interest in being able to use this technology in exterior environments as a substitute for solvent-borne coatings. A 3-year study examining the possible reasons for the poor durability of radiation curable coatings showed that the resistance of the monomers and oligomers to hydrogen abstraction was crucially important, and the water permeability of the cured coating influenced the long-term adhesion performance. The project concluded that with the appropriate combination of curing technology and monomer/oligomer selection, the prospects of UV curable coatings for outdoor exposure are very encouraging.

  20. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  1. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  2. Solar Selective Absorption Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of solar selective absorber coatings that significantly improve the thermal conversion efficiency of solar units by reducing radiative energy losses from the absorbing elements. ...

  3. Coated woven materials and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCreary, William J.; Carroll, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Coating of woven materials so that not only the outer surfaces are coated has been a problem. Now, a solution to that problem is the following: Woven materials are coated with materials, for example with metals or with pyrolytic carbon, which materials are deposited in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactions using a fluidized bed so that the porosity of the woven material is retained and so that the tiny filaments which make up the strands which are woven (including inner as well as outer filaments) are substantially uniformly coated.

  4. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-04-24

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation.

  5. Method of identifying defective particle coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Mark E.; Whiting, Carlton D.

    1986-01-01

    A method for identifying coated particles having defective coatings desig to retain therewithin a build-up of gaseous materials including: (a) Pulling a vacuum on the particles; (b) Backfilling the particles at atmospheric pressure with a liquid capable of wetting the exterior surface of the coated particles, said liquid being a compound which includes an element having an atomic number higher than the highest atomic number of any element in the composition which forms the exterior surface of the particle coating; (c) Drying the particles; and (d) Radiographing the particles. By television monitoring, examination of the radiographs is substantially enhanced.

  6. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  7. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide ...

  8. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  9. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes Title: Nanocomposite protective ... USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 25 ENERGY STORAGE

  10. Superhydrophobic Thin Film Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Industrial Technologies ... Find More Like This Return to Search Superhydrophobic Thin Film Coatings Oak Ridge ...

  11. Scalable superhydrophobic coatings based on fluorinated diatomaceous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on fluorinated diatomaceous earth Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable superhydrophobic coatings based on fluorinated diatomaceous earth Authors: Polyzos, Georgios ...

  12. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  13. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  14. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: Be easy to apply Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity Not be hazardous in final applied form Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be

  15. W-Coating for MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, J.G.; Mani, S.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-07-08

    The integration of miniaturized mechanical components has spawned a new technology known as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Surface micromachining, defined as the fabrication of micromechanical structures from deposited thin films, is one of the core technological processes underlying MEMS. Surface micromachined structures have a large ratio of surface area to volume which makes them particularly vulnerable to adhesion to the substrate or adjacent structures during release or in use--a problem is called stiction. Since microactuators can have surfaces in normal or sliding contact, function and wear are critical issues for reliable operation of MEMS devices. Surface modifications are needed to reduce adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures. In this paper, we will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with Tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. We will discuss the effect of wet and vapor phase cleans along with different process variables. Endurance of the W coating is important, especially in applications where wear due to repetitive contacts with the film may occur. Further, tungsten is hard and chemically inert, Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this, approach manufacturable.

  16. Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Sease, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

  17. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Lithium coatings on the ...

  18. Measure Guideline. Transitioning From Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco With EPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01

    This measure guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

  19. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  20. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  1. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  2. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  3. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  4. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  5. Multilayer coatings for solar energy control applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kivaisi, R.T.; Mbise, G.

    1993-12-31

    This work presents some results for window coatings that are suitable for solar control applications. Selected research results are given for metal/dielectric based coatings optimized for normal incidence. These coatings can be used to improve the performance of windows both for architectural and automobile sectors. Surface coatings which are transparent at 0.3 < {lambda} < 0.7 {micro}m can be used to solar control windows. A thin homogeneous noble metal film (eg Ag) can combine short wavelength transmittance with high long wavelength reflectance. By embedding the metal film between high refractive index dielectric layers one can optimize the transmittance in the desired spectral region. Transmittance data for multilayer stacks designed for normal and non normal incidence to the coating are presented.

  6. The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

  7. Zero discharge organic coatings, powder paint - UV curable paint - E-coat. Volume 1. Final report, June 1993-June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, J.; Martin, D.R.; Spadafora, S.J.; Eng, A.T.; Stark, H.

    1995-06-01

    Zero Discharge Organic Coatings project developed powder paint, Ultraviolet (UV) curable paint, and electro- coating (E-coat) paint for military Applications. These technologies offer potential for high performance coatings with little or no volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions or hazardous waste generation. The ZDOC project focused on formulating non-toxic corrosion inhibitors into these coating technologies, and the applications development of powder coatings. Non-toxic replacements for traditional lead and chromate inhibitors were selected based on a previous NAWCADWAR investigation. Once incorporated, the performance of the coatings with and without inhibitors was compared. Also, the protective mechanisms of these inhibitors were studied. The applications development for powder coatings analyzed technologies to allow powder coating of non-conductive substrates and evaluated the use of IR energy to cure powder coatings. Inhibitors were successfully incorporated into electrocoatings and powder coatings, however corrosion performance results varied with coating formulation.

  8. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  9. Deprotonation and oligomerization in photo-, radiolytically and electrochemically induced redox reactions in hydrophobic alkylalkylimidazolium ionic liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkrob, I . A.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-14

    Radical chemistry initiated by one-electron reduction of 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium cations in the corresponding ionic liquids (ILs) is examined. The reaction scheme is examined in light of the recent experimental data on photo-, radiation-, and electrochemically induced degradation of the practically important hydrophobic alkylimidazolium ILs. It is suggested that the primary species leading to the formation of the oligomers and acidification of the IL is a {sigma}{sigma}* dimer radical cation that loses a proton, yielding a neutral radical whose subsequent reactions produce C(2)-C(2) linked oligomers, both neutral and charged. The neutral oligomers (up to the tetramer) account for the features observed in the NMR spectra of cathodic liquid generated in electrolytic breakdown of the IL solvent. In photolysis and radiolysis, these neutral species and/or their radical precursors are oxidized by radical (ions) derived from the counteranions, and only charged dimers are observed. The dication dimers account for the features observed in the mass spectra of irradiated ILs. The products of these ion radical and radical reactions closely resemble those generated via carbene chemistry, without the formation of the carbene via the deprotonation of the parent cation. As the loss of 2-protons increases the proticity of the irradiated IL, it interferes with the extraction of metal ions by ionophore solutes, while the formation of the oligomers modifies solvent properties. Thus, the peculiarities of radical chemistry in the alkylimidazolium ILs have significant import for their practical applications.

  10. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  11. The hydrophobic effect in a simple isotropic water-like model: Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-04-14

    Using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we show that a simple isotropic water-like model with two characteristic lengths can reproduce the hydrophobic effect and the solvation properties of small and large non-polar solutes. Influence of temperature, pressure, and solute size on the thermodynamic properties of apolar solute solvation in a water model was systematically studied, showing two different solvation regimes. Small particles can fit into the cavities around the solvent particles, inducing additional order in the system and lowering the overall entropy. Large particles force the solvent to disrupt their network, increasing the entropy of the system. At low temperatures, the ordering effect of small solutes is very pronounced. Above the cross-over temperature, which strongly depends on the solute size, the entropy change becomes strictly positive. Pressure dependence was also investigated, showing a “cross-over pressure” where the entropy and enthalpy of solvation are the lowest. These results suggest two fundamentally different solvation mechanisms, as observed experimentally in water and computationally in various water-like models.

  12. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity ... Title: Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - ...

  13. Wear-Resistant, Nano-Composite Steel Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wear-Resistant, Nano-Composite Steel Coatings Laser Processing Techniques Used for the ... wear resistant nano-composite coatings and components for a wide range of applications. ...

  14. Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sangeeta, D.; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Nelson, Warren Arthur

    2001-01-01

    A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

  15. Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition Title: Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition ...

  16. Project Profile: Advanced Anti-Soiling Coatings for CSP Collector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: Advanced Anti-Soiling Coatings for CSP Collector Mirrors and Heliostats ... the need to further develop self-cleaning reflector coatings for solar collectors. ...

  17. Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Sandia National ...

  18. High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers This presentation was ...

  19. Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist prepares slot die coater for solution based ...

  20. Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, ...

  1. Effect of Superalloy Substrate and Bond Coating on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Several different single-crystal superalloys were coated with different bond coatings to study the effect of composition on the cyclic oxidation lifetime of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coating deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition from a commercial source. Three different superalloys were coated with a 7 {micro}m Pt layer that was diffused into the surface prior to YSZ deposition. One of the superalloys, N5, was coated with a low activity, Pt-modified aluminide coating and Pt-diffusion coatings with 3 and 7 {micro}m of Pt. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure in 1 h cycles at 1150 C to assess average coating lifetime. The 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating on N5 had an average YSZ coating lifetime >50% higher than a Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5. Without a YSZ coating, the Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5 showed the typical surface deformation during cycling, however, the deformation was greatly reduced when constrained by the YSZ coating. The 3 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating had a similar average lifetime as the Pt-modified aluminide coating but a much wider scatter. The Pt diffusion bond coating on superalloy X4 containing Ti exhibited the shortest YSZ coating lifetime, this alloy-coating combination also showed the worst alumina scale adhesion without a YSZ coating. The third generation superalloy N6 exhibited the longest coating lifetime with a 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating.

  2. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  3. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Thornton, Joel A.; Madronich, Sasha; Ortega, John V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Laskin, Alexander; Maughan, A. D.

    2007-10-16

    Semi-empirical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models typically assume a well-mixed organic aerosol phase even in the presence of hydrophobic primary organic aerosols (POA). This assumption significantly enhances the modeled SOA yields as additional organic mass is made available to absorb greater amounts of oxidized secondary organic gases than otherwise. We investigate the applicability of this critical assumption by measuring SOA yields from ozonolysis of α-pinene (a major biogenic SOA precursor) in a smog chamber in the absence and in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and lubricating oil seed aerosol. These particles serve as surrogates for urban hydrophobic POA. The results show that these POA did not enhance the SOA yields. If these results are found to apply to other biogenic SOA precursors, then the semi-empirical models used in many global models would predict significantly less biogenic SOA mass and display reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic POA emissions than previously thought.

  4. Wetting state on hydrophilic and hydrophobic micro-textured surfaces: Thermodynamic analysis and X-ray visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Dong In; Kwak, Ho Jae; Doh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun Sun Kiyofumi, Moriyama; Kang, Hie Chan; Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-04-27

    In this study, the wetting state on hydrophobic and hydrophilic micro-textured surfaces was investigated. High spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray radiography was used to overcome the limitations in visualization in previous research and clearly visualize the wetting state for each droplet under quantified surface conditions. Based on thermodynamic characteristics, a theoretical model for wetting state depending on the chemical composition (intrinsic contact angle) and geometrical morphology (roughness ratio) of the surfaces was developed.

  5. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  6. Switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface of electrospun poly (l-lactide) membranes obtained by CF₄microwave plasma treatment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Mengyao; Zhou, Baoming; Jiao, Kunyan; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Teng, Kunyue; Zhao, Lihuan; Wang, Jiajun; Jiao, Yanan

    2014-11-29

    A switchable surface that promotes either hydrophobic or hydrophilic wettability of poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous membranes is obtained by CF₄ microwave plasma treatment in this paper. The results indicated that both etching and grafting process occurred during the CF₄ plasma treatment and these two factors synergistically affected the final surface wettability of PLLA membranes. When plasma treatment was taken under a relatively low power, the surface wettability of PLLA membranes turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Especially when CF₄ plasma treatment was taken under 100 W for 10 min and 150 W for 5 min, the water contact angle sharply decreasedmore » from 116 ± 3.0° to ~0°. According to Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results, the PLLA fibers were notably etched by CF₄ plasma treatment. Combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, only a few fluorine-containing groups were grafted onto the surface, so the etching effect directly affected the surface wettability of PLLA membranes in low plasma power condition. However, with the plasma power increasing to 200 W, the PLLA membrane surface turned to hydrophobic again. In contrast, the morphology changes of PLLA fiber surfaces were not obvious while a large number of fluorine-containing groups grafted onto the surface. So the grafting effect gradually became the major factor for the final surface wettability.« less

  7. Switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface of electrospun poly (l-lactide) membranes obtained by CF₄microwave plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Mengyao; Zhou, Baoming; Jiao, Kunyan; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Teng, Kunyue; Zhao, Lihuan; Wang, Jiajun; Jiao, Yanan

    2014-11-29

    A switchable surface that promotes either hydrophobic or hydrophilic wettability of poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous membranes is obtained by CF₄ microwave plasma treatment in this paper. The results indicated that both etching and grafting process occurred during the CF₄ plasma treatment and these two factors synergistically affected the final surface wettability of PLLA membranes. When plasma treatment was taken under a relatively low power, the surface wettability of PLLA membranes turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Especially when CF₄ plasma treatment was taken under 100 W for 10 min and 150 W for 5 min, the water contact angle sharply decreased from 116 ± 3.0° to ~0°. According to Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results, the PLLA fibers were notably etched by CF₄ plasma treatment. Combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, only a few fluorine-containing groups were grafted onto the surface, so the etching effect directly affected the surface wettability of PLLA membranes in low plasma power condition. However, with the plasma power increasing to 200 W, the PLLA membrane surface turned to hydrophobic again. In contrast, the morphology changes of PLLA fiber surfaces were not obvious while a large number of fluorine-containing groups grafted onto the surface. So the grafting effect gradually became the major factor for the final surface wettability.

  8. Switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface of electrospun poly (l-lactide) membranes obtained by CF?microwave plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Mengyao; Zhou, Baoming; Jiao, Kunyan; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Teng, Kunyue; Zhao, Lihuan; Wang, Jiajun; Jiao, Yanan

    2014-11-29

    A switchable surface that promotes either hydrophobic or hydrophilic wettability of poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous membranes is obtained by CF? microwave plasma treatment in this paper. The results indicated that both etching and grafting process occurred during the CF? plasma treatment and these two factors synergistically affected the final surface wettability of PLLA membranes. When plasma treatment was taken under a relatively low power, the surface wettability of PLLA membranes turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Especially when CF? plasma treatment was taken under 100 W for 10 min and 150 W for 5 min, the water contact angle sharply decreased from 116 3.0 to ~0. According to Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results, the PLLA fibers were notably etched by CF? plasma treatment. Combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, only a few fluorine-containing groups were grafted onto the surface, so the etching effect directly affected the surface wettability of PLLA membranes in low plasma power condition. However, with the plasma power increasing to 200 W, the PLLA membrane surface turned to hydrophobic again. In contrast, the morphology changes of PLLA fiber surfaces were not obvious while a large number of fluorine-containing groups grafted onto the surface. So the grafting effect gradually became the major factor for the final surface wettability.

  9. Hydrophobic organic contaminants in surficial sediments of Baltimore Harbor: Inventories and sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Baker, J.E.

    1999-05-01

    The heavily urbanized and industrialized Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco River/Back River system is one of the most highly contaminated regions of the Chesapeake Bay. In June 1996, surficial sediments were collected at 80 sites throughout the subestuarine system, including historically undersampled creek sand embayments. The samples were analyzed for a suite of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) consisting of 32 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 113 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. Total PAH and total PCB concentrations ranged from 90 to 46,200 and 8 to 2,150 ng/g dry weight, respectively. There was enormous spatial variability in the concentrations of HOCs, which was not well correlated to grain size or organic carbon content, suggesting nonequilibrium partitioning and/or proximity to sources as important factors explaining the observed spatial variability. High concentrations of both classes of HOCs were localized around major urban stormwater runoff discharges. Elevated PAH concentrations were also centered around the Sparrow`s Point Industrial Complex, most likely a result of the pyrolysis of coal during the production of steel. All but 1 of the 80 sites exceeded the effects range-low (ERL) for total PCBs and, of those sites, 40% exceeded the effects range-medium (ERM), suggesting toxicity to marine benthic organisms would frequently occur. Using principal component analysis, differences in PAH signatures were discerned. Higher molecular weight PAHs were enriched in signatures from sediments close to suspected sources (i.e., urban stormwater runoff and steel production complexes) compared to those patterns observed at sites further from outfalls or runoff. Due to varying solubilities and affinities for organic matter of the individual PAHs, partitioning of the heavier weight PAHs may enrich settling particles with high molecular weight PAHs. Lower molecular weight PAHs, having lower affinity for particles, may travel from the source to a

  10. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-02-14

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V{sub E} as a function of ethanol mole fraction X{sub E} is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  11. Study of Hydrophobic and Ionizable Hydrophilic Copolymers at Polymer/Solid and Polymer/Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perahia, Dvora

    2011-11-01

    Joint experimental-computational efforts were set to characterize the interfacial effects on the structure and dynamics of polymers consisting of highly rigid hydrophilic-ionizable and hydrophobic sub-units within one polymeric chain casted into thin films of several molecular dimensions. Focusing on the ultra thin film region we separate out the interfacial effects from bulk characteristics. Specifically, the study sought to: identify the parameters that control the formation of a stable polymer-solid interface. The study consists of two components, experimental investigations and computational efforts. The experimental component was designed to derive empirical trends that can be used to correlate the set of coupled polymer molecular parameters with the interfacial characteristics of these polymers, and their response to presence of solvents. The computational study was designed to provide molecular insight into the ensemble averages provided by the experimental efforts on multiple length scales from molecular dimensions, to the nanometer lengths to a macroscopic understanding of solvent interactions with structured polymers. With the ultimate goal of correlating molecular parameters to structure, dynamics and properties of ionic polymers, the first stage of the research began with the study of two systems, one which allowed tailoring the flexibility of the backbone without the presence of ionic groups, but with a potential to sulfonate groups at a later stage, and a polymer whose backbone is rigid and the density of the ionic group can be varied. The combined experimental and computational studies significantly extended the understanding of polymers at interfaces from model systems to polydispersed copolymers with blocks of varying nature and complexity. This new insight directly affects the design of polymers for sustainable energy applications from batteries and fuel cells to solar energy.

  12. METHOD OF PREPARING COATED REFRACTORY WARE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.; Weissman, S.I.

    1959-07-21

    A method is presented for preparing a dense, refractory coating on a vessel adapted to the handling of molten metals such as uranium and plutonium. According to the invention, the inner surface of a heat stable container formed of a refractory metal of either niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, or tungsten is coated with molten thorium within 10 minutes so as to present alloying with the refractory metal and then exposed to a reactive atmosphere of nitrogen at a temperature of about 1750 deg for 30 minutes to form a refractory thorium nitride coating.

  13. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  14. Corrosion control of metals by organic coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooij, W.J. van; Bierwagen, G.P.; Skerry, B.S.; Mills, D.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive treatment of the entire field of corrosion control of metals, from mechanisms and testing procedures to modification of metal surfaces and interfaces by silanes and plasma techniques. They discuss the new, sophisticated analytical tools, such as Time-of-Flight SIMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and all materials -- metals, pretreatments, and paint systems. The contents include: (1) Corrosion under organic coatings; (2) Mechanisms of corrosion control by organic coatings; (3) Metal pretreatments; (4) Techniques to study organic coating-metal interfaces; (5) Modification of metal surfaces and interfaces; (6) corrosion testing; (7) Adhesion testing; (8) Paint systems; (9) Conclusions and prospects references.

  15. Void forming pyrolytic carbon coating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L.; Cook, Jackie L.

    2000-01-01

    A pyrolytic carbon coated nuclear fuel particle and method of making it. The fuel particle has a core composed of a refractory compound of an actinide metal. The pyrolytic carbon coating surrounds the core so as to provide a void volume therebetween. The coating has an initial density of no greater than 1.45 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor than 3.0 and a final density upon heat treatment above about 2000.degree. C. of greater than 1.7 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor greater than 5.

  16. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  17. Method of applying coatings to substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1991-01-01

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hithereto unavailable compositions, are provided.

  18. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  20. Parylene coating of syntactic composites. [Foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schloman, A.H.

    1980-11-01

    A manufacturing process developed for parylene coating syntactic parts has resulted in several improvements. Thin edges have been strengthened, which minimizes breakage during the manufacturing process and subsequent assembly; part and surface toughness has been improved; the coefficient of friction during assembly has been reduced; and the bonding of the pads, shoehorn, and clips has been enhanced. Improvements in the tensile strength and flexural strength of the syntactic composite as a result of the coating are discussed, and coated parts and deposited films produced by laboratory and production coaters are compared.

  1. Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01

    This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

  2. Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  3. Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In addition, the pinned oil layer can also mitigate or prevent icing. It also provides a ... limited to anti-corrosion, marine, anti-icing, and antibacterial coatings.Benefits Keeps ...

  4. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Reed, S.T.

    1988-01-26

    An antireflection film made from reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  5. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    1990-01-01

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  6. Optical coatings for HF overtone laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, S.; Zhang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Optical components which highly reflect the hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone wavelengths (near 1.3{micro}m) and transmit or absorb the HF fundamental wavelengths (2.6 to 3.1{micro}m) can be used to obtain high intensity 1.3{micro}m radiation with HF chemical laser technology. This paper describes the development of the HF overtone laser resonator mirrors. Also presented are the designs of the coatings for laser resonator and the optical performance results for the coatings which includes separated coatings that are highly reflected in 1.3--1.4{micro}m wavelengths and highly transmitted or low reflected in 2.6--3.1{micro}m wavelengths and the double band antireflection coating for 1.3--1.4{micro}m and 2.6--3.1{micro}m.

  7. Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

    2014-07-29

    A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

  8. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  9. Preparation and characterization of beryllium coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dua, A.K.; Agarwala, R.P.; Desai, P.B.

    1985-11-01

    The application of low Z coatings on various structurally strong components of a controlled thermonuclear tokamak fusion reactor is expected to reduce the plasma contamination and power loss. With this view, coatings of beryllium have been given on different substrates like (304 and 316) stainless steel, monel-400, molybdenum, copper, and graphite in a specially designed vacuum deposition unit employing physical vapor deposition technique, and its morphology studied as a function of deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, coating thickness, deposition rate, and angle of deposition. It has been characterized using various analytical techniques. Its morphology has been studied with the help of a scanning electron microscope. Coating adherence and hardness have been measured. Results obtained have been analyzed and discussed.

  10. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  11. Pilot demonstration of cerium oxide coated anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, J.S.; Frederick, M.S.; Shingler, M.J.; Alcorn, T.R.

    1992-10-01

    Cu cermet anodes were tested for 213 to 614 hours with an in-situ deposited CEROX coating in a pilot cell operated by Reynolds Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. At high bath ratio ([approximately]1.5) and low current density (0.5 A/cm[sup 2]), a [ge]1 mm thick dense CEROX coating was deposited on the anodes. At lower bath ratios and higher current density, the CEROX coating was thinner and less dense, but no change in corrosion rate was noted. Regions of low current density on the anodes and sides adjacent to the carbon anode sometimes had thin or absent CEROX coatings. Problems with cracking and oxidation of the cermet substrates led to higher corrosion rates in a pilot cell than would be anticipated from lab scale results.

  12. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  13. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wenz, Robert P.; Weber, Michael F.; Arudi, Ravindra L.

    1992-02-04

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  14. Method for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles, device for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung Y

    2015-01-20

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the particles to a standing wave; and contacting the subjected particles with a coating moiety.

  15. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  16. METHOD OF COATING SURFACES WITH BORON

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, G.R.

    1949-10-11

    A method of forming a thin coating of boron on metallic, glass, or other surfaces is described. The method comprises heating the article to be coated to a temperature of about 550 d C in an evacuated chamber and passing trimethyl boron, triethyl boron, or tripropyl boron in the vapor phase and under reduced pressure into contact with the heated surface causing boron to be deposited in a thin film.

  17. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C.; Stotlar, Suzanne C.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  18. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  19. Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schienle, James L.; Strangman, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

  20. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  1. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  2. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2006-07-31

    The third year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings has been devoted to two principal topics: (i) continuing the assessment of the long-term, thermal cycle stability of the Eu{sup 3+} doped 8YSZ temperature sensor coatings, and (ii) improving the fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. Following the earlier, preliminary findings, it has been found that not only is the luminescence from the sensors not affected by prolonged thermal cycling, even after 195 hours at 1425 C, but the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature remains unchanged. As the temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future, our findings indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} doped thermal barrier coating sensors are very robust and have the potential of being stable throughout the life of coatings. Investigation of Eu{sup 3+} doped coatings prepared by plasma-spraying exhibited the same luminescence characteristics as those prepared by electron-beam evaporation. This is of major significance since thermal barrier coatings can be prepared by both process technologies. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  3. Modelling the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirolini, S.; Marchese, M.; Jacucci, G.; Harding, J.H.; Mulheran, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings produced by plasma spraying have a characteristic microstructure of lamellae, pores and cracks. The lamellae are produced by the splashing of particles onto the substrate. As the coating grows, the lamellae pile on top of each other, producing an interlocking structure. In most cases the growth is rapid and chaotic. The result is a microstructure characterized by pores and cracks. The authors present an improved model for the deposition process of thermal barrier coatings. The task of modeling the coating growth is split into two parts: first the authors consider a description of the particle on arrival at the film, based on the available theoretical, numerical and experimental findings. Second they define and discuss a set of physically-based rules for combining these events to obtain the film. The splats run along the surface and are permitted to curl up (producing pores) or interlock. The computer model uses a mesh to combine these processes and build the coating. They discuss the use of the proposed model in predicting microstructures and hence in correlating the properties of these coatings with the parameters of the process used to make them.

  4. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  5. Advanced protective coatings for gas turbine blading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czech, N.; Stamm, W.

    1998-07-01

    The new gas turbines now being marketed are characterized by outputs and efficiencies which were unthinkable just a few years ago. A key factor for achieving efficiency is the highest possible turbine inlet temperature, currently approx. 1,400 C. In such a machine, it is the turbine blades which are subjected to the greatest thermal and mechanical stresses. They are also subjected to extreme chemical stress in the form of oxidation, which in the following is understood as the corrosive action due almost exclusively to the temperature of the turbine blade surface and (to a much lesser degree) the pressure and oxygen content of the hot gas. In many cases, this is compounded by hot corrosion, which results in accelerated oxidation due to impurities in the fuel and air. In terms of physics, this demanding challenge requires the use of cooling techniques which push the envelope of feasibility. In terms of materials engineering, an innovative multifaceted solution is called for. In more concrete terms, this means a combination of convection, impingement and film cooling of blades made of the strongest high-temperature alloy materials and coated with one or possibly multiple coatings. The base material ensures the blade's mechanical integrity while the coating(s) provide(s) protection against the oxidizing and corrosive attack, as well as the thermal stresses which cannot be sufficiently mitigated by cooling. The superiority of single crystal materials over polycrystalline or directionally solidified nickel-base superalloys is illustrated. The coating is a third-generation NiCoCrAIY VPS (vacuum plasma spray) coating. In the paper, the authors discuss the current status of coating developments for large, stationary gas turbines and present solutions for achieving important development objectives.

  6. Issues for conversion coating of aluminum alloys with hydrotalcite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drewien, C.A.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrotalcite coatings on aluminum alloys are being developed for corrosion protection of aluminum in aggressive saline environments. Coating bath composition, surface pretreatment, and alloying elements in aluminum all influence the performance of these coatings during salt spray testing. The coating bath, comprised of lithium carbonate, requires aging by dissolution of aluminum into the bath in order to grow corrosion resistant coatings. Coatings formed in non- aged baths do not perform well in salt spray testing. The alloying elements in aluminum alloys, especially copper, influence the coating growth and formation leading to thin coatings. The effect of the alloy elements is to limit the supply of aluminum to the coating/electrolyte interface and hinder growth of hydrotalcite upon aluminum alloys.

  7. Method for loading lipsomes with ionizable phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, pharmaceutical preparations and a method for administering the preparations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mehlhorn, R.J.

    1998-10-27

    A method of entrapping ionizable compounds, preferably phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, into liposomes having transmembrane gradients is disclosed. The procedures involve forming liposomes in an acidic medium or a basic medium, adding to the acidic medium a cationic compound or to the basic medium an anionic compound and then adding a base to the cationic-containing medium or an acid to the anionic-containing medium, thereby inducing the ionizable compound into the liposomes` internal aqueous phase. The compound-entrapped liposomes prepared in accordance with the disclosed methods may be used as pharmaceutical preparations. Methods of administering such pharmaceutical preparations are also disclosed. 2 figs.

  8. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J.; Anderson, Brian L.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  9. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  10. Method for loading lipsomes with ionizable phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, pharmaceutical preparations and a method for administering the preparations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mehlhorn, Rolf Joachim

    1998-10-27

    A method of entrapping ionizable compounds, preferably phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, into liposomes having transmembrane gradients is disclosed. The procedures involve forming liposomes in an acidic medium or a basic medium, adding to the acidic medium a cationic compound or to the basic medium an anionic compound and then adding a base to the cationic-containing medium or an acid to the anionic-containing medium, thereby inducing the ionizable compound into the liposomes' internal aqueous phase. The compound-entrapped liposomes prepared in accordance with the disclosed methods may be used as pharmaceutical preparations. Methods of administering such pharmaceutical preparations are also disclosed.

  11. X-ray structures of checkpoint kinase 2 in complex with inhibitors that target its gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-09-17

    The serine/threonine checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) is an attractive molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors to treat cancer. Here, we report the rational design of Chk2 inhibitors that target the gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket located behind the adenine-binding region of the ATP-binding site. These compounds exhibit IC{sub 50} values in the low nanomolar range and are highly selective for Chk2 over Chk1. X-ray crystallography was used to determine the structures of the inhibitors in complex with the catalytic kinase domain of Chk2 to verify their modes of binding.

  12. Tantalum coatings for the petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, C.; Watson, J.L. Sr.; Walker, J.P. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Tantalum coatings have never been a cost attractive item for the petrochemical industry but corrosion-resistant tantalum coatings have been and continue to be a very cost effective solution for many complex metallurgical applications. There are certain environments where thermally-sprayed tantalum has little or no competition from all other corrosion-resistant-alloy-coatings (CRAC). This paper reviews tantalum technology in terms of the relevant petrochemical needs and priorities. Selected properties of both tantalum (Ta) and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} are given along with a brief history of tantalum and Ta coatings. Some important discussion is also given about the very difficult development path that tantalum has been forced to overcome. This characterization study involves 2 different applicators and two competitive processes; i.e., plasma and high velocity oxygen flame (HVOF) spraying. Test coupons from this cooperative effort by Watson and Gartner are evaluated in terms of structure, properties and composition. Electron and optical metallography are both used with microhardness and associated methods of characterization for thermal spray coatings.

  13. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  14. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results formore » several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.« less

  15. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  16. Polymeric complexes of polyaniline as anticorrosion coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racicot, R.J.; Yang, S.C.; Brown, R.

    1998-07-01

    During the past few years there has been a strong interest in developing conducting polymers as an alternative to the traditional anticorrosion coatings. One of the driving forces for this research comes from the need for an environmentally friendly chromate-free anticorrosion coating for high-strength light weight aluminum alloys. The possibilities for a new scratch-tolerant paint for steel prompted the development of conductive polymer anticorrosion paints. By molecular engineering, the authors have synthesized a double-strand polymeric complex of polyaniline that is suitable as an anticorrosion paint on metals in low pH environments. In this article, the authors will discuss (1) the molecular design for solubility and adhesion, (2) the effectiveness of the electroactive coating under electrochemical impedance tests, and (3) a mechanistic study of the anticorrosion mechanism by examining the polymer/metal interfacial interactions.

  17. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  18. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  19. Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loehman, Ronald E.; Corral, Erica L.

    2012-03-20

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

  20. Metallic and nonmetallic coatings for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Crane, J.K.; Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.

    1981-04-17

    Some fusion targets designed to be driven by 0.35 to 1 ..mu..m laser light are glass spheres coated with layers of various materials such as hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, beryllium, copper, gold, platinum, etc. The glass shell, which is filled with gas, liquid or solid deuterium-tritium fuel, must have remarkably good surface and wall thickness uniformity. Methods for depositing the various materials will be discussed. They include plasma polymerization, electro-deposition, sputtering and evaporation. Many of the difficulties encountered in the coating processes are the result of coating on free spheres with very small radii - 35 to 500 micrometers. Several means of overcoming the problems will be described and experimental results presented.

  1. Glass/ceramic coatings for implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2011-09-06

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

  2. Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

  3. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman; Henry N. , Taylor; John S.

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  4. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  5. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2002-01-01

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  6. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2005-01-25

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  7. Rescuing Those Left Behind. Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-07-21

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. This interaction is thought to be membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. These gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  8. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  9. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  10. Production of porous coating on a prosthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

  11. Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen (Kennwick, WA); Ustyugov, Oleksiy A. (Spokane, WA)

    2006-03-28

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

  12. ALLOY COATINGS AND METHOD OF APPLYING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1958-08-26

    A method for providing uranium articles with a pro tective coating by a single dip coating process is presented. The uranium article is dipped into a molten zinc bath containing a small percentage of aluminum. The resultant product is a uranium article covered with a thin undercoat consisting of a uranium-aluminum alloy with a small amount of zinc, and an outer layer consisting of zinc and aluminum. The article may be used as is, or aluminum sheathing may then be bonded to the aluminum zinc outer layer.

  13. Method of applying coatings to substrates and the novel coatings produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1987-09-15

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of a multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hitherto unavailable compositions, are provided. 2 figs.

  14. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  15. The possibility of forming a sacrificial anode coating for Mg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, Nancy J; Li, Juchuan; Sacci, Robert L; Thomson, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Mg is the most active engineering metal, and is often used as a sacrificial anode/coating to protect other engineering metals from corrosion attack. So far no sacrificial anode coating has been developed or considered for Mg. This study explores the possibility of forming a sacrificial coating for Mg. A lithiated carbon coating and a metaphosphated coating are applied on the Mg surface, respectively, and their open-circuit-potentials are measured in saturated Mg(OH)2 solution. They exhibit more negative potentials than bare Mg. SEM reveals that the metaphosphated coating offers more effective and uniform protection for Mg than the lithiated carbon coating. These preliminary results indicate that development of a sacrificial anode coating for Mg is indeed possible.

  16. A Nano Surface Icephobic Coating Delays Ice Formation | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano Surface Icephobic Coating Delays Ice Formation Click to email this to a friend (Opens ... A Nano Surface Icephobic Coating Delays Ice Formation Azar Alizadeh 2012.03.08 Hi folks, ...

  17. Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee

    2007-06-19

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

  18. New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak ... roof coatings and asphalt shingles to reduce energy consumption of new and existing roofs. ...

  19. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control You are accessing a ...

  20. Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

    1986-12-17

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

  1. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using optical coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honea, Eric C.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2005-06-07

    A laser gain medium having a layered coating on at least certain surfaces of the laser gain medium. The layered coating having a reflective inner material and an absorptive scattering outside material.

  2. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  3. Lithium battery electrodes with ultra-thin alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Se-Hee, Lee; George, Steven M.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Yoon Seok, Jung; Dillon, Anne C.

    2015-11-24

    Electrodes for lithium batteries are coated via an atomic layer deposition process. The coatings can be applied to the assembled electrodes, or in some cases to particles of electrode material prior to assembling the particles into an electrode. The coatings can be as thin as 2 .ANG.ngstroms thick. The coating provides for a stable electrode. Batteries containing the electrodes tend to exhibit high cycling capacities.

  4. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, and new lubricants. deer12_gangopadhyay.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Low-Friction Hard Coatings Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG

  5. Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Silvered Polymeric Mirrors | Department of Energy Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability of Silvered Polymeric Mirrors Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability of Silvered Polymeric Mirrors 3M logo 3M, under the CSP R&D FOA, is developing optical coatings for solar mirrors that are durable, easily maintained, and more cost-effective. Approach Diagram of the most successful coatings identified by the research team based on the mix of

  6. Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Discharging |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Discharging Technology available for licensing: Coating increases electrical conductivity of cathode materials Coating does not hinder battery performance Provides two coating processes that yield surface-treated, electro-active materials for a variety of applications, such as in a rechargeable lithium battery in both processes, and primary and secondary lithium battery applications in another process.

  7. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displays and Photovoltaic Cells | Argonne National Laboratory Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings are deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Provides uniform coating of complex, 3D nanostructures such as electrodes for next-generation PV cells Improved coating precision uses less material and reduces cost PDF icon

  8. Cube-corner reflectors with interference dielectric coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A L; Murashkin, V V; Akent'ev, A S; Karaseva, E A

    2013-09-30

    The cube-corner reflectors (CCRs) with a special interference dielectric coating intended for ring retroreflector systems of space vehicles with uniaxial orientation are considered. The diffraction patterns of radiation reflected from the CCRs with different face coatings are studied. It is shown that the choice of the angle between the faces, the size and the coating of CCR faces allow essential variation in the diffraction pattern, thereby providing its optimisation for solving different navigation problems. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  9. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices Technology available for licensing: A process that includes suspending/dissolving an electro-active material and a carbon precursor in a solvent; and then depositing the carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal oxides without the problems associated with

  10. Tunable Encapsulation Structure of Block Copolymer Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Youngkyu; Ahn, Suk-Kyun; Zhang, Zhe; Smith, Gregory Scott; Do, Changwoo

    2015-01-01

    The nano-sized and shape-tunable molecular building blocks can provide great opportunities for the fabrication of precisely controlled nanostructures. In this work, we have fabricated a molecular building block of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) coated by PPO-PEO-PPO block copolymers whose encapsulation structure can be controlled via temperature or addition of small molecules. The structure and optical properties of SWNT-block copolymers have been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The structure of the hydrated block copolymer layer surrounding SWNT can be controlled reversibly by varying temperature as well asmore » by irreversibly adding 5-methylsalicylic acid (5MS). Increasing hydrophobicity of the polymers with temperature and strong tendency of 5MS to interact with both block copolymers and orbitals of the SWNTs are likely to be responsible for the significant structural change of the block copolymer encapsulation layer, from loose corona shell to tightly encapsulating compact shell. These result shows an efficient and simple way to fabricate and manipulate carbon-based nano building blocks in aqueous systems with tunable structure.« less

  11. Optimizing High-Z Coatings for Inertial Fusion Energy Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Nikroo, Abbas; Goodin, Daniel T.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.

    2003-05-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors require shells with a high-Z coating that is both permeable, for timely filling with deuterium-tritium, and reflective, for survival in the chamber. Previously, gold was deposited on shells while they were agitated to obtain uniform, reproducible coatings. However, these coatings were rather impermeable, resulting in unacceptably long fill times. We report here on an initial study on Pd coatings on shells in the same manner. We have found that these palladium-coated shells are substantially more permeable than gold. Pd coatings on shells remained stable on exposure to deuterium. Pd coatings had lower reflectivity compared to gold that leads to a lower working temperature, and efficiency, of the proposed fusion reactor. Seeking to combine the permeability of Pd coatings and high reflectivity of gold, AuPd-alloy coatings were produced using a cosputtering technique. These alloys demonstrated higher permeability than Au and higher reflectivity than Pd. However, these coatings were still less reflective than the gold coatings. To improve the permeability of gold's coatings, permeation experiments were performed at higher temperatures. With the parameters of composition, thickness, and temperature, we have the ability to comply with a large target design window.

  12. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  13. Fabrication of Gas-Filled Tungsten-Coated Glass Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Baugh, W.; Steinman, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx}0.15 {mu}m/hr coatings with {approx}2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {mu}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx}100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 deg. C.

  14. High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

  15. Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michalske, Terry A.; Rye, Robert R.; Smith, William L.

    1993-01-01

    A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

  16. Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

  17. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  18. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

  19. Evaluation of metallized paint coatings for composite spacecraft structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzuskiewicz, J.E. )

    1990-04-01

    Thermal control coatings are needed to minimize temperature excursions of composite spacecraft structures in low earth orbit. Coatings prepared with combinations of metal flake and metal oxide pigments were prepared to obtain a range of solar absorptance and emittance properties. These coatings were subjected to screening tests to characterize their ultraviolet stability, atomic oxygen resistance and outgassing properties.

  20. Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iacovangelo, Charles D.; Browall, Kenneth W.

    1985-01-01

    A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell.

  1. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1996-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  2. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  3. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  4. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1993-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  5. Fiber metal interlayer improves ceramic coating performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrabet, G.P.

    1994-11-01

    This article is a review of the use of a compliant fiber metal inner layer between a ceramic coating and metal. The material used is Zirconia with phase stabilizers of magnesium oxide, calcium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Design, fabrication, and testing of the stabilized zirconia is discussed.

  6. Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindemer, Terrence B.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Beatty, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

  7. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klann, Raymond T.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2002-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  8. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  9. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-01-01

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

  10. IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

  11. Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their allows. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided.

  12. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  13. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  14. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  15. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  16. Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ve brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run a large engineering company.

  17. Investigation of damage behavior of thermally sprayed coatings depending on coating thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crostack, H.A.; Beller, U.

    1995-12-31

    In order to increase the lifetime of components used for diesel engines or gas turbines surfaces are coated by ceramics. In recent years it succeeded in spraying thermal barrier coatings based on zirconia up to a thickness of a few millimeters. A comparison of the damage behavior between yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings with different thickness will be presented. The coatings are produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. The thickness is varied from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm. In order to characterize the mechanical as well as the damage processes different methods of destructive testing (tensile, bending, and loading test) are applied. Additionally, non-destructive testing methods were used to investigate the damage processes on micro structural level. The results will be discussed according to the microstructure.

  18. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  19. Bond Coating Performance of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Ian G; Pint, Bruce A

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are intended to work in conjunction with internal cooling schemes to reduce the metal temperature of critical hot gas path components in gas turbine engines. The thermal resistance is typically provided by a 100--250 {mu}m thick layer of ceramic (most usually zirconia stabilized with an addition of 7--8 wt% of yttria), and this is deposited on to an approximately 50 {mu} thick, metallic bond coating that is intended to anchor the ceramic to the metallic surface, to provide some degree of mechanical compliance, and to act as a reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (Al) to protect the underlying superalloy from high-temperature corrosion. A feature of importance to the durability of thermal barrier coatings is the early establishment of a continuous, protective oxide layer (preferably {alpha}-alumina) at the bond coating-ceramic interface. Because zirconia is permeable to oxygen, this oxide layer continues to grow during service. Some superalloys are inherently resistant to high-temperature oxidation, so a separate bond coating may not be needed in those cases. Thermal barrier coatings have been in service in aeroengines for a number of years, and the use of this technology for increasing the durability and/or efficiency of industrial gas turbines is currently of significant interest. The data presented were taken from an investigation of routes to optimize bond coating performance, and the focus of the paper is on the influences of reactive elements and Pt on the oxidation behaviour of NiAl-based alloys determined in studies using cast versions of bond coating compositions.

  20. Brazing titanium-vapor-coated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M.L. ); Pak, J.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia was vacuum furnace brazed to itself, to nodular cast iron, and to commercially pure titanium with a Ag-30Cu-10Sn wt% filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the ZrO[sub 2] surfaces with Ti prior to brazing by RF sputtering or electron beam evaporation. Braze joints made with Ti-sputter-coated ZrO[sub 2] contained high levels of porosity, but those made with Ti coatings deposited by evaporation, referred to as Ti-vapor-coated, contained little or no porosity. Brazing caused the ZrO[sub 2] within about 1 mm (0.04 in.) of the joint surfaces to turn black in color, and thermodynamic analysis indicated that the discoloration was likely due to oxygen diffusion out of the ZrO[sub 2] into the Ti vapor coating during brazing. Braze joint strength was determined by flexure testing in the four-point bend arrangement, and on a more limited basis, by shear testing. The latter method was used mainly as a screening test for ZrO[sub 2]-Fe and ZrO[sub 2]-Ti joints. Flexure testing of ZrO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] and ZrO[sub 2]-Fe braze joints was done at 25, 200, 400, and 575 C (77, 392, 752 and 1,067 F) in air. For flexure testing, average strengths of joint specimens decreased with increasing test temperature. The lower average strengths of ZrO[sub 2]-Fe specimens compared to those from ZrO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] joints was attributed to higher residual stresses in the ceramic-to-metal joints.

  1. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2003-05-13

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  2. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains a minimum of 243 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Paint selection for coating radioactive-waste drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, J.L.

    1980-07-01

    It is concluded that although the white epoxy Paint Sample E is suitable for coating waste drums, the additional pretreated costs of grit blasting prior to paint application would preclude adoption of that paint system. The specified 10.0-mil coating thickness of that coating would also incur higher costs. The Vorac epoxy-phenolic base paint (buff or yellow) was the only other paint that exhibited suitable corrosion and impact resistance required for coating the waste drums. In addition, that paint does not require a grit-blasted substrate or other costly pretreatment prior to coating.

  7. Selective emission multilayer coatings for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockeram, Brian Vern

    2004-01-27

    Multilayer coating designs have been developed to provide selective emission for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator surface. These coatings increase the surface emissivity of a molybdenum TPV radiator substrate in the wavelength range that matches the bandgap of the TPV cells to increase the power density of the TPV system. Radiator emission at wavelengths greater than the bandgap energy of the TPV cells is greatly reduced through the use of these coatings, which significantly increases the efficiency of the TPV system. The use of this coating greatly improves the performance of a TPV system, and the coating can be tailored to match the bandgap of any practical TPV system.

  8. Ground plane insulating coating for proximity focused devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Power, Gary D.

    1998-01-01

    A thin layer of alumina (aluminum oxide) is coated onto the ground plane of a microchannel plate (MCP) without covering the pores of the MCP so it does not effect the performance. The coating is sputtered onto the ground plane at a very steep angle. The addition of the thin dielectric coating of alumina greatly improves the spatial resolution of proximity focused image intensifiers using a narrow gap between the phosphor screen and the MCP. With the coating on the ground plane and the same gap the phosphor screen can be ran at 9000 volts, as compared to 3 kV without the coating.

  9. Ground plane insulating coating for proximity focused devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Power, G.D.

    1998-07-14

    A thin layer of alumina (aluminum oxide) is coated onto the ground plane of a microchannel plate (MCP) without covering the pores of the MCP so it does not effect the performance. The coating is sputtered onto the ground plane at a very steep angle. The addition of the thin dielectric coating of alumina greatly improves the spatial resolution of proximity focused image intensifiers using a narrow gap between the phosphor screen and the MCP. With the coating on the ground plane and the same gap the phosphor screen can be ran at 9000 volts, as compared to 3 kV without the coating. 3 figs.

  10. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

  11. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  12. Radiation pressure efficiency measurements of nanoparticle coated microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soo Y.; Taylor, Joseph D.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex

    2013-12-02

    Experimental measurements of the radiation pressure efficiency (Q{sub pr}) for several microparticles have been compared to theoretical calculations extrapolated from the Bohren-Huffman code for Mie scattering of coated particles. An increased shift of the Q{sub pr} parameter was observed for 2??m SiO{sub 2} core particles coated with nanoparticles of higher refractive indices. Coatings of 14?nm melamine particles were found to increase the Q{sub pr} parameter 135 times over similar coatings using SiO{sub 2} particles of the same size. While a coating of 100?nm polystyrene particles also showed a significant increase, they did not agree well with theoretical values. It is hypothesized that other factors such as increased scatter, drag, and finite coating coverage are no longer negligible for coatings using nanoparticles in this size regime.

  13. Coated armor system and process for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Lillo, Thomas M.; McHugh, Kevin M.

    2010-11-23

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  14. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Borom, Marcus Preston

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  15. Balloon Coating with Rapamycin Using an On-site Coating Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmehl, Joerg; Ruhr, Juergen von der; Dobratz, Markus; Kehlbach, Rainer; Braun, Isabelle; Greiner, Tim-Oliver; Claussen, Claus D.; Behnisch, Boris

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The efficacy of drug-eluting balloons has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The drug predominantly used is paclitaxel because of its lipophilic properties and the rapid onset of action. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an alternative balloon coating with rapamycin that can be applied on site.MethodsThe balloon coating (3.0/18 and 3.0/12 mm, Cathy No. 4, Translumina GmbH) with rapamycin was conducted with a coating machine (Translumina GmbH). Concentrations were 2, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3, and 4 %. Measurements regarding the amount of substance released to the vessel wall were carried out on explanted porcine coronaries by means of ultraviolet and visible-light spectroscopy. Inflation time varied between 30 and 120 s. The biological effect of the coating was evaluated in a porcine peripheral overstretch and stent implantation model. Results. The amount of rapamycin on the balloon surface ranged from 558 {+-} 108 {mu}g for the 2 % solution to 1,441 {+-} 228 {mu}g in the 4 % solution. An amount of 95 {+-} 63-193 {+-} 113 {mu}g was released into the vessel wall. The quantitative measurements of the angiographic examinations 4 weeks after treatment revealed a reduction of diameter stenosis from 20.6 {+-} 17.4 % in the control group to 11.6 {+-} 5.5 % in the drug-eluting balloon group. Conclusion. A balloon coating with rapamycin omitting an excipient is possible with a dose-adjustable coating machine. However, the biological effects are moderate, which make further optimization of the coating process and evaluation of appropriate excipients necessary.

  16. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  17. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  18. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  19. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  20. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  1. Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1994-12-31

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

  2. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  3. High temperature low friction surface coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Bharat

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

  4. Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd

    2014-09-26

    One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

  5. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

  6. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  7. Characterization of Biocompatible Parylene-C Coatings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible Parylene-C Coatings for BIOMEMS Applications Quoc P. Nguyen a,* , Jost Goettert a , William T. Monroe b , Varshni Singh a a Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA b Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, LSU, Baton Rouge, LA qnguye6@lsu.edu * Master Thesis, LSU Biological and Agricultural Engineering Summary Biological Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS) is one of the forefronts of research for

  8. Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-12-30

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided. 13 figs.

  9. METAL COATED ARTICLES AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-26

    A method for manufacturing a solid metallic uranium body having an integral multiple layer protective coating, comprising an inner uranium-aluminum alloy firmly bonded to the metallic uranium is presented. A third layer of silver-zinc alloy is bonded to the zinc-aluiminum layer and finally a fourth layer of lead-silver alloy is firmly bonded to the silver-zinc layer.

  10. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  11. Molybdenum Coatings with Filtration of Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasilin, V. V.; Nezovibat'ko, Y. N.; Shvets, O. M.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.; Timoshenko, A. I.; Zavaleev, V. A.

    2008-03-19

    Deposition of molybdenum coatings in arc discharge with assistance of HF one is analyzed in this paper. To avoid substrate heating to high temperature and micro-arc formation during cleaning process, the surface cleaning was carried out with HF plasma only. For reduction of droplet fraction in plasma the 'freestanding' filter was utilized. As a filter a solenoid was used, which generated a curvilinear (with the angle of 90 deg.) transportation magnetic field. The effective crosssectional area of the plasma flow at which was observed the uniform distribution of the thickness of the applied coating, was equal to 113 sm{sup 2}. The coating on the base of arc discharge, filter and HF-biasing of substrate were deposited on different substrates, including glass and stainless steel.The optical (refractive index) properties of molybdenum films are presented. The reflective characteristics of the obtained molybdenum films in the range of wavelengths from 200 to 700 nm were measured.Molybdenum films were also investigated under the effect of the plasma emission, using an ECR discharge in a simple double-mirror magnetic trap. The time varying negative potential was supplied to sample holder what provided a wide energy distribution of ions bombarded the sample surface in range 30...1500V.

  12. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    Abstract A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  13. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Spence, Paul A.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  14. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  15. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  16. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Lillo; Richard Wright

    2009-05-01

    HVOF coatings have shown high resistance to corrosion in fossil energy applications and it is generally accepted that mechanical failure, e.g. cracking or spalling, ultimately will determine coating lifetime. The high velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF) for applying coatings is one of the most commercially viable and allows the control of various parameters including powder particle velocity and temperature which influence coating properties, such as residual stress, bond coat strength and microstructure. The mechanical durability of coatings is being assessed using a dual eddy current coil method to monitor crack formation in real time during thermal cycling. Absolute impedence signals from two coils, which interrogate two different areas on the sample, are collected. Crack detection can be determined from the differential signal generated from these absolute signals. The coils are operated at two different frequencies, resulting in two differential signals used for crack detection. Currently this crack detection method is being used to elucidate the influence of thermal cycling temperature and coating thickness on cracking. Recent results (cycles to failure) will be presented for FeAl coatings thermally sprayed (HVOF) onto carbon steel to two coating thicknesses (160 microns and 250 microns thick) and subsequently cycled at temperatures up to 700oC. Thinner coatings exhibit greater resistance to cracking. Ultimately the resistance to cracking will be used to explore the relationship between HVOF spraying parameters, the mechanical properties of the coating and coating bond strength to develop optimized thermal spray parameters. To this end thermal spray coatings (FeAl and Fe3Al) have been applied to additional alloy substrates (Grade 91 steel, 316 SS, etc.) relevant to the fossil industry. Future plans also include a direct comparison to conventional weld overlay coatings currently used in the industry as well as exploration of new coatings. The room temperature

  17. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  18. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  19. Method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taxacher, Glenn Curtis; Crespo, Andres Garcia; Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey

    2015-02-17

    A method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure comprises selecting a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress, modifying the outer surface to provide a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and applying a coating to extend over at least a portion of the textured region, wherein the steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist deformation of the coating relative to the substrate structure. A rotating component comprises a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress. The outer surface defines a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and a coating extends over at least a portion of the textured region. The steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist creep.

  20. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  1. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell CCMs in automotive applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_ccms_auto.pdf (117.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary R&D Plan for the High Temperature

  2. Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs):

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary | Department of Energy III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Technical targets for CCMs in stationary applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_ccms_stat.pdf (93.65 KB) More Documents & Publications R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes

  3. Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window Coatings 1 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist prepares slot die coater for solution based deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 2 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the coating quality of a slot die deposition of electrochromic layer. Image: Heliotrope Technologies 3 of 3 A Heliotrope scientist investigates the spray coater for a solution based deposition of electrochromic layer. Image:

  4. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR COATING A CERAMIC BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanchard, M.K.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for protecting a beryllium carbide-graphite body. The method consists in providing a ceramic coating which must contain at least one basic oxide component, such as CaO, at least one amphoteric oxide component, such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and at least one acidic oxide component, such as SiO/ sub 2/. Various specific formulations for this ceramic coating are given and the coating is applied by conventional ceramic techniques.

  5. METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  6. Method and coating composition for protecting and decontaminating surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overhold, D C; Peterson, M D

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  7. Dissipation factor as a predictor of anodic coating performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, Janda K. G.

    1995-01-01

    A dissipation factor measurement is used to predict as-anodized fixture performance prior to actual use of the fixture in an etching environment. A dissipation factor measurement of the anodic coating determines its dielectric characteristics and correlates to the performance of the anodic coating in actual use. The ability to predict the performance of the fixture and its anodized coating permits the fixture to be repaired or replaced prior to complete failure.

  8. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

  9. Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Tower Receivers | Department of Energy Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Sandia National Laboratories logo -- This project is inactive -- Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is developing, characterizing, and refining advanced solar-selective coatings with high solar-weighted absorptivity (a

  10. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwai S.; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry; Liang, Wuwei

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  11. Low gloss UV-cured coatings for aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Mark; Muschar, Harry

    2014-12-09

    A method of applying a low gloss coating to a substrate such as the exterior surface of an aircraft is disclosed. The coating composition comprising a polyene, a polythiol, a flatting agent and a coloring pigment is applied to the substrate and given a first dosage of UV radiation followed by a second dosage in which the second dosage is greater than the first resulting in an ultralow gloss coating.

  12. Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirayama, Chikara; Wagner, George R.

    1982-05-18

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lubricant anti-wear additives work together? | Department of Energy Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives working together.

  14. High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Receivers | Department of Energy High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042413_ambrosini.pdf (3.05 MB) More Documents & Publications High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower

  15. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  16. Customized Nanoengineered Coatings for Science and Industry | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Customized Nanoengineered Coatings for Science and Industry Nanoengineered coatings have diverse applications in the manufacture of microelectronics, optics, sensors and solid-state detectors, to name a few. Of the many techniques for producing manoengineered coatings, atomic layer deposition, or ALD, offers superlative performance. Argonne's advanced ALD materials capabilities and intellectual property are available to scientific firms and industry. PDF icon

  17. Superhydrophobic Metal-Oxide Thin Film Coatings - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...anti-icing coatings Superhydrophobic pattern printing More Information Patent: Tolga Aytug, Daniela Florentina Bogorin, Mariappan Parans Paranthaman, and John T. Simpson. ...

  18. Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Window Daylighting Demo

  19. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  20. Unique Carbon-Coated Cathodes Improve Electrical Conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unique Carbon-Coated Cathodes Improve Electrical Conductivity (ANL-IN-09-043) Procedure Using Carbon Precursors Have Proved Superior to Conventional Methods Argonne National...

  1. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  2. COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

  3. Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    coating process and apply the research to lower cost polymer membranes that are already used in established markets, such as municipal water treatment and water desalination. ...

  4. Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kniseley, Richard N.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Merkle, Brian D.

    1990-01-30

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

  5. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

  6. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L.; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Lutz, Thomas J.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2010-11-23

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  7. The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The commercial development of water repellent ...

  8. Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    forces between silica nanoparticles in water. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between silica nanoparticles in water. ...

  9. Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings (ERCs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Initial solar reflectance field-applied coating CRRC (n248) Sleiman et al. (2011) Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 4 Approach Dow Chemical developed prototypes of ERCs with ...

  10. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: ...

  11. Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Teledyne Scientific and Imaging - Thousand Oaks, CA A highly durable membrane coating will be developed, optimized, and tested for the pulp and paper industry's black ...

  12. Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table IV: ...

  13. Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> TEM 2.5-nm-thick nano-coated ultrathin film on lithium-ion cathode particle surface; coating is highly uniform, in contrast to films applied through conventional technology (for reference, bar in lower-left corner measures 5 nm)</p> TEM 2.5-nm-thick nano-coated ultrathin

  14. Final Project Report G-Plus Windshield Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matson, Dean W.; Koram, Kwaku

    2002-08-01

    Samples of Sungate windshield material provided by PPG were analyzed to ascertain failure mechanisms observed at the interface between a copper busbar and the electrically conductive coating in use. Samples of failed windshield material were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, as well as surface analysis methods. These were compared to corresponding samples of good coatings. The primary failure mechanism of the coated windshield appears to be related to electrical discharges that originate where air-filled gaps are present between the copper busbar and the conductive coating. Gaps are produced by irregularities or wrinkles in the copper busbar that may result from the installation process.

  15. Self-Healing Polymeric Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The coating industry is moving towards solvent and volatile-organic-compound-free, ... impact of repainting (e.g., waste disposal and volatile-organic-compound emissions). ...

  16. Corrosion investigation of coatings for surface protection of military hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, N.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1996-10-01

    A product improvement program (PIP) for the surface finish of some steel military hardware has been recently initiated by the Navy. Presently the metal cleaning methods, interior and exterior surface finishes and corrosion protection requirements for such hardware are specified in MIL-P-18948. The coated hardware are stored in a warehouse structure for long durations. Because these storage places are not environmentally controlled (that is, no temperature or humidity control) the corrosion protection has not been adequate. The exterior surfaces of the hardware are coated with a corrosion inhibiting alkyd primer coating (TT-P-664) or a rust inhibiting lacquer primer coating (MIL-P-11414) to a thickness of 0.4 to 0.6 mils. The exterior color paint, (MIL-E-52891 or MIL-P11195), is applied to a thickness of 1.5 mils. The investigation of various coatings to replace the present system is an ongoing effort. The coatings have been examined from a corrosion protection vantage point and results have been correlated. The coatings were evaluated by exposing them to natural marine atmosphere and seawater wetdown tests. The coatings were also exposed to a 5.0% sodium chloride solution in a laboratory environmental salt fog chamber for 500 hours. Selected coatings were examined using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The results obtained from field tests, salt fog, and EIS measurements are discussed.

  17. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  18. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Nancy M.; Johnson, John A.; Tow, David M.; Walter, John B

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

  19. Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

  20. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  1. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, Robert E.; Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  2. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-07

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  3. Glass Coating Makes Solar Panels More Efficient | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    uncover how contact paste performs in solar modules. EERE Success Story - Back to the Basics: Studying Solar Cell Components Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics

  4. Thermal Multi-layer Coating Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Multi-layer Coating Analysis Key to Argonne's thermal multi-layer analysis method is the numerical algorithm used for automated analysis of thermal imaging data for...

  5. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  6. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  7. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  8. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Arendt, Paul N.; Piel, Helmut

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  9. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM CARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kane, J.S.; Carpenter, J.H.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1962-01-16

    A method is given for coating graphite with a hard, tenacious layer of niobium carbide up to 30 mils or more thick. The method makes use of the discovery that niobium metal, if degassed and heated rapidly below the carburization temperature in contact with graphite, spreads, wets, and penetrates the graphite without carburization. The method includes the obvious steps of physically contacting niobium powders or other physical forms of niobium with graphite, degassing the assembly below the niobium melting point, e.g., 1400 deg C, heating to about 2200 to 2400 deg C within about 15 minutes while outgassing at a high volume throughput, and thereafter carburizing the niobium. (AEC)

  10. Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

  11. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  12. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  13. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  14. Paint coatings: Controlled field and chamber experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edney, E.O.

    1989-04-01

    To determine the impact of pollution levels on the weathering rates of coatings, laboratory chamber experiments and controlled field exposures at North Carolina and Ohio sites were conducted in such a manner to separate the contributions due to dry deposition, wet deposition, precipitation pH, etc. The results of these studies confirm that acidic gases such as SO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/, as well as acids within rain, promote the dissolution of alkaline components including CaCO/sub 3/, ZnO, and Al flake from paint films. It is unclear from these studies whether the removal of these components reduces the service life or protective properties of the paint film. Other researchers within the Coatings Effects Program are conducting subsequent analyses to determine micro-damage of these paints. The uptake of acidic gases to painted surfaces is a complex process that depends on several factors. The deposition rate of SO/sub 2/ to a wet, painted surface may be controlled by the level of oxidants such as H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  15. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  16. Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution

  17. Anti-diffusion metal coated O-rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biallas, George Herman; Boyce, James Reid

    2016-03-22

    A method for inhibiting diffusion of gases and/or transmission of photons through elastomeric seals and a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal wherein at least a portion of the surface of a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal is coated with a compatibly-deformable, malleable metal coating.

  18. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  19. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2007-06-05

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H.; Varrin, Jr., Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  1. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  2. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  3. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, Donald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Wright, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  4. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  5. New capabilities and applications for electrophoretically deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Our primary purpose in this test is to provide a brief general description of a few applications of various electrophoretic systems which have been investigated and have found use in various coating applications at Sandia National Laboratories. Both organic and inorganic suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous media have been considered in these studies. Applications include high voltage insulating dielectrics, thermally conductive/electrically insulating films, adherent lubricating films, uniform photoresist films, glass coatings, and fissile uranium oxide/carbon composite films for studies of nuclear powered lasers. More recently, we have become interested in the beneficial environmental aspects of being able to provide protective polymer coatings which reduce or minimize the use of organic solvents required by traditional spray coat processes. Important practical factors which relate to film uniformity, adhesion, and composition are related to unique coating or plating capabilities and applications. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  7. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings: a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2016-02-02

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  8. Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian; Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong; Li, Xingwen

    2014-10-15

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

  9. Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study demonstrates high NOx conversion with SCR coated on DPF. Optimization of catalyst washcoat and coating process minimizes back-pressure while maintaining good performance.

  10. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Carlin, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  11. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  12. The effect of environment on thermal barrier coating lifetime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James Allen

    2016-03-15

    While the water vapor content of the combustion gas in natural gas-fired land-based turbines is ~10%, it can be 20–85% with coal-derived (syngas or H2) fuels or innovative turbine concepts for more efficient carbon capture. Additional concepts envisage working fluids with high CO2 contents to facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. To investigate the effects of changes in the gas composition on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycling tests (1-h and 100-h cycles) were performed in air with 10, 50, and 90 vol. % water vapor and CO2-10% H2O and compared to prior results in dry air or O2. Twomore » types of TBCs were investigated: (1) diffusion bond coatings (Pt-diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide) with commercial electron-beam physical vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings on second-generation superalloy N5 and N515 substrates and (2) high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed MCrAlYHfSi bond coatings with air plasma-sprayed YSZ top coatings on superalloys X4, 1483, or 247 substrates. For both types of coatings exposed in 1-h cycles, the addition of water vapor resulted in a decrease in coating lifetime, except for Pt-diffusion coatings which were unaffected by the environment. In 100-h cycles, environment was less critical, perhaps because coating failure was chemical (i.e., due to interdiffusion) rather than mechanical. As a result, in both 1-h and 100-h cycles, CO2 did not appear to have any negative effect on coating lifetime.« less

  13. Pre-Ceramic Monocomposite and Ceramic Coatings by Sol-Gel-Pyrolysis and Slurry-Pyrolysis Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T

    1997-01-29

    This presentation provides information on the relevant coating systems, the starting materials, and properties of the coatings.

  14. Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.; Sloan, Kelly M.; Vance, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

  15. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  16. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  17. Composite of coated magnetic alloy particle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  18. Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

  19. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1996-01-01

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  20. Interface Science of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2009-01-01

    The drive for greater efficiency in propulsion and industrial/power production machinery has pushed metallurgy to develop ever better alloys and taken existing metallic components to their reliability threshold. Nowhere is that better illustrated than in turbine engine materials. The nickel-based superalloys currently in use for the most demanding areas of the engines melt at 1230-1315 aC and yet see combustion environments >1600 aC. The result is that these components require thermal protection to avoid failure from phenomena such as melting, creep, oxidation, thermal fatigue, and so on [1]. The stakes are high as the equipment must remain reliable for thousands of take-offs and landings for aircraft turbine engines, and up to 40,000 hours of operation in power generating land-based gas turbines [2, 3]. One of the most critical items that see both the greatest temperatures and experience the highest stresses is the hot-section turbine blades. Two strategies have been adopted to help the superalloy turbine blades survive the demanding environment: Active air cooling and ceramic thermal protection coatings, which together can reduce metal surface temperatures by >300 aC.[2]. The combination of turbine blade external film cooling and internal air cooling requires an exceptionally complex structure with flow passages and sets of small holes in the blades where air bled from a matching stage of the compressor is directed over the surface. Stecura [4] was among the first to describe a successful coating system, and today s the ceramic insulating layer alone is credited with reducing metal temperatures as much as 165 aC [1, 5].

  1. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  2. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  3. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  4. Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Energy Efficient Heat Engines Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine Faber

    2004-10-31

    This program aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of the microstructural, mechanical, and chemical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based coatings for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (AS800) substrates and optimize such coatings for environmental barriers. The program consisted of three tasks: processing of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings, phase and microstructural development, and life-limiting phenomena. Northwestern University formed a cross-functional team with Lehigh University, Honeywell Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major accomplishments are: (1) Conditions for the plasma spray of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and its alloys were optimized to provide maximum density and thickness. (2) Adherent small particle plasma spray coatings of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be routinely prepared. (3) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be stabilized against its disruptive phase transformation to 1400 C by the addition of one or more oxides of Al, La, and/or Nb. (4) Residual stresses in the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were measured using X-rays and changed with thermal exposure. (5) Properly doped coatings are more resistant against thermal cycling than undoped coatings, and can be cycled many thousand times without spallation. (6) Water vapor testing in the ORNL Keiser Rig of adherent coatings showed that undoped Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is not an effective barrier at preventing chemical changes to the AS800. (7) Limited water vapor testing of doped and adherent coatings, which had successfully survived many thermal cycles, showed that in the water vapor environment, de-cohesion may occur.

  5. Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

  6. Conductive polymeric cable anodes for pipelines with deteriorating coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, W.F.; Pikas, J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Deteriorating pipeline coating systems have been a dilemma in the industry for many years. The interaction between coatings and cathodic protection (CP) is based on the type of coating and the amount of deterioration. There are two primary strategies to approach the problem: recoat, which is very expensive and may require taking the line out of service and cause loss of revenue; or install additional conventional CP groundbed systems. This article presents a state-of-the-art groundbed system using close-coupled conductive polymeric cable anodes that eliminate the problems of conventional groundbeds.

  7. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Harju, Karen M.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  8. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2003-05-06

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  9. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-15

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the {alpha} and {beta} primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the {alpha} and the {beta} rainbows.

  10. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs Print Friday, 27 February 2015 17:11 Hu et al. designed a new yellow phosphor with high quantum yield by immobilizing a preslected chromophore into the rigid framework of a metal-organic framework (MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous efficacy. The new yellow phosphor demonstrates

  11. Parylene coated microspheres: Operational parameters and round robin results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; Foreman, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Achieving less than 0.1 micrometer defect and close thickness tolerances with parylene coatings has proven a challenge. Los Alamos has investigated how some parameters of coater design and operation affect coating quality. Numerous coater configurations (home-built and commercial) are being used at our Laboratory and elsewhere. In an effort to evaluate the ability of these various types of units to meet desired tolerances, we ran a round robin evaluation involving six coating operations (US and UK). Each participant received an identical and precharacterized set of targets. Results of both the round robin and coater design/operation evaluation are presented.

  12. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  13. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  14. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  15. Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xinghang; Misra, Amit; Nastasi, Michael A.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2006-07-18

    Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

  16. Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

  17. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guilei, E-mail: sunguilei@126.com [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Xiaojie, E-mail: dalian03@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Qiquan [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Yan, Honghao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  18. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

  19. The impact of carbon coating on the synthesis and properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The impact of carbon coating on the synthesis and properties of Fe16N2 powders Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  20. In-situ composite formation of damage tolerant coatings utilizing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A coating steel component with a pattern of an iron based matrix with crystalline particles metallurgically bound to the surface of a steel substrate for use as disc cutters or ...

  1. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as plasma-facing material (PFM) in fusion reactor Development of tungsten coating on PFM (such as F82H) Bulk W is heavy Influences density control of fusion plasma, and ...

  2. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  3. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, R.H.

    1981-02-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 h. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  4. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  5. New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    New Novel Polymers Offer Significant Reduction in Use of Raw Materials. The North American architectural coatings industry sold over 700 million gallons of paint in 2002 for a value of $7 billion dollars.

  6. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  7. Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymeric Mirrors Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability of Silvered Polymeric Mirrors 3M logo 3M, under the CSP R&D FOA, is developing ...

  8. Moisture retardation of micronized TATB pellets through Parylene coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, T.W.; Sandoval, J.

    1980-09-01

    Initial efforts to determine if Parylene coating of micronized TATB pellets is effective in retarding moisture adsorption are described. Machined and pressed pellets (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm height) at densities of approximately 1.8 g/cc, both coated and uncoated, were placed in relative humidity desiccators at ambient temperature for a period of 13 weeks. Gain in weight and dimensional growth were monitored by periodic weighing and dimensional measurements. It was found that Parylene coating reduces the rate at which micronized TATB pellets adsorb moisture. This reduction is dependent on relative humidity. As humidity increases, the protection afforded by the Parylene coating decreases. At the end of the study two pellets were dried for 24 hours at 100/sup 0/C and their weights returned to slightly less than original. Moisture uptake therefore appears to be primarily surface adsorption. No significant dimensional growth occurred over the 13-week study.

  9. Damage threshold of platinum coating used for optics for self...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    used for optics for self-seeding of soft x-ray free electron laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Damage threshold of platinum coating used for optics for ...

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Conformal Coating of Nanoporous Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Guang; Han, Catherine Y.; Wang, H. Hau; Birrell, James P.; Welp, Ulrich; Hryn, John N.; Pellin, Michael J.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Poco, John F.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Amore » tomic layer deposition ( ALD ) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide ( AAO ) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered pores with diameters d ∼ 40 nm and pore length L ∼ 70 microns. The AAO membranes were coated by ALD to fabricate catalytic membranes that demonstrate remarkable selectivity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane.dditional AAO membranes coated with ALD Pd films show promise as hydrogen sensors. Silica aerogels have the lowest density and highest surface area of any solid material. Consequently, these materials serve as an excellent substrate to fabricate novel catalytic materials and gas sensors by ALD .« less

  11. Determination of Elastic Properties and Characterization of Thermal Barrier Coatings using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical properties of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are extremely important to engine design. However, the determination of these properties is often difficult because of the unique and complicated microstructure of the coatings. In this presentation the determination of the elastic constants of plasma sprayed Yttria stabilized Zirconia thermal barrier coatings using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy will be described along with an analysis that enables the determination of the elastic constants as a function of temperature and coating direction. In this work, results on the following issues will be discussed: 1) the elastic anisotropy of thermal barrier coatings, which is associated with coating failure modes; 2) sintering effects on coating compliance comparing with thermal behavior, which is important to coating performance on engineering structures, such as turbine engines; 3) coating elastic modulus at high temperatures close to the service condition, which provides insights of coating mechanical behavior in both fundamental and practical studies.

  12. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Bird, Eugene L.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  13. Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Wind Energy Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (825 KB) Technology Marketing SummarySandia has developed a method and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine

  14. Device and Method for Fluidizing and Coating of Ultrafine Particles |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Device and Method for Fluidizing and Coating of Ultrafine Particles Technology available for licensing: An ultrathin surface coating composed of metal oxides that, when applied to granular electrode materials on a large scale, promises to solve the structural instability of electrode materials and the resulting rapid fade of cell capacity at high voltages and high temperatures in lithium-ion batteries A low-cost, scalable process for increasing structural

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  16. Reproducibility of electrochemical noise data from coated metal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierwagen, G.P.; Mills, D.J.; Tallman, D.E.; Skerry, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    The use of electrochemical noise (ECN) as a method to characterize the corrosion-protection properties of organic coatings on metal substrates was pioneered by Skerry and Eden, and since then has been used by others as a probe for coating metal corrosion studies. However, no statistical examination of the reproducibility of the data from such measurements has been published. In the data the authors present, they have done a systematic analysis of important experimental variables in such systems. They have examined the method for accuracy and reproducibility with respect to sample preparation, sample immersion, and metal substrate preparation. They have taken several marine coatings systems typical of US Navy use, prepared duplicate samples of coating metal systems, and examined them under the same immersion exposure. The variables they considered for reproducibility are paint application (in three-coat systems), metal panel preparation (grit-blasted steel), and immersion conditions. The authors present ECN data with respect to immersion time on the values of noise voltage standard deviation {sigma}{sub V}, noise current standard deviation {sigma}{sub I}, and the noise resistance R{sub n} as given by {sigma}{sub V}/{sigma}{sub I}. The variation among supposedly identical sample pairs in identical immersion monitored under identical conditions is presented. The statistics of the time records of the data are considered, and the variations with respect to specific coatings classes are also considered within the limits of the data. Based on these data, comments concerning ECN on coated metal systems as a predictive test method are presented along with special considerations that must be made to properly use the method for coating ranking and lifetime prediction.

  17. Final Report- Low Cost High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar absorbing coating is a key enabling technology to achieve hightemperature high-efficiency concentrating solar power operation. A high-performance solar absorbing material must simultaneously meet all the following three stringent requirements: high thermal efficiency (usually measured by figure of merit), hightemperature durability, and oxidation resistance. The objective of this research is to employ a highly scalable process to fabricate and coat black oxide nanoparticles onto solar absorber surface to achieve ultra-high thermal efficiency.

  18. Project Profile: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance Nanostructured Coating Project Profile: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating Two illustrations side by side showing how sunlight is absorbed through layers on the left, and on the right, blue dots are above rectangular slab with two layers. --This project is inactive -- The University of California San Diego, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), is developing a new low-cost and scalable process for

  19. RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM Naval Research Laboratory Contact NRL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication MAT14FactSheet (55 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThe Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh environments. Developed for the maritime industry, it is suit-able for the interior &

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electrode Coating Defect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis and Processing NDE for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries | Department of Energy Electrode Coating Defect Analysis and Processing NDE for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electrode Coating Defect Analysis and Processing NDE for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting