Sample records for hydrological monitoring program

  1. Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

  2. Gasbuggy, New Mexico Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) that has been conducted since 1972 at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico underground nuclear detonation site. The nuclear testing was conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program, which is discussed in greater detail in Appendix A. The detonation at Gasbuggy took place in 1967, 4,240 feet below ground surface, and was designed to fracture the host rock of a low-permeability natural gas-bearing formation in an effort to improve gas production. The site has historically been managed under the Nevada Offsites Project. These underground nuclear detonation sites are within the United States but outside of the Nevada Test Site where most of the experimental nuclear detonations conducted by the U.S. Government took place. Gasbuggy is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM ).

  3. Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

  4. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2012 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 8, 2012. The samples were shipped to GEL Laboratories in Charleston, South Carolina, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry; tritium was analyzed using two methods. The conventional tritium method has a detection limit on the order of 400 pCi/L, and a select set of samples was analyzed for tritium using the enriched method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  5. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 18, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method. The laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  6. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  7. Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    1 Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling Reza Khanbilvardi Springs, MD, USA 1 Introduction Remote sensing data and information are shown great potential in supplying measurements, remote sensing based measurements are spatially averages over the pixels can appropriate

  8. Hydrologic Monitoring Summary Long Valley Caldera, California | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms |Information Hydrologic

  9. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  10. Clark county monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, Sheila [Urban Environmental Research, 10100 W. Charleston Boulevard Las Vegas, 89135 (United States); Auger, Jeremy [Applied Analysis, 10100 West Charleston Blvd, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89135 (United States); Navies, Irene [Clark County, Department of Comprehensive Planning, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since 1988, Clark County has been one of the counties designated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' (AULG). The AULG designation is an acknowledgement by the federal government that could be negatively impacted to a considerable degree by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. These negative effects would have an impact on residents as individuals and the community as a whole. As an AULG, Clark County is authorized to identify 'any potential economic, social, public health and safety, and environmental impacts' of the potential repository (42 USC Section 10135(C)(1)(B)(1)). Toward this end, Clark County has conducted numerous studies of potential impacts, many of which are summarized in the Clark County's Impact Assessment Report that was submitted by the DOE and the president of the United States in February 2002. Given the unprecedented magnitude and duration of the DoE's proposal, as well as the many unanswered questions about the number of shipments and the modal mix, the estimate of impacts described in these studies are preliminary. In order to refine these estimates, Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department's Nuclear Waste Division is continuing to assess potential impacts. In addition, the County has implemented a Monitoring Program designed to capture changes to the social, environmental, and economic well-being of its residents resulting from the Yucca Mountain project and other significant events within the County. The Monitoring Program acts as an 'early warning system' that allows Clark County decision makers to proactive respond to impacts from the Yucca Mountain Project. (authors)

  11. Yucca Mountain biological resources monitoring program; Annual report FY92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) during fiscal year 1992 (FY92) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  12. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Annual report, FY91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the Yucca Mountain area, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and to ensure that activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1991 (FY91) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Activities Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  13. Energy Management Programs- Monitoring Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, S. P.; Shamy, M. D.

    ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS - MONITORING PERFORMANCE Stanley P. Pauls Mustafa D. Shamy Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway, N. J. ABSTRACT of the historical energy consumption records. Energy use standards have been established to Steam Model monitor... energy conservation performance in bulk pharmaceutical plants. The model considers The basic steam model for most industrial process, comfort heating, and fixed loads. operations is made up of the following components: As the oil crisis developed...

  14. Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

  15. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  16. ICP (Institutional Conservation Program) monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages present the final report of activities undertaken by Carpenter Environmental Associates, Inc. (CEA) in carrying out its contractual obligations for the New York Support Office of the US Department of Energy. The contract calls for the field monitoring/review of DOE grants to schools and hospitals under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP). This final report is the result of a review of statistics and findings gathered over the period of the contract, which included monitoring visits to 50 grantees in New York State and New Jersey. The report is intended to highlight aspects of the monitoring project and to make recommendations. This report is organized into four sections: Section 1 details the steps taken by CEA in organizing and implementing the review; Section 2 presents program statistics; Section 3 discusses monitoring review concerns, implementation issues and commonly observed problems/accomplishments; and Section 4 lists recommendations. Taken as a whole, this final report is intended to convey a complete picture of CEA's activities under this contract. 25 tabs.,

  17. DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Effective Date: _July 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual REVISION HISTORY Revision Date Revision Description #12;LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Page 3 of 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS

  18. Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance Program, State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assistance Program (WAP) Closeout Frequently Asked Questions SEP Notice 10-011 EECBG Program Notice 10-013 Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Sub-Recipient Monitoring...

  19. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera, Mono County,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms |Information

  20. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera, Mono County,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms |InformationCalifornia,

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  5. 1990 Weatherization Assistance Program monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuels, L.S.

    1992-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year 1990 DOE weatherization programs were monitored in Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The focus of the monitoring was on a total of 18 subgrantees. Separate reports on the monitoring completed on each site was submitted as well as the final summary report for each state. The scope of monitoring consisted of a review of current contracts, budgets, program operating procedures, staffing, inventory control, financial and procurement procedures, review of client files and audit reports, inspection of completed dwelling units and assessment of monitoring, training, and technical assistance provided by the grantees. A random sampling of completed units were selected and visits were made to inspect these weatherized dwellings.

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  8. Annual Monitoring Results A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grainsize 33 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)33 Trace Metals34 Trace Organics34 Quality Assurance / Quality Control (QA/QC) 37 QA/QC of Percent Solids37 QA/QC of Grain Size 37 QA/QC of TotalAnnual Monitoring Results 2012 A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY

  9. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  10. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    are analyzed to assess the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservation and the surroundingORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  12. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  13. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  14. Diabetes Education Program Blood Glucose Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Diabetes Education Program Blood Glucose Monitoring Self Blood Glucose Monitoring is an easy way to assess your diabetes control. This information will help you and your doctor see how your treatment plan in a very short amount of time with a simple finger prick. Your diabetes educator will help you select

  15. The Kansas Black Bass Tournament Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kansas Black Bass (Micropterus spp.) Tournament Monitoring Program was begun by the Kansas Fish and Game program of the Kansas Fish and Game Commission avoids both of these prob- lems. The Kansas Black Bass annually to each of the bass clubs in Kansas before the bulk of fishing begins, and clubs are asked

  16. Review of present groundwater monitoring programs at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershey, R.L.; Gillespie, D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater monitoring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is conducted to detect the presence of radionuclides produced by underground nuclear testing and to verify the quality and safety of groundwater supplies as required by the State of Nevada and federal regulations, and by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. Groundwater is monitored at water-supply wells and at other boreholes and wells not specifically designed or located for traditional groundwater monitoring objectives. Different groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS are conducted by several DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) contractors. Presently, these individual groundwater monitoring programs have not been assessed or administered under a comprehensive planning approach. Redundancy exists among the programs in both the sampling locations and the constituents analyzed. Also, sampling for certain radionuclides is conducted more frequently than required. The purpose of this report is to review the existing NTS groundwater monitoring programs and make recommendations for modifying the programs so a coordinated, streamlined, and comprehensive monitoring effort may be achieved by DOE/NV. This review will be accomplished in several steps. These include: summarizing the present knowledge of the hydrogeology of the NTS and the potential radionuclide source areas for groundwater contamination; reviewing the existing groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS; examining the rationale for monitoring and the constituents analyzed; reviewing the analytical methods used to quantify tritium activity; discussing monitoring network design criteria; and synthesizing the information presented and making recommendations based on the synthesis. This scope of work was requested by the DOE/NV Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and satisfies the 1993 (fiscal year) HRMP Groundwater Monitoring Program Review task.

  17. ICP (Institutional Conservation Program) monitoring: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages present the Final Report of activities undertaken by Arawak in carrying out its contractual obligations for the New York Support Office of US Department of Energy. The contract calls for the field monitoring/review of DOE grants to schools and hospitals under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP). This Final Report is the result of a review of statistics and findings gathered over the period of the contract, which included monitoring visits to 78 grantees in New York State and New Jersey. The report is intended to highlight aspects of the monitoring project and to make recommendations.

  18. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  19. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  20. A survey of an air monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.B.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to compare personal air sampling data to stationary air sampling data and to bioassay data that was taken during the decontamination and decommissioning of sixty-one plutonium glove boxes at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1995. An air monitoring program administered at Argonne National Laboratory was assessed by comparing personal air sampler (PAS) data, stationary air sampler (SAS) data, and bioassay data. The study revealed that the PAS and SAS techniques were equivalent when averaged over all employees and all workdays, but the standard deviation was large. Also, large deviations were observed in individual samples. The correlation between individual PAS results and bioassay results was low. Personal air samplers and bioassay monitoring played complementary roles in assessing the workplace and estimating intakes. The PAS technique is adequate for detection and evaluation of contaminated atmospheres, whereas bioassay monitoring is better for determining individual intakes.

  1. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  2. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  3. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  6. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A. [DOE/NNSA

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  7. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program抯 activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  8. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  11. ORNL Environmental Monitoring Programs 5-1 5. ORNL Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , which includes 3500 and 4500 areas' cell ven- tilation system, isotope solid-state ventilation system, 3025 and 3026 areas' cell ventilation system, 3042 ventilation system, and 3092 central off-gas system Monitoring Programs source is composed of any ventilation system or component such as a vent, a laboratory

  12. Results of calendar year 1994 monitor well inspection and maintenance program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMaster, B.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, S.B.; Sitzler, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compendium of results of the calendar year 1994 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the life expectancy of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant during 1994. All inspections were conducted between April and December.

  13. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  15. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  16. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program. Using a Secchi disk, volunteers collected water transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  18. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan describes the technical approach that is implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well. Under this approach, wells granted ?active? status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling, whereas wells granted ?inactive? status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP. Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans. This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes.

  19. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  20. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

  1. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) from January 1994 through December 1994 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  2. Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of...

  3. An internal dose monitoring program at an academic research institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carsten, Keith Eric

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of an internal dose monitoring program for radioactive material based on the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 26, "Recommendations...

  4. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs: Examining Limitations and Future Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Christopher A.; Weiner, Scott G.; Feldman, James A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li G, Brady JE, Lang B, et al. Prescription drug monitoringand drug overdose mortality. Inj Epidemiol. 2014;1:1-9.EM, Desai HA. Prescription drug monitoring programs and

  5. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  9. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  10. Monitoring and evaluation of green public procurement programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adell, Aure [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain)] [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Schaefer, Bettina [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain)] [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Ravi, Kavita [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)] [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Corry, Jenny [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)] [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective procurement policies can help governments save considerable amounts of money while also reducing energy consumption. Additionally, private sector companies which purchase large numbers of energy-consuming devices can benefit from procurement policies that minimize life-cycle energy costs. Both public and private procurement programs offer opportunities to generate market-transforming demand for energy efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. In recent years, several governments have implemented policies to procure energy efficient products and services. When deploying these policies, efforts have focused on developing resources for implementation (guidelines, energy efficiency specifications for tenders, life cycle costing tools, training, etc.) rather than defining monitoring systems to track progress against the set objectives. Implementation resources are necessary to make effective policies; however, developing Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) mechanisms are critical to ensure that the policies are effective. The purpose of this article is to provide policy makers and procurement officials with a preliminary map of existing approaches and key components to monitor Energy Efficient Procurement (EEP) programs in order to contribute to the improvement of their own systems. Case studies are used throughout the paper to illustrate promising approaches to improve the M and E of EEP programs, from the definition of the system or data collection to complementary instruments to improve both the monitoring response and program results.

  11. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  12. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program in the 21st Century: The Evolution of a Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the evolution of the various operational aspects of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) network following the transfer of program administration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education in 1999-2000. The CEMP consists of a network of 29 fixed radiation and weather monitoring stations located in Nevada, Utah, and California. Its mission is to involve stakeholders directly in monitoring for airborne radiological releases to the off site environment as a result of past or ongoing activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and to make data as transparent and accessible to the general public as feasible. At its inception in 1981, the CEMP was a cooperative project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DRI, and EPA. In 1999-2000, technical administration of the CEMP transitioned from EPA to DRI. Concurrent with and subsequent to this transition, station and program operations underwent significant enhancements that furthered the mission of the program. These enhancements included the addition of a full suite of meteorological instrumentation, state-of-the-art electronic data collectors, on-site displays, and communications hardware. A public website was developed. Finally, the DRI developed a mobile monitoring station that can be operated entirely on solar power in conjunction with a deep-cell battery, and includes all meteorological sensors and a pressurized ion chamber for detecting background gamma radiation. Final station configurations have resulted in the creation of a platform that is well suited for use as an in-field multi-environment test-bed for prototype environmental sensors and in interfacing with other scientific and educational programs. Recent and near-future collaborators have included federal, state, and local agencies in both the government and private sectors. The CEMP also serves as a model for other programs wishing to involve stakeholders with a meaningful role in the process of monitoring and data collection.

  13. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  14. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  15. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  16. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  17. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  19. The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

  20. Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

  1. Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Draft Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.; Etheredge, R.; Glass, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and analysis of the data to account for weather, changes in operation of the building, etc. This is a quality assurance method to ensure that agencies purchasing retrofits receive real savings from the LoanSTAR Program. The second objective of monitoring... manager. The draft is routed to a review assistant (graduate student) who reviews it in detail for numerical correctness and agreement with the POSSR, format and guidelines. Insofar as possible, the review assistant comments on the concepts employed...

  2. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    program are analyzed to assess the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservationORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations

  3. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs 6-1 6. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Complex Radiological Airborne Effluent Monitoring The release of radiological contaminants, primarily. Uranium and other radionuclides are han- dled in millicurie quantities at facilities within the boundary laboratory is operated in a leased facility that is not within the ORR boundary; it is located approximately

  4. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

  5. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  6. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs 6-1 6. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , which alert operations personnel to process-upset conditions or to a decline in filtration-system-12 Complex room ventila- tion systems are estimated from radiation control data collected on airborne at the Y-12 National Security Complex for air, water, and groundwater environ- mental media. These programs

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. Weatherization Assistance Program: Final monitoring report for: Arizona, California, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization programs for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, and Nevada. The provisions of the contract specified an initial year and renewable optional periods of two (2) additional years. The first year of the contract began on October 1, 1985, and expired on September 30, 1986. The final report for that first year was submitted to DOE-SAN in August, 1986. The second year of the contract began on October 1, 1986, and expired on September 30, 1987. The final report for that second year was submitted to DOE-SAN in August, 1987. This report covers the monitoring of grantees and subgrantees for the second option year, or what is the third year of the contract. The first two (2) weeks of the third year's activities were devoted to scheduling the agencies to be monitored. The actual field monitoring began on November 16, 1987, and was completed on August 19, 1988. During this nine-month period, twenty-nine (29) agencies, both grantees and subgrantees, were visited and evaluated under this contract.

  11. Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

  12. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco site for the LTHMP on May 16 and 17, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method, because the laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  13. Load Monitoring CEC/LMTF Load Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Lesieutre, B.; Yang, Steve; Ellis, A.; Meklin, A.; Wong, B.; Gaikwad, A.; Brooks, D.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Phillips, John; Kosterev, Dmitry; Hoffman, M.; Ciniglio, O.; Hartwell, R.; Pourbeik, P.; Maitra, A.; Lu, Ning

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper addresses the needs, options, current practices of load monitoring. Recommendations on load monitoring applications and future directions are also presented.

  14. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

  15. The Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program Fourth Quarter 2000 (October thru December 2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during fourth quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program.

  16. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  17. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the fourth quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  18. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  19. The Savannah River site`s groundwater monitoring program: second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1997, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. A detailed explanation of the flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1997 are included in this report.

  20. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. First quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

  2. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Gregory Graham; Newkirk, Jay Ronald; Borst, Frederick Jon

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct and scattered radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  4. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Second Quarter 1998 (April through June 1998)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J B

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for the program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  5. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Fourth Quarter 1999 (October through December 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Savannah River site during fourth quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official records of the analytical results.

  6. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Third Quarter 1999 (July through September 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program during the third quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  7. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Second Quarter 2000 (April through June 2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 2000 (January through March 2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, M.

    2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during first quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 1999 (January through March 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  10. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program second quarter 1999 (April through June 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  11. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 1998 (January through March 1998)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Savannah River Site during first quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  12. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Third Quarter 2000 (July through September 2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during third quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Quality Assurance Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) applies to the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Sandia National Laboratories/California. This QAPP follows DOE Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE G 414.1-2A June 17, 2005). The Environmental Monitoring Program is located within the Environmental Operations Department. The Environmental Operations Department is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA operations have minimal impact on the environment. The Department provides guidance to line organizations to help them comply with applicable environmental regulations and DOE orders. To fulfill its mission, the department has groups responsible for waste management; pollution prevention, air quality; environmental planning; hazardous materials management; and environmental monitoring. The Environmental Monitoring Program is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA complies with all Federal, State, and local regulations and with DOE orders regarding the quality of wastewater and stormwater discharges. The Program monitors these discharges both visually and through effluent sampling. The Program ensures that activities at the SNL/CA site do not negatively impact the quality of surface waters in the vicinity, or those of the San Francisco Bay. The Program verifies that wastewater and stormwater discharges are in compliance with established standards and requirements. The Program is also responsible for compliance with groundwater monitoring, and underground and above ground storage tanks regulatory compliance. The Program prepares numerous reports, plans, permit applications, and other documents that demonstrate compliance.

  14. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Table 1 lists those well series with constituents in the groundwater above Flag 2 during third quarter 1992, organized by location. Results from all laboratory analyses are used to generate this table. Specific conductance and pH data from the field also are included in this table.

  15. A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  16. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program (BMAP) plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Cicerone, D.S. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y-12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided, but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas or a reduction in sampling intensity in others. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide them in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

  17. Report on the Watershed Monitoring Program at the Paducah Site January-December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed Monitoring of Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks has been conducted since 1987. The monitoring was conducted by the University of Kentucky between 1987 and 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of monitoring are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for DOE protect and maintain the use of Little Bayour and Big Bayou creeks for frowth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota. The watershed (biological) monitoring discussed in this report was conducted under DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. Future monitoring will be conducted as required by the Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) in March 1998. A draft Watershed Monitoring Program plan was approved by the Kentucky Division of Water and will be finalized in 1999. The DOE permit also requires toxicity monitoring of one continuous outfall and of three intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The Watershed Monitoring Program for the Paducah Site during calendar year 1998 consisted of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of fish communities. This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from january 1998 to December 1998, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  18. Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

  19. Evaluation of a Citizen-Science Highway Wildlife Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Kylie; Broberg, Len; Servheen, Christopher; Quinn, Michael S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rigor of this unique citizen-science program. Posters ICOETuse of citizen involvement in transportation science. After

  20. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  1. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program 1993 well installation, abandonment, and maintenance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the well and environmental soil boring information compiled for the groundwater monitoring program of the Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1993. It includes discussions of environmental soil borings, surveying, well construction, abandonments, maintenance, and stabilization. EPD/EMS is responsible for monitoring constituents in the groundwater at approximately 135 waste sites in 16 areas at SRS. The majority of this monitoring is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and by federal and state regulations administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells; environmental soil borings; development of sampling and analytical schedules; collection and analyses of groundwater samples; review of analytical and other data; maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data; quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance; and reports of results to waste site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD. EPD/EMS is responsible for monitoring the wells but is not responsible for the facilities that are monitored. It is the responsibility of the custodian of each waste site to ensure that EPD/EMS is informed of sampling requirements and special requests for the sampling schedule, to assist in reviewing the data, and to make any decisions regarding groundwater monitoring at the waste site.

  2. 4. Transition to integrated regional monitoring and evaluation framework The Fish and Wildlife Program calls for a monitoring program to evaluate whether the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4. Transition to integrated regional monitoring and evaluation framework The Fish and Wildlife for Program funding and plan for a transition for currently funded methods over a specific period of time of the individual project without specific justification. This transition should be accomplished within three years

  3. Calendar years 1989 and 1990 monitoring well installation program Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the well-construction activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during 1989 and 1990. The well- construction program consisted of installing seventy-five monitoring wells. Geologists from ERCE (formally the Engineering, Design and Geosciences Group) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems), supervised and documented well-construction activities and monitored for health and safety concerns. Sixty-seven monitoring wells were installed under the supervision of an ERCE geologist from March 1989 to September 1990. Beginning in September 1990, Energy Systems supervised drilling activities for eight monitoring wells, the last of which was completed in December 1990. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program preoperational testand biomass distribution at potential OTEC sites.6th OTEC conference, Washington, D.C. Payne, S.F. 1979. The

  6. Piloting A Monitoring Program For CCC LWD Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atherton, Shanna; Zhu, Bingyao

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetlands: a 5 year post-operation survey on the Rhone River,operations through the WSP member or the CCC Fisheries Intern program existing creek survey

  7. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.JR.; Hill, W.R.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The revised Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted as required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Science Division (ESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of the Y-12 Plant. The revision to the BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted during the period of 1985 to present. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided; experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional bioaccumulation monitoring if results indicate unexpectedly high PCBs or Hg) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is still observed). The program scope will be re-evaluated annually. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of Y-12 Plant operations (past and present) on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

  8. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  9. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  10. Office of Hydrologic Development Hydrology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2010 Office of Hydrologic Development Hydrology Laboratory Strategic Science Plan #12;OHD This Strategic Science Plan (Plan) establishes the directions for research in hy- drology at the Hydrology Laboratory of the Office of Hydrologic Development. It first establishes a cross-reference between the Plan

  11. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  12. Mode Estimation of Modelbased Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint颅based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS颅1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

  13. Overview of the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~eriments. mntation and Measurine Technique$ International Energy Agency and the Swedish Council for Building Research, Stockholm, Sweden. 15. Haberl, J., Claridge, D. and Harrje, D., 1990. "The Design of Field Experiments and Demonstrations," Procee...Gnps of the 1990 Field Monitorin? Worksh~p, Gothenburg, Sweden. April. 5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Texas LoanSTAR program is funded through the Texas Governor's Energy Management Center using oil overcharge funds. The GEMC program manager in Malcolm Verdict...

  14. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs 6-1 6. Y-12 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    RADIOLOGICAL AIRBORNE EFFLUENT MONITORING The release of radiological contaminants, primarily uranium are handled in millicurie quantities at facilities within the boundary of the Y-12 Plant as part of ORNL and Y on Union Valley Road. The laboratory is operated in a leased facility that is not within the ORR boundary

  15. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

  16. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  17. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2001 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  18. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  19. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 3, Monitored retrievable storage program plan. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the current DOE program objectives and the strategy for implementing the proposed program for the integral MRS facility. If the MRS proposal is approved by Congress, any needed revisions to the Program Plan will be made available to the Congress, the State of Tennessee, affected Indian tribes, local governments, other federal agencies, and the public. The proposal for constructing an MRS facility must include: the establishment of a federal program for the siting, development, construction, and operation of MRS facilities; a plan for funding the construction and operation of MRS facilities; site-specific designs, specifications, and cost estimates for the first such facility; a plan for integrating MRS facilities with other storage and disposal facilities authorized by the NWPA. 32 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  20. August 23, 2002 Coded Wire Tag Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : "First, let us acknowledge that this is a huge program that annual conducts a large number of activities that are essential to the Basin, and the data provided has been widely utilized over many years. However and the Columbia River basin, as well as the various escapements to hatcheries and spawning grounds. Based

  1. 1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  2. MISOLFA solar monitor for the ground PICARD program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, T; Assus, P; Dufour, C; Fodil, M; Morand, F; Renaud, C; Simon, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developed at the Observatoire de la C\\^ote d'Azur (OCA) within the framework of the PICARD space mission (Thuillier et al., 2006) and with support from the french spatial agency (CNES), MISOLFA (Moniteur d'Images Solaires Franco-Alg\\'erien) is a new generation of daytime turbulence monitor. Its objective is to measure both the spatial and temporal turbulence parameters in order to quantify their effects on the solar diameter measurements that will be made from ground using the qualification model of the SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper) instrument onboard PICARD. The comparison of simultaneous images from ground and space should allow us, with the help of the solar monitor, to find the best procedure possible to measure solar diameter variations from ground on the long term. MISOLFA is now installed at the Calern facility of OCA and PICARD is scheduled to be launched in 2010. We present here the principles of the instrument and the first results obtained on the characteristics of the turbulenc...

  3. Course offer (1/2) Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Course offer (1/2) 路 Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc) 路 advanced engineering hydrology course focused on hydrological monitoring, processunderstanding and new analysis and modelling techniques 路 Fluvial Systems (1st management and riverine ecosystem sustainability 路 Hydrology of Glaciers (2nd Sem. MSc) 路 study of ice

  4. Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an are monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  5. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2001-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  6. Community Radiation Monitoring Program. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, E.N.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE); the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UNEL). The twelfth year of the program began in the fall of 1991, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE-sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The program began as an outgrowth of activities that occurred during the Three Mile Island incident in 1979. The local interest and public participation that took place there were thought to be transferrable to the situation at the NTS, so, with adaptations, that methodology was implemented for this program. The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the existing EPA monitoring network, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as station managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These managers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded, through their training, experience, community standing, and effort, in becoming a very visible, able and valuable asset in this link.

  7. Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway,Farmers Mutual ElectricMichigan:Program

  8. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1993, PNNL established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. This program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1998 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 123 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1999. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas.

  9. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Estimates of Suspended-sediment Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interpolation. A model was developed to estimate fluxes associated with tidal advection and dispersion using. On an annual basis, dispersive flux caused an upstream sediment flux of about 0.39 Mt (million metric tonnesSan Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Estimates of Suspended-sediment

  10. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  11. Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

  12. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors.

  13. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (2003)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Newkirk; F. J. Borst, CHP

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2003 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  14. Community radiation monitoring program. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, E.N.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UUNEL). The thirteenth year of this program began in the fall of 1992, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE--sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the then-existing EPA monitoring network around the NTS, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah, and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Station Managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These mangers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded through their training, experience, community standing, and effort in becoming a very visible, able, and valuable asset in this link.

  15. Community Radiation Monitoring Program; Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, E.N.; McArthur, R.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (U of U). This eleventh year of the program began in the summer of 1991 and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE-sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which the DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of those efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Managers and program representatives in 19 communities adjacent to and downwind from the NTS. These Managers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded, through their training, experience, community standing, and effort, in becoming a very visible, able and valuable asset in this link.

  16. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. Third quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  17. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the estuary are monitored indicators that reflect the status of habitat conditions and fish performance, e.g., habitat connectivity, survival, and life history diversity. Performance measures also pertain to implementation and compliance. Such measures are part of the monitoring, research, and action plans in this estuary RME document. Performance targets specific to the estuary were not included in the 2007 draft Biological Opinion.

  18. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  19. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Second quarter, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  20. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  1. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Group of the Health Protection Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1988 (October--December), routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations was performed. The drinking water samples were collected from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. Two sets of flagging criteria were established in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  2. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  4. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

  5. Weatherization assistance program: Final monitoring report for Arizona; California; the Navajo Nation; Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization program for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada. The provisions of the contract specified an initial year and renewable optional periods of two (2) additional years. This report covers the monitoring of grantees and subgrantees for the first option year, or what is the second year of the contract. The first two (2) weeks of the second year's activities were devoted to scheduling the agencies to be monitored. The actual field monitoring began on October 14, 1986, and was completed on May 22, 1987. During this seven-month period, thirty-five (35) agencies were visited and evaluated under this contract.

  6. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  7. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  8. Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terraqua, Inc. (Wauconda, WA)

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

  9. Policy Recommendations for Establishing the LoneSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy consumption analyzed?sometimes with monthly data and sometimes with 15-minute or hourly demand data. 6 The levels of monitoring and analysis recommended can be grouped in three categories: 1) Facility/whole building(s) utility data: These data... receiving retrofits 3) Improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR Program - 4) Provide a detailed data base of energy use in commercial* buildings located in Texas The money for each retrofit financed from the LoanSTAR Program must...

  10. Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E.Townsend

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

  11. Extended Community: An Oral History of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), 1989 - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan DeSilva

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) provides a unique opportunity to trace a concept created by two nuclear industry originators from inception, as it transitioned through several stewardship agencies, to management by a non-profit organization. This transition is informed not only by changes over two decades in the views of the general populace toward nuclear testing but also by changing political climates and public policies. Several parallel histories accompanied the development of the CEMP: an administrative history, an environmental history, and a history of changing public perception of not only nuclear testing, but other activities involving radiation such as waste transportation, as well. Although vital, those histories will be provided only as background to the subject of this study, the oral histories gathered in this project. The oral histories collected open a window into the nuclear testing history of Nevada and Utah that has not heretofore been opened. The nuclear industry has generated a great deal of positive and negative reaction since its inception. The CEMP emerged with specific objectives. It was designed to provide information to potential downwind communities and counter negative perceptions by creating more community involvement and education about the testing. The current objectives of the program are to: (1) Manage and maintain the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) offsite monitoring program including 26 radiation and environmental monitoring stations with associated equipment. Provide air sample collection and analysis, radiological and meteorological data collection, interpretation and reporting. (2) Facilitate independent operation of radiological monitoring stations and data verification by private citizens living in communities in proximity to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). (3) Hire and initiate training of local citizens to serve as Community Environmental Monitors (CEMs) in designated communities. (4) Provide relevant training by qualified instructors to the CEMs as necessary. (5) Assist and manage CEMs in accomplishing their duties, and ensure that contracts and paychecks are issued on schedule. (6) Provide CEMs and Emeriti monthly materials to facilitate public awareness. This project explores how those objectives evolved over time with changes in the nuclear testing program. How similar are today's objectives to those originally established for the program? Do those objectives reflect a changing political landscape as well as changes in testing needs? Those questions and more will be addressed as we follow the program from its inception, through earlier versions administered first by the Public Health Service (PHS), then by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the current administrator, the Desert Research Institute (DRI).

  12. Chemical trends at lakes ans streams in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network, 19882000 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 351366 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    of `acid rain' were first documented in the Pennines, Northern England, following the onsetChemical trends at lakes ans streams in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network, 1988颅2000 351 in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network, 1988-2000: Evidence for recent recovery at a national scale C

  13. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Environmental Monitoring Program in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is a hazardous and low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Extensive site investigations have revealed contaminated surface water, sediments, groundwater, and soils. Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from 1989--1991 and on recent interactions with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The information shows WAG 6 contributes < 2% of the total off-site contaminant risk released over White Oak Dam (WOD). The alternative selected to address hazards at WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls to prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases to determine if source control measures will be required in the future, and development of technologies to support final remediation of WAG 6. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-1192&D1). Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12-18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC. The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years.

  14. Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  15. Advanced monitoring technologies for the evaluation of demand-side management programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Vine, E.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. The aim of this study is to provide an assessment of the state-of-the-art technologies that can be used for monitoring and evaluating demand-side management (DSM) programs. Additionally, the study points out research, development, and demonstration projects whose implementation can contribute to a more accurate and cost-effective evaluation of the performance of end-use technologies. During the past two decades, technology developments in the fields of microelectronics, computers and communications had a large impact on monitoring equipment. The improvements achieved led to the appearance of increasingly powerful, convenient to use, and flexible equipment, enabling a wider application of end-use metering at a lower cost. Equipment specifications are getting closer and closer to an ``ideal`` monitoring system: Good accuracy, high reliability, moderate cost, large number of monitored end uses, large data storage capacity, flexible communications, non-intrusiveness, powerful preprocessing of data. This report briefly examines the following techniques that can be used for end-use monitoring: field test equipment, general purpose data loggers, run-time data loggers, utility-oriented data loggers, energy management systems, two-way communication, power line carrier techniques, direct and distributed load control, and non-intrusive load monitoring. The report concludes with recommendations for developing new measurement technologies, as well as additional research and development activities to support these efforts.

  16. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. (ed.); Adams, S.M.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Frank, M.L.; Garten, C.T.; Houston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Berry, J.B.; Talmage, S.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Amano, H. (JAERI, Tokai Res., Establishment, Ibari-Ken (Japan)); Jimenez, B.D. (School of Pharmacy, Univ. of Puerto Rico (San Juan)); Kitchings, J.T.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  17. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

  18. Chesapeake Bay citizen monitoring program report: Conestoga River (October 1986-June 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, Inc. (ACB) began a pilot water quality testing project using volunteers in July 1985 as one of the activities funded under its Chesapeake Bay Program public participation grant from USEPA. This initial project was carried out in the tidal portions of the James River in Virginia and the Patuxent River in Maryland. The major objective of the Conestoga River Citizen Monitoring Project is to track concentration of nitrate in the ambient waters of the Conestoga River with the intent of answering the questions: (1) Has the level of nitrate in the river changed over time; and (2) Is there a downward trend in observed nitrate. The report summarizes the water quality data collected by the Conestoga River volunteer monitors with particular emphasis on the concentration of nitrate.

  19. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Baseline and Postremediation Monitoring Program Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements to present the plan for baseline and postremediation monitoring as part of the selected remedy. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the requirements to monitor for soil and terrestrial biota in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain; sediment, surface water, and aquatic biota in LEFPC; wetland restoration in the LEFPC floodplain; and human use of shallow groundwater wells in the LEFPC floodplain for drinking water. This document describes the monitoring program that will ensure that actions taken under Phases I and II of the LEFPC remedial action are protective of human health and the environment.

  1. Detection and Plant Monitoring Programs: Lessons from an Intensive Survey of Asclepias meadii with Five Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Helen M.; Reed, Aaron W.; Kettle, W. Dean; Slade, Norman A.; Bodbyl-Roels, Sarah Ann; Collins, Cathy Diane; Salisbury,Vaughn

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    information about probabilities of detection and what factors cause plants to be missed. This information can guide development of monitoring programs. Citation: Alexander HM, Reed AW, Kettle WD, Slade NA, Bodbyl Roels SA, et al. (2012) Detection and Plant... of observers. This value was calculated as: 1{ 1{pA 1{pB 1{pC 1{pD 1{pE 藿 #2; 1 where pA, pB, pC, pD, and pE refer to observer-specific detection probabilities. We calculated a common variance using the delta method [34]. Each observer...

  2. Monitoring inspections of ICP program ECM and TA grantees. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities undertaken to review DOE grants to schools, hospitals and municipalities under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) are reported. This Final Report is the result of a review of statistics and findings gathered over the period of the contract. It is intended to highlight aspects of the monitoring project and to make recommendations. This report is organized into four sections: the steps taken in organizing and implementing the review; statistics regarding the 92 grants reviewed; some of the common factors which fostered success or problems in the administration of the ICP grants; and recommendations.

  3. A Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary pollutant effects on aquatic life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary 2011 pollutant effects on aquatic life pulse goals of Bay water quality managers is to ensure that pollutants do not interfere with the abilityA Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary

  4. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration抯 Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

  6. Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology PC Monitor Energy Consumption To estimate the energy consumption of PC monitors, we use the database

  7. Community Radiation Monitoring Program annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, E.N.; McArthur, R.D.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The events of FY 1990 indicate that another successful year in the evolution of the Community Radiation Monitoring Program is in the books. The agencies and organizations involved in the program have developed a sound and viable working relationship, and it appears that the major objectives, primarily dispelling some of the concerns over weapons testing and radiation on the part of the public, are being effectively addressed. The program is certainly a dynamic operation, growing and changing to meet perceived needs and goals as more experience is gained through our work. The change in focus on our public outreach efforts will lead us to contacts with more students and schools, service clubs and special interest groups in the future, and will refine, and hopefully improve, our communication with the public. If that can be accomplished, plus perhaps influencing a few more students to stay in school and even grow up to be scientists, engineers and better citizens, we will be closer to having achieved our goals. It is important to note that the success of the program has occurred only because the people involved, from the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Desert Research Institute, the University of Utah and the Station Managers and Alternates work well and hard together. Our extended family'' is doing a good job. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  9. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  12. Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

  13. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  14. The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Expansion of Existing Smolt Trapping Program and Steelhead Spawner Surveys : March 1st, 2008 - February 28th, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Todd; Tonseth, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-0017) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and; (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g., Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

  15. 1999 data report: Groundwater monitoring program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the annual 1999 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology and the groundwater sampling procedure. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Results indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater elevation was monitored quarterly with no major changes noted. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with a flow velocity less than one foot per year; however, this is subject to change because the wells have a similar groundwater elevation.

  16. Nevada Test Site 2002 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2002 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Results from all samples collected in 2002 were within established criteria. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA) regulated unit within the RWMS-5 and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

  17. Nevada Test Site 2001 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2001 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Due to detections of TOC and TOX in some samples collected in 2000, a plan, as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), was executed to collect an increased number and type of samples in 2001. Results from all samples collected in 2001 were below ILs. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 RWMS and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year.

  18. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  19. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R&D-1 project titled ``Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.`` The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  20. Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; currently the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) was prepared in December 1986, as required by the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that was issued on September 11, 1986. The effluent discharges to Mitchell Branch are complex, consisting of trace elements, organic chemicals, and radionuclides in addition to various conventional pollutants. Moreover, the composition of these effluent streams will be changing over time as various pollution abatement measures are implemented over the next several years. Although contaminant inputs to the stream originate primarily as point sources from existing plant operations, area sources, such as the classified burial grounds and the K-1407-C holding pond, can not be eliminated as potential sources of contaminants. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities. BMAP will determine whether the effluent limits established for ORGDP protect the designated use of the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch) for growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life. Another objective of the program is to document the ecological effects resulting from various pollution abatement projects, such as the Central Neutralization Facility.

  1. Ground Water Surveillance Monitoring Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide assists DOE sites in establishing and maintaining surveillance monitoring programs to detect future impacts on ground water resources from site operations, to track existing ground water contamination, and to assess the potential for exposing the general public to site releases. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  2. An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

  3. Fiscal year 1996 well installation program summary, Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1996 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge Tennessee. Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Two groundwater monitoring wells were installed during the FY 1996 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed in the Lake Reality area and was of polyvinyl chloride screened construction. The other well, installed near the Ash Disposal Basin, was of stainless steel construction.

  4. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  5. Statement of Work (SOW) for services provided by the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility for the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program during calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLECKLER, B.P.

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits.

  6. Groundwater monitoring plan for the proposed state-approved land disposal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1993-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a detection-level groundwater monitoring program for the state-approved land disposal structure (SALDS). The SALDS is an infiltration basin proposed for disposal of treated effluent from the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this plan is to present a groundwater monitoring program that is capable of determining the impact of effluent disposal at the SALDS on the quality of groundwater in the uppermost aquifer. This groundwater monitoring plan presents an overview of the SALDS, the geology and hydrology of the area, the background and indicator evaluation (detection) groundwater monitoring program, and an outline of a groundwater quality assessment (compliance) program. This plan does not provide a plan for institutional controls to track tritium beyond the SALDS.

  7. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2012 results. During 2012, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater samples were collected at UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 on March 21, August 7, August 21, and September 11, 2012, and static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 19, June 6, August 2, and October 15, 2012. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Final results from samples collected in 2012 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  8. Nevada Test Site 2009 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program, Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2009 results. During 2009, groundwater at each of the three pilot wells was sampled on March 10, 2009, and August 18, 2009, and water levels at each of the three pilot wells were measured on February 17, May 6, August 17, and November 10, 2009. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2009 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  9. Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Report to the Monitoring and Analysis Review Committee, August 1991 (Volume I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Athar, A.; Kissock, J. K.; Reddy, T. A.; Ruch, D. K.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Willis, D.; Lopez, R.; Sparks, R. J.; Bryant, J.; O'Neal, D. L.; Heffington, W. M.; Brown, M.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LoanSTAR program has now completed its second prototype year. This report is Volume I of a two volume set that documents the progress since the January 1991 MARC meeting. This first voume contains photocopies of the material presented...

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12, determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells installed at Y-12 and the related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes.

  11. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  12. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  13. Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 11 Global PC Monitor Electricity Consumption for Annualtotal global electricity consumption of personal computer (IV-c) c), the annual electricity consumption contributed by

  14. Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Sub-Recipient Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guidance for energy efficiency and conservation block grants grantees on sub-recipient monitoring. eecbg10-019subgranteemonitoringguidance.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  15. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for:  inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12,  determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and  identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment.

  16. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  17. Final report on DSA methods for monitoring alumina in aluminum reduction cells with cermet anodes. Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensors Development Program was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Processes. The work was performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objective of the Sensors Development Program in FY 1990 through FY 1992 was to determine whether methods based on digital signal analysis (DSA) could be used to measure alumina concentration in aluminum reduction cells. Specifically, this work was performed to determine whether useful correlations exist between alumina concentration and various DSA-derived quantification parameters, calculated for current and voltage signals from laboratory and field aluminum reduction cells. If appropriate correlations could be found, then the quantification parameters might be used to monitor and, consequently, help control the alumina concentration in commercial reduction cells. The control of alumina concentration is especially important for cermet anodes, which have exhibited instability and excessive wear at alumina concentrations removed from saturation.

  18. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program - Calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIEDIKER, L.P.

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services that the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Environmental Compliance Program (ECP) throughout the calendar year for effluent and environmental monitoring (EEM) analysis. One of the purposes of EEM is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents and the environment immediately around facilities that might contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine the degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits.

  19. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

  20. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497颅531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497颅531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  1. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  2. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    , kinematic waves, transmissivity feedback, exchange between matrix and macropores, and so forth (Beven, 1989 these observations in the following way may prove useful. Paradox 1: Rapid Mobilization of Old Water The hydrology of old water' paradox, exemplified by Figure 1. In many small catchments, streamflow responds promptly

  3. INFORMATION: Management Alert on the Department's Monitoring of the Weatherization Assistance Program in the State of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion to improve the energy efficiency of homes owned or occupied by low income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety. Since the Recovery Act was enacted in February 2009, the Department has awarded weatherization grants to every state, the District of Columbia and five territories. Because of the unprecedented level of funding and the risks associated with spending vast amounts of money in a relatively short period of time, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) initiated a series of audits designed to evaluate the Program's internal control structures at both the Federal and state levels. As part of our work, we are in the process of reviewing Weatherization Program internal controls for the State of Illinois. We are also currently performing identical audits in the States of North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Under the Recovery Act and the Department's Program, the State of Illinois received $242 million to weatherize 26,933 homes. The State of Illinois awarded these funds to 35 local agencies responsible for determining recipients' eligibility, contracting for the installation of the weatherization work, and conducting final inspections to ensure that work on homes was done in accordance with requirements. Inspectors working for the local agencies are required to evaluate the quality of mechanical and architectural improvements, such as furnace installations and window caulking, and certify that the work performed meets established standards. Under a Department approved plan in place at the time of our review, state officials were required to evaluate the sufficiency of local agency monitoring controls and to inspect the work performed on at least five percent of the units weatherized with Department funds during the program year for each local agency. We identified significant internal control deficiencies in the management of the Weatherization Program in Illinois which require immediate attention. Specifically, our audit testing revealed significant problems with on-site monitoring and inspection of the Illinois Home Weatherization Assistance Program (Illinois). We noted that the Department had not fulfilled its requirement to perform monitoring visits at the State level. In addition, Illinois officials had not complied with the Department's requirements for inspecting weatherization work conducted by local agencies. Finally, we found that a weatherization inspection for one of the local agencies failed to detect substandard installation of energy saving materials. This case involved a furnace gas leak that could have resulted in serious injury to the occupants and material damage to the structure. This is an interim report and our audit work remains in progress.

  4. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Webinar Series: Evaluation, Monitoring, & Verification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will cover the basics of Evaluation, Monitoring, & Verification (EM&V). Attendees will learn key concepts, an overview of the full process, and EM&V framework.

  5. AN ANALYSIS OF THE MONITORING AVIAN PRODUCTIVITY AND SURVIVORSHIP (MAPS) PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    FOR ITS INTEGRATION INTO NORTH AMERICAN COORDINATED BIRD MONITORING James F. Saracco, David F. De detectable by MAPS with 80% power in the South-central Region....... 38 Table 8. Effect sizes detectable

  6. U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Microcystins in Freshwater Sources Monitoring Technologies for Measuring Stored Carbon Dioxide from Sequestration Applications. These technology categories have been priorities for the AMS Center stakeholders, Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) for microcystins, and EPA Region 7 for carbon

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air monitoring program Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF A DESK-EDGE-MOUNTED TASK VENTILATION SYSTEM Summary: of a personal computer, heat release from a computer monitor and overhead light, and by a recirculating air... In...

  8. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  9. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  10. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, L.M.

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

  11. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  12. Transferable methods identified during the monitoring of the DOE Chicago Operations Office Weatherization Assistance Program. Final report. Task F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the outcomes of the analyses performed under this task. The first of these is the presentation of a range of materials/approaches initially found by contract monitoring teams to be potentially unique/innovative/useful to Weatherization Program operators. The second is a summary of the general categories of information eventually selected as having good transfer potential. The third is a listing of areas of information currently needed by grantees. The final step is a matching of useful information to needs cited by grantees.

  13. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Webinar Series-- #2 Evalution, Monitoring & Verification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The second of a 6 part webinar series on the Rural Utility Service抯 new Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program (EECLP).

  14. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  15. 2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2005 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. In additon to providing groundwater monitoring results, this report also includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Ny County, Nevada.

  16. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate.

  17. Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling variability as well as characteristics and hydrological behavior of catchments, we have proceeded simulator and a distributed hydrological model (with four production functions and a distributed transfer

  18. Application of Tritium Remote Control and Monitoring System (TRECAMS) to TFTR`s tritium inventory management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, G.; Bashore, D.; Dong, J.; Diesso, M.; Mika, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TFTR has a stringent program to manage and account for its tritium inventory. In support of this a tritium inventory accounting capability has been implemented on TRECAMS. This was an ideal approach because TRECAMS is a high reliability system that monitors the necessary parameters, i.e., temperatures, pressures, valve positions, etc., to track the movement of tritium. It also has a powerful set of utilities which support such an application. This paper describes the application of TRECAMS to monitor the transfer of tritium between the Uranium Beds (UBEDs), the Tritium Gas Delivery Manifold (TGDM), 14 Tritium Use Point holding volumes, and the TFTR torus. Real time data is presented to the TFTR operators using graphical displays and trends. An event driven program automatically collects the data before and after tritium transfers, calculates differences and sums, tabulates the data and provides printed reports. The reports include summaries of tritium deliveries, bleedback operations, injections, a daily summary of delivery/bleedback activities, and a daily summary of injection activities. All reference data is archived and can be reproduced in a plotted or tabular format. This data can be displayed or printed by the TFTR Shift Supervisor`s VAX workstation or by anyone with an account on the laboratory`s VAX cluster.

  19. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program during calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling & Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits. The Appendix identifies the samples EEM plans to submit for analysis in CY-1997. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring (especially Appendix G) (VTHC 1995a), Effluent Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Data (WHC 1995b), Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (WHC 1994b), and Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (DOE 1996). Should changes to this document be necessary, WSCF or the Air & Water Services (A&WS) Organization may amend it at any time with a jointly approved internal memo.

  20. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  1. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    - active programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers a sim- ple controllers, have simple behaviors. However, the above trajectory spends most of its time wend- ing its way

  2. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS-1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

  3. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The REMS Program Policy for submitting of PII information in accordance with the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) under DOE Order 231.1B and the REMS Reporting Guide.

  4. Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kush, J. A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commerce or any other business or industrial organization. HRM's officers and directors are employees of its participating companies. HRM does not have any paid employees it contracts for all necessary services. Radian Corporation has been contracted... participating companies. HRM does not have any paid employees it contracts for 119 all necessary services. Radian Corporation has been contracted for the ambient air monitoring and special studies for all phases of HRM thus far. All participating companies...

  5. Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Sciences The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System David G Tarboton1 , David Maidment2 , Ilya Zaslavsky3 Sciences. Hydrologic Information Systems (HIS) are part of this infrastructure. Hydrologic information--Hydrologic Information System; Web services; Data Model; Hydrology I. INTRODUCTION The advancement of hydrologic science

  6. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Ph. D. Student: Christopher captures the hydrology is important for determining the effectiveness of a terrain simplification technique also present a novel ter- rain simplification algorithm based on the compression of hydrology features

  7. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Jonathan Muckella , Marcus network. A quan- titative measurement of how accurately a drainage network captures the hydrology to preserve the important hydrology features. This method and other simplification schemes are then evaluated

  8. Teaching Estuarine Hydrology with Online Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed . Coastal ocean . Hydrology . Education . SanSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007a. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay andSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007b. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay and

  9. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  10. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  11. Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring & Analysis Program- Characterizing Loanstar Buildings & Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challa, V.; Athar, A.; Abbas, M.; Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.

    ) conversion. Other widely recommended measures arc the conversion of incandescent lighting to fluorescent lighting and installing an Energy Monitoring and Control System (EMC...$). TIle estimated savings frollllhese retrofits arc more or less in line..., TX, May 13-14, 1992 Code Building Area Recommended Retrofits Aetro", Completion SQ-It 081e ZEC zachry Engineerlng Cenler 324,000 VAV (48Ohp), EMCS Ma,ch 1991 U,T, Austin EOB Educalion Buildinn 251,161 UOhlS Incd ,OS, VAV (4oohp), VSP 75hp...

  12. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: Monitoring EGS-Related Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel; Carwile, Clifton

    2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews technologies that could be applicable to Enhanced Geothermal Systems development. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from hydrothermal to hot dry rock. We monitored recent and ongoing research, as reported in the technical literature, that would be useful in expanding current and future geothermal fields. The literature review was supplemented by input obtained through contacts with researchers throughout the United States. Technologies are emerging that have exceptional promise for finding fractures in nonhomogeneous rock, especially during and after episodes of stimulation to enhance natural permeability.

  13. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program during calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greager, E.M.

    1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits. The Appendix identifies the samples EEM plans to submit for analysis in CY-1998. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring (especially Appendix G) (WHC 1995a), Effluent Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Data (WHC 1995b), Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan (WMNW 1997), and Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (DOE 1996). Should changes to this document be necessary, WSCF or the Waste Management Federal Services, Inc. (WMH) Air and Water Services (AWS) Organization may amend it at any time with a jointly approved internal memo.

  14. The integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : U.S. Forest Service Fish Abundance and Steelhead Redd Surveys Annual Report : January 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Call, Justin

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract report is one of a series of reports that document implementation components of the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) funded project: Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00, Chris Jordan, NOAA-NWFSC project sponsor). Other components of the project are separately reported, as explained below. The ISEMP project has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical data management, communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonids populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, ISEMP has adopted an approach to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot areas, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ES

  15. Report on the biological monitoring program for Bear Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 1989-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L. [ed.] [ed.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Cada, G.F.; Peterson, M.J. [and others] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bear Creek Valley watershed drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in the Bear Creek Valley resulted in the contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Ecological monitoring by the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was initiated in the Bear Creek watershed in May 1984 and continues at present. Studies conducted during the first year provided a detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek. The initial characterization was followed by a biological monitoring phase in which studies were conducted at reduced intensities.

  16. The limnology of L Lake: Results of the L-Lake monitoring program, 1986--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    L Lake was constructed in 1985 on the upper regions of Steel Creek, SRS to mitigate the heated effluents from L Reactor. In addition to the NPDES permit specifications (Outfall L-007) for the L-Reactor outfall, DOE-SR executed an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that thermal effluents from L-Reactor will not substantially alter ecosystem components in the approximate lower half of L Lake. This region should be inhabited by Balanced (Indigenous) Biological Communities (BBCs) in accordance with Section 316(a) of the Pollution Control (Clean Water) Act (Public Law 92-500). In response to this requirement the Environmental Sciences Section/Ecology Group initiated a comprehensive biomonitoring program which documented the development of BBCs in L Lake from January 1986 through December 1989. This report summarizes the principal results of the program with regards to BBC compliance issues and community succession in L Lake. The results are divided into six sections: water quality, macronutrients, and phytoplankton, aquatic macrophytes, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, and community succession. One of the prime goals of the program was to detect potential reactor impacts on L Lake.

  17. Method, system and computer program product for monitoring and optimizing fluid extraction from geologic strata

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medizade, Masoud (San Luis Obispo, CA); Ridgely, John Robert (Los Osos, CA)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement which utilizes an inexpensive flap valve/flow transducer combination and a simple local supervisory control system to monitor and/or control the operation of a positive displacement pump used to extract petroleum from geologic strata. The local supervisory control system controls the operation of an electric motor which drives a reciprocating positive displacement pump so as to maximize the volume of petroleum extracted from the well per pump stroke while minimizing electricity usage and pump-off situations. By reducing the electrical demand and pump-off (i.e., "pounding" or "fluid pound") occurrences, operating and maintenance costs should be reduced sufficiently to allow petroleum recovery from marginally productive petroleum fields. The local supervisory control system includes one or more applications to at least collect flow signal data generated during operation of the positive displacement pump. No flow, low flow and flow duration are easily evaluated using the flap valve/flow transducer arrangement.

  18. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  19. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Black, M.C. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)] [and others

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  20. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  1. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations the CSIRO (Australia) monitoring program from aircraft 1972 - 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsmore, D.J.; Pearman, G.I. [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Victoria (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations were measured in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Australia-New Zealand region and as far south as Antarctica for the period 1972-1981. The samples were collected from aircraft over a large range of latitudes and altitudes. The sampling program has been based on the cooperation of the Australia Department of Transport, Quantas Airways, Trans Australia Airlines, the United States, New Zealand and Australian Air Forces and occasional chartering of light aircraft for special purposes.

  2. Weatherization assistance program. Final monitoring report for Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization programs for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada. This final report summarizes both the findings and the recommendations that emerged from the forty (40) visits to grantees and subgrantees. The remarks are not intended to be detailed and exhaustive. Specific problems, achievements, and recommendations are to be found in the narrative reports. But some findings and traits are sufficiently general that they warrant being included in this final report. The recommendations reflect those general characteristics.

  3. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2003 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam Juvenile Fish Facility (LGR) was characterized by water temperatures, total flows and spill that were below the five year average, low levels of debris, and increased smolt collection numbers compared to 2002 with the exception of unclipped sockeye/kokanee. There were 6,183,825 juvenile salmonids collected. Of these, 6,054,167 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,957,885 by barge and 96,282 by truck. An additional 102,340 fish were bypassed back to the river, primarily due to research projects with another 62,122 bypassed through the PIT-tag bypass system. According to the PTAGIS database, 152,268 PIT-tagged fish were detected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, Smolt Monitoring Staff recorded 345 PIT-tagged raceway and sample mortalities. Of the 6,183,825 total fish collected, 113,290 were PIT-tagged or radio tagged and 380 were sacrificed by researchers. The collection included 836,885 fish that had hatchery marks other than clipped fins (elastomer, freeze brands or Coded Wire Tags). An estimated 54,857 incidental fish were collected with an additional 8,730 adult salmonids removed from the separator.

  4. Uncertainty of solute flux estimation in ungauged small streams:potential implications for input-output nutrient mass balances Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -output nutrient mass balances 675 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) 漏 EGU Uncertainty of stream nutrient retention/release under a wide spectrum of hydrological conditions. Providing good estimates of the mass balances for nutrients depends on precise hydrological monitoring and good chemical

  5. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico)] [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States)] [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany)] [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.] [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)] [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  6. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

  7. 2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

  8. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Baseline sampling program report: Volume 2, Appendix sections 1--7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, L.M.

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains no text. It consist entirely of results monitoring stack opacity, benzene surveys, chemical effluent in wastewater, etc.

  9. Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 63, April 1 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deinert, Mark

    Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 颅 63, April 1 颅 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002 Real radiography can be used for quantitative imaging of hydrologic phenomena at video frame rates, with great

  10. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menski, Fred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  11. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  12. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in theAN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARYGeochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in the

  13. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECHNOLOGY FOR FAULT ZONE HYDROLOGY Kenzi Karasaki Lawrencefor characterizing the hydrology of fault zones, recognizingstructure of faults to hydrology, that it still may be

  14. Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  15. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

  16. United States Department of Energy New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy. 1991--1992 Heating Oil and Propane Price Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In cooperation with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (DEPE), Office of Energy participated in a program to monitor retail prices of no. 2 heating oil and propane in New Jersey. According to program instructions, we conducted price surveys on a semi-monthly basis to obtain the necessary information from retail fuel merchants and propane dealers identified by the EIA. The period of the surveys was October 7, 1991 to March 16 1992. We submitted data collected as of specified reference dates to the EIA, within two working days of those dates.

  17. The Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Report to the Monitoring and Analysis Review Committee, August 1991 (Volume II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Athar, A.; Kissock, J. K.; Reddy, T. A.; Ruch, D. K.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Willis, D.; Lopez, R.; Sparks, R. J.; Bryant, J.; O'Neal, D. L.; Heffington, W. M.; Brown, M.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LoanSTAR program has now completed its second prototype year. This report is Volume II of a two volume set that documents the progress since the January 1991 MARC meeting. This second volume contains papers and ...

  18. TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Citation: Hudson, R., and G. Horel. 2007. An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver Island and south

  19. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  20. Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs Jeffrey C, before a hydrologic and climatic transition in the late Noachian led to a decrease in erosion rates the temporal evolution of Martian groundwater hydrology during the Noachian and early Hesperian epochs using

  1. Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and QuestionsQuestions Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University Hydrologic Model Schematic state variables e.g. snow, soil moisture Hydrologic Models streamflow Meteorological Data ( )station, gridded Land Cover

  2. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  3. RREC -October 2014 Use of Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    RREC - October 2014 Use of Hydrology and Hydraulics to Support Environmental Response Hydrology 颅 the study of the movement of water. Usage for this application is to mean the quantification at the site was Broad scale steps: 颅 Prepare hydrologic model to estimate river flow at points of interest

  4. 5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 547颅577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/5/547/2008/ 漏 Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions Papers published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  5. Energy Management and Control Systems and their Use for Performance Monitoring in the LoanSTAR Program, Technical Report prepared for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Energy and Environment Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemeier, K. E.; Akbari, H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-93/06-02 LBL-33114 UC-350 LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR USE FOR PERFORMANCE MONITORING IN THE LOANSTAR PROGRAM Final Report Prepared...

  6. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  7. Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

  8. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D. [and others] [and others

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  9. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  10. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental monitoring programs Operational environments Decontamination and decommissioning projects Compliance assessments Radiological release programs ORISE is actively...

  11. Curso 7-Modelos Digitais de Elevao na Hidrologia: Extrao de Atributos Hidrolgicos da Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic Attributes from Topography Data

  12. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  13. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation Induced Biogeochemical, intensively studied over the last 20 years (4), has potential to further impact bioremediation efforts

  15. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  16. Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universit盲t

    Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological information B. Devaraju, N. Sneeuw Institute of Geodesy, Universit篓at Stuttgart, Germany estimates of mass changes with observed hydrological data, which is available for 20% of the land area

  17. Effective monitoring of non-chromate chemical treatment programs for refinery cooling systems using sewage water as make-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlMajnouni, A.D.; Jaffer, A.E. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated sewage water as make-up to the cooling tower requires novel approaches to control potential cooling water problems common to refineries besides meeting environmental regulations. An intensive field study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of non-chromate treatment programs. On-line cleaning of the exchangers occurred prior to instituting the new chemical treatment program. Low carbon steel corrosion rates with minimal deposition was achieved. Microbiological fouling was controlled with chlorination and non-oxidizing biocide program. Field results are presented which compare the efficacy of these proprietary treatments to control corrosion and inhibit scale and fouling. Analytical results which provide a comprehensive performance evaluation of a new non-chromate chemical treatment program are presented.

  18. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology catalogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matalucci, R.V. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Esparza-Baca, C.; Jimenez, R.D. [Applied Sciences Laboratory, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents a summary of 58 technologies that are being developed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology (OST) to provide site, waste, and process characterization and monitoring solutions to the DOE weapons complex. The information was compiled to provide performance data on OST-developed technologies to scientists and engineers responsible for preparing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) and preparing plans and compliance documents for DOE cleanup and waste management programs. The information may also be used to identify opportunities for partnering and commercialization with industry, DOE laboratories, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. Each technology is featured in a format that provides: (1) a description, (2) technical performance data, (3) applicability, (4) development status, (5) regulatory considerations, (6) potential commercial applications, (7) intellectual property, and (8) points-of-contact. Technologies are categorized into the following areas: (1) Bioremediation Monitoring, (2) Decontamination and Decommissioning, (3) Field Analytical Laboratories, (4) Geophysical and Hydrologic Characterization, (5) Hazardous Inorganic Contaminant Analysis, (6) Hazardous Organic Contaminant Analysis, (7) Mixed Waste, (8) Radioactive Contaminant Analysis, (9) Remote Sensing,(10)Sampling and Drilling, (11) Statistically Guided Sampling, and (12) Tank Waste.

  19. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL抯 role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  20. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY2012 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspections completed by the GWPP on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2010 through 2012. In addition, this report also documents well inspections performed under the Y-12 Water Resources Restoration Program, which is administered by URS|CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). This report documents well maintenance activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2009); and provides summary tables of well inspections and well maintenance activities during the reference time period.

  1. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  2. TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production in Two Partially Harvested Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Forest ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  3. TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest: effects of partial retention harvesting, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Abstract

  4. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

  5. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    springs and fumaroles are consistent with a magnetic source for some of the carbon and helium discharged in thermal areas, and observed changes in 3-He4-He between 1978 and 1984...

  6. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by pumping at the geothermal production well field nearby. Authors Christopher D. Farrar, Michael L. Sorey, S.A. Rojstaczer, Cathy J. Janik, T.L. Winnett and M.D. Clark...

  7. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show distinct responses to the Chalfant Valley earthquakes. Authors Christopher D. Farrar, M.L. Sorey, S.A. Rojstaczer, A.C. Steinemann and M.D. Clark Published U.S. Geological...

  8. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera, Mono County,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9 CorporationHydraA) JumpMenderes

  9. Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU Center for Contaminant Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU 颅 Center for Contaminant Hydrology Coordinator The Center for Contaminant Hydrology (CCH) ( HYPERLINK "http://www.engr.colostate.edu/CCH/" www

  10. Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks Quatre remarques sur la online xxx Presented by Ghislain de Marsily Keywords: Geomorphology Hydrology River network Mots cle

  11. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  12. Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

  13. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

  14. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secrest, Laura A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether the monitoring construct is unitary or multidimensional. The LISREL 8.3 program was used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and structural modeling analyses on the proposed theoretical models. A total of 419 elementary school children...

  15. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  16. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  17. Influence of soil physicochemical properties on hydrology and restoration response in Carolina Bay wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C. D.; Andrews, D.M.; Kolka, R.K.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina Bays are shallow depression wetlands found in the southeast US that have been severely altered by human activity. The need to restore these complex and diverse systems is well established, but our understanding of basic wetland hydrological processes is limited, hence our ability to predict the need for and/or assess the effectiveness of bay restorations is hindered. Differing physicochemical properties of soils within bay interiors may control bay hydrology. However, previous efforts to establish relationships between soil characteristics and bay hydrology have been inconclusive and the question still remains as to why some bays are ponded throughout the year while others, within a similar landscape unit, are predominantly dry. An assessment of soil and hydrologic characteristics was initiated in restored and unrestored control bays to determine if a relationship exists. Soil morphology was described and permanent monitoring wells were installed at each site. Soil samples were collected by horizon to a depth of 2 meters at the topographic center of each site, and then analyzed. After three years, multiple regression analysis (stepwise backward and forward) was used to establish relationships between the soil physicochemical characteristics and bay hydroperiod in the undisturbed sites. Results from surface soils indicated that exchangeable acidity (EA) was the best single predictor of hydrology. The best double predictor was EA and total N and EA, total N and total C as the best triple predictor. A significant relationship (r2 = 0.96) between hydroperiod and clay content in the argillic horizon (Bt) was also observed. Subsequently, this relationship was utilized to predict hydrologic response using pre-restoration hydroperiod data. The model accurately identified sites that did not need hydrologic restoration (too wet), and effectively showed sites that responded well to restoration activities.

  18. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  19. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  20. Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis Tom Fricker University discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (logSPM, Kuczera et al., 2006). The purpose). 1 #12;3 The Saturated Path Hydrology Model We consider the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (log

  1. 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Charles

    Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

  2. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  3. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  4. Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

  5. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  6. Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Marla Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

  7. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regime on vernal pool hydrology. Freshwater Biology 50:and L. Stromberg. (1998). Hydrology of vernal pools on non-Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools

  8. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-IMPLICIT SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-arising in subsurface hydrology. These problems includeFinite Element Method in Hydrology," Int. Jour. Num. Meth.

  9. Research connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistry in California oak woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Dahlgren, Randy A; Swarowsky, Alexandre; Tate, Kenneth W; Lewis, David J; Singer, Michael J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dahlgren RA, Tate KW. 2000. Hydrology in a California oakResearch connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistrybetween nitrogen cycling and soil hydrology in a manner that

  10. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

  11. Journal of Hydrology (NZ) 47 (2): 67-83 2008 New Zealand Hydrological Society (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of intensified irrigation practices on catchment #12;68 hydrology. The report `Growing for good the economic value of irrigation with environmental costs and sustainable agricultural practices (Poff etal) Hydrological impacts of irrigated agriculture in the Manuherikia catchment, Otago, New Zealand S. W. Kienzle1

  12. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis DeputyStructure

  13. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  14. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  15. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  16. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  17. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  18. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  19. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  20. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  1. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  2. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  3. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  4. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  5. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  6. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  7. Synopsis of the first cycle of the pulp and paper mill environmental effects monitoring program in the Atlantic region. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-99-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, R.; Smith, N.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 1992 amendments to the Federal Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations included changes in effluent limits and a requirement for every Canadian pulp and paper mill to conduct an environmental effects monitoring (EEM) program in order to determine if the fish, fish habitat, and the utilization of the fishery resource were being adequately protected by the requirements of the Regulations. This report summarizes results of 17 EEM studies of the mills operating in the Atlantic region. Study components included: An adult fish survey; an invertebrate community survey; measurements for chlorinated dioxins and furans, if the mills used chlorine for bleaching; supporting water and sediment quality measurements; and a fish tainting study if there was any public concern about the tainting of fish. Monitoring techniques that produced useful results are identified along with areas where problems were encountered. Changes are recommended for the next cycle of the EEM program.

  8. Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    1 Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) 漏 EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling? Keith hydrological models in hydrology as an expression of a pragmatic realism. Some of the problems of distributed

  9. Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data Jonathan Muckella , Marcus Andradeb , W present a new data structure for simplifing terrain that captures hydrology significant features using. This allows better compression ratios the standard Triangu- lated Irregular Networks with highier hydrology

  10. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  11. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Hudson and Axel Anderson KEYWORDS: Water management, Coastal watersheds, hydrological modeling CITATIONPractice. ResearchSection,Coast ForestRegion, BCMOF,Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-022. EN-022 Hydrology March 2006

  12. Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Jim

    : Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology . James O. Berger potential use in hydrology. These tools include Bayesian model selection, new computational techniques be applied to problems in hy颅 drology. Keywords: Bayesian Inference, Hydrology, Model Selection, Bayes

  13. CONTINUOUSTIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUS颅TIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen颅water system in groundwater hydrology is given. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation, i for an air颅water system in groundwater hydrology, ff = a; w [1], [11], [26]: @(OEae ff s ff ) @t +r \\Delta

  14. Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland Paula J. Mousera,*, W. Cully to hydrologic changes is imperative for successful conservation and remediation efforts. We studied a 1.25-ha Vermont kettlehole bog for one year (September 2001颅October 2002) to identify hydrologic controls

  15. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology,Tsitika Watershed.Research Section,CoastForest Region,BCMOF, Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-021. EN-021 Hydrology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-021 March 2006 Forest Research

  16. 2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN Yoram Rubin, Professor of Civil hydrology. Starting from 1987, Yoram has published a considerable body of important articles, primarily works have always addressed central problems of hydrologic modeling, on both fundamental and applied

  17. Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dr Measurements with Hydrologic Data H. Kindt 1, J. Riegger 1, A. B谩rdossy 1, B. Devaraju 2 and N. Sneeuw 2 henry pattern for which storage changes can be constrained within the limits of hydrological data uncertainty. 2

  18. Hydrology in Practice Elizabeth M. Shaw -Former Lecturer and Hydrologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Hydrology in Practice 4th Edition Elizabeth M. Shaw - Former Lecturer and Hydrologist Keith J Environment Centre, University of Lancaster, UK Rob Lamb - Consultant, JBA Consulting About the book Hydrology in Practice is an excellent and very successful introductory text for engineering hydrology students who go

  19. Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1 1 Great Lakes forecasts in operational hydrology builds a sample of possibilities for the future, of climate series from-parametric method can be extended into a new weighted parametric hydrological forecasting technique to allow

  20. Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research Christian Skalka gathering system for snow hydrology field re- search campaigns conducted in harsh climates and remote areas for understanding hydrological and ecological processes and incorporating those pro- cesses in agricultural

  1. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor 庐 for chemistry/24) SFEI Sediment Chemistry, Benthic Samples 2.3 Activities August 24, 1995 0700颅0720 Mobilized gear at R

  2. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor 庐 . 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2.1 Objectives, 1994 0710颅0716 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina, departed for Pacheco Creek site

  3. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor庐 for chemistry samples 0700颅0931 Mobilized gear aboard R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina. Departed for Grizzly Bay site (BF

  4. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor庐. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2.1 Objectives The objectives/26) SFEI Sediment chemistry, benthic samples #12;2.3 Activities August 25, 1994 0710颅0716 Mobilized gear

  5. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor 庐 . 2.0 CRUISE REPORT.3 Activities February 16, 1995 0700颅0717 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez Marina, departed Marina, mobilized benthic sampling gear onto vessel. February 17, 1995 0655颅0717 Mobilized gear at R

  6. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor庐. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2 chemistry, benthic samples 2.3 Activities 2/10/94 0700颅0730 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez;1640颅1745 Mobilized benthic sampling gear onto vessel, replaced zinc anode on stern of vessel. 2/11/94 0700

  7. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted from the R/V David Johnston using a 0.1-m 2 Van Veen grab coated with Dykor庐. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT 2 chemistry, benthic samples 2.3 Activities 2/10/94 0700颅0730 Mobilized gear at R/V David Johnston, Martinez benthic sampling gear onto vessel, replaced zinc anode on stern of vessel. 2/11/94 0700颅0720 Mobilized

  8. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    containing the bivalves were gently scrubbed with a brush to remove any fouling organisms. 2.0 CRUISE REPORT stations, the mussels at some stations had not generated any byssal threads and sounded hollow when

  9. Cruise Report Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    samples for Dr. K. Bruland of UC Santa Cruz were collected at Dumbarton Bridge. All sampling except Bridge site for Dr. Ken Bruland of UC Santa Cruz. 2.2 Personnel The personnel and work assignments

  10. Appendix MON: WIPP Monitoring Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 TableimpurityAppeals8I CulturalM

  11. Energy Monitoring--The State of the Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusnak, J. J.; McEver, R.; Dragoo, W.

    In the past decade, energy monitoring has become an invaluable part of energy conservation programs. A fully implemented and effective monitoring program provides management with the assurance that all other elements of their energy management...

  12. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  13. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

  14. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 20952101 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2006; Lis et al., 2008). The capital cost is much lower, as well as the operation costs per analysed, Stockholm, Sweden 2 University of Arizona, Hydrology and Water Resources, Tucson, AZ, USA *Correspondence to), Pearce (1990), Burns (2002), Buttle and McDonnell (2004)] stream water comes. Such estimates can help

  15. bor is an e g hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Jon Harb managin North Am environm Atmosph Research founding served a Denver a Harbor i extensive has co-a papers in sciences geograph from the American Society, New Zea Science Physical and the G bor is an e g hydrologic merica, Eur mental scien heric Science h, Interim D co-director as Dean

  16. Ch.10 Connections Why is hydrology important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    , irrigation engineers have designed drainage systems to carry unwanted salts away from the agricultural areas in transporting dissolved and suspended materials through phases of biogeochemical cycles. #12;Irrigation Impacts The main purpose of irrigation is to modify the hydrological cycle in a way that allow crops to flourish

  17. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 揈nvironmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 揈nvironmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 揈nvironmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  1. Hydrology of the Texas Blackland Prairie: Riesel Watershed Data and Published Hydrologic Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    , OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas..., OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas...

  2. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  3. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  4. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  5. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  6. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  7. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  8. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  9. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 22, 10801092 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    monitoring programme Chi-Man Leung* and Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong

  10. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  11. The impact of climate change on vadose zone pore waters and its implication for long-term monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glassley, William E.; Nitao, John J.; Grant, Charles W.; Johnson, James W.; Steefel, Carl I.; Kercher, James R.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protecting groundwater is of growing interest as pressure on these resources grows. Recharge of groundwater takes place through the vadose zone, where complex interactions between thermal-hydrological-geochemical processes affect water quality. Monitoring processes in the vadose zone is an important means of evaluating the long-term health of aquifer systems, and has become an integral part of many subsurface engineering efforts. Monitoring such systems, however, may be affected by changes in climate that slowly propagate through vadose zone systems. We describe in this paper the use of NUFT-C, a reactive transport simulator designed to run on a high performance, massively parallel computer, to compare quantitatively the evolution of a deep vadose zone with changes expected from an engineered high-level nuclear waste repository. The results suggest that the impacts from waste emplacement are, in some instances, similar to those that would be observed as a result of climate change, whereas others are distinguishable from evolution of the natural system. Such simulations facilitate design of long-term monitoring programs that take account of these complex effects. The results emphasize the importance of developing long-term baseline measurements and control sites, in order to enhance confidence in interpretations of complexly evolving data sets that will be obtained from multi-decade monitoring efforts.

  12. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

  13. Groundwater Quality Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  14. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Geological Survey, Water Res. Investigations Rep. 95-United States. J. Amer. Water Resources Assoc, 35, 1525-hydrology. J. American Water Resources Association, 39, 771-

  15. assessing hydrological alteration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (SFHS) is a non-profit, professional society, established to provide Sukop, Mike 217 South Florida Hydrologic Society Dr Joseph D Hughes Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  16. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. yushuwuthmcmodelingpeer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Me...

  18. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  19. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the...

  20. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Eric Sonnenthal (PI) Jonny...

  1. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  2. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  3. Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527537 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees 527 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527颅537 (2002) 漏 EGS Hydrological processes in the catchments, playing a relevant hydrological and geomorphic role. Annual precipitation is 924 mm and potential

  4. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) 漏 EGU The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology

  5. Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas 891 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) 漏 EGU Recession-based hydrological.R. Young1 and S.R. Kansakar2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK 2

  6. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2004 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2004. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2004 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2004 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2004 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G contai

  7. The Pipe vs. The Shed: Waste Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lather, Alaska; Wozniak, Monika

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting Bypaper was to compare the hydrology of the East Bay Municipala stream and watershed hydrology. Using stream flow data for

  8. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

  9. abort-gap monitor bsra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new declarative, interpreted and Generalised Event Monitoring language (GEM), used to program event monitors which can perform common processing activities such as fi... Masoud...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced corrosion monitoring Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Collection: Fossil Fuels 2 Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a...

  11. Geochemical evidence for the hydrology of a Tamarack-peat bog, Brimfield Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.; Miller, L.A. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology and Water Resources)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat Bogs and wetlands represent unique environmental settings what are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic stresses involving inputs of water and chemicals. This study used geochemical and hydrologic monitoring to determine the inputs and fates of elements of the Kent-Brimfield bog located in Portage County, Ohio. Based on physical and chemical information collected over one year, a model is proposed here describing the hydrologic connection between a bog and shallow ground water surrounding the bog. The chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and ground water in the bog vicinity were monitored for one year. Field measurements included water levels, pH, Eh, alkalinity and temperature. Trace metal content of the peat, the pore waters, soil water and ground waters were determined by GFAA, ICP and LIC methods. This bog was found to function as part of a perched water table aquifer. Water in the upper 3 m of the bog is found to be chemically similar to precipitation, but modified by reactions involving dissolution of mineral matter and biologic processes. The chemistry of water deeper in the bog (> 3m) resembles shallow ground water surrounding the bog, modified by weathering of underlying geologic materials and sulfate reduction. This similarity, along with ground water elevations within and outside of the bog, supports that shallow ground water interacts with, and helps maintain water levels in the upper surface of the bog. From these results, a model is proposed for the seasonal variations in hydrologic processes operating in the wetland and surrounding basin, and describes how wetlands may change seasonally from being influent to effluent systems.

  12. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  13. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  15. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  17. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  18. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  19. Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    INSIGHT: Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools Laura Paeglis, IWM and GeoHydrologic Tools #12;What is INSIGHT? 路 Interactive, web-based maps. 路 Evaluations of basins and their status as fully or overappropriated. 路 Educational tool for water managers and the public. 路 One

  20. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorkland, Ronald, E-mail: r_bjorkland@hotmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced environmental management. Adaptive database framework is needed to accommodate project-monitoring data.

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  2. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  3. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  4. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix B to Attachment 3, Lithologic logs and monitor well construction information. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains lithology logs and monitor well construction information for: NC processing site; UC processing site; and Burro Canyon disposal site. This information pertains to the ground water hydrology investigations which is attachment 3 of this series of reports.

  5. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

  6. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

  7. Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco Dear Hydrology Section president Rafael Bras and President-elect George Hornberger, members of the hydrology of the breadth of possibilities that hydrology represents overall. Hence, I was grateful to be reminded, during

  8. Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist 颅 Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015 runoff. This position requires applied, working knowledge of forest hydrology, hydrology modelling to support the use of i-Tree-related hydrologic models and tools. Develop framework for i-Tree Hydro

  9. Marsh, mudflat and tidal creek assessment Cumberland Island National Seashore. Kings Bay Environmental Monitoring Program cumberland island national seashore. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, L.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to determine whether backbarrier dredging for the Kings Bay Naval Base is affecting marsh habitat sustainability on Cumberland Island. Research was predicated on the hypothesis that if the operation is indeed exerting an influence on Cumberland Island, it will most likely be first perceived in the effect it has on the rates of supply and delivery of sediments to the marshes and mudflats. The authors located three comparable sites, which experience a different level of exposure to the effects of dredging. Second, we initiated a time-series of marsh/mudflat sedimentation measurements, which are expected to be continued in future years. Finally, we compared six different methods for monitoring sedimentation, all of which are currently in practice.

  10. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  11. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  12. Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated With Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 WMA T Tank Farm Pump-and-Treat System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump-and-treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 T Tank Farm pump-and-treat system monitor wells during a recent shutdown (May 1, 2008) and restart activity (June 4, 2008) involving extraction well 299-W11-46. Specifically, this report 1) applies to recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses to determine large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) assesses characteristics and conditions that influence hydrologic responses (both laterally and vertically) associated with pump-and-treat systems. The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  13. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  14. active layer hydrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SFHS) is a non information, contact: - Neil JohnsonMWH - Jayantha ObeysekeraSFWMD - Mike SukopFIU - Chris PetersCH2M HILL Sukop, Mike 199 Eco-hydrological controls on...

  15. Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Building a Texas Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Cycle Building a Texas Hydrologic Information System TX-HIS #12;Q to couple streamflow models to GCMs 路 We need to break the hydro-illogical cycle and plan for the delivery

  16. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  17. Review of soil water models with respect to savanna hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derry, Julian F; Russell, Graham; Liedloff, Adam C

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective management leading towards sustainable rangeland production in arid and semi-arid regions will stem from effective soil water management and comprehension of the hydrological properties of the soil in relation to pastoralism. However...

  18. Hydrological and Oceanographic Considerations for Integrated Coastal Zone Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainable economic development. This study aims to support environmental management at the scaleHydrological and Oceanographic Considerations for Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Southern reduce soil fertility in the uplands and nega- tively affect mangrove, seagrass, and coral reef

  19. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  20. Modelling the hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karatay, Mehmet Rahmi

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to better understand the relationships between basal water pressure, friction, and sliding mechanisms at ice sheet scales. In particular, it develops a new subglacial hydrology model (Hydro) to explicitly ...

  1. CE 372 Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics Learning objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmann, Chris

    time of concentration in two ways. Compute time of concentration using the kinematic-wave, Kerby for exams. 1. Identify and explain processes in the hydrologic cycle. Carry out a water balance. 2. Define

  2. annual groundwater monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 58 (2012) Volunteer Ground-Water Monitoring Coming to Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 1 Dedicated to Sharing Information...

  3. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extensive monitoring programs for trace radionuclides relevant to the observation of illicit nuclear activities. FUNDING SOURCE: United States Department of Energy NA22 FOR MORE...

  4. Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law establishes criteria for three levels of credible data for a surface water quality monitoring and assessment program and establishes the necessary training and experience for persons to...

  5. Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    radioactivity. Visit http:www.cemp.dri.edu for more information on the off-site air monitoring program. "Each year, we use this report as one of our tools to inform the...

  6. Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awwad, Haitham Munir

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Approved as to style and content by: uan B. Valdes (Chair of Committee) alph A. Wurbs (Member) Marshall J. Mc...

  7. Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    .S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Cambridge Massachusetts March 30 - April 1, 2000 by David, Cambridge, Massachusetts. http://nexus.umn.edu/Papers/Monitoring.pdf #12;Outline Complexity of Problem be linked to Master plans Capital Improvement Programs Financing System Development Regulation #12

  8. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  9. WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLarge file sizeMonitoring

  10. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  11. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  12. Sustainable Energy Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanner, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... Appoint Energy Manager Analyze Existing Conditions Develop Plan Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature District Commitment...

  13. A proposed Approach to Monitoring and Assessing Drought in the Caribbean Adrian Trotman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    A proposed Approach to Monitoring and Assessing Drought in the Caribbean By Adrian Trotman1 , L the past two decades have prompted the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) to pay teamed with the Brace Centre, McGill University under the Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN) project

  14. A Nonparametric Multivariate Multi-Index Drought Monitoring Framework ZENGCHAO HAO AND AMIR AGHAKOUCHAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Sarah

    making, as well as for taking prompt and effective actions to avoid璻educe the effects of droughts to characterize agricultural and hydrological droughts (Hayes et al. 2011). The standard- ization conceptA Nonparametric Multivariate Multi-Index Drought Monitoring Framework ZENGCHAO HAO AND AMIR

  15. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  16. The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status 345 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) 漏 EGU Anatomy of a catchment: the relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status C

  17. Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability 325 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) 漏 EGU Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability: the River Irthing

  18. Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629644 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution 629 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629颅644 (2001) 漏 EGS Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution M.T. van Wijk and W

  19. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615627 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology 615 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615颅627 (2001) 漏 EGS Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity颅rain rate relationships for radar hydrology* Remko Uijlenhoet1 Sub-department Water Resources

  20. Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU Over-parameterisation, a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des

  1. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  2. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  3. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  4. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

  5. State Energy Program Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Program Operations Manual is a reference tool for the states and the program officials at the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and Regional Support Offices as well as State Energy Offices. The Manual contains information needed to apply for and administer the State Energy Program, including program history, application rules and requirements, and program administration and monitoring requirements.

  6. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  7. assistance program plan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their site visit o Outline for today Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth 69 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Program Plan Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  8. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  9. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  10. GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

  11. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  12. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  13. Updating the US Hydrologic Classification: An Approach to Clustering and Stratifying Ecohydrologic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic classifications unveil the structure of relationships among groups of streams with differing stream flow and provide a foundation for drawing inferences about the principles that govern those relationships. Hydrologic classes provide a template to describe ecological patterns, generalize hydrologic responses to disturbance, and stratify research and management needs applicable to ecohydrology. We developed two updated hydrologic classifications for the continental US using two streamflow datasets of varying reference standards. Using only reference-quality gages, we classified 1715 stream gages into 12 classes across the US. By including more streamflow gages (n=2618) in a separate classification, we increased the dimensionality (i.e. classes) and hydrologic distinctiveness within regions at the expense of decreasing the natural flow standards (i.e. reference quality). Greater numbers of classes and higher regional affiliation within our hydrologic classifications compared to that of the previous US hydrologic classification (Poff, 1996) suggested that the level of hydrologic variation and resolution was not completely represented in smaller sample sizes. Part of the utility of classification systems rests in their ability classify new objects and stratify analyses. We constructed separate random forests to predict hydrologic class membership based on hydrologic indices or landscape variables. In addition, we provide an approach to assessing potential outliers due to hydrologic alteration based on class assignment. Departures from class membership due to disturbance take into account multiple hydrologic indices simultaneously; thus, classes can be used to determine if disturbed streams are functioning within the realm of natural hydrology.

  14. Environmental Monitoring at the Savannah River Plant, Annual Report - 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, C.

    2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental monitoring program has been in existence at SRP since 1951. The original preoperational surveys have evolved into an extensive environmental monitoring program in which sample types from approximately 500 locations are analyzed for radiological and/or nonradiological parameters. The results of these analyses for 1981 are presented in this report.

  15. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  16. Hydrological, geochemical, and ecological characterization of Kesterson Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Kesterson Reservoir related research activities carried out under a cooperative program between Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of California during FY89. The primary objectives of these investigations are: Predict the extent, probability of the occurrence, and selenium concentrations in surface water of temporary wetland habitat at Kesterson; assess rates and direction of migration of the drainage water plume that seeped into the aquifer under Kesterson; monitor and predict changes in quantity and speciation of selenium in surface soils and vadose zone pore-waters; and develop a comprehensive strategy through soil, water, and vegetation management to safely dissipate the high concentrations of selenium accumulated in Kesterson soils. This report provides an up-date on progress made in each of these areas. Chapter 2 describes results of recent investigations of water table fluctuations and plume migration. Chapter 3 describes results of ongoing monitoring of soil water selenium concentrations and evaporative accumulation of selenium at the soil surface. Chapter 4 describes early results from the soil, water, and vegetation management field trials as well as supporting laboratory and theoretical studies. In Chapter 5, new analytical methods for selenium speciation are described and quality assurance/quality control statistics for selenium and boron are provided. 110 refs., 138 figs., 62 tabs.

  17. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 4261 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    autumn. Glaciers represent a substantial source of renewable energy, contribute to the sustain- ability Management, The University of British Columbia, Canada 2 BC Hydro, Burnaby, Canada, and Department of Geography, The University of British Columbia, Canada 3 Geography Program and Natural Resources

  18. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  19. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  20. The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomblies, Arne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

  1. Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

  2. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender 路 Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  3. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  4. 2 Executive Summary Figure 1 Location of White Salmon subbasin, topography, vegetation, demographics, and hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , demographics, and hydrology #12;xii 2.1 Purpose and Scope The White Salmon subbasin management plan

  5. A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkez, Branko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

  6. INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Forbes

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

  7. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  8. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

  9. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

  10. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-11:50 AM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  11. Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS To obtain (choose 4 hours) Core Courses [Requireda ] CEE 450: Surface Hydrology CEE 451: Env. Fluid Mech. CEE 457: Groundwater Hydrology CEE 434: Environmental Systems I CEE 595W: Seminar CEE 595W: Seminar Choose at least

  12. Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology Environmental, Earth and Ocean. 9758 1998 M.S. CIVIL ENGINEERING, University of New Hampshire 1994 B.S. in HYDROLOGY, University of New Hampshire, GPA 3.94/4.00 1991 Summa Cum Laude , University Honors in Hydrology AWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING

  13. Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman 358 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) 漏 EGU The role of wetlands in the hydrological cycle Andy Bullock1 and Mike Acreman2 1 Independent Consultant, Ledbury, Herefordshire, HR8 2DX, UK 2 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxon. OX10 8BB, UK

  14. Franois Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Fran莽ois Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon 940 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004.lauzon@golder.com Abstract Since the 1990s, neural networks have been applied to many studies in hydrology and water and stacking having been applied regularly in hydrology and water resources for some years, while Bayesian

  15. HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA Alonso Caballero #12;HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST and dry periods. Consequently, the tropical hydrology of cloud-forest watersheds is not well studied

  16. Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook 62 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) 漏 EGU, Wasserwirtschaftsamt Bamberg, Kasernstra?e 4, 96047 Bamberg, Germany 2 University of Freiburg, Institute of Hydrology, Fahnenbergplatz, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany E-mail for corresponding author: stefan.uhlenbro@hydrology

  17. GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-12:00PM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  18. Simulated Global Atmospheric Dust Distribution: Sensitivity to Regional Topography, Geomorphology, and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    , and Hydrology Charles S. Zender, Earth System Science Dept., UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (zender@uci.edu) David for predicting future trends in dust production. We identify three related geomorphologic and hydrologic hydrologically disturbed/renewed sed- iments. Dust models which attempt to account for sediment-rich source

  19. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography:50 AM or by appointment. Email: feifei.pan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  20. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 7389 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73颅89 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17?ironmental Engineering, Uni?ersity of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA d Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, Uni-7722 98 00143-0 #12;( )D.G. Jewett et al.rJournal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73颅8974 the interface