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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

Fan, Hongyou

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Hydrophobic Nano Coating on Solar Photovoltaic Panels, Polaris Initiative Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project evaluated the effects of a hydrophobic nano coating on photovoltaic panels. Variables studied were hydrophobicity, changes in cleanliness of the surfaces, and changes in ice and snow accumulation.BackgroundThe nano coating evaluated was being marketed commercially as a vehicle windshield treatment that was meant to keep the windshield glass clean and repel water from the windshield. The treatment claimed to last for up to 1 year in automotive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hydrophobic Polycationic Coatings Disinfect Poliovirus and Rotavirus Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition (“painting”) onto polyethylene, ...

Larson, Alyssa Maxine

4

Durability of Hydrophobic Coatings for Superhydrophobic Aluminum Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust and easily produced Superhydrophobic surfaces are of great interest for mechanical applications, including drag reduction and MEMS. We produce novel superhydrophobic surfaces with several different coatings and tested the durability of each of these coatings with respect to long term immersion in water in order to determine the most long-lasting surface preparation. A pair of combinations of spin on polymers, surface features, and adhesion promoters was found that provide long term durability.

Jenner, Elliot [University of Pittsburgh; Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; D'Urso, Brian R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives  

SciTech Connect

Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

7

SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

8

SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

9

Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Investigation of Super-Hydrophobic Coatings with Hierarchical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wettability of the modified surfaces was studied by contact angle method and .... Preparation and Characterization on Cellulose Nanofiber Film · Preparation ...

13

Tritium Transfer in Porous Concrete Materials Coated with Hydrophobic Paints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. Fukada et al.

14

Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

Membrane Partitioning: “Classical” and “Nonclassical” Hydrophobic Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enthalpy compen- sation). The heat capacity associated withcomposition. The measured heat capacity values were used tolipid bilayers. Keywords Heat capacity Á Hydrophobic effect

Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; White, Stephen H.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

D' Urso, Brian R. (Clinton, TN); Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Water entry of small hydrophobic spheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the normal impact of hydrophobic spheres on a water surface. Particular attention is given to characterizing the shape of the resulting air ...

Bush, John W. M.

19

Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobic effect in this representative system of protein and ligand: hydrophobic interactions, here, seem to comprise approximately equal contributions from enthalpy (plausibly from strengthening networks of hydrogen bonds among molecules of water) and entropy (from release of water from configurationally restricted positions).

J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

HOW WATER MEETS A HYDROPHOBIC SURFACE: RELUCTANTLY AND WITH FLUCTUATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the depleted region depended on whether the water contained dissolved gases. Ambient water produced an 11 Ã?HOW WATER MEETS A HYDROPHOBIC SURFACE: RELUCTANTLY AND WITH FLUCTUATIONS BY ADELE POYNOR TORIGOE B By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order

Torigoe, Adele Poynor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bioactive Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Tailoring the Surface Properties of Parylene Biocompatible Coating: Martina Cihova1; Quoc Nguyen2; Varshni Singh2; 1Karlsruhe Institute of ...

22

Hydrophobic silica aerogel production at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present herein a characterization of a standard method used at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to produce hydrophobic silica aerogels and expand this method to obtain a wide range of refractive index (n = 1.006-1.14). We describe in detail the entire production process and explain the methods used to measure the characteristic parameters of aerogels, namely the refractive index, transmittance, and density. We use a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique to relate the transparency to the fine structure of aerogels.

Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Yokogawa, Hiroshi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydrophobic silica aerogel production at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present herein a characterization of a standard method used at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to produce hydrophobic silica aerogels and expand this method to obtain a wide range of refractive index (n = 1.006-1.14). We describe in detail the entire production process and explain the methods used to measure the characteristic parameters of aerogels, namely the refractive index, transmittance, and density. We use a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique to relate the transparency to the fine structure of aerogels.

Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Takayuki Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Yokogawa

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Environmental Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009... thermal cycle lifetime when compared to conventional EB-PVD coatings. ... widely used on turbine engine blades/vanes as stand-alone overlayers. .... thin film provides a flexible, low-cost platform for surface engineering.

25

Investigation of microbicidal activity of surface-immobilized hydrophobic polycations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrophobic polycations have been shown to completely kill bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, on-contact. Herein we describe advances with this technology on two fronts: (1) innovation of a polycationic-derivative ...

Hsu, Bryan Boen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

Fan, H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14 Compositions of unmelted frit batches for high-temperature service silicate-based coatings...Sodium nitrate 5.0 4.0 4.4 . . . 3.8 . . . . . . Fluorspar 4.5 3.2 2.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . . . Tricobalt tetroxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.5 . . . . . . Nickel oxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.6 . . . . . . Manganese dioxide 1.8 . . . 1.1 . . . 1.1 . . . . . . Barium carbonate . . . . . . . . . 26.3 . . . 56.6 56.6...

28

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Title Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Salminen, Justin, Nicolas Papaiconomou, Anand R. Kumar, Jong-Min Lee, John B. Kerr, John S. Newman, and John M. Prausnitz Journal Fluid Phase Equilibria Volume 261 Pagination 421-426 Keywords hydrophobic, ionic liquids, piperidinium, properties, pyrrolidinium, safety, toxicity Abstract Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]+, 1-methyl-1-octyl pyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]+ and 1-methyl-1-octyl piperidinium [MOPip]+ cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

29

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

31

Paint Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Test requirements and time to failure of various coatings...20â??30 0.8â??1.2 150 200â??500 Light zinc phosphate+lacquer paint 23â??28 0.9â??1.1 120 150â??250 Dry film lubrication, air cured 8â??13 0.3â??0.5 â?¦ 50â??100 Heavy zinc phosphate+dry film lubrication, baked 12â??25 0.5â??1.0 100 500â??1000 CARC topcoat 46â??56 1.8â??2.2 â?¦ 25â??50 Light zinc phosphate+CARC primer+topcoat 76â??127 3â??5...

32

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and particularly to the surface of the coating. The pinning action keeps the oil from leeching out of the coating, even when the ...

33

Apparatus for coating powders  

SciTech Connect

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and resistant to environmental damage from ingested sand particles ( categorized ... A Study on the Hot Corrosion Resistance of Metal-cemet-glass Coating on ...

35

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

UT-B ID 201002370 06.2012 Technology Summary Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and ...

36

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

37

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

38

Coating Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Powder  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a method of modifying existing coating techniques to include a bonded superhydrophobic outer coating layer. ...

39

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Study on the Hydrophobicity and Investigation of Physical and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... plastic, ceramic, paint, electric insulation, wood applications, cement, medicine and flame ... which property permits processing in a wide range of polymer system. ... Annealing Characteristics of Cold Sprayed Pure Cu and Ni Coatings Using ...

42

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

43

Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers  

SciTech Connect

This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sliding drops across alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a joint numerical and experimental study to sistematically characterize the motion of drops sliding over a periodic array of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes with large wettability contrast, and typical width of hundreds of $\\mu \\textrm{m}$. The fraction of the hydrophobic stripes has been varied from about 20% to 80%. The effects of the heterogeneous patterning can be described by a renormalized value of the critical Bond number, i.e. the critical dimensionless force needed to depin the drop before it starts to move. Close to the critical Bond number we observe a jerkily motion characterized by an evident stick-slip dynamics. As a result, dissipation is strongly localized in time, and the mean velocity of the drops can easily decrease by an order of magnitude compared to the sliding on homogeneous surface. Lattice Boltzmann (LB) numerical simulations are crucial for disclosing to what extent the sliding dynamics can be deduced from the computed balance of capillary, viscous and body forces at varying the Bond number, the surface composition and the liquid viscosity. Away from the critical Bond number, we characterize both experimentally and numerically the dissipation inside the droplet by studying the relation between the average velocity and the applied volume forces.

M. Sbragaglia; L. Biferale; G. Amati; S. Varagnolo; D. Ferraro; G. Mistura; M. Pierno

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Aging and metastability of monoglycerides in hydrophobic solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aging of aggregated structures of monoglycerides in hydrophobic medium is described by a set of different techniques. Polarized microscopy was used to study the mesomorphic behavior as a function of time. Differential scanning calorimetry was utilized to quantitatively monitor changes in the latent heat in different phase transformations that take place in the aging system. Infrared spectroscopy was applied to detect the formation of hydrogen bonding between surfactants. The X-ray diffraction patterns fingerprinted the molecular arrangement in different emerging phases. Infra-red spectroscopy was used to monitor the state of hydrogen bonding in the system. We conclude that in both inverted-lamellar and sub-alpha crystalline phases, monoglyceride molecules inevitably lose their emulsified ability in the hydrophobic solutions through the gradual change in hydrogen bonding patterns. On aging, the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between glycerol groups causes the segregation of chiral (D and L) isomers within the bilayers. Therefore all structures were eventually forced to reorder into the beta-crystalline state, distinguishing between the D and L layers. Accordingly, the highly ordered packing of aged structures weakened the emulsifying ability and finally leaded the collapse of the percolating gel network.

C. H. Chen; E. M. Terentjev

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Recent Approaches and Challenges in Smart Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-healing coatings -Self-cleaning and superhydrophobic coatings - Chemical Conversion Coatings - Nano- and Micro-capsules Based Polymer Coatings

47

Tag: coat drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 48

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes assessments of ceramic and thermal spray coatings that have advanced significantly or recently been marketed for use in the utility boiler industry to reduce slagging, mitigate fireside corrosion and potentially, circumferential cracking due to cyclic temperature variations. These innovations promise to enhance coating quality as well as reduce time and labor required to protect large areas of the boiler waterwalls. Coatings may also enable plants to improve production rates; thereb...

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    49

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    50

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    51

    Field Guide: Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has numerous products to help plant personnel meet the challenges of working with aging systems, structures, and components, but none that comprehensively address protective coatings and linings. This field guide provides a compilation of protective coating and lining information in a form that allows the user to have a ready reference available during condition assessment of the various protective coatings and linings used in the plant.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    52

    Polymeric and Conversion Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Ongoing research reveals that the search for appropriate conversion ... of the coated alloy was ~ 250 mV more noble compared to bare alloy.

    53

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    54

    Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

    55

    COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    56

    Alternate Coating Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The cold spray process can prepare thick coatings (> 1 cm) with many ... protection, thermal insulation, thermal dissipation, wear resistance, ...

    57

    To grate a liquid into tiny droplets by its impact on a hydrophobic microgrid  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We report on experiments of drop impacting a hydrophobic microgrid of typical spacing a few tens of micrometers. Above a threshold in impact speed

    P. Brunet; F. Lapierre; F. Zoueshtiagh; V. Thomy; A. Merlen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    58

    Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To overcome this barrier, at least two improvements are required. First, new and different contactor geometries are necessary to achieve efficient contact with an extremely low pressure drop. Second, the temperature limits of the membranes must be increased. In the absence of these improvements, sweeping gas MD will not be economically competitive. However, the membranes may still find use in hybrid desalination systems.

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59

    Superoleophilic particles and coatings and methods of making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Superoleophilic particles and surfaces and methods of making the same are described. The superoleophilic particles can include porous particles having a hydrophobic coating layer deposited thereon. The coated porous particles are characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m and a plurality of nanopores. Some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity. The superoleophilic particles also include oil pinned within the nanopores of the porous particles The plurality of porous particles can include (i) particles including a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features comprising a contiguous, protrusive material, (ii) diatomaceous earth particles, or (iii) both. The surfaces can include the superoleophilic particles coupled to the surface.

    Simpson, John T; D& #x27; Urso, Brian

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    60

    Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    61

    Critical behavior of a water monolayer under hydrophobic confinement  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We study by Monte Carlo simulations the low temperature phase diagram of a water monolayer confined between hydrophobic walls separated by h = 0.5 nm. By finite size scaling of the appropriate order parameter, we find a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in the universality class of the two-dimensional (2D) Ising model in the limit of infinite walls. However, for wall sizes up to hun- dreds of times larger than the monolayer thickness h, the LLCP is better described by the 3D Ising model universality class, something unexpected based on studies for simple liquids. We ascribe this result to the strong cooperativity and the low coordination number of the hydrogen bond network.

    Valentino Bianco; Giancarlo Franzese

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    62

    Thermal barrier coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    63

    Chemical Conversion Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 16   Applications of aluminum using chemical conversion coatings...doors 6063 Acrylic paint (b) Cans 3004 Sanitary lacquer Fencing 6061 None applied Chromate conversion coatings Aircraft fuselage skins 7075 clad with 7072 Zinc chromate primer Electronic chassis 6061-T4 None applied Cast missile bulkhead 356-T6 None applied Screen 5056 clad with 6253 Clear varnish...

    64

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    65

    Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    66

    LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    67

    Laser Processing and Hard Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013 ... Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II: Laser Processing and Hard Coatings Sponsored by: TMS Materials ...

    68

    Superhydrophic Coatings - ORNL  

    The result is a coating which causes liquids to “bead up” on the surface of a ... Brian R. D’Urson and John T. Simpson, ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC

    69

    Coating Manufacturing Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 30, 2013 ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low emissivity ... Finally, specific functional applications such as electrical contact and coatings on ... The study is supported by RFBR, research project No.

    70

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    71

    METAL COATING BATHS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    72

    Spin coating apparatus  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

    Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73

    Comparison of the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of illites and kaolinites  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The main problem appearing in oil recovery is possibly due t heavy petroleum components attached or adsorbed on the mineral rocks. The interaction between oil and reservoir rocks is principally related to clay minerals in the reservoir. Indeed, clay minerals are known to highly affect the porosity as well as the permeability of the rocks, thus inducing serious recovery problems. Therefore, a better knowledge of the interaction potential between clay minerals and oil is necessary to understand the mechanism of retention, to evaluate crude oil reserves and the recovery expectations, and finally to make the right choice of a recovery strategy. Asphaltene and water adsorption isotherms on clay surfaces have been determined to approach the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of several samples of kaolinites and illites. It is shown that the nature and the genesis condition of the clays affect the adsorption of both asphaltene and water. A larger amount of asphaltene is adsorbed on kaolinites while illites show more affinity for water. Cation hydration is shown to be responsible for part of the total hydrophilicity of the clays. It is also found that 25% of the kaolinite surface is hydrophilic, whereas this value extends to 40% for illite. Finally, it is shown that hydrophilicity decreases, whereas asphaltene adsorption increases.

    Saada, A.; Siffert, B.; Papirer, E. [Centre de Recherches sur la Physico-Chimie des Surfaces Solides, Mulhouse (France)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    74

    Thermodynamics, Structure, and Dynamics of Water Confined between Hydrophobic Plates  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of 512 water-like molecules that interact via the TIP5P potential and are confined between two smooth hydrophobic plates that are separated by 1.10 nm. We find that the anomalous thermodynamic properties of water are shifted to lower temperatures relative to the bulk by $\\approx 40$ K. The dynamics and structure of the confined water resemble bulk water at higher temperatures, consistent with the shift of thermodynamic anomalies to lower temperature. Due to this $T$ shift, our confined water simulations (down to $T = 220$ K) do not reach sufficiently low temperature to observe a liquid-liquid phase transition found for bulk water at $T\\approx 215$ K using the TIP5P potential. We find that the different crystalline structures that can form for two different separations of the plates, 0.7 nm and 1.10 nm, have no counterparts in the bulk system, and discuss the relevance to experiments on confined water.

    Pradeep Kumar; Sergey V. Buldyrev; Francis W. Starr; Nicolas Giovambattista; H. Eugene Stanley

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    75

    Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    76

    Dynamics of gravity driven three-dimensional thin films on hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterned substrates  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We investigate numerically the dynamics of unstable gravity driven three-dimensional thin liquid films on hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterned substrates of longitudinal stripes and checkerboard arrangements. The thin film can be guided preferentially on hydrophilic longitudinal stripes, while fingers develop on adjacent hydrophobic stripes if their width is large enough. On checkerboard patterns, the film fingering occurs on hydrophobic domains, while lateral spreading is favoured on hydrophilic domains, providing a mechanism to tune the growth rate of the film. By means of kinematical arguments, we quantitatively predict the growth rate of the contact line on checkerboard arrangements, providing a first step towards potential techniques that control thin film growth in experimental setups.

    Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernandez-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    77

    METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    78

    Evaporation and wetting dynamics of sessile water droplets on submicron-scale patterned silicon hydrophobic surfaces  

    SciTech Connect

    The evaporation characteristics of 1 l sessile water droplets on hydrophobic surfaces are experimentally examined. The proposed hydrophobic surfaces are composed of submicron diameter and 4.2- m-height silicon post arrays. A digital image analysis algorithm was developed to obtain time-dependent contact angles, contact diameters, and center heights for both non-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and patterned post array surfaces, which have the same hydrophobic contact angles. While the contact angles exhibit three distinct stages during evaporation in the non-patterned surface case, those in the patterned silicon post array surface case decrease linearly. In the case of post array hydrophobic surfaces, the initial contact diameter remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet above the posts completely dries out. The edge shrinking velocity of the droplet shows nonlinear characteristics, and the velocity magnitude increases rapidly near the last stage of evaporation.

    Choi, Chang Kyoung [Michigan Technological University; Shin, Dong Hwan [Chung-Ang University; Lee, Seong Hyuk [Chung-Ang University; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    79

    Low-temperature dynamics of water confined in a hydrophobic mesoporous material  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Quasielastic neutron scattering was used to study the dynamics of three-dimensional confined water in a hydrophobic mesoporous material designated as CMK-1 in the temperature range from 250 to 170 K. We observe a crossover ...

    Chu, Xiang-qiang

    80

    Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    81

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    82

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    83

    Nontoxic foul-release coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at Daytona Beach, Florida. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    84

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    85

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    86

    Superhydrophobic Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Technology Marketing Summary ORNL researchers have developed a variety of materials and processes to produce coatings with superhydrophobic properties ...

    87

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    88

    Understanding Compatibilities between Advanced Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    89

    Coating method for graphite  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    90

    Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

    SciTech Connect

    Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    91

    Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

    92

    Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    93

    Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    94

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is well known that fireside corrosion of waterwall panels in coal-fired boilers increased with the introduction of low NOx combustion systems since the early 1980s. This report describes ongoing work to evaluate protective coating solutions used to mitigate the wastage due to corrosion, and to determine which provide the greatest resistance to the circumferential cracking phenomena. It includes recent laboratory corrosion assisted thermal fatigue tests and analyses of field-exposed samples of ...

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    95

    No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    96

    The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump were investigated. The base case tests used a… (more)

    Parker, Brandon DeWayne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    97

    Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    98

    Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles  

    SciTech Connect

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    99

    UV Curable Coatings -- Marketing Kit  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Ultra violet (UV) curable coatings are being successfully applied to electric motors, metal shafts, cell phones, printing, plastic packaging, and wood laminates. Demand is expected to expand to an even greater number of end products as issues related to environmental well-being, finish quality, cost reductions, and manufacturing efficiencies drive this market. This UV Curable Coatings-Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel present UV curable coating opportunities to custo...

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    100

    Thermal and Cold Sprayed Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013... Coating Evaluated by Micro and Nano Indentation: Meysam Keshavarz1; Mohd Hasbullah bin Hj.Idris1; 1UTM,Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    101

    Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods  

    SciTech Connect

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    102

    Carbonaceous film coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    103

    Adsorption and desorption kinetics for hydrophilic and hydrophobic vapors on activated carbon  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ]. It is apparent that the LDF kinetic model is applicable for a wide variety of adsorbate­adsorbent systemsAdsorption and desorption kinetics for hydrophilic and hydrophobic vapors on activated carbon are of fundamental importance in applications of adsorbents in real situations. The adsorption/desorption char

    Thomas, Mark

    104

    The amphiphilic self-assembling peptide EAK16-I as a potential hydrophobic drug carrier  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is crucial for hydrophobic drugs to be dissolved and stabilized by carriers in aqueous systems and then to be delivered into target cells. An amphiphilic self-assembling peptide EAK16-I (Ac-AEAKAEAKAEAKAEAK-NH2) is reported here to be able to stabilize ...

    Jing Wang; Fushan Tang; Feng Li; Juan Lin; Yinghui Zhang; Linfang Du; Xiaojun Zhao

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    105

    Coated ceramic breeder materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A lithium containing ceramic breeder material is described which is coated with a neutron multiplier such as Beryllium (Be), Beryllium Oxide (BeO), or other material having a higher thermal conductivity than the lithium ceramic material itself. In addition to exhibiting certain thermal conductivity properties, the neutron multiplier must be capable of withstanding the high temperatures (700/sup 0/ to 1300/sup 0/K) experienced in a breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. State of the art considerations have indicated several possible configurations for the lithium containing ceramic breeders, including a sphere-pac arrangement or sintered pellets or blocks. When one adds a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO into a sphere-pac bed of lithium containing ceramic breeders, current concepts include mixing the neutron multiplier randomly into the sphere-pac bed in the form of small spheres of a size comparable to that of the lithium ceramic particles. The present invention shows that a sphere-pac bed of breeder particles coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be and BeO has an improved thermal conductivity when compared with that of a bed of uncoated breeder particles randomly mixed with Be or BeO spheres having the same breeder/multiplier composition ratio.

    Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1986-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    106

    Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The thermodynamics of hydration changes gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc... We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on temperature and solute size, one can obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of temperature and solute size. These function can provide interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T=293.15 K to T=333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

    Yuri S. Djikaev; Eli Ruckenstein

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    107

    Thin film ion conducting coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    108

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings | Department...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV)...

    109

    Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... This brief article covers the uses of abradable coatings, their development and their function. Wear at high speed, effect of tip width and coating ...

    110

    Solar selective absorption coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron ...

    111

    Ceramic composite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    112

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1989-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    113

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    114

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    115

    Kinetic solvation pressure: a measure of environmental effects on reaction rates. 1. Application to hydrophobic systems  

    SciTech Connect

    A quantity termed kinetic solvation pressure is defined as (/partial derivative//Delta/G/sup /double dagger////partial derivative//anti/V)/sub T/, where /anti/V is the reactant molar volume. It is identified with the difference in the amount of isothermal work, per unit volume expansion necessary to create a solvation cavity in a particular medium, upon transition-state complex formation. The quantity was evaluated for the hydrolysis of carboxylic esters mediated by different hydrophobic catalysts and was found to be equal to +26 J cm/sup /minus/3/ for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of n-alkyl acetates in water solvent; but it becomes negative when macro- or supramolecular acids were used as catalysts: /minus/16 J cm/sup /minus/3/ for Dowex 50W-X2, /minus/43J cm/sup /minus/3/ for poly(styrenesulfonic acid), /minus/64 J cm/sup /minus/3/ for dodecylsulfuric acid micelles. These results suggest the action of hydrophobic forces in enhancing the catalytic power of the supermolecules, relative to aqueous hydrogen ion. No such effect is seen in aqueous acetone or when more hydrophilic acetates are used as substrates. Kinetic solvation pressure for enzyme-catalyzed ester hydrolysis is five times more negative than for the resin system, indicating the full action of hydrophobic forces in the catalytic process.

    Mata-Segreda, J.F.

    1988-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    116

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    117

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    118

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    119

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    120

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

    Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    121

    Low proliferation and high apoptosis of osteoblastic cells on hydrophobic surface are associated with defective Ras signaling  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The hydrophobic (HPB) nature of most polymeric biomaterials has been a major obstacle in using those materials in vivo due to low compatibility with cells. However, there is little knowledge of the molecular detail to explain how surface hydrophobicity affects cell responses. In this study, we compared the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoblastic MG63 cells adhered to hydrophilic (HPL) and hydrophobic surfaces. On the hydrophobic surface, less formation of focal contacts and actin stress fibers, a delay in cell cycle progression, and an increase in apoptosis were observed. By using fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a model growth factor, we also investigated intracellular signaling pathways on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The activation of Ras, Akt, and ERK by FGF1 was impaired in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface. The overexpression of constitutively active form of Ras and Akt rescued those cells from apoptosis and recovered cell cycle progression. Furthermore, their overexpression also restored the actin cytoskeletal organization on the hydrophobic surface. Finally, the proliferative, antiapoptotic, and cytoskeletal effects of constitutively active Ras in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface were blocked by wortmannin and PD98059 that inhibit Akt and ERK activation, respectively. Therefore, our results suggest that the activation of Ras and its downstream molecules Akt and ERK to an appropriate level is one of crucial elements in the determination of osteoblast cell responses. The Ras pathway may represent a cell biological target that should be considered for successful surface modification of biomaterials to induce adequate cell responses in the bone tissue.

    Chang, Eun-Ju [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong-Hee [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Jung-Eun [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-Ae [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Seung Ko, Jea [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Man [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hyunmkim@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    122

    Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders  

    SciTech Connect

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    123

    Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

    124

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet ...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet...

    125

    Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    126

    Dielectric Coatings for IACT Mirrors  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy need mirror with high reflectance roughly in the wavelength between 300 and 550 nm. The current standard reflective layer of such mirrors is aluminum. Being permanently exposed to the environment they show a constant degradation over the years. New and improved dielectric coatings have been developed to enhance their resistance to environmental impact and to extend their possible lifetime. In addition, these customized coatings have an increased reflectance of over 95% and are designed to significantly lower the night-sky background contribution. The development of such coatings for mirrors with areas up to 2 m2 and low application temperatures to suite the composite materials used for the new mirror susbtrates of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the results of extensive durability tests are presented.

    Förster, A; Chadwick, P; Held, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    127

    Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M. [LERMPS-UTBM (Site de Sevenans), 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    128

    Cathode Coating (IN-09-061)  

    A team of scientists at Argonne National Laboratory has developed a special coating for the cathodes used in lithium batteries. With the coating, batteries charge and discharge more quickly, without a loss in performance.

    129

    Superhydrophobic Metal-Oxide Thin Film Coatings  

    Because of their numerous advantages and applications, considerable efforts have been expended to develop superhydrophobic (water repellant) coatings. However, traditional superhydrophobic coatings are soft in nature, with a Teflon-like surface ...

    130

    Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

    SciTech Connect

    Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

    Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    131

    Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications. Author(s), Ming Fu, Roger Wustman, Jeffrey Williams, Douglas Konitzer.

    132

    Coatings for SOFC Interconnects: Design, Deposition and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Engineering effective combinations of oxidation resistance, electronic conductivity and SOFC component compatibility has proven challenging for coating ...

    133

    Coatings for Corrosion and Wear Resistance Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 2, 2012 ... Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing ...

    134

    Polysilazane Based Corrosion Coatings for Magnesium  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

    135

    Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation  

    SciTech Connect

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simultaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure 12 comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets 16 is machined out to form a dimple 11. Glass microballoons, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

    Lowe, Arthur T. (Tempe, AZ); Hosford, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    136

    Method of forming metallic coatings on polymeric substrates and of forming graded polymeric coatings or films  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The invention described herein relates to methods of forming graded polymeric coatings or films on a desired substrate and of forming metallic coatings on polymeric or other nonmetallic substrates. In particular, it relates to methods of forming such coatings or films by sorption and/or diffusion of metals into coatings or films of polymeric material deposited by conventional techniques on a desired substrate.

    Liepins, R.

    1981-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    137

    Comparision of Stellite Coatings on Valve Steel Material Prepared ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    138

    Preparing of High Silicon Coating by Composite Electrodeposition in ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    139

    Improved Mechanical Properties of Cermet Coatings as a Function ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    140

    Growth saturation of unstable thin films on transverse-striped hydrophilic-hydrophobic micropatterns  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we demonstrate the growth saturation of an unstable thin liquid film on micropatterned hydrophilic-hydrophobic substrates. We consider different transverse-striped micropatterns, characterized by the total fraction of hydrophilic coverage and the width of the hydrophilic stripes. We compare the growth of the film on the micropatterns to the steady states observed on homogeneous substrates, which correspond to a saturated sawtooth and growing finger configurations for hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, respectively. The proposed micropatterns trigger an alternating fingering-spreading dynamics of the film, which leads to a complete suppression of the contact line growth above a critical fraction of hydrophilic stripes. Furthermore, we find that increasing the width of the hydrophilic stripes slows down the advancing front, giving smaller critical fractions the wider the hydrophilic stripes are. Using analytical approximations, we quantitatively predict the growth rate of the contact line as a function of the covering fraction, and predict the threshold fraction for saturation as a function of the stripe width.

    Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernandez-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    141

    Effective slip in pressure-driven flow past super-hydrophobic stripes  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Super-hydrophobic array of grooves containing trapped gas (stripes), have the potential to greatly reduce drag and enhance mixing phenomena in microfluidic devices. Recent work has focused on idealized cases of stick-perfect slip stripes, with limited guidance. Here, we analyze the experimentally relevant situation of a pressure-driven flow past striped slip-stick surfaces with arbitrary local slip at the gas sectors. We derive analytical formulas for maximal (longitudinal) and minimal (transverse) directional effective slip lengths that can be used for any surface slip fraction (validated by numerical calculations). By representing eigenvalues of the slip length-tensor, they allow us to obtain the effective slip for any orientation of stripes with respect to the mean flow. Our results imply that flow past stripes is controlled by the ratio of the local slip length to texture size. In case of a large (compared to the texture period) slip at the gas areas, surface anisotropy leads to a tensorial effective slip, by attaining the values predicted earlier for a perfect local slip. Both effective slip lengths and anisotropy of the flow decrease when local slip becomes of the order of texture period. In the case of small slip, we predict simple surface-averaged, isotropic flows (independent of orientation). These results provide a framework for the rational design of super-hydrophobic surfaces and devices.

    Aleksey V. Belyaev; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    142

    Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    143

    APPLIEDPHYSICAL Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    that competes with the energy- consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy-consuming desorption of coat proteins, until on the membrane into elementary coat-building units, called monomers. The membrane-bound monomers then polymerize

    Sens, Pierre

    144

    Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    145

    Probabilistic approach to the length-scale dependence of the effect of water hydrogen bonding on hydrophobic hydration  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We present a probabilistic approach to water-water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a hydrophobic particle and hydrophobe radius. This approach can be used in the density functional theory (DFT) and computer simulations to examine particle size effects on the hydration of particles and on their solvent-mediated interaction. For example, it allows one to explicitly identify a water hydrogen bond contribution to the external potential whereto a water molecule is subjected near a hydrophobe. The DFT implementation of the model predicts the hydration free energy per unit area of a spherical hydrophobe to be sharply sensitive to the hydropobe radius for small radii and weakly sensitive thereto for large ones; this corroborates the vision of the hydration of small and large length-scale particles as occurring via different mechanisms. On the other hand, the model predicts that the hydration of even apolar particles of small enough radii may become thermodynamically favorable owing to the interplay of the energies of pairwise (dispersion) water-water and water-hydrophobe interactions. This sheds light on previous counterintuitive observations (both theoretical and simulational) that two inert gas molecules would prefer to form a solvent-separated pair rather than a contact one.

    Yuri S. Djikaev; Eli Ruckenstein

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    146

    UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

    SciTech Connect

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    147

    Manipulation of hydrophobic interactions in associative polymers using cyclodextrin and enzyme  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    the kinetics of the enzymatic reactions. The model accounts for equilibrium between the CD bound Michaelis Menten kinetics and the kinetic parameters are determined by tracking the changes are widely used as rheology modifiers in a variety of applications including paints, coatings, and aircraft

    Khan, Saad A.

    148

    Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    149

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

    150

    Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    151

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    152

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    SciTech Connect

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    153

    Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

    Abney, Kent D. (30 San Juan St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Kinkead, Scott A. (70 Canada Cir., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Mason, Caroline F. V. (148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Rais, Jiri (Fr. Krizka 11, 17000 Praha 7, CZ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    154

    Micron-scale droplet deposition on a hydrophobic surface using a retreating syringe  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Droplet deposition onto a hydrophobic surface is studied experimentally and numerically. A wide range of droplet sizes can result from the same syringe, depending strongly on the needle retraction speed. Three regimes are identified according to the motion of the contact line. In Region I, at slow retraction speeds, the contact line expands and large droplets can be achieved. In Region II, at moderate needle speeds, a quasi-cylindrical liquid bridge forms resulting in drops approximately the size of the needle. Finally, at high speeds (Region III), the contact line retracts and droplets much smaller than the syringe diameter are observed. Scaling arguments are presented identifying the dominant mechanisms in each regime. Results from nonlinear numerical simulations agree well with the experiments, although the accuracy of the predictions is limited by inadequate models for the behavior of the dynamic contact angle.

    Qian, Bian; Gagnon, David; Tripathi, Anubhav; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    155

    Novel hydrophobic ionic liquids electrolyte based on cyclic sulfonium used in dye-sensitized solar cells  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A novel series of hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids based on six cyclic sulfonium cations were first time synthesized and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells as pure solvents for electrolyte system. The chronoamperograms result showed that the length of substituent on sulfonium cations could inhibit the I{sub 3}{sup -} diffusion and the five-ring structure of sulfonium was benefit for fast triiodide ion diffusion. The electrochemical impendence spectra measurement of dye-sensitized solar cells with these ionic liquid electrolytes was carried out and the result indicated that the cations' structure had indeed influence on the cells' performance especially for the fill factor, which was further proved by the measurement result of I-V curves of these dye-sensitized solar cells. The conclusion was obtained that the electron exchange reaction on Pt counter electrode/electrolyte interface dominated the cells' performance for these ionic liquid electrolyte-based DSCs. (author)

    Guo, Lei; Pan, Xu; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Changneng; Fang, Xiaqin; Chen, Shuanghong; Dai, Songyuan [Key Lab of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    156

    Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

    Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    157

    High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    158

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level 1 Coatings Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry has experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside reactor containment. Although degradation has become a concern to the industry, the industry lacked a thoroughly documented history of the degradation and its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted research to understand the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified coatings used inside containment. This report describes the ...

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    159

    Hybrid Polymer/Nanoparticle Multi--Functional Optical Coatings  

    porosity, refractive index, hydrophobicity, and surface geometry. This ... for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

    160

    Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    161

    Sulfur-Resistant Silicone Conformal Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    162

    SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of the University of California, nor any of their employees,of the University of California. The views and opinions ofof the University of California. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    163

    Coating Industry Response to Legislative Pressure  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 2   Summary of existing federal regulations affecting the coatings industry...also have their own internal regulations, directives, and guidelines

    164

    Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes ...  

    Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... The fast plasma discharge and subsequent rapid pyrolysis of an organic precursor result in a uniform coating of ...

    165

    Coating and Surface Technologies for Turbine Airfoils  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    more difficult, coatings and other surface technologies are becoming more ... to developing higher strength single crystal superalloys. Although it has been ...

    166

    ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: I - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The DARPA program in advanced thin film coatings is developing innovative technologies to eliminate volatile organic compounds, heavy metals and other ...

    167

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation.

    168

    Protective Coatings for Molybdenum – Industrial Processing and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Symposium, Advanced Protective Coatings for Refractory Metals and Alloys ... In particular molybdenum is a state of the art structural material in glass ...

    169

    Solar Selective Absorption Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Sandia has developed a new class of solar selective absorber coatings that significantly improve the thermal conversion efficiency of solar units by reducing ...

    170

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    171

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    172

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    173

    Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a ...

    174

    Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    175

    The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    176

    Study on machined thermal sprayed coatings adherence  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Thermal sprayed coatings represent a modern way of solving real important problems, like repairing worn parts working under severe wearing conditions or, ensuring efficient corrosion protection of parts used in sea, as platform, bridges, or obtaining ... Keywords: adherence, cylindrical turning, metallizing process, sample, thermal sprayed coatings, transducer

    Mihaiela Iliescu; Mihnea Costoiu; Sergiu Tonoiu

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    177

    Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    178

    Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    179

    Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    firing time and temperature on 6P57 coatings on Ti6Al4V and 6P50 on Co-firing time and temperature on the adhesion of coatings manufactured with glass 6P57 on Ti6Al4V and glass 6P50 on Co-

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    180

    Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    181

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    182

    Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. This invention has applications to breeding blankets for fusion reactors as well as to alkali metal thermal to electric converters.

    Park, J.H.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    183

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    184

    The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    185

    Comparative Study of Aluminide Coatings on Mild Steel by Different ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by Release on Demand ... High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications .

    186

    Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries Title Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon...

    187

    ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and ...  

    ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and Some Potential Applications ... (e gicing coatings on power lines, insulators, infrastructure (e.g.

    188

    Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Coatings for Oxidation ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Our protective coatings were evaluated for thermal-shock performance at the ... that our coatings provide oxidation protection of C-C composites at temperature.

    189

    Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Life Model for Coated Superalloy ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    in an aggressive combustion gas environment. Coating ..... M.I. Wood and G.F. Harrison, "Modeling The Deformation Of Coated. Superalloys Under Thermal ...

    190

    Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contacts and Cell Coatings The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide...

    191

    Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    coatings for nickel up to 1,100 C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at...

    192

    Advances in Zinc-Coated Steel Sheet: Processing and Properties  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Influences of Ni-Pretreatments on Galvanized Coatings · Surface Performance of Environment-Friendly Galvanized Sheet for Appliance · Thermal Spray Coating ...

    193

    Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    194

    Structure of gas-liquid interface and hydrophobic interface for urea aqueous solution: a computer simulation study  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Urea aqueous solution is ubiquitously used to denature protein. Regardless of its extensive use, the mechanism is still unclear and remains an active field of study. There have been two proposed mechanisms, the direct and indirect. The indirect mechanism, which attributes the ability of urea of changing water structure, is susceptible since many research works show that there is little effect of urea on water structure. The current study provided evidence for the indirect mechanism by demonstrating that the introduction of urea slightly changes the water structure in the hydrophobic interfacial areas. In the current study, the urea aqueous solution systems with either gas-liquid or hydrophobic interface are studied by MD simulations, and the structures of water near the interfacial areas are analyzed in terms of density, orientation and number of hydrogen bonds. For each kind of interface, systems with four different urea concentrations are included, ranging from 0M to 8M. The results show slight change of water structure by the urea solute on the hydrophobic interface in terms of the orientation and number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule.

    Yu, Meng

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    195

    The Most Severe Test for Hydrophobicity Scales: Two Proteins with 88% Sequence Identity but Different Structure and Function  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Protein-protein interactions (protein functionalities) are mediated by water, which compacts individual proteins and promotes close and temporarily stable large-area protein-protein interfaces. In their classic paper Kyte and Doolittle (KD) concluded that the "simplicity and graphic nature of hydrophobicity scales make them very useful tools for the evaluation of protein structures". In practice, however, attempts to develop hydrophobicity scales (for example, compatible with classical force fields (CFF) in calculating the energetics of protein folding) have encountered many difficulties. Here we suggest an entirely different approach, based on the idea that proteins are self-organized networks, subject to finite-scale criticality (like some network glasses). We test this proposal against two small proteins that are delicately balanced between alpha and alpha/beta structures, with different functions encoded with only 12% of their amino acids. This example explains why protein structure prediction is so challenging, and it provides a severe test for the accuracy and content of hydrophobicity scales. The new method confirms KD's evaluation, and at the same time suggests that protein structure, dynamics and function can be best discussed without using CFF.

    Alexander E. Kister; James C. Phillips

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    196

    On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating. An alternative manufacturing route is to coat the sheet metal first before forming. The change in the manufacturing sequence can potentially improve cost and reduce environmental impact. This approach, however, requires the coating to survive the deformation process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull-off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet by using a uniaxial tensile tester. Experimental results from two selected polymer coated sheet metals show that coating adhesion was affected by plastic deformation. An analytical model based on a virtual interface crack concept was developed to indicate the adhesion potential of the coating-substrate interface. From interfacial fracture mechanics, the initial adhesion potential is defined as the energy release rate characterized by the virtual interface crack and the initial pull-off stress. The analytical model was used to predict coating adhesion loss after deformation in uniaxial tension mode. The analytical model predictions agreed well with experimental results. Finite element analysis tool was applied to simulate more complex deformation modes in stamping of coated sheet meals. The stress field near the interface crack tip was used to calculate the energy release rate and predict the adhesion loss under different deformation modes. The predictions obtained from numerical method are also in good agreements with the experimental results in biaxial tension and tension-compression modes. The research has led to a better understanding of the effects of plastic deformation on coating adhesion. The developed adhesion test methods can be used to generate useful information on coating durability for diverse practical use. It is also expected that the results of the research will facilitate the development of better polymer coated sheet metal to be used in sheet metal forming processes.

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    197

    Study of Hydrophobic and Ionizable Hydrophilic Copolymers at Polymer/Solid and Polymer/Liquid Interfaces  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Joint experimental-computational efforts were set to characterize the interfacial effects on the structure and dynamics of polymers consisting of highly rigid hydrophilic-ionizable and hydrophobic sub-units within one polymeric chain casted into thin films of several molecular dimensions. Focusing on the ultra thin film region we separate out the interfacial effects from bulk characteristics. Specifically, the study sought to: identify the parameters that control the formation of a stable polymer-solid interface. The study consists of two components, experimental investigations and computational efforts. The experimental component was designed to derive empirical trends that can be used to correlate the set of coupled polymer molecular parameters with the interfacial characteristics of these polymers, and their response to presence of solvents. The computational study was designed to provide molecular insight into the ensemble averages provided by the experimental efforts on multiple length scales from molecular dimensions, to the nanometer lengths to a macroscopic understanding of solvent interactions with structured polymers. With the ultimate goal of correlating molecular parameters to structure, dynamics and properties of ionic polymers, the first stage of the research began with the study of two systems, one which allowed tailoring the flexibility of the backbone without the presence of ionic groups, but with a potential to sulfonate groups at a later stage, and a polymer whose backbone is rigid and the density of the ionic group can be varied. The combined experimental and computational studies significantly extended the understanding of polymers at interfaces from model systems to polydispersed copolymers with blocks of varying nature and complexity. This new insight directly affects the design of polymers for sustainable energy applications from batteries and fuel cells to solar energy.

    Perahia, Dvora

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    198

    Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary  

    SciTech Connect

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    199

    METHOD OF PREPARING COATED REFRACTORY WARE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for preparing a dense, refractory coating on a vessel adapted to the handling of molten metals such as uranium and plutonium. According to the invention, the inner surface of a heat stable container formed of a refractory metal of either niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, or tungsten is coated with molten thorium within 10 minutes so as to present alloying with the refractory metal and then exposed to a reactive atmosphere of nitrogen at a temperature of about 1750 deg for 30 minutes to form a refractory thorium nitride coating.

    Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.; Weissman, S.I.

    1959-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    200

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level I Coatings—Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside the reactor containment. These instances of degradation became a concern to the industry, but the industry did not have a thoroughly documented history of the degradation or its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a project that conducted research to gain an understanding of the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified ...

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    201

    Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS  

    SciTech Connect

    This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    202

    Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    203

    OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    204

    Thin film-coated polymer webs  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    205

    (Ni-P) Coatings on AISI  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... investigation shows that Electroless Nickel coated AISI 1040 steel has high potential to replace hard chrome plated AISI ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray ... New Developments in High Velocity Air-Fuel Spraying.

    206

    Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    207

    Silica-coated liposomes for insulin delivery  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, ...

    Neelam Dwivedi; M. A. Arunagirinathan; Somesh Sharma; Jayesh Bellare

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    208

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

    Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    209

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant. 4 figs.

    Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    210

    Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    211

    Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    212

    Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    213

    Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

    NONE

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    214

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    215

    Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

    SciTech Connect

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    216

    Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    217

    Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    218

    Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    219

    Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project |  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project The Department of Energy is conducting research into bio-based thermochromic intelligent roof coatings. The coatings are developed from waste cooking oil. Project Description This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a waste cooking oil-based thermochromic smart roof coating technology that will adjust light transmission in response to temperature changes. This will reduce energy demands for temperature regulation. The project will also study the effects of different oil sources on coating properties. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and United Environment & Energy. Project Goals

    220

    Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

    Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    221

    Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    222

    Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer of coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, light-weight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention. 13 figs.

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1988-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    223

    Figure correction of multilayer coated optics  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    224

    Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    225

    Thermomechanical behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    The effect of coating porosity and thickness on the resistance to damage of yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings in an oxidizing environment by thermal cycling was evaluated. Hardness and elastic modulus of an as-processed porous coating were lower than those of a dense coating and the porous coating failed after fewer thermal cycles. Similarly, specimen with a thicker coating failed after fewer thermal cycles than specimen with a thinner coating. The earlier failure of the porous coating is due to lower fracture toughness and enhanced oxidation of the coating/substrate interface, whereas, the earlier failure of the thick coating is due to higher thermal transient stresses that developed in the coating during thermal cycling. Generally, an increase in coating density led to initial increase in both hardness and elastic modulus with increasing thermal cycles. However, hardness and density gradually decreased as the number of thermal cycles increase because of microcracks formation and growth. Microscopic observations indicated that the formation of multiple microcracks and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to final coating failure.

    Singh, J. P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    226

    Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 deg C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 10^7 cm^(-3). With one-minute integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 10^6 cm^(-3) was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density was observed between the cells.

    V. M. Acosta; A. Jarmola; D. Windes; E. Corsini; M. P. Ledbetter; T. Karaulanov; M. Auzinsh; S. A. Rangwala; D. F. Jackson Kimball; D. Budker

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    227

    Reactor Shim Control by Coolant Passage Coating  

    SciTech Connect

    Work at North American Aviation in connection with the ReactorSafety Program has suggested the use of a poison-bearing "paint" which would coat reactor coolant channels, and provide a supplement to the control systems of the Hanford reactors. A review of Hanford operating problems indicates that this addition to the present control systems would enable an increase in annual production for each reactor of about 6% or the production equivalent of about 21 days at maximum power level. Installation and maintenance problems for this system would be minor, and development of a suitable coating material appears promising.

    Wheelock, C.W.

    1953-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    228

    Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    229

    Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen (Kennwick, WA); Ustyugov, Oleksiy A. (Spokane, WA)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    230

    Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    231

    Production of porous coating on a prosthesis  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    232

    ALLOY COATINGS AND METHOD OF APPLYING  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing uranium articles with a pro tective coating by a single dip coating process is presented. The uranium article is dipped into a molten zinc bath containing a small percentage of aluminum. The resultant product is a uranium article covered with a thin undercoat consisting of a uranium-aluminum alloy with a small amount of zinc, and an outer layer consisting of zinc and aluminum. The article may be used as is, or aluminum sheathing may then be bonded to the aluminum zinc outer layer.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    233

    Method of applying coatings to substrates and the novel coatings produced thereby  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of a multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hitherto unavailable compositions, are provided. 2 figs.

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    234

    Electrode coating composed of copolymers derived from diacetone acrylamide  

    SciTech Connect

    An improved electrode coating and separator coating derived from a copolymer of diacetone acrylamide and a polymerizable monomer. This invention relates to novel rechargeable electrodes, separators and processes for preparing same.

    Rampel, G.

    1985-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    235

    Atomic layer deposition for the conformal coating of nanoporous materials  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered ...

    Jeffrey W. Elam; Guang Xiong; Catherine Y. Han; H. Hau Wang; James P. Birrell; Ulrich Welp; John N. Hryn; Michael J. Pellin; Theodore F. Baumann; John F. Poco; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    236

    Biological, Electronic, and Functional Thin Films and Coatings I  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 4, 2013... scan (PPS) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). ... Eclipse Active and Passive Solar Control Coatings: Hulya ... In this paper two novel thin film coating systems will be presented for energy conservation solar ...

    237

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Diamond-like Coating Improves...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    News Feature Archive Diamond-like Coating Improves Electron Microscope Images By Mike Ross November 26, 2012 Coating the surface of a material with a single layer of diamond-like...

    238

    Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    239

    Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

    Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    240

    Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    241

    Chromium-free Conversion Coatings for Aerospace Aluminum Alloys  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Predicting and Combating Corrosion and Degradation of New Coating and ...

    242

    Graphene Coated with Titanium Nitride as Electrode Materials for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , 2013 and Beyond: Flexible Electronics. Presentation Title, Graphene Coated ...

    243

    Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

    Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

    244

    Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A Slag Management System for Gasification Operations · Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC Operating Conditions · Advanced ...

    245

    RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Technology Marketing Summary The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh ...

    246

    High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings. Presentation ...

    247

    Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

    ... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

    248

    ZnO Nanorods as Antireflective Coatings for Single Crystalline ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Graphene Coating-enabled Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission and Optical Diode ... Synthesis of Monolithic Iron Incorporated Silica Aerogels by Ambient ...

    249

    Superhydrophobic Coatings Using Double-Silane Treated Silica ...  

    Disclosure Number 201202928 Technology Summary This invention relates to superhydrophobic coatings and more specifically to durability improvements. ...

    250

    Coatings and Surface Treatments for Application on a Martensitic ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

    251

    Change of Stress-Strain Behaviors in EB-PVD TBC Coating Systems ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... coating system, axial stress born by applied external condition changes from compression to tension. ... Aerospace Coatings via Directed Vapor Deposition.

    252

    IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    253

    Solid alcohol fuel with hydration inhibiting coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This patent describes a process for preparing a solid alcohol fuel. It comprises: mixing an alcohol solution with a cellulose derivative having a hydration inhibiting coating thereby forming a slurry and then adding an effective amount sufficient to increase the pH level above 8, of a caustic material so as to effect hydration and solidification.

    Gartner, S.

    1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    254

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    255

    Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    256

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

    SciTech Connect

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    257

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    258

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    259

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    260

    Surface coating for prevention of crust formation  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    261

    Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    262

    Testing of coatings for the nuclear industry  

    SciTech Connect

    Coatings for commercial nuclear power plants need to withstand humidity, radiation exposure, and LOC accident conditions; they also must be decontaminable. Tests for decontaminability, radiation stability, and design-basis-accident (DBA) resistance are described. An irradiation test facility using spent fuel assemblies and a spray loop for simulating a DBA are described. A sample test report sheet is presented. (DLC)

    Goldberg, G.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    263

    CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    on the following six RD&D program areas: · Residential and Commercial Building End-Use Energy EfficiencyCORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Environmentally

    264

    Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    265

    Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

    Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Long, Jr., Ernest L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beatty, Ronald L. (Wurlingen, CH)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    266

    High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    267

    High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    268

    Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    269

    FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS  

    SciTech Connect

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    270

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes work to develop new thermal barrier coating systems, which will be essential to the operation of the ATS engine which is under development. Work is at the stage of process improvement and bond coat improvement, along with proof testing of the coatings under thermal conditions typical of what can be expected in the ATS engine.

    NONE

    1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    271

    Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

    Michalske, Terry A. (P.O. Box 1042, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rye, Robert R. (1304 Espanola NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Smith, William L. (9916 Fostoria Rd., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    272

    Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

    Ludwig, Frank A. (Irvine, CA); Higley, Lin R. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    273

    Thermal Sprays and Ceramic Coatings Assessments: Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Ceramic and Thermal Sprays Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report includes assessments of Ceramic and Thermal Spray coatings both by laboratory evaluation and analysis of field samples. The field samples are presented as case studies describing the condition of the material solution applied. Several thermal sprays and ceramic coatings were tested and analyzed for their ability to mitigate fireside corrosion, reduce slagging and it's propensity to have circumferential cracking occur due to cyclic temperature variations. In addition, the case studies provide ...

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    274

    Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    275

    Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    276

    SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    High-Performance Nanostructured High-Performance Nanostructured Coating to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

    277

    Coated armor system and process for making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    278

    Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    279

    Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    280

    Pratt and Whitney thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. They are used in aircraft engines and have accumulated millions upon millions of reliable hours. Differences in the duty cycles of the aircraft and industrial gas turbines are recognized as is the marked differences in environmental operational envelope. At the completion of this program the TBCs best suited to meet the needs of the ATS program will have been identified, tested, and confirmed.

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    281

    Is it possible to check microcomponent coatings?  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Optical microcomponents are increasingly used in laser optical systems because of their many and novel industrial applications. These components are coated in order to enhance their optical performance, but optical characterizations are very difficult due to the shapes and small size. Thus, to perform this kind of measurement, special devices are needed. It is difficult to check component optical responses after manufacturing. Thus a new method, developed by the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, is proposed to fill this gap.

    Piombini, Herve; Voarino, Philippe; Lemarchand, Fabien

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    282

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    283

    North American Coating Laboratories | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Coating Laboratories American Coating Laboratories Jump to: navigation, search Name North American Coating Laboratories Address 9450 Pineneedle Drive Place Mentor, Ohio Zip 44060 Sector Services, Solar Product Consulting; Engineering/architectural/design; Manufacturing; Research and development;Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 440-357-7000 Website http://www.nacl.com Coordinates 41.70303°, -81.302082° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.70303,"lon":-81.302082,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

    284

    Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials  

    SciTech Connect

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

    Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    285

    Microphase separation in copolymers of hydrophilic PEG blocks and hydrophobic tyrosine-derived segments using simultaneous SAXS/WAXS/DSC  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Hydration- and temperature-induced microphase separations were investigated by simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in a family of copolymers in which hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks are inserted randomly into a hydrophobic polymer made of either desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE) or iodinated I{sub 2}DTE segments. Iodination of the tyrosine rings in I{sub 2}DTE increased the X-ray contrast between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in addition to facilitating the study of the effect of iodination on microphase separation. The formation of phase-separated, hydrated PEG domains is of considerable significance as it profoundly affects the polymer properties. The copolymers of DTE (or I{sub 2}DTE) and PEG are a useful model system, and the findings presented here may be applicable to other PEG-containing random copolymers. In copolymers of PEG and DTE and I{sub 2}DTE, the presence of PEG depressed the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the copolymer relative to the homopolymer, poly(DTE carbonate), and the DTE/I{sub 2}DTE segments hindered the crystallization of the PEG segments. In the dry state, at large PEG fractions (>70 vol%), the PEG domains self-assembled into an ordered structure with 14-18 nm distance between the domains. These domains gave rise to a SAXS peak at all temperatures in the iodinated polymers, but only above the T{sub g} in non-iodinated polymers, due to the unexpected contrast-match between the crystalline PEG domains and the glassy DTE segments. Irrespective of whether PEG was crystalline or not, immersion of these copolymers in water resulted in the formation of hydrated PEG domains that were 10-20 nm apart. Since both water and the polymer chains must be mobile for the phase separation to occur, the PEG domains disappeared when the water froze, and reappeared as the ice began to melt. This transformation was reversible, and showed hysteresis as did the melting of ice and freezing of the water incorporated into the polymer. PEG-water complexes and PEG-water eutectics were observed in WAXS and DSC scans, respectively.

    Murthy, N.S.; Wang, W.; Kohn, J. (Rutgers); (Vermont)

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    286

    TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    287

    Wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    High interfacial stresses and coating failure are expected when a hard coating protects a more-compliant substrate in applications involving high-stress wear contact. Assuming that small differences in stiffness (or modulus) between the coating and substrate are required for a wear-resistant coating in such applications, four approaches have been taken to develop such coatings for cobalt-base alloys. Hardness, scratch adhesion, and nano-indentation testing identified the most promising candidates for cobalt-base alloys: A thin coating with hard Cr{sub 2}N and less-stiff Cr-N(ss) layers; a thick, four-layered coating with a 4{mu}m inner layer of Cr-N(ss)/ 1 {mu}m layer of Cr{sub 2}N/4 {micro}m layer of Cr-N(ss)/1 {micro} outer layer of Cr{sub 2}N; a duplex approach of ion nitriding to harden the subsurface,followed by application of a dual-layered Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating; and ion nitriding alone. The low scratch adhesion values and high modulus/hardness values indicate that ZrN, TiN, and plasma carburized coatings represent less beneficial approaches. Two different cobalt-base alloys were studied in this work: Haynes 25 and Stellite 3 (Stoody Deloro Stellite). Based on weight change, profilometry measurements, and metallographic and SEM examinations after four-ball wear testing, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/CrN(ss) coated coupons exhibited a significantly lower wear rate than the uncoated Haynes 25 coupons. Of greater importance, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coatings were adherent on the Stellite 3 intermediate balls and Haynes 25 cups, and prevented the wear of the cobalt-base substrate. based on these results, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating was the best coating candidate, and this coating could result in a reduced wear rate and less cobalt wear debris. The ion nitrided coupons exhibited slightly higher wear than the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coated coupons, while the wear of the thin duplex coated coupons was the highest. However, the nitride layer was adherent and protected the Haynes 25 substrate. Therefore, modification of the ion nitriding conditions or surface lapping after nitriding are approaches that may improve the wear resistance of the ion nitriding and duplex coatings.

    Cockeram, B.V.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    288

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game March 22, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT’s twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT's twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs In honor of Women's History Month, we've brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run

    289

    Warm coats, big thanks | Y-12 National Security Complex  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Community / Warm coats, big thanks Community / Warm coats, big thanks Warm coats, big thanks Posted: January 9, 2014 - 2:23pm Over the last 12 years, Y-12ers have donated almost 7000 coats, sweaters and other winter wear to the Volunteer Ministry Center. As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while, Y-12ers have shown their volunteer spirit for the twelfth straight year by helping countless people stay warm thanks to another successful United Way Coat Drive to benefit the Volunteer Ministry Center. In total, the site donated 589 coats and winter wear items, 64 pairs of gloves, 47 scarves, and 66 hats and toboggans, which VMC makes available to the public through its Knoxville office. In addition, this year's efforts were expanded to include collection of toiletries for VMC. Y-12 collected more than 20 copy paper boxes full of

    290

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

    Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    291

    Optical interference coatings for improved luminaire performance. Final report  

    SciTech Connect

    An interior broadbeam HID uplight and an upstream roadway luminaire were developed to demonstrate that optical coated luminaire components can improve the visual effectiveness and energy efficiency of a lighting system. Optical coated reflectors and flat lens covers were very effective in the development of new improved lighting techniques. The coatings reduce reflection and transmission losses, opening the door to new design options for improving lighting performance and saving energy.

    Rubins, H.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    292

    High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    293

    Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

    Hirayama, Chikara (Murrysville, PA); Wagner, George R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    294

    Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    295

    METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    297

    VINYL COATING OF GRAPHITE PLATES FOR ULTRASONIC INSPECTION  

    SciTech Connect

    A process has been developed for application of a thin, adherent vinyi plastic coating to graphite plates to prevent absorption of coupling fluids'' used in ultrasonic inspection. The plates are preheated and dipped mechanically in a fluid plastisol, and the resulting coating is fused in an infra-red heater. No significant attenuation of ultrasonic impulse results from presence of the coating. After inspection, the vinyl sheath may be easily stripped from the plate. (auth)

    Church, J.S.; Bell, J.H. Jr.; Donahoe, J.K.; Faussone, R.A.; Rogers, G.B.; Rowen, J.T.

    1958-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

    299

    Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

    300

    Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Heat Exchangers in Heat Storage ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Inorganic salt hydrate PCMs have a number of advantages in comparison to ... Al -Si-Fe coatings on 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Cold Metal Transfer Technique.

    302

    Preparation of Polymer-Coated Functionalized Ferrimagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles*  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A simple chemical method to synthesize PMAA coated maghemite nanoparticles is described. Monomer methacrylic acid molecules were absorbed onto the synthesized ferrimagnetic nanoparticles followed by polymerization. The ...

    Yu, Shi

    303

    Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    304

    Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    305

    Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated Conductor ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated ... global energy demand and the need for improved efficiency of energy usage.

    306

    Formation of Vanadate Conversion Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present investigation, a chromate-free, corrosion-resistant conversion coating using vanadium based solution was applied to AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    307

    Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

    308

    Water Phobic Powder Coatings Promise Breakthrough in Energy Saving ...  

    of algae on the surfaces of water systems. Water repellent coatings can be advantageously applied to large-scale structures, such as boat hulls,

    309

    Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

    For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

    310

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present investigation, HVAS process has been used to deposit coating on steel substrates.The oxidation behavior of HVAS sprayed (FeCr)-based ...

    311

    Hybrid Polymer/Nanoparticle Multi-Functional Optical Coatings ...  

    This unique capability of Sandia’s multifunctional coatings expands the potential applications into a variety of new markets. Benefits ... Department of Energy ...

    312

    Wear- and Corrosion-resistant Coatings for Oil and Chemical ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Wear- and Corrosion-resistant Coatings for Oil and ... and reactors for refinery processing, require protection against abrasion, friction, erosion ...

    313

    DISSERTATION: Mechanical Behavior of Gas Turbine Coatings - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... ABSTRACT: Coatings are frequently applied on gas turbine components in order to restrict surface degradation such as corrosion and ...

    314

    Mechanical Behavior of Technological Coatings and Thin Films  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    New “green” coatings made from renewable materials or using green manufacturing processes are sought in addition to traditional ... Just click on the button.

    315

    Behavior of Corrosion Prevention in Self-Healing Polymer Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    However, once the polymer coating has been breached, for example due to cracking ... Hysteretic Behavior of Concrete Cylinders Confined by Active Confining ...

    316

    Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Novel Current Activated Tip-based Sintering (CATS) of Advanced Materials · Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light Ceramic Surface.

    317

    Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings on ... of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions.

    318

    Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

    319

    Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating. Author(s), Sofiane Djeraf, Yamina Mebdoua, Hadj Lahmar, Rachid Lakhdari.

    320

    Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    May 1, 2007 ... Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites by Bianhua Han, Tianjiao Luo, Chunlin Liang,Guangchun Yao, ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    Effect of copper coatings on the interfacial between short carbon ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract Scope, Short carbon fiber reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites were prepared by stir casting. The fibers were coated copper by electroless ...

    322

    High-temperature Erosion Behavior of Aluminide-coated Turbine ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The high-temperature erosion behavior of an aluminide-coated turbine blade ... The Tensile Property Of A Gas Turbine Engine Fan Blade And Casing Material.

    323

    ARTICLE: Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... Topic Title: ARTICLE: Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency Topic Summary: F. Ghasripoor et. al. article from Materials ...

    324

    Protective coatings for front surface reflectors. Phase I, final report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicone resins were evaluated as protective coatings for front surface aluminum and silver reflectors. The solar weighted hemispherical reflectances and specular reflectances of float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum and protected with silicone coatings were measured. The float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum were highly reflective. The total reflectances of the silver samples were 5 to 7% higher than the aluminized samples. The resin coated aluminum samples were much more specular than the silver samples. Coupling agents used to improve the adhesion of the protective silicone resin coating to the silver surface adversely affected the specularities.

    Dennis, W.E.

    1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.  

    SciTech Connect

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    HIGH SURFACE AREA SILICON CARBIDE-COATED CARBON AEROGEL ...  

    Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicon carbide, improving the thermal stability of the carbon ae ...

    327

    JOM 0601: Recent Progress in the Coating Protection of Gamma ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Recent Progress in the Coating Protection of Gamma Titanium-Aluminides. C. LEYENS, R. BRAUN, M. FRÖHLICH, and P. EH. HOVSEPIAN ...

    328

    Superhydrophobic Coating for Evaporative Purification and Minerals Extraction  

    Researchers at ORNL are using their superhydrophobic coating technology to tackle the age-old problem of obtaining potable water. In the process, they ...

    329

    Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    330

    Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 2, 2012 ... Symposium, Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for Demanding Oil and Gas Applications. Sponsorship. Organizer(s), Julio ...

    331

    Coating crystalline nuclear waste forms to improve inertness  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Crystalline waste forms of high simulated waste loading were successfully coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Sol-gel technology was used to produce microspheres that contained simulated waste. A separate process for cesium immobilization was developed, which loads 5 wt % Cs onto zeolite particles for subsequent coating. The chemical vapor deposition process was developed for depositing thin layers of carbon and silicon carbide onto particles in a fluidized-bed coater. Pyrolytic carbon-coated particles were extremely inert in numerous leach tests. Aqueous leach test results of coated waste forms were below detection limits of such sensitive analytical techniques as atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission.

    Stinton, D.P.; Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    332

    Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization  

    SciTech Connect

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'Â?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    Spark Plasma Sintering of Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrate  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present work, we will discuss the results of deposition of amorphous coatings on metallic substrates using spark plasma sintering method. The influence of ...

    334

    Development of Improved Bond Coat for Enhanced Turbine Durability  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    combustion gas was contaminated with sea salt and a second hold temperature of ..... J.H Wood and E.H. Goldman, “Protective Coatings”,. Superalloys II, ed.

    335

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    336

    Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    337

    Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested ...

    338

    Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    339

    Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

    Riley, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    340

    COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc-nickel  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc- nickel. Author(s), Melissa L. Klingenberg, Clayton Drees, Elizabeth Berman, ...

    342

    REPORT: Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the ...

    343

    Advanced Conductive Coating Process for Planar SOFC Stacks  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Advanced Conductive Coating Process for Planar SOFC Stacks. Author(s), Jung Pyung Choi, Jeffry W Stevenson, Eric M Riel, Jeff F. Bonnett, ...

    344

    Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC Interconnects. Author(s), Jeffrey W. Fergus, Yingjia Liu, Yu Zhao. On-Site Speaker ...

    345

    Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects. Author(s), Heather McCrabb, Tim Hall, Junwei Wu, Hui Zhang, Xingbo Liu, ...

    346

    (DLC) Coatings: Part 1-Deposition and - Programmaster.org  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Thick TiSiCN and TiCrSiCN Nanocomposite Coatings and ... Functional Composites: Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes in Silica Aerogel.

    347

    Cathode Coating (IN09-061) - Argonne National Laboratory  

    A cathode coating that leads to faster battery charging and discharging without a loss ... Charge and discharge capacity of pristine, 250ºC dry air and

    348

    Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High Capacity Li-Ion Battery. Author(s), Indranil Lahiri, Wonbong Choi. On-Site ...

    349

    Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Feb 1, 2001 ... TMS: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Home ... Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming Alloys by Stela ...

    350

    Corrosion Control by Natural Alkaloids in Silicone Coatings on Mild ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Author(s), Sandy Tran, James Calvin Earthman. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Sandy Tran. Abstract Scope, Protective coatings are typically applied to improve

    351

    Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

    Kniseley, Richard N. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Merkle, Brian D. (Ames, IA)

    1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    352

    Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion  

    SciTech Connect

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    353

    Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    354

    Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry  

    SciTech Connect

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    355

    Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    356

    Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    358

    Advances in Coatings Technologies for Corrosion and Wear ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    N.R. Sorensen and F.M. Hosking. Pulsed Ion Beam ... Chromate-Free Corrosion Resistant Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys R.G. Buchhiet ... Corrosion Inhibition Mechanisms in Polymer Systems for Compliant Coatings Technologies ... C.R. Aita. High Energy Ion Processing of Materials for Improved Hardcoatings

    359

    Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher; Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Hydrophobic ionic liquids  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    362

    Hydrophobic ionic liquids  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

    Koch, Victor R. (Lincoln, MA); Nanjundiah, Chenniah (Lynn, MA); Carlin, Richard T. (Nashua, NH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    363

    Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    364

    Role of surface coating on cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Surface coating of cathode materials has been widely investigated to enhance the life and rate capability of lithium-ion batteries. The surface coating discussed here was divided into three different configurations which are rough coating, core shell structure coating and ultra thin film coating. The mechanism of surface coating in achieving improved cathode performance and strategies to carry out this surface modification is discussed. An outlook on atomic layer deposition for lithium ion battery is also presented.

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Amine, K.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Hanyang Univ.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    365

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    366

    Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Posted By Office of Public Affairs Warm coats, big thanks As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while,

    367

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    368

    Applications of coatings in coal-fired energy systems  

    SciTech Connect

    Corrosion and erosion of metallic structural materials at elevated temperatures in complex multicomponent gas environments that include particulates are potential problems in many fossil energy systems, especially those using coal as a feedstock. The use of appropriate corrosion-resistant coatings on metallic components offers an avenue to minimize material degradation and extend component life. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of coating performance in environments typical of pulverized-coal-fired boilers, coal gasification, fluidized-bed combustion, and gas turbines. The paper discusses the complexity of environments in different systems and the coating requirements for acceptable performance. Examples illustrate the morphology and corrosion/erosion performance of coating/structural alloy combinations exposed in some of these systems. La addition, future research and development needs are discussed for coating applications in several coal-fired systems.

    Natesan, K.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    369

    Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to advance the knowledge of ceramic coatings for components in the hot gas-path of advanced, low-emission gas-fired turbine engines. The ceramic coating systems being studied by NDE include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades and combustor liners to allow hotter gas path temperatures and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Data provided by NDE methods will be used to: (a) provide data to assess reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages (c) track growth rates of defects during use in engines and (d) allow rational judgement for replace/repair/re-use decisions of components.

    Sun, J. G. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Finaltion of Super alloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J, Metals,

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    Polyethylene passive samplers for measuring hydrophobic organic chemical concentrations in sediment porewaters and their use in predicting bioaccumulation in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) from sites near Boston, MA  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    In order to determine the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, the following areas of research were explored: (1) the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices in ...

    Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    372

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Element One, Inc. Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 191524 likes Element One, based in Boulder, Colorado, has created the only available coatings that change color when detecting hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks, either reversibly or non-reversibly, to provide both current and historical information about leaks. Element One's patented gas indicators and sensors use catalyzed thin films or nanoparticles of a transition metal oxide to create very low cost sensors for use in industrial and consumer environments, greatly reducing the potential for undetected leaks and their cost and safety implications. This technology is also being integrated for use in refineries, industry gas and fuel cells systems and was developed using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

    373

    Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage  

    SciTech Connect

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at 0.25 A$g1 achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F$g1 on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to 0.43 F$cm2.

    Jost, Kristy [Drexel University; Perez, Carlos O [ORNL; Mcdonough, John [Drexel University; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Heon, Min [Drexel University; Dion, Genevieve [Drexel University; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    374

    Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    376

    Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    377

    Interface Science of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The drive for greater efficiency in propulsion and industrial/power production machinery has pushed metallurgy to develop ever better alloys and taken existing metallic components to their reliability threshold. Nowhere is that better illustrated than in turbine engine materials. The nickel-based superalloys currently in use for the most demanding areas of the engines melt at 1230-1315 aC and yet see combustion environments >1600 aC. The result is that these components require thermal protection to avoid failure from phenomena such as melting, creep, oxidation, thermal fatigue, and so on [1]. The stakes are high as the equipment must remain reliable for thousands of take-offs and landings for aircraft turbine engines, and up to 40,000 hours of operation in power generating land-based gas turbines [2, 3]. One of the most critical items that see both the greatest temperatures and experience the highest stresses is the hot-section turbine blades. Two strategies have been adopted to help the superalloy turbine blades survive the demanding environment: Active air cooling and ceramic thermal protection coatings, which together can reduce metal surface temperatures by >300 aC.[2]. The combination of turbine blade external film cooling and internal air cooling requires an exceptionally complex structure with flow passages and sets of small holes in the blades where air bled from a matching stage of the compressor is directed over the surface. Stecura [4] was among the first to describe a successful coating system, and today s the ceramic insulating layer alone is credited with reducing metal temperatures as much as 165 aC [1, 5].

    Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    378

    Emissivity enhancement coatings for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Ten emissivity enhancing coatings (ZrO{sub 2} + 18% TiO{sub 2} + 10% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrC, Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, ZrTiO{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2} + 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2% HfO{sub 2}, TiC, TiC + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 5% TiO{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2} + 10% MoSi{sub 2}) deposited on Mo, Nb, and Haynes 230 substrates were evaluated for potential use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator applications. Emissivity testing of as-coated and annealed coupons indicate that 5 of the 10 Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) coating candidates have promise (ZrO{sub 2} + 18% TiO{sub 2} + 10% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrC, Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, ZrTiO{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2} + 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2% HfO{sub 2}). Four of the ten coatings have emissivity values that are too low to be of further interest (TiC, TiC + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 5% TiO{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2} + 10% MoSi{sub 2}). The final coating was mostly Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and exhibited excessive evaporation during vacuum annealing with a significant decrease in emissivity. Base metal powder, which was added to the bond layer of all coatings to improve coating adhesion, was detected in the top layer of the coatings. Differences in reactive interaction between the base metal powder and coating during vacuum annealing produced varying changes in emissivity. A small decrease in emissivity was observed for the ZrC coating deposited on niobium, which agrees with the limited interaction between the niobium base metal particles and the ZrC coating detected in SEM/EDS examinations. A large decrease in emissivity was observed for the ZrC coating deposited on Haynes 230, and significant interaction between the base metal particles and ZrC coating was observed.

    Yue, J.J.; Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    379

    Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO{sub 3} and WO{sub x} phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO{sub 2} and NiWO{sub 4} were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO{sub x} was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO{sub 3} oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E{sub a} = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E{sub a} {approx} 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO{sub 2}, and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO{sub 4} for W-N-Ni coatings.

    Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-Polo II, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    380

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders  

    SciTech Connect

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling  

    SciTech Connect

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    382

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    383

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    384

    Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Pulse Electroplated Ni/nano-Al2O3 Composite Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Ni/nano-Al2O3 composite coatings were prepared by pulse electro-plating. The experiments of corrosion resistance were carried for 304 stainless steel, pure Ni coating and Ni/nano-Al2O3 composite coating in 3.5% NaCl and 10% HCl solutions. The microstrcuture ... Keywords: pulse electro-plating, composite coating, microhardness, corrosion resistance

    Hu Bin-Liang, Tan Yuan-Qiang

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    385

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

    SciTech Connect

    Twelve weld overlay hardfacing alloys have been selected for preliminary erosion testing based upon a literature review. Four of the selected coatings were deposited on a 1018 steel substrate using plasma arc welding process. During the past quarter, the remaining eight coatings were deposited in the same manner. Ten samples from each coatings were prepared for erosion testing. Microstructural characterization of each coating is in progress. This progress report describes coating deposition and sample preparation procedures. Relation between coatings hardness and formation of cracks in coatings is discussed.

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    386

    Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate based Bio-Ceramic Coatings ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This presentation will focus on a new class of bio-ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphate (CaP), that have been applied to the surface of titanium alloy

    387

    Tribological Study of Plasma Sprayed Wear Resistant Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Higher quality coatings are by and large achieved using high energy air plasma spraying system. Cr2O3.2TiO2 is ideal for hard chrome replacement.As sprayed  ...

    388

    Strategies for incorporating functional block copolymers into polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This thesis explores the creation of thin film responsive hydrogel coatings via Layer-by Layer assembly (LbL) of temperature (T) responsive block copolymer - polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). First, the LbL conditions ...

    Tan, Wui Siew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    389

    Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    390

    Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    070103 (36 Months Duration) 546,000 Total Contract Value (546,000 DOE) Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine Engines Using a Novel Solution-Precursor...

    391

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development: Technical progress report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Objectives are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability. Such coating systems are essential to the ATS engine (gas turbine) meeting its objectives.

    NONE

    1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    392

    Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

    SciTech Connect

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    393

    Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    394

    Biological Properties of Zinc Oxide-Coated Anodized Aluminum Oxide  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We used agar diffusion assays to evaluate the activity of zinc oxide-coated ... Zirconia Stabilisation Nano-Confined by Using Electroless Nickel Cladding .... Metal Oxide Nanofibers Produced by a ForceSpinning Method for Battery Electrodes.

    395

    Palladium Coated Kieselghuhr for Simultaneous Separation and Storage of Hydrogen  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This paper will discuss characteristics of the palladium-coated kieselguhr or diatomaceous earth, design and operation of the FTB, and results of performance tests such as separation efficiency, hydrogen storage capacity and system heat transfer characteristics.

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    396

    Ceria-Based High-Temperature Coatings for Oxidation Prevention  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... over alloy additions with respect to their low cost, relative ease of application, ... using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis ... coating follow a general trend in their performance of 321 > 316 > 347 > 304.

    397

    Genetically engineered phage fibers and coatings for antibacterial applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Multifunctionality can be imparted to protein-based fibers and coatings via either synthetic or biological approaches. Here, we demonstrate potent antimicrobial functionality of genetically engineered, phage-based fibers ...

    Mao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    398

    A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

    Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    399

    High Performance Polymer Composite Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post Combustion CO 2 Capture and Separation From Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational...

    400

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

    Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Progress in short period multilayer coatings for water window applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    mirrors for the water window,” Optics Letters, Volume 28,K alpha Line in the Water Window Region,” Applied Optics,coatings for water window applications E.M. Gullikson, F.

    Gullikson, E.M.; Salmassi, F.; Aquila, A.L.; Dollar, F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The cold sprayed Al-BMG coating revealed a very dense structure with nearly zero ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    403

    Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    404

    Bonding Mechanism of Cold Spray Coating on Magnesium Alloys  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    405

    Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a ...

    406

    Cold Spray Process as an Alternative for Bioactive Coatings for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on 316L ...

    407

    Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    408

    Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets  

    SciTech Connect

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Farnum, E.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Vitkovski, I.V. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). MHD-Machines Lab.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    409

    Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles  

    SciTech Connect

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    411

    In Situ Temporary Repair of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on combustion turbine blades and vanes is a critical issue in the power generation industry. Degradation of TBCs occur by the spallation of the ceramic layer — partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) — that resides on the Al2O3-covered MCrAlY bondcoat. In the event of such local failures of the TBC, a quick in-situ technique to repair the coating would be desirable.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    412

    Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    Protective coatings and sealants for solar applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    An aging study has been completed which evaluated a number of polymeric materials for potential use as (1) protective coatings for back surfaces of mirrors and (2) solar heliostat edge seals. These investigations were conducted in an artificial weathering chamber that accelerated thermal cycling. The primary mirror failure mode was observed to be silver corrosion resulting from moisture exposure. To increase mirror longevity in current heliostat designs, intimate bonding at all the composite interfaces is essential to minimize moisture pathways to the silvered surface. If any voids or delaminations are present, mirror degradation will eventually occur. Delaminations can also occur as the result of mechanical stresses brought about by mismatches in the various materials coefficients of thermal expansion. If good bonding cannot be achieved or mechanical stresses avoided, then improved moisture barriers must be designed to assure mirror longevity. With good adhesion, a KRATON rubber was found to exhibit superior back surface mirror protection (12 months in environmental chamber with no corrosion). An ultraviolet stabilized butyl rubber appeared to be the best edge seal. All heliostats edge sealed with silicones showed silver corrosion which indicated either poor bonding or moisture permeation.

    Wischmann, K. B.; Gonzales, M. H.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    414

    Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    416

    DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES  

    SciTech Connect

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same  

    SciTech Connect

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

    Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA)

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report, 15 December 1992--14 December 1995  

    SciTech Connect

    Goal is to provide a basis for improved flotation separation efficiency in nonsulfide minerals by establishing the collector (surfactant) adsorption reactions and developing appropriate surface chemistry control strategies. In-situ measurements of surfactant adsorption were made for selected nonsulfide mineral systems using FT-IR/IRS with reactive internal reflection elements. The IRS adsorption density equation was developed to measure the surfactant adsorption, and its validity was confirmed using transferred Langmuir-Blodgett films. Order and organization of adsorbed surfactants were established from linear dichroism spectroscopy. Hydrophobicity and stability of adsorbed surfactants at mineral surfaces can now be explained. The surface charge/collector colloid adsorption mechanism was used to explain the anomalous behavior of KCl and flotation of double salts (schoenite, kainite, borax, etc.) from saturated brines. Adsorbing surfactnat colloids at salt surfaces in brines were studied by photon correlation spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Studies are being initiated of the interparticle forces in soluble salt flotation and of interfacial water near hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    423

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Effect of Grit Blasting on Substrate Roughness and Coating Adhesion  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughnesses produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel with different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using a Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those on substrates prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

    Dominic Varacalle; Donna Guillen; Doug Deason; William Rhodaberger; Elliott Sampson

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    425

    Measurement of thermal noise in multilayer coatings with optimized layer thickness  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

    Villar, Akira E.; Black, Eric D.; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 264-33, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbaune (France); Waves Group, University of Sannio at Benevento, Benevento, Italy, INFN and LSC (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    Micro X-ray Radiography for the Coating Thickness Measurement in the Simulated TRISO-coated Fuel Particle  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    TRISO(Tri-Isotropic)-coated fuel particle is utilized owing to its higher stability at a high temperature and its efficient retention capability for fission products in the HTGR(high temperature gas-cooled reactor). The typical spherical TRISO-coated fuel particle with a diameter of about 1 mm is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The outer coating layers consist of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, an inner PyC(I-PyC) layer, a SiC layer, and an outer PyC(O-PyC) layer. Most of the inspection items for the TRISO-coated fuel particle depend on the destructive methods. Recently, X-ray radiography or X-ray CT methods are being applied to nondestructively measure the thickness of the coating layers at the relevant research organizations in the world. The destructive method is very accurate, but it is difficult to prepare test samples. Above all, the number of destructive test samples must be minimized during the fabrication process due to the generation of radioactive wastes during the test procedures. The thickness of the coating layers of the TRISO fuel particle can be nondestructively measured by the X-ray radiography without generating radioactive wastes. In this study, the thickness of coating layers for a simulated TRISO-coated fuel particle with a ZrO{sub 2} kernel instead of a UO{sub 2} kernel was measured by using micro-focus X-ray radiography. The used X-ray system is the Harmony 130 developed at DRGEM Corporation in Korea. The maximum tube voltage/current of the X-ray generator is 130 kV/400 {mu}A. The focus spot size of the X-ray generator is 5 {mu}m. The resolution of the used electronic X-ray detector is 48 {mu}m. The number of pixels is 1024 x 1024. And, the intensity resolution of a pixel is 12 bit (4096 gray levels). The tube voltage/current was 40 kV/100 {mu}A under the inspection condition. Here, the distance from the source to the detector was 397 mm, and the distance from the source to the center of the object ranged from 10 to 50 mm. The exposure time was adjusted to acquire images with a good quality of the boundaries. The radiographic image was also enhanced by an image processing technique to acquire clear boundary lines between the coating layers. The boundary lines were detected on the enhanced image. The thickness of the coating layers was computed by measuring the distance between the boundary lines. The thickness of the coating layers was effectively measured by applying the micro-focus X-ray radiography by using the precise X-ray generator and the electronic detector with a high resolution. The inspection process for the TRISO-coated fuel particles will be improved by the developed micro-focus X-ray radiography technology. (authors)

    Woong Ki, Kim; Young Woo, Lee; Ji Yeon, Park [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Duk-jin Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwan Woo, Lee; Jung Byung, Park [DRGEM Corp. 388-1, Asan Medical Center, Songpa, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung Woong, Ra [Chungnam National University, 220 Goong Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    427

    STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC.  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER-OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-94GO 10029 W(A)-95-018; CH-0863 The Petitioner, Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Electrochromics Windows Program." The objective of the cooperative agreement is to develop and demonstrate a thin-film electrochronic switching technology suitable for commercialization in the fenestration industry. The agreement comprises three phases including, respectively, development, demonstration, and market deployment. In Phase I, a viable electrochromic window system wilh a transmittance

    428

    Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating  

    SciTech Connect

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

    Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

    Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Splice Resistance Measurements in 2G YBCO Coated Conductor  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the electrical splice resistance of second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to study the splice resistance of 2G YBCO coated conductor as a function of: a) operating temperature, b) magnetic field strength (B-field), and c) magnetic field orientation ( ). Understanding the splice resistance with its corresponding variation as a function of surface preparation and operating conditions is essential to the practical implementation of electric utility devices; e.g., motors, generators, transformers, cables, and fault-current limiters, etc. Preliminary test results indicate that the 2G YBCO splice resistance shows a weak temperature dependence and a significantly stronger dependence upon magnetic field strength and magnetic field orientation. Surface preparation conditions are also briefly discussed. Index Terms coated conductor, splice, critical current, YBCO

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    PATCHY SILICA-COATED SILVER NANOWIRES AS SERS SUBSTRATES  

    SciTech Connect

    We report a class of core-shell nanomaterials that can be used as efficient surface-enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The core consists of silver nanowires, prepared through a chemical reduction process, that are used to capture 4- mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA), a model analyte. The shell was prepared through a modified Stöber method and consists of patchy or full silica coats. The formation of silica coats was monitored via transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and phase-analysis light scattering for measuring effective surface charge. Surprisingly, the patchy silica coated silver nanowires are better SERS substrate than silver nanowires; nanomolar concentration of 4-MBA can be detected. In addition, “nano-matryoshka” configurations were used to quantitate/explore the effect of the electromagnetic field at the tips of the nanowire (“hot spots”) in the Raman scattering experiment.

    Murph, S.; Murphy, C.

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    433

    Heat Capacity Effects Associated with the Hydrophobic Hydration and Interaction of Simple Solutes: A Detailed Structural and Energetical Analysis Based on MD Simulations  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We examine the SPCE and TIP5P water models to study heat capacity effects associated with the hydrophobic hydration and interaction of Xenon particles. We calculate the excess chemical potential for Xenon employing the Widom particle insertion technique. The solvation enthalpy and excess heat capacity is obtained from the temperature dependence of the chemical potentials and, alternatively, directly by Ewald summation, as well as a reaction field based method. All three different approaches provide consistent results. The reaction field method allows a separation of the individual components to the heat capacity of solvation into solute/solvent and solvent/solvent parts, revealing the solvent/solvent part as the dominating contribution. A detailed spacial analysis of the heat capacity of the water molecules around a pair of Xenon particles at different separations reveals that the enhanced heat capacity of the water molecules in the bisector plane between two Xenon atoms is responsible for the maximum of the heat capacity observed at the desolvation barrier, recently reported by Shimizu and Chan ({\\em J. Am. Chem. Soc.},{\\bf 123}, 2083--2084 (2001)). The about 60% enlarged heat capacity of water in the concave part of the joint Xenon-Xenon hydration shell is the result of a counterplay of strengthened hydrogen bonds and an enhanced breaking of hydrogen bonds with increasing temperature. Differences between the two models concerning the heat capacity in the Xenon-Xenon contact state are attributed to the different water model bulk heat capacities, and to the different spacial extension of the structure effect introduced by the hydrophobic particles. Similarities between the different states of water in the joint Xenon-Xenon hydration shell and the properties of stretched water are discussed.

    Dietmar Paschek

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    434

    Durability testing of antireflection coatings for solar applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Antireflection (AR) coatings can be incorporated into highly transmitting glazings that, depending on their cost, performance, and durability of optical properties, can be economically viable in solar collectors, agricultural greenhouses, and PV systems. A number of AR-coated glazings have been prepared under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Durability of Materials for Solar Thermal Collectors. The AR coatings are of two types, including (1) various sol-gels applied to glass and (2) an embossed treatment of sheet acrylic. Typically, for unweathered glazings, a 4%--5% increase in solar-weighted transmittance has been achieved. For AR-coated glass, reflectance values as low as 0.5%--0.7% at selected wavelengths (680--720 nm) were obtained. To determine the durability of the hemispherical transmittance, several collaborating countries are testing these materials both outdoors and in accelerated weathering chambers. All materials exposed outdoors are affixed to mini-collector boxes to simulate flat-plate collector conditions. Results for candidate AR coatings weathered at geographically disperse outdoor test sites exhibit changes in spectral transmittance primarily in the high visible range (600--700 nm). Accelerated testing at measured levels of simulated solar irradiance and at different constant levels of temperature and relative humidity have been performed in different countries. Parallel testing with different levels of laboratory-controlled relevant stress factors permits the time-dependent performance of these materials to be compared with measured results from in-service outdoor exposure conditions. Coating adhesion and performance loss resulting from dirt and dust retention are also discussed.

    Jorgensen, G.; Brunold, S.; Koehl, M.; Nostell, P.; Roos, A.; Oversloot, H.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    435

    Substrate recovery of Mo-Si multilayer coated optics  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Imaging optics in a soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) system must meet stringent requirements to achieve high throughput and diffraction limited performance. Errors in the surface figure must be kept to less than {approximately}1 nm and the rms surface roughness must be less than 0.1 nm. The ML coatings must provide high reflectivity (> 60%) at wavelengths in the vicinity of 13 nm. The reflectivity bandpasses of the optics must be aligned within 0.05 nm. Each coating must be uniform across the surface of the optic to within 0.5%. These specifications challenge the limits of the current capabilities in optics fabrication and ML deposition. Consequently a set of qualified SXPL imaging optics is expected to be expensive, costing in the range of 100--250 k$. If the lifetime of the imaging optics is short, the replacement cost could significantly impact the economic competitiveness of the technology. The most likely failure modes for the imaging optics are mechanisms that degrade the ML coatings, but which leave the substrates intact. A potentially low cost solution for salvaging the imaging optics could be to strip the damaged ML coating to recover the substrate and then deposit a new coating. In this paper the authors report on the use of reactive ion etching (RIE) to remove Mo-Si ML coatings from precision optical substrates. The goal of this work was to characterize the etching process both in the ML film and at the substrate, and to determine the effects of the etching on the surface figure and finish of the substrate.

    Stearns, D.G.; Baker, S.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

    SciTech Connect

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    437

    The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    439

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    440

    Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX  

    SciTech Connect

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

    A. Cao, S.J. Zweben, D.P. Stotler, M. Bell, A. Diallo, S.M. Kaye and B. LeBlanc

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    Multilayer coatings for the EUVL front-end test bed  

    SciTech Connect

    Good illumination uniformity at the mask and wafer planes, and high wafer thoroughput in the EUVL front-end test bed facility at LLNL require graded period multilayer (ML) coatings on several of the optics. The ML deposition was accomplished using a newly developed deposition technique which avoids the use of {open_quotes}uniformity masks{close_quotes} to define the spatial dependence of the ML period variation. The capabilities of the process in providing the specified ML coatings are discussed for both EUVL condenser and imaging systems.

    Vernon, S.P.; Carey, M.J.; Gaines, D.P.; Weber, F.J.

    1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    442

    T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits 0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September 19, 2011 - 8:45am Addthis PROBLEM Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks. PLATFORM: All versions of Director prior to 5.5.2.3 are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. reference LINKS: Blue Coat Advisories ID: SA62 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026061 Blue Coat Director 510 Blue Coat SGME 5 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: An attacker can use the HTTP TRACE method to echo malicious script back to the client as part of a Cross Site Scripting (XSS) attack. No

    443

    Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings from the book ...

    444

    Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    445

    Low emissivity high-temperature tantalum thin film coatings for silicon devices  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The authors study the use of thin ( ? 230?nm) tantalum (Ta) layers on silicon (Si) as a low emissivity (high reflectivity) coating for high-temperature Si devices. Such coatings are critical to reduce parasitic radiation ...

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika

    446

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, September 1, 1997--November 30, 1997  

    SciTech Connect

    The objectives of this project were to provide an improved thermal barrier coating system with increased temperature capability and reliability. This report describes bond coat development, manufacturing, nondestructive evaluation, maintenance, and repair, and bench testing.

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    447

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. [Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

    SciTech Connect

    In the previous period of work, twelve overlay hardfacing alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All twelve coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. The coating deposition and sample preparation procedures were described in the previous quarterly report. During the past quarter, all the coatings were erosion tested at 400 C. The erosion resistance of each coating was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. This progress report describes the erosion test results and coating microstructures. Also, a preliminary analysis on the relationships, between weld overlay coating hardness, microstructure, and erosion resistance will be discussed.

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    448

    Stellite Coatings on Hot Work Tool Steels for Tooling Applications in ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    X38CrMoV5 hot work tool steel widely used in the manufacture of conventional forging dies was coated with a series of stellite coatings in the present work.

    449

    Molten Salt Multi-anode Reactive Alloy Coating(MARC) of Ta-W ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In this study, Ta-W coated samples (Ta-7.31W, Ta-4.12W and Ta-1.92W) were prepared by multi-anode reactive alloy coating (MARC) process in molten salt ...

    450

    Method for synthesis of high T.sub.c superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J.sub.c.

    Gao, Wei (Somerville, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    451

    Method for synthesis of high T[sub c] superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J[sub c].

    Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    452

    TiO2 Photocatalyst Thin-Film Coatings on Polyethylene Terephthalate  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Approaching Multimaterial 3D Nanostructured Gas Phase Nanoxerographic Printers · Carbon Nanotube Coatings Laser Power and Energy Measurements.

    453

    METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES  

    SciTech Connect

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    454

    Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a coating system meeting the requirements for photovoltaic module encapsulation.

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    455

    Silica-Coated Titania and Zirconia Colloids for Subsurface Transport  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    , Environmental Engineering Program, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8286, and Department of Civil transport experiments. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that coating with silica imparted electrophoretic mobility and size (by dynamic light scattering) over a 90-day period showed that the silica

    Elimelech, Menachem

    456

    Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

    SciTech Connect

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    457

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

    SciTech Connect

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    458

    Laser ultrasonics for the evaluation of composites and coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Laser ultrasonics, an esoteric laboratory curiosity in the 1960s, is finding its niche in industry today. The technique has evolved concurrently with advances in electronics and optics to achieve recent breakthroughs. Two applications will be presented here: rapid inspection of complex shaped composite structures and in-situ monitoring of a coating process in hostile environments. The ability to inspect complex shapes rapidly with in-process capability is a clear cost benefit for the NDT community, where nondestructive testing has long been viewed as an added cost. Complex shape composite structures are now common, particularly in the aircraft industry, and may be critically load bearing. The ability to inspect virtually any shape without immersion is becoming ever more important. The rapidly growing aircraft engine coating industry is moving toward higher temperature coatings and therefore more efficient engine operation. Control of the coating process will be cost effective and there simply is no other way to quantitatively assess the process at temperatures as high as 1,400 C (2,552 F). These examples serve to demonstrate how a deep understanding of a complex subject has led to timely practical applications.

    Ringermacher, H.I. [United Technologies Research Center, Hartford, CT (United States); McKie, A.D.W. [Rockwell International Corp., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States). Science Center

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    459

    DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    460

    Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

    SciTech Connect

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG  

    SciTech Connect

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    462

    Mechanisms, Models, and Simulations of Metal-Coated Fiber Consolidation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of existing contacts as matrix plasticity and/or PLC. When the voids are small the coated fiber bundle shrinks-shaped voids with a shape factor similar to that observed in the experiments. Creep rates were microstructure fractions were introduced into the model using micromechanics-based creep constitutive relationships

    Wadley, Haydn

    463

    Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    464

    Young modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    with miniature moving parts, such as micro- electromechanical systems and hard-disk drives.1,2 A betterYoung modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings Elisa Riedoa with varying hardness obtained by different growth temperatures. For the CrN films, we show that the changes

    Brune, Harald

    465

    Electron sources utilizing thin CsBr coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We present experimental results obtained in solid Cu targets coated with ~18nm thick CsBr films operating in a reflection mode. The results indicate a factor of 50X increase in quantum efficiency relative to uncoated Cu samples. The CsBr/Cu samples are ... Keywords: Alkali halides, CsBr, Electron sources, Free electron lasers, Multi electron beam tools, Photocathodes

    Juan R. Maldonado; Zhi Liu; D. H. Dowell; Robert E. Kirby; Yun Sun; Piero Pianetta; Fabian Pease

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    466

    BoneMaster™ HA Coating – An In Vivo Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... group (668 N) demonstrated significantly higher pull out strength than control PPS group (348 N). After 32 weeks, the pull out strength for BoneMaster HA and PPS groups ... Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on ...

    467

    Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

    SciTech Connect

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we focused on getting a bench-scale test system to expose alloy coupons to simulated gasifier environment. The test facility was designed to allow about 20 specimen coupons to be exposed simultaneously for an extend period to a simulated coal gas stream at temperatures up to 1000 C. The simulated gas stream contained about 26%H{sub 2}, 39%CO, 17%CO{sub 2}, 1.4% H{sub 2}S and balance steam. We successfully ran a 100+h test with coated and uncoated stainless steel coupons. The tested alloys include SS304, SS316, SS405, SS409, SS410, and IN800. The main finding is that Ti/Ta coating provides excellent protection to SS405 under conditions where uncoated austenitic and ferritic stainless steel alloy coupons are badly corroded. Cr coatings also appear to afford some protection against corrosion.

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    468

    Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture.

    Shield, Jeffrey E. (Sandy, UT); Goldman, Alan I. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    469

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    silicon carbide (SiC) substrate coated with tungsten. Although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is being method for coating preparation. Another example application is the tungsten-plasma spray- ing coated SiC-fiber (foam) for high heat-resistance. It is helpful to enhance the SiC-fiber heat-resistance that tungsten

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    470

    Machining force regression models and real time control when turning MET 4 metallized coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Due to their wide range of application, metallized coatings are widely used in industry, both for wear resistance or corrosion protection. In order to obtain the required geometric precision, machining these coatings is many times required. As their ... Keywords: control system, experiments design, force, metallized coating, real time, regression, turning

    Mihaiela Iliescu; Luigi Vl?d?reanu; Marius Soceanu

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    471

    DIFFUSE COATINGS ON IRON AND STEEL; Diffusionye Pokrytiya na Zheleze i Stali  

    SciTech Connect

    The physico-chemical principles of the formation of diffuse coatings, new methods of their application, and experimental results of investigations of the properties of the coatings obtained by these methods are discussed. The diffuse coatings formed by the elements in each group of the Periodic Table were investigated. (M.C.G.)

    Gorbunov, N.S.

    1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    472

    Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    The costs and hazards resulting from nuclear plant radiation exposure with activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. However, the hardnesses of many cobalt-base wear alloys are significantly lower than conventional PVD hard coatings, and mechanical support of the hard coating is a concern. Four approaches have been taken to minimize the hardness differences between the substrate and PVD hard coating: (1) use a thin Cr-nitride hard coating with layers that are graded with respect to hardness, (2) use a thicker, multilayered coating (Cr-nitride or Zr-nitride) with graded layers, (3) use nitriding to harden the alloy subsurface followed by application of a multilayered coating of Cr-nitride, and (4) use of nitriding alone. Since little work has been done on application of PVD hard coatings to cobalt-base alloys, some details on process development and characterization of the coatings is presented. Scratch testing was used to evaluate the adhesion of the different coatings. A bench-top rolling contact test was used to evaluate the wear resistance of the coatings. The test results are discussed, and the more desirable coating approaches are identified.

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    473

    Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most impressive finding was the impact of the clay on the elongation at break; a nearly 400% increase was observed for a clay concentration of 0.5 wt.%. These coatings also demonstrate a number of other property enhancements, which make them a good candidate for continued research. Another approach explored in this research was the use of structured and self-cleaning surfaces. If the amount of coating utilized can be significantly reduced, the environmental impact is diminished.

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    474

    Decontamination of Tritiated-Water Using Super-hydrophobic Pt-Catalyst Synthesized with Water-in-Supercritical CO{sub 2}  

    SciTech Connect

    Tritium, {sup 3}H, is one of the hydrogen isotopes, created in coolant of a fission reactor and to be utilized as fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. Since a large amount of tritium will be contained in a fusion reactor or in a fission reactor, a small fraction of the tritiated chemical species, in most cases, tritiated water, may leak to the environment. Tritium is, however, a radioactive isotope whose specific radioactivity is 4 x 10{sup 17} Bq kg{sup -1}, and easy to transfer in human body, its confinement is very important from the safety aspect. One of the problems of tritium confinement and decontamination of tritiated chemical species is related with necessity of its isotope separation from lighter hydrogen isotopes, {sup 2}H and {sup 1}H. Most of principles for the isotope separations are based on fractionations of isotopes in different chemical species. A large fractionation for hydrogen isotopes is observed in a chemical exchange of hydrogen atoms between water, Q{sub 2}O, and hydrogen gas, Q{sub 2}, where 'Q' denotes one of the hydrogen isotopes. Heavier isotopes are enriched significantly into Q{sub 2}O rather than Q{sub 2}. Therefore practical method of tritium removal would be established by hydrogen isotope separation with chemical exchange of water and hydrogen gas. At first, we prepared a catalyst, by reducing Pt{sup 4+} in reversed micelles where the reducing agent, aqueous solution of sodium tetra borohydrate, NaBH{sub 4} was also contained in reversed micelles prepared separately. In this situation, micelles containing Pt{sup 4+} and reducing reagent collided and produced Pt nanoparticles, which were expected to be impregnated in the hydrophobic structure after depressurization. After this type of earlier experiment we determined a mass of impregnated Pt by total dissolution of gauze with aqua regia followed by concentration measurement of Pt with ICP-AES. We performed several trials, unfortunately, however, the mass of Pt deposited on the gauze was very small to detect, and this approach turns to be not successful. As the second approach, we utilize CO{sub 2} soluble Pt precursor, CODMe{sub 2}Pt purchased from Sigma-Aldrich Co. and H{sub 2} gas as reducing agent, which could be completely mixed with SC-CO{sub 2}. This system was well-known for Pt particle formation by auto-catalytic growth. The second approach was aiming at increasing Pt amount deposited in the gauze. This approach was successful in increasing Pt amount, but the Pt particle size also increased to be more than 50 nm, which was not suitable for catalyst. Finally, we synthesized the catalyst by the following procedure: firstly, a reducing agent of NaBH{sub 4} was deposited on the nano-textured hydrophobic layer on the gauze. This step was realized by forming reversed micelles of aqueous NaBH{sub 4} solution using a surfactant AOT and a co-surfactant 2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,-octafluoro-1-pentanol (F-pentanol) in SC-CO{sub 2}. This system of surfactant combination of AOT and F-pentanol has been found to work successfully in recent studies. In the second step, the gauze was contacted with CODMe{sub 2}Pt dissolved in SC-CO{sub 2} to synthesize seeds of Pt particles for the auto-catalytic reaction proceeding by CODMe{sub 2}Pt with hydrogen. The seeds were formed by the reaction between deposited NaBH{sub 4} and CODMe{sub 2}Pt in SC-CO{sub 2}. The physical characterization of this catalyst was performed by SEM-EDS. By this procedure, the Pt hydrophobic catalyst where Pt nanoparticle of 10 nm in diameter was locally deposited in the nano-textured layer was successfully prepared. Hydrophobicity after the chemical Pt deposition was tested by measurement of water absorbed on the gauze and the catalyst performance was evaluated by {sup 1}H{sup 2}H formation through the scrambling reaction from {sup 1}H{sub 2} and {sup 2}H{sub 2} and the reaction was successfully observed. We demonstrated a new hydrophobic catalyst preparation using SC-CO{sub 2} effectively. We can conclude that the approach of creating Pt nanoparticles in SC-CO{sub 2} and depositing them in

    Youichi Enokida; Kayo Sawada [EcoTopia Science Institute (Japan)]|[Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 1 furo-cho, Nagoya 463-8603, Aichi-ken (Japan); Ryosuke Shimizu [EcoTopia Science Institute (Japan); Ichiro Yamamoto [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 1 furo-cho, Nagoya 463-8603, Aichi-ken (Japan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    475

    Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls--Application to TiN-Coated Rolls  

    SciTech Connect

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer (''roll coating'', ''pick up'') may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

    Ould, Choumad; Montmitonnet, Pierre [Ecole des Mines de Paris-ParisTech, CEMEF, UMR CNRS 7635, BP 207-06904 Sophia-Antipolis-Cedex (France); Gachon, Yves; Badiche, Xavier [HEF R and D, Z.I. Sud, rue Benoit Fourneyron, 42166 Andrezieux-Boutheon-Cedex (France)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    476

    Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

    Phelps, Amanda C. (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin K. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoire, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    477

    Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm  

    SciTech Connect

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

    Moore, Karen A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zatorski, Raymond A. (East Hampton, CT)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    478

    Antireflection Coating Design for Series Interconnected Multi-Junction Solar Cells  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    AR coating design for multi-junction solar cells can be more challenging than in the single junction case. Reasons for this are discussed. Analytical expressions used to optimize AR coatings for single junction solar cells are extended for use in monolithic, series interconnected multi-junction solar cell AR coating design. The result is an analytical expression which relates the solar cell performance (through J{sub SC}) directly to the AR coating design through the device reflectance. It is also illustrated how AR coating design can be used to provide an additional degree of freedom for current matching multi-junction devices.

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    479

    Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K. (Salt Lake City, UT); Gensse, Chantal (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    480

    Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to study the use of ceramic coatings on components in the hot-gas path of advanced low-emission gas-fired turbines. The types of ceramic coatings include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades, and combustor liners to allow hotter gas-path temperatures, and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high-temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites. The NDE methods will be used to (a) provide data to assess the reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages, (c) track growth rates of defects during component use in engines, and (d) allow rational judgment for replace/repair/re-use decisions regarding components. Advances in TBC application, both electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS), are allowing higher temperatures in the hot-gas path. However, as TBCs become ''prime reliant,'' their condition at scheduled or unscheduled outages must be known. NDE methods are under development to assess the condition of the TBC for pre-spall conditions. EB-PVD test samples with up to 70 thermal cycles have been studied by a newly developed method involving polarized laser back-scatter NDE. Results suggest a correlation between the NDE laser data and the TBC/bond-coat topography. This finding is important because several theories directed toward understanding the pre-spall condition suggest that the topography in the thermally grown oxide layer changes significantly as a function of the number of thermal cycles. Tests have also been conducted with this NDE method on APS TBCs. Results suggest that the pre-spall condition is detected for these coatings. One-sided, high-speed thermal imaging also has shown promise for NDE of APS coatings. Testing of SiC/SiC composites for combustor liners has demonstrated that environmental EBCs are required to reduce oxidation-induced recession rates. NDE technologies, primarily one-sided and through-thickness thermal imaging, are under development to detect delaminations and degradation of EBCs. Recent results have demonstrated that NDE thermal image data correctly detected pre-spall regions of a barium-strontium-alumino-silicate coating on melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC. The NDE data were verified with field test data from a combustor liner in a 4.5 MW(e) natural-gas-fired turbine. The shape of the spalled EBC region and the growth of the spalled EBC region after various engine run times were correlated with boroscope image data from field tests. An effort has recently been started to address NDE development for oxide/oxide ceramic composites with an EBC. We will discuss the NDE methods under development for TBCs, recent NDE test results from thermally cycled TBCs, NDE results from EBCs on SiC/SiC, and the new effort directed toward oxide/oxide materials.

    Ellingson, W. A.; Deemer, C.; Sun, J. G.; Erdman, S.; Muliere, D.; Wheeler, B.

    2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrophobic coating shc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    481

    Edge coating apparatus with movable roller applicator for solar cell substrates  

    SciTech Connect

    A non-contact edge coating apparatus includes an applicator for applying a coating material on an edge of a solar cell substrate and a control system configured to drive the applicator. The control system may drive the applicator along an axis to maintain a distance with an edge of the substrate as the substrate is rotated to have the edge coated with a coating material. The applicator may include a recessed portion into which the edge of the substrate is received for edge coating. For example, the applicator may be a roller with a groove. Coating material may be introduced into the groove for application onto the edge of the substrate. A variety of coating materials may be employed with the apparatus including hot melt ink and UV curable plating resist.

    Pavani, Luca; Abas, Emmanuel

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    482

    Commercial oxide paints as coatings for SiGe thermoelectric materials  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicon-germanium alloys are used as thermoelectric materials for radioisotope thermoelectric generators. One problem is the loss of the alloy by sublimation. In the Unicouple, sublimation was minimized by a Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coating. In the Multicouple design the application of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coatings which is done at high temperature is not practical. Suppression of sublimation in the Multicouple design is presently accomplished by applying glass coatings. The difficulties encountered with the glass coatings are associated with the poor adherence of the coatings. In the present study, commercial oxide points (mainly ZrO/sub 2/) which have low thermal expansion coefficients are used as coating materials. No spalling from the surface of the coated sample occurred in 1506 hours at 1080/sup 0/C in vacuum, and sublimation was reduced significantly. Zirconium silicate was observed on the surface by x-ray diffraction.

    Amano, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1986-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    483

    In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers  

    SciTech Connect

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    484

    Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Electrodeposited Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects H. McCrabb * , T. Hall * , J. Wu # , H. Zhang # , X. Liu # , E.J. Taylor * * Faraday Technology Inc., 315 Huls Dr., Clayton, OH 45315, USA # West Virginia University, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng.ESB, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA Overall Objective Overall Objective Principal Investigator: Heather McCrabb, Company Name: Faraday Technology, Inc., Address: 315 Huls Drive, Clayton, OH 45315, Phone: 937-836-7749, E-mail: heathermccrabb@faradaytechnology.com, Company website: faradaytechnology.com Previous Work at WVU Results Develop an inexpensive manufacturing process for depositing (Mn,Co) 3 O 4 spinel coatings onto SOFC interconnects. Introduction The decrease in the SOFC operating temperatures from 1000°C to between 650 and 850°C has enabled the use of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels as interconnects

    485

    Apparatus and method for laser deposition of durable coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Disclosed are method and apparatus for depositing durable coatings onto the surface of a substrate without heating the entire substrate to high temperatures by using lasers to heat the substrate and dissociate a deposition gas. The apparatus comprises a deposition chamber for enclosing the substrate upon which a coating is to be deposited, gas delivery means for directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate, a first laser for heating the substrate, and a second laser for irradiating the deposition gas to dissociate the gas. The method includes placing a substrate within a vacuum deposition chamber and directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate. Then the substrate is heated with a first laser while the deposition gas is irradiated with a second laser to dissociate the deposition gas.

    Veligdan, J.T.; Vanier, P.; Barletta, R.E.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    486

    Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    487

    Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems  

    SciTech Connect

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) must ensure that the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) or safety-related containment spray system (CSS) remains capable of performing its design safety function throughout the life of the plant. This requires ensuring that long-term core cooling can be maintained following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Adequate safety operation can be impaired if the protective coatings which have been applied to the concrete and steel structures within the primary containment fail, producing transportable debris which could then accumulate on BWR ECCS suction strainers or PWR ECCS sump debris screens located within the containment. This document will present the data collected during the investigation of coating specimens from plants.

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    488

    Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    489

    Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

    Kaita, R

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    490

    Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

    Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross