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1

Hydrologic monitoring program, Rifle Oil Shale Facility Site, Colorado. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

A hydrologic monitoring and assessment program is being developed to investigate the hydrologic characteristics of surface and ground waters in the region of the Anvil Points, Colorado, Rifle Oil Shale Facility. The objectives of the program are to: evaluate ground-water contributions to study streams; assess contaminant transport capability of surface and ground waters; determine peak discharge magnitude and frequency relationships for use in designing possible spent oil shale disposal works; and assess the impact of specified hypothetical problems, events, or scenarios. To accomplish these objectives, seven major tasks have been identified: (1) literature review of existing studies dealing with the regional, hydrological, physiographical, geological, and climatological characteristics; (2) ground-water characterization; (3) drainage basin characteristics and channel geometry; (4) streamflow and sediment transport; (5) stream travel times; (6) analysis of spent shale disposal; and (7) support of water quality sample collection.

Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes by Using Airborne Multispectral and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes EVS is developing a reliable, cost-effective, repeatable method for long-term, utility-scale environmental monitoring in arid environments. Environmental monitoring is one of the primary means to ensure that impacts associated with renewable energy development are minimized. One critical aspect of water resources monitoring is the study of surface hydrologic processes - flow conveyance, sediment transport, and groundwater recharge - associated with intermittent and ephemeral streams. Surface hydrology plays an important role in local ecosystems and water availability for human use, which is particularly critical for arid environments. Knowledge about ephemeral streams is the key to understanding the hydrologic cycle and how it influences the abundance and distribution

4

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling Reza Khanbilvardi Springs, MD, USA 1 Introduction Remote sensing data and information are shown great potential in supplying measurements, remote sensing based measurements are spatially averages over the pixels can appropriate

Krakauer, Nir Y.

7

Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was performed in 2004, including the installation of an injection well (Well 45) and a downgradient monitoring (Wells 41 and42)weredrilledapproximatelytwoyearspoststimulation; one was located between the injection with the polylactate decomposi- tion. The produced hydrogen can decrease the pH in the vicinity of the injection well

Chen, Jinsong

8

Pantex Plant meteorological monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

The current meteorological monitoring program of the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas, is described in detail. Instrumentation, meteorological data collection and management, and program management are reviewed. In addition, primary contacts are noted for instrumentation, calibration, data processing, and alternative databases. The quality assurance steps implemented during each portion of the meteorological monitoring program are also indicated.

Snyder, S.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Effective Date: _July 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual REVISION HISTORY Revision Date Revision Description #12;LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Page 3 of 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS

14

Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is intended to document the quality assurance of the Environmental Monitoring Program. The Quality Assurance Project Plan has two parts and is written to become a chapter in the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Part A describes the management responsibilities and activities performed to assure the quality of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Part B covers the documentation requirements for changes in the Monitoring Program, and provides details on control of the design and implementation of quality assurance activities.

Holland, R.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual Page 2 of 22 REVISIONMonitoring and Analysis Program Manual Page 3 of 22 TABLE OF

Gravois, Melanie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydrology and radionuclide migration program 1987 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's participation in the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the fiscal year 1987. The report discussed initial data from a new well (UE20n-1) drilled at the Cheshire site; presents a description of a proposed laboratory study of migration of colloids in fractured media; lists data collected during the drilling and initial sampling of UE20n-1; and describes a tentative proposal for work to be performed in FY88 by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Groundwater sampled from the new well at the Cheshire site contains tritium concentrations comparable to those measured in previous years from locations above and within the Cheshire cavity. This presence of tritium, as well as several other radionuclides, in a well 100 m away from the cavity region indicates transport of radionuclides, validates a proposed model of the flow path, and provides data on rates of groundwater flow. Previous work at the Cheshire site has shown that radionuclides are transported by colloids through fractured media. However, we have no data that can be used for predictive modeling, and existing theories are not applicable. While physical transport mechanisms of sub-micrometer colloids to defined mineral surfaces are well known, predictions based on well-defined conditions differ from experimental observations by orders of magnitude. The U.C. Berkeley group has designed a laboratory experiment to quantify colloid retention and permeability alteration by the retained colloids.

Marsh, K.V. (comp.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary ...

D. S. Bigelow; J. R. Slusser; A. F. Beaubien; J. H. Gibson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radionuclide emissions from DOE sources at ETTP must be determined for purposes of estimat- ing doseETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs Setting The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly known as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or K-25

Pennycook, Steve

27

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage yards at ETTP remained well below the requirements in DOE orders. Nonradiological emissions were airborne radionuclide emissions from DOE sources at ETTP must be determined for purposes of estimating doseETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs Setting

Pennycook, Steve

28

Review of present groundwater monitoring programs at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater monitoring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is conducted to detect the presence of radionuclides produced by underground nuclear testing and to verify the quality and safety of groundwater supplies as required by the State of Nevada and federal regulations, and by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. Groundwater is monitored at water-supply wells and at other boreholes and wells not specifically designed or located for traditional groundwater monitoring objectives. Different groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS are conducted by several DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) contractors. Presently, these individual groundwater monitoring programs have not been assessed or administered under a comprehensive planning approach. Redundancy exists among the programs in both the sampling locations and the constituents analyzed. Also, sampling for certain radionuclides is conducted more frequently than required. The purpose of this report is to review the existing NTS groundwater monitoring programs and make recommendations for modifying the programs so a coordinated, streamlined, and comprehensive monitoring effort may be achieved by DOE/NV. This review will be accomplished in several steps. These include: summarizing the present knowledge of the hydrogeology of the NTS and the potential radionuclide source areas for groundwater contamination; reviewing the existing groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS; examining the rationale for monitoring and the constituents analyzed; reviewing the analytical methods used to quantify tritium activity; discussing monitoring network design criteria; and synthesizing the information presented and making recommendations based on the synthesis. This scope of work was requested by the DOE/NV Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and satisfies the 1993 (fiscal year) HRMP Groundwater Monitoring Program Review task.

Hershey, R.L.; Gillespie, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Probability Forecasting in Sweden: Some Results of Experimental and Operational Programs at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes new operational and experimental forecasting programs at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) designed to provide users with more detailed and more useful weather forecasts. User groups currently ...

Karl-Ivar Ivarsson; Rune Joelsson; Erik Liljas; Allan H. Murphy

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flexible Hardware Acceleration for Instruction-Grain Program Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instruction-grain program monitoring tools, which check and analyze executing programs at the granularity of individual instructions, are invaluable for quickly detecting bugs and security attacks and then limiting their damage (via containment and/or ... Keywords: Log-Based Architectures, LBA, Instruction-grain Program Monitoring, Hardware Acceleration, Inheritance Tracking, Idempotent Filter, Metadata-TLB, Lifeguards

Shimin Chen; Michael Kozuch; Theodoros Strigkos; Babak Falsafi; Phillip B. Gibbons; Todd C. Mowry; Vijaya Ramachandran; Olatunji Ruwase; Michael Ryan; Evangelos Vlachos

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Results of calendar year 1994 monitor well inspection and maintenance program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compendium of results of the calendar year 1994 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the life expectancy of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant during 1994. All inspections were conducted between April and December.

McMaster, B.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, S.B.; Sitzler, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

Cathy A. Wills

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon J. FASULLO Program in Atmospheric, in final form 7 April 2005) ABSTRACT The 2002 Indian summer monsoon season is unique because of its in which ENSO events fail to be associated with significant monsoon anomalies. In this study, atmospheric

Fasullo, John

42

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides guidelines and techniques for analyzing and trending data using statistical methods for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This procedure outlines the steps used in data analysis and trending. It includes guidelines for performing data analysis and for monitoring (or controlling) processes using performance indicators. This procedure is used when trending and analyzing item characteristics and reliability, process implementation, and other quality-related information to identify items, services, activities, and processes needing improvement, in accordance with 10 CFR Part 830, Subpart A, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, and University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL. Trend codes, outlined in Attachment 4, are assigned to issues at the time of initiation and entry into the Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) database in accordance with LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Issues Management Program Manual. Throughout this procedure, the term performance is used to encompass all aspects of performance including quality, timeliness, efficiency, effectiveness, and reliability. Data analysis tools are appropriate whenever quantitative information describing the performance of an item, service, or process can be obtained.

Gravois, Melanie

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

COOPER, J.R.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

Overview of the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas LoanSTAR program is an eight year, $98 million revolving loan program, funded by oil overcharge dollars, for energy conservation retrofits in Texas state, local government and school buildings. The program began in 1988. Public sector institutions participating in the program must repay the loans according to estimated energy savings from an energy audit. This paper provides an overview of the monitoring program at Texas A&M University, the prime subcontractor to the Texas Governor's Energy Management Center on the LoanSTAR Program. As part of this program, a statewide energy Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) has been established. The major objectives of the LoanSTAR MAP are to: 1) verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, 2) reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements, 3) improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program, and 4) initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings in Texas. Currently, the program is monitoring hourly data from over two dozen building using public domain polling procedures that collect information from microcomputerbased field recorders supplied by several manufacturers. Future efforts will include investigating the feasibility of reducing energy monitoring costs by utilizing Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS)-based monitoring and expand the program into additional sites.

Turner, W. D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety March 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay

48

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety March 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay

49

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radon Monitoring Results BPA Residential Weatherization Program, Report Number 1.  

SciTech Connect

In October 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began offering free radon monitoring to participants of its regionwide Residential Weatherization Program. The purpose of the radon monitoring is to provide information to participating homeowners or consumers on the average radon concentrations within their residences. This radon concentration information and other information on indoor air quality (IAQ) is provided to assist homeowners on their decision to install ''house-tightening'' weatherization measures. This radon report will present background information on why BPA decided to offer radon monitoring, the procedures used for monitoring, the extent of BPA radon monitoring in the region, and results of this monitoring. Subsequent BPA radon monitoring reports will be produced on a quarterly basis which will include a brief narrative on the radon monitoring and provide a summary of the radon data received to date.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Scoping Evaluation to Revise the EPRI Standard Radiation Monitoring Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program (SRMP) and BWR Radiation Level Assessment and Control (BRAC) program are the cornerstone of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Radiation Management program. These programs provide an essential tie between radiation field generation and chemical and operational changes, but there is some evidence that the trends in these reactor coolant piping dose rates do not correspond to radiation field trends elsewhere in the plant. In an effort to improve corre...

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

Vibration Monitoring and Analysis Program Development: Interim Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by an EPRI team and will serve as an interim guideline to assist the member utilities in the further improvement of maintenance processes by presenting, in detail, the key elements that should be included in a well-organized vibration monitoring and analysis program, as well as conducting comprehensive vibration program evaluations. This report uses the EPRI Monitoring and Diagnostics Center's "Spider Chart" approach to depict graphic representation of the vibration monitori...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Long-Term Surveillance and Monitoring Program Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Program Monitoring Program Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report for the Period January 1,1998, Through December 31,1998 February 1999 This file contains inspection data for the Shiprock Site only. Long-Term Surveillance and Monitoring Program Annual Site inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites 1998 Annual Report February 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-966587335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number SO0184 Contents Page 1.0 Introduction .......................................................... SHP-I

54

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the third revision of the 'Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan' for groundwater wells associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: (1) inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12; (2) identifying maintenance needs that extend the life of the well and assure well-head protection is in place, and (3) identifying wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring-well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. The inspection and maintenance of groundwater monitoring wells is one of the primary management strategies of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Management Plan, 'proactive stewardship of the extensive monitoring well network at Y-12' (BWXT 2004a). Effective stewardship, and a program of routine inspections of the physical condition of each monitoring well, ensures that representative water-quality monitoring and hydrologic data are able to be obtained from the well network. In accordance with the Y-12 GWPP Monitoring Optimization Plan (MOP) for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (BWXT 2006b), the status designation (active or inactive) for each well determines the scope and extent of well inspections and maintenance activities. This plan, in conjunction with the above document, formalizes the GWPP approach to focus available resources on monitoring wells which provide the most useful data. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes: (1) the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime); (2) the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime); and (3) the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV east of scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime in the 'Updated Subsurface Database for Bear Creek Valley, Chestnut Ridge, and parts of Bethel Valley on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (BWXT 2003a). A detailed description of the hydrogeologic framework at Y-12 can be found in the GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2004a).

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An internal dose monitoring program at an academic research institution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of an internal dose monitoring program for radioactive material based on the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 26, "Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection" and the regulatory requirements contained in Title 10, Part 20 of the Code of Federal Regulations, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation". The elements of an internal dose monitoring program were reviewed as a prelude to evaluating the internal dose monitoring program at Texas A&M University. A revised internal dose monitoring program was proposed. Identification of individuals required to participate in the internal dose monitoring program was based on methodology adapted from NUREG 1400, "Air Sampling in the Workplace". A review of radioactive material use for 1996 and the bioassay records from 1980 through 1996 was used to determine radionuclide use levels to identify participants eligible for routine and confirmatory bioassays and to develop a schedule for monitoring personnel who are eligible for bioassays. Methods to calculate intake and assess dose using bioassay data were chosen. Action levels were established as percentages of the applicable regulatory dose limits. Bioassay report forms were developed and the requirements for recording results and reporting the dose assessment to regulatory agencies were established.

Carsten, Keith Eric

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Microsoft Word - WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety CARLSBAD, N.M., March 3, 2011 - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In February, the WIPP Laboratory, which operates out of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), was accredited by the DOE's Laboratory Accreditation Program for the fourth consecutive time. The lab received accreditation for conducting in vitro radiobioassay analysis - meaning it analyzes levels of radioactivity in the biological waste of radiological workers who might have come into contact with radiological

57

PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program: 2013 Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Energy Institute/Institute of Nuclear Power Operations/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Radiation Protection “RP 2020” Initiative was developed to promote radiation dose reduction by emphasizing radiological protection fundamentals and reducing radioactive source term. EPRI was charged as the technical lead in the area of source term reduction, and EPRI’s Radiation Management Program initiated a multi-year program to develop an understanding of source term ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

Lynch, Timothy P.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Monitoring Equipment Installation Manual (October 1994)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas LoanSTAR (Loans to Save Taxes and Resources) Program is a $98.6 million revolving loan fund to finance energy conservation retrofits in Texas government buildings. The loans are repaid through energy cost savings resulting from the retrofits. These energy cost savings are verified through an extensive metering and monitoring program conducted by the Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL). The National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) and its for-profit subsidiary, the NCAT Development Corporation, have been the principal monitoring instrumentation subcontractors to ESL throughout the Program's life.

Bohmer, C.; Lippman, R.; McBride, J.; Casebolt, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A reactor core on-line monitoring program - COMP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program named COMP is developed for on-line monitoring PWRs' in-core power distribution in this paper. Harmonics expansion method is used in COMP. The Unit 1 reactor of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (Daya Bay NPP) in China is considered for verification. The numerical results show that the maximum relative error between measurement and reconstruction results from COMP is less than 5%, and the computing time is short, indicating that COMP is capable for online monitoring PWRs. (authors)

Wang, C. [State Nuclear Power Software Development Center, Beijing, 100029 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ. (China); Building 1, Compound No.29, North Third Ring Road, Xicheng District, Beijing, 100029 (China); Wu, H.; Cao, L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ. (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Introduction to the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an introduction to a long-term biological monitoring program and the Environmental Management special issue titled Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management. The Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program, or BMAP, was implemented to assess biological impairment downstream of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, beginning in 1985. Several of the unique aspects of the program include its long-term consistent sampling, a focus on evaluating the effectiveness of specific facility abatement and remedial actions, and the use of quantitative sampling protocols using a multidisciplinary approach. This paper describes the need and importance of long-term watershed-based biological monitoring strategies, in particular for addressing long-term stewardship goals at DOE sites, and provides a summary of the BMAP's objectives, spatial and temporal extent, and overall focus. The primary components of the biological monitoring program for East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee are introduced, as are the additional 9 papers in this Environmental Management special issue.

Peterson, Mark J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nonradiological Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program FY 1991, annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 12 liquid effluent streams from fiscal year 1987 through fiscal year 1991 are presented with emphasis on fiscal year 1991 (October 1990 through September 1991) activities.

Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.; Einerson, J.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nonradiological Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program FY 1991, annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 12 liquid effluent streams from fiscal year 1987 through fiscal year 1991 are presented with emphasis on fiscal year 1991 (October 1990 through September 1991) activities.

Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.; Einerson, J.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Draft Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major objectives of the LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) are to: verify energy and dollar savings of energy conservation retrofits in state, school and local government buildings; reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements at facilities receiving retrofits; improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR Program; and provide a detailed data base of energy use in commercial/institutional buildings located in Texas.

Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.; Etheredge, R.; Glass, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the possibility of expanding the program to measure more parameters is discussed. The estimated cost of expanding schedule for one season and includes the cost of lab analyses, equipment, courier service and miscellaneous volunteers, processing samples, and compiling data. Based on this estimate, a Co-op student could monitor

67

THE PLUTONIUM AEROSOL MONITORING PROGRAM AT ANL-IDAHO FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The physical and radiation characteristics of plutonium aerosols are reviewed briefly. A number of detecting and sampling devices and techniques are discussed for application to plutonium aerosols under conditions of reactor operations. The monitoring program and the Pu-fueled reactors at ANL-Idaho are described. (D.L.C.)

Stoddart, P.G.

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Monitoring and evaluation of green public procurement programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective procurement policies can help governments save considerable amounts of money while also reducing energy consumption. Additionally, private sector companies which purchase large numbers of energy-consuming devices can benefit from procurement policies that minimize life-cycle energy costs. Both public and private procurement programs offer opportunities to generate market-transforming demand for energy efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. In recent years, several governments have implemented policies to procure energy efficient products and services. When deploying these policies, efforts have focused on developing resources for implementation (guidelines, energy efficiency specifications for tenders, life cycle costing tools, training, etc.) rather than defining monitoring systems to track progress against the set objectives. Implementation resources are necessary to make effective policies; however, developing Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) mechanisms are critical to ensure that the policies are effective. The purpose of this article is to provide policy makers and procurement officials with a preliminary map of existing approaches and key components to monitor Energy Efficient Procurement (EEP) programs in order to contribute to the improvement of their own systems. Case studies are used throughout the paper to illustrate promising approaches to improve the M and E of EEP programs, from the definition of the system or data collection to complementary instruments to improve both the monitoring response and program results.

Adell, Aure [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain)] [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Schaefer, Bettina [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain)] [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Ravi, Kavita [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)] [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Corry, Jenny [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)] [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

Vance, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Raciometry J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor ARM Instrument Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor ARM Instrument Development Program Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington the end of FY93 are noted. Fiscal Year 1993 is the third and final year of the initial (3-year) funding cycle for ARM- funded instrument development projects. That is, IDP principal investigators will be required to submit a new proposal in order to be considered for funding beyond September 30, 1993. As for the first funding cycle, continuation proposals will be peer-reviewed and funding awarded on a competitive basis. Goals of the Instrument Development Program The primary goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Instrument Development Program (lOP) is to develop fieldable atmospheric sensing systems which 1) provide a needed atmospheric observation/

71

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program in the 21st Century: The Evolution of a Monitoring Network  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the evolution of the various operational aspects of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) network following the transfer of program administration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education in 1999-2000. The CEMP consists of a network of 29 fixed radiation and weather monitoring stations located in Nevada, Utah, and California. Its mission is to involve stakeholders directly in monitoring for airborne radiological releases to the off site environment as a result of past or ongoing activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and to make data as transparent and accessible to the general public as feasible. At its inception in 1981, the CEMP was a cooperative project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DRI, and EPA. In 1999-2000, technical administration of the CEMP transitioned from EPA to DRI. Concurrent with and subsequent to this transition, station and program operations underwent significant enhancements that furthered the mission of the program. These enhancements included the addition of a full suite of meteorological instrumentation, state-of-the-art electronic data collectors, on-site displays, and communications hardware. A public website was developed. Finally, the DRI developed a mobile monitoring station that can be operated entirely on solar power in conjunction with a deep-cell battery, and includes all meteorological sensors and a pressurized ion chamber for detecting background gamma radiation. Final station configurations have resulted in the creation of a platform that is well suited for use as an in-field multi-environment test-bed for prototype environmental sensors and in interfacing with other scientific and educational programs. Recent and near-future collaborators have included federal, state, and local agencies in both the government and private sectors. The CEMP also serves as a model for other programs wishing to involve stakeholders with a meaningful role in the process of monitoring and data collection.

Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

72

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radionuclides from ETTP operations were well within the allowable derived concentration guides published in DOE to the public from uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards at ETTP remained below the requirements in DOE than 99%. 4.1 ETTP RADIONUCLIDE AIRBORNE EFFLUENT MONITORING Inorder to demonstrate compliance withDOE

Pennycook, Steve

74

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness.

Jaquish, R.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1998 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by relatively moderate spring flows and spill, moderate levels of debris, cool spring, warm summer and fall water temperatures, and increased chinook numbers, particularly wild subyearling chinook collected and transported. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database on fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 which provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater sampling (Section 3.0), whereas well granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also determines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 4.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 5.0). This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure 1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated in accordance with the schedule required in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2001). Between scheduled updates of this plan, any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan, will be described in addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee). Information included in the addenda will be incorporated into the plan during the next scheduled update.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

GRAD: a tool for program analysis and progress monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information required for development, monitoring, and evaluation of Federal geothermal programs is extensive, and is needed on a timely basis to optimize the allocation of resources. This paper describes the development and operation of the Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD). GRAD was created as part of the National Geothermal Progress Monitor System in 1979. The database is organized around the concept of a geothermal area and provides broad coverage of geothermal development activities in the United States. Sixteen records, covering pre-lease, lease, and post-lease activities have been defined for each area. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publicly available for retrieval and use.

Yen, W.W.S.; Lawrence, J.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km{sup 2} area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site-specific exposure rates. This configuration also allows for remote programming and troubleshooting of sensors. Involvement of stakeholders in the monitoring process provides a number of benefits, including increased public confidence in monitoring results, as well as decreasing costs by more than 50 percent from when the program was managed entirely by U.S. federal employees. Additionally, the CEMP provides an ideal platform for testing new environmental sensors. (authors)

Hartwell, William T. [Division of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Shafer, David S. [Division of Hydrological Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated every three years, as specified in the ''Y-12 GWPP Management Plan'' (BWXT 2004). Between scheduled updates of this plan, addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee) will document any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan. The addenda, numbered in consecutive ascending order, will be forwarded to all personnel included on the distribution list for this plan. The addenda are inserted in Appendix C pending the next scheduled update of the plan, which will incorporate the information included in the addenda.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

Holland, Robert C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The NOAA Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS)—A New Surface Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new radiation monitoring program, the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS), that builds upon and takes over from earlier NOAA networks monitoring components of solar radiation [both the visible component (SOLRAD) and ...

B. B. Hicks; J. J. DeLuisi; D. R. Matt

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PROGRESS REPORT ON THE BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PROGRESS PROGRESS REPORT ON THE BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE MONTICELLO, UTAH, MILL SITE: AUGUST 1996 SAMPLING PERIOD J. G. Smith M. J. Peterson M. G. Ryon G. R. Southworth Date: March 3, 1997 Prepared for G. A. Pierce Health and Safety Research Division Environmental Technology Section OakRidge National Laboratory Grand Junction, Colorado Prepared by Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-960R22464 2 I. INTRODUCTION From 1942 through 1946, the Vanadium Corporation of America operated a vanadium and uranium mill in Monticello, Utah (Rust Geotech 1995a). In 1948, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) purchased the mill site and milled uranium from 1949 until the mill was permanently closed in January 1960. During operation

91

Load Monitoring CEC/LMTF Load Research Program  

SciTech Connect

This white paper addresses the needs, options, current practices of load monitoring. Recommendations on load monitoring applications and future directions are also presented.

Huang, Zhenyu; Lesieutre, B.; Yang, Steve; Ellis, A.; Meklin, A.; Wong, B.; Gaikwad, A.; Brooks, D.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Phillips, John; Kosterev, Dmitry; Hoffman, M.; Ciniglio, O.; Hartwell, R.; Pourbeik, P.; Maitra, A.; Lu, Ning

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1  

SciTech Connect

The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

Lynch, Timothy P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Environmental monitoring and assessment program at potential OTEC sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecologically sound operations of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants can be insured by careful attention to the marine environment during the design phase. This requires quality information from regions of potential OTEC interest, coordinated with required assessment studies to insure legal compliance. Currently, preliminary or actual surveys and laboratory studies are being conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, and Guam for potential moored or seacoast OTEC plants and in the equatorial South Atlantic for proposed plant--ship operations to provide such benchmark and baseline data. These data plus existing archival information can be used to model effects of OTEC operations based on projected design schemes. Four major areas of concerns (1) redistribution of oceanic properties, (2) chemical pollution, (3) structural effects, and (4) socio-legal-economic; and 11 key issues associated with OTEC development and operation have been identified. In general mitigating strategies can be used to alleviate many deleterious environmental effects of operational problems as biostimulation, outgassing, etc. Various assessment research studies on toxicity, biocide releases, etc., are under way or are planned to investigate areas where no clear mitigating strategy is available. Data from the monitoring and assessment programs is being integrated into a series of environmental compliance documents including a comprehensive programmatic environmental impact assessment.

Wilde, P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 011 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies that were conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River and to investigate associations with hydrological, ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2010 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River, and to investigate associations with hydrological, water ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Second Quarter 1998 (April through June 1998)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for the program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

Hutchison, J B

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy Performance Analysis Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance U. S. Department of Energy OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................. 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND EVALUATION APPROACH ........................4 2.0 DOE REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAMS..........................4 3.0 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS .................................................7 3.1 Groundwater Monitoring and Protection...........................7 3.2 Environmental Radiological Program Management ........ 11 3.3 Environmental Radiological Monitoring and Surveillance ...............................................................15 3.4 Radiological Air Emissions

103

Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of radiological airborne emissions. This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to written requirements.

Boom, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Summary and results of the comprehensive environmental monitoring program at the INEL's Raft River geothermal site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Program was designed to demonstrate that moderate temperature (approx. 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids could be used to generate electricity and provide an alternate energy source for direct-use applications. The environmental program was initiated soon after drilling began. The major elements of the monitoring program were continued during the construction and experimental testing of the 5-MW(e) power plant. The monitoring studies established pre-development baseline conditions of and assessed changes in the physical, biological, and human environment. The Physical Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on geology, subsidence, seismicity, meteorology and air quality. The Biological Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on the flora and fauna of the terrestrial ecosystem, studied raptor disturbances, and surveyed the aquatic communities of the Raft River. The Human Environmental Monitoring Program surveyed historic and archaeological sites, considered the socioeconomic environment, and documented incidences of fluorosis in the Raft River Valley. In addition to the environmental monitoring programs, research on biological direct applications using geothermal water was conducted at Raft River. Areas of research included biomass production of wetland and tree species, aquaculture, agricultural irrigation, and the use of wetlands as a treatment or pretreatment system for geothermal effluents.

Mayes, R.A.; Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

107

1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The use of EMCS in building monitoring: Experience from energy edge and LoanSTAR Programs  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring building energy performance can provide important immediate feedback to building personnel in building commissioning, operation and maintenance. It also provides an essential ``reality-check`` and feedback (immediate and longer-term) in many utility efforts such as demand-side management impact evaluation, forecasting, and conservation measure technology assessment. However, monitoring can be quite expensive, often resulting in either the need to reduce experimental sample sizes (with resulting reduced accuracy) or to forgo monitoring altogether. Analysis of data from in-place Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs) may be an effective alternative to dedicated monitoring in many cases. EMCS-based monitoring can have several advantages: reduced cost due to the fact that the equipment has already been purchased and installed, an increased amount of available data, information on building operation, and an on-site data processing capability. The use of EMCSs for monitoring has been investigated at several sites within two different conservation programs: the Energy Edge Evaluation Project (new construction), and the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program (retrofit). The text that follows provides an overview of the potential role that EMCS-based monitoring may play in conservation efforts, and a summary of the findings of these investigations. The presentation at the National Conference on Building Commissioning will provide greater detail on the experiences with EMCS monitoring in the two conservation programs.

Heinemeier, K.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CERTS 2012 Program Review - Oscillation Monitoring System - Mani Venkatasubramanian, WSU  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System System Mani V. Venkatasubramanian Washington State University Pullman WA 2 Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 TCP or UDP Real-time PMU data stream OMS results Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 Real-time PMU data stream SQL server txt file 3 Event Analysis Engine Damping Monitor Engine OMS Flowchart FDD analysis for ambient data Event? Prony analysis for post- disturbance data Start Read data from PDC Moving window crosscheck Yes No Moving window crosscheck Alarm Controller trigger Poorly damped mode detected? Yes No 4 Complementary Engines

110

Program on Technology Innovation: Next Generation Monitoring, Assessment, and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power system operation technologies such as computerized one-line diagram visualization, state estimation, contingency analysis, and distance relay were developed upwards of 50 years ago, However, technological advances in communication, computing, and algorithms have made it possible to reexamine methods for performing real-time monitoring, assessment, and control. This report describes the vision, infrastructure, and technology roadmap for future smart control centers.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technical basis and evaluation criteria for an air sampling/monitoring program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air sampling and monitoring programs at DOE facilities need to be reviewed in light of revised requirements and guidance found in, for example, DOE Order 5480.6 (RadCon Manual). Accordingly, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) air monitoring program is being revised and placed on a sound technical basis. A draft technical basis document has been written to establish placement criteria for instruments and to guide the ``retrospective sampling or real-time monitoring`` decision. Facility evaluations are being used to document air sampling/monitoring needs, and instruments are being evaluated in light of these needs. The steps used to develop this program and the technical basis for instrument placement are described.

Gregory, D.C.; Bryan, W.L.; Falter, K.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

South Central Coast Cooperative Aerometric Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SCCCAMP field measurement program, conducted 3 September to 7 October 1985, is the most comprehensive mesoscale photochemical study of its type ever undertaken. The study area encompasses 2 × 104 km2 of coastal and interior south-central ...

Waiter F. Dabberdt; William Viezee

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico,coast (OTEC-1 site); o Puerto Rico - one site near PuntaHawaii, Gulf of Mexico, and Puerto Rico - a program has been

Wilde, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Materials Reliability Program: Thermal Fatigue Monitoring Guidelines (MRP-32, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides thermal fatigue monitoring guidelines for attached piping systems in which there might be high potential for thermal fatigue cracking. The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has published guidance under the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 03-08 materials initiative for addressing potential thermal fatigue cycling in non-isolable reactor coolant system branch lines. This guidance calls for monitoring, inspection, and/or fatigue analysis of susceptible lines.

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

115

1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part I, Estimation of Survival, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Survival was monitored for specific marked groups of steelhead and spring chinook. Survival through the mid-Columbia from Winthrop Hatchery and the Methow River to below Priest Rapids Dam was estimated. Estimation of survival of marked groups of steelhead from Little Goose Dam to below Ice Harbor Dam was attempted. Serious problems were evident in the Snake River survival data. A release strategy which avoids holding of control groups was tested with satisfactory results.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Monitoring energy use of copiers to determine program design and potential savings for the Energy Star Copier program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past five years, considerable attention has been focused on the electricity use of office equipment in commercial office buildings. Several groups have monitored energy use of PCs, monitors, printers and fax machines. However, little attention has been paid to monitoring energy use of copiers. Procedures for testing energy usage and usage profiles of copiers are needed to make valid comparisons between machines and to determine overall energy use and potential energy savings. In this paper, the authors present a method to analyze the energy use and usage profiles of copiers. This method is determined through long-term measurements from a Watt-hour meter connected to the copier and by measuring light flashes from the copier. Energy use from the copier can also be estimated by using a test procedure developed by Dandridge. Results from using the long term monitoring methods will be presented for several different sized copiers, and compared to the estimated energy use derived from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) method. After summarizing these results, the authors determine criteria for a program to recognize energy-efficient copiers. These criteria were submitted as an Energy Star Copier program to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The new Energy Star Copier Program was announced in July 1995, with criteria based on these suggestions. Using the final Energy Star Copier program criteria and this data, the authors determine potential future savings for the program. The ability to automatically turn the copier off at night is the greatest energy-saving feature most copiers can have. The best way to reduce overall office costs is to have the copier set automatically to make double-sided copies.

Dandridge, C.B. [ReEnergize Consortium, Berkeley, CA (United States); Norford, L.K. [Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Nordman, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A cost effective trace gas measurement program for long term monitoring of the stratospheric circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stratospheric trace gas measurement program using balloon-based sonde and AirCore sampler techniques, is proposed as a way to monitor the strength of the stratospheric mean meridional, or Brewer-Dobson circulation. Modeling work predicts a strengthening ...

Fred L. Moore; Eric A. Ray; Karen H. Rosenlof; James W. Elkins; Pieter Tans; Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney

119

Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Monitoring and Verification Procedures Used in the Texas LoanSTAR and Rebuild America Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monitoring and verification procedures that have been developed for the Texas LoanSTAR program and the ESL's Rebuild America Program have become a foundation for a number of other state and federal M&V programs, including the United States Department of Energy's (USDOE's) 1996 NEMVP, 1997 IPMVP, 2001 IPMVP, ASHRAE's GP 14P, and the 1999 Texas Performance Contracting Guidelines. This paper reviews the basic procedures that are used for monitoring and verifying energy savings in commercial buildings that receive energy conservation retrofits, including procedures that are used for measuring energy savings in buildings where hourly pre-retrofit and post-retrofit whole-building data have been collected; buildings where monthly pre-retrofit and hourly post-retrofit data are collected; and buildings where monthly preretrofit and monthly post-retrofit data are used to verify savings.

Farouz, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Community radiation monitoring program. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UUNEL). The thirteenth year of this program began in the fall of 1992, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE--sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the then-existing EPA monitoring network around the NTS, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah, and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Station Managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These mangers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded through their training, experience, community standing, and effort in becoming a very visible, able, and valuable asset in this link.

Cooper, E.N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the estuary are monitored indicators that reflect the status of habitat conditions and fish performance, e.g., habitat connectivity, survival, and life history diversity. Performance measures also pertain to implementation and compliance. Such measures are part of the monitoring, research, and action plans in this estuary RME document. Performance targets specific to the estuary were not included in the 2007 draft Biological Opinion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances (a) In general The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and on-going medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of the exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such empIoyment. (b) Implementation of program ( I ) The Secretary shall, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, issue regulations under which the Secretary shall implement the program. Such regulations shall, to the extent practicable, provide for a process to- (A) identify the hazardous substances and radioactive substances to which

130

Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances (a) In general The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and on-going medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of the exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such empIoyment. (b) Implementation of program ( I ) The Secretary shall, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, issue regulations under which the Secretary shall implement the program. Such regulations shall, to the extent practicable, provide for a process to- (A) identify the hazardous substances and radioactive substances to which

131

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

Terraqua, Inc. (Wauconda, WA)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Screw Trap, 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2006 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 37,938 fish from 15 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 15% of fish enumerated followed by rainbow trout (10%) and mountain whitefish (7%). Day surveys were conducted during the summer period 2007 (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2007 (October) surveys. The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) program from August through November of 2007. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 999 wild Oncorhynchus mykiss and 5,107 wild run O. tshawytscha were PIT tagged during the study period. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 22.3% for juvenile O. tshawytscha and 9.0% for juvenile O. mykiss. Rotary screw traps operated 7 days a week and remote capture operations were conducted when flow and temperature regimes permitted. This is third annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

Nelle, R.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Extended Community: An Oral History of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), 1989 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

Studying the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) provides a unique opportunity to trace a concept created by two nuclear industry originators from inception, as it transitioned through several stewardship agencies, to management by a non-profit organization. This transition is informed not only by changes over two decades in the views of the general populace toward nuclear testing but also by changing political climates and public policies. Several parallel histories accompanied the development of the CEMP: an administrative history, an environmental history, and a history of changing public perception of not only nuclear testing, but other activities involving radiation such as waste transportation, as well. Although vital, those histories will be provided only as background to the subject of this study, the oral histories gathered in this project. The oral histories collected open a window into the nuclear testing history of Nevada and Utah that has not heretofore been opened. The nuclear industry has generated a great deal of positive and negative reaction since its inception. The CEMP emerged with specific objectives. It was designed to provide information to potential downwind communities and counter negative perceptions by creating more community involvement and education about the testing. The current objectives of the program are to: (1) Manage and maintain the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) offsite monitoring program including 26 radiation and environmental monitoring stations with associated equipment. Provide air sample collection and analysis, radiological and meteorological data collection, interpretation and reporting. (2) Facilitate independent operation of radiological monitoring stations and data verification by private citizens living in communities in proximity to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). (3) Hire and initiate training of local citizens to serve as Community Environmental Monitors (CEMs) in designated communities. (4) Provide relevant training by qualified instructors to the CEMs as necessary. (5) Assist and manage CEMs in accomplishing their duties, and ensure that contracts and paychecks are issued on schedule. (6) Provide CEMs and Emeriti monthly materials to facilitate public awareness. This project explores how those objectives evolved over time with changes in the nuclear testing program. How similar are today's objectives to those originally established for the program? Do those objectives reflect a changing political landscape as well as changes in testing needs? Those questions and more will be addressed as we follow the program from its inception, through earlier versions administered first by the Public Health Service (PHS), then by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the current administrator, the Desert Research Institute (DRI).

Susan DeSilva

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Extended Community: An Oral History of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), 1989 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

Studying the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) provides a unique opportunity to trace a concept created by two nuclear industry originators from inception, as it transitioned through several stewardship agencies, to management by a non-profit organization. This transition is informed not only by changes over two decades in the views of the general populace toward nuclear testing but also by changing political climates and public policies. Several parallel histories accompanied the development of the CEMP: an administrative history, an environmental history, and a history of changing public perception of not only nuclear testing, but other activities involving radiation such as waste transportation, as well. Although vital, those histories will be provided only as background to the subject of this study, the oral histories gathered in this project. The oral histories collected open a window into the nuclear testing history of Nevada and Utah that has not heretofore been opened. The nuclear industry has generated a great deal of positive and negative reaction since its inception. The CEMP emerged with specific objectives. It was designed to provide information to potential downwind communities and counter negative perceptions by creating more community involvement and education about the testing. The current objectives of the program are to: (1) Manage and maintain the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) offsite monitoring program including 26 radiation and environmental monitoring stations with associated equipment. Provide air sample collection and analysis, radiological and meteorological data collection, interpretation and reporting. (2) Facilitate independent operation of radiological monitoring stations and data verification by private citizens living in communities in proximity to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). (3) Hire and initiate training of local citizens to serve as Community Environmental Monitors (CEMs) in designated communities. (4) Provide relevant training by qualified instructors to the CEMs as necessary. (5) Assist and manage CEMs in accomplishing their duties, and ensure that contracts and paychecks are issued on schedule. (6) Provide CEMs and Emeriti monthly materials to facilitate public awareness. This project explores how those objectives evolved over time with changes in the nuclear testing program. How similar are today's objectives to those originally established for the program? Do those objectives reflect a changing political landscape as well as changes in testing needs? Those questions and more will be addressed as we follow the program from its inception, through earlier versions administered first by the Public Health Service (PHS), then by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the current administrator, the Desert Research Institute (DRI).

Susan DeSilva

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

HEU Transparency Program: Monitoring at the U.S. Permanent Presence Office in Russia  

SciTech Connect

In February 1993, the US and the Russian Federation signed an agreement that allows the US to purchase 500 tonnes of Russian low-enriched uranium (LEU) that has been blended down from the high-enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons. The agreement calls for the HEU to be blended down to LEU at Russian facilities and then shipped to the United states to be used for making commercial reactor fuel. This HEU Agreement was crafted to avoid the rigid verification procedures of previous arms control and nonproliferation treaties. In the United States, it is being implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the HEU Transparency Program. Transparency refers to agreed-upon measures intended to build confidence that the objectives of the HEU Agreement are being met. The objectives of the HEU Transparency Program are to ensure that (a) the HEU subject to the agreement is extracted from Russian nuclear weapons; (b) this same extracted HEU enters an oxidation facility and is oxidized therein; (c) the declared quantity of HEU is blended down to LEU; and (d) the LEU that is delivered to the United states, pursuant to the agreement, is fabricated into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. The HEU Agreement gives Russian monitors access to the US Enrichment Corporation's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, and to the five US fuel fabrication facilities receiving the Russian uranium. In turn, US monitors have access to the four principal Russian plants that convert HEU to LEU. Currently, monitoring at three Russian facilities--the Mayak Production Association near Ozersk, Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE) near Tomsk, and Electrochemical Integrated Plant (ECP) near Zelenogorsk--is confined to periodic visits. However, US monitors have continuous access to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Enterprise (UEIE) in Novouralsk through the US Permanent Presence Office (PPO) located there. This paper summarizes the monitoring activities and challenges involved in managing and coordinating the PPO.

Boggs, C.J.; Monette, F.A.; Hensley, J.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

DOE program on seismic characterization for regions of interest to CTBT monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the DOE programs on Geophysical Characterization of (1) the Middle East and North Africa (ME-NA) and (2) Southern Asia (SA) is to provide the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFRAC) with the analytic tools and knowledge base to permit effective verification of Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) compliance in those regions. The program also aims at using these regionalizations as models for the development of a detailed prescription for seismic calibration and knowledge base compilation in areas where the US has had little or no previous monitoring experience. In any given region, the CTBT seismic monitoring system will depend heavily on a few key arrays and/or three-component stations, and it will be important to know as much as possible about the physical properties of the earth`s crust and upper mantle: (1) in the vicinity of these stations, (2) in areas of potential earthquake activity or commercial blasting in the region containing the stations, and (3) along the propagation path from the sources to the stations. To be able to discriminate between various source types, we will also need to know how well the various event characterization techniques perform when they are transported from one tectonic or geologic environment to another. The Department of Energy`s CMT R&D program plan (DOE, 1994), which includes the ME-NA and SA characterization programs, incorporates an iterative process that combines field experiments, computer modeling and data analysis for the development, testing, evaluation and modification of data processing algorithms as appropriate to achieve specific US monitoring objectives. This process will be applied to seismic event detection, location and identification.

Ryall, A.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weaver, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Importance of Data Management in a Long-term Biological Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) has always needed to collect and retain high-quality data on which to base its assessments of ecological status of streams and their recovery after remediation. Its formal quality assurance, data processing, and data management components all contribute to this need. The Quality Assurance Program comprehensively addresses requirements from various institutions, funders, and regulators, and includes a data management component. Centralized data management began a few years into the program. An existing relational database was adapted and extended to handle biological data. Data modeling enabled the program's database to process, store, and retrieve its data. The data base's main data tables and several key reference tables are described. One of the most important related activities supporting long-term analyses was the establishing of standards for sampling site names, taxonomic identification, flagging, and other components. There are limitations. Some types of program data were not easily accommodated in the central systems, and many possible data-sharing and integration options are not easily accessible to investigators. The implemented relational database supports the transmittal of data to the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) as the permanent repository. From our experience we offer data management advice to other biologically oriented long-term environmental sampling and analysis programs.

Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys, 2006-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 11 sites during the summer 2006 survey period and at 15 sites during fall 2006 and winter 2007 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 39,898 fish from 14 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 19% of fish enumerated followed by mountain whitefish (18%) and rainbow trout (14%). Day and night surveys were conducted during the summer 2006 period (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2006 (October) and winter 2007 (February/March) surveys. This is second annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

Nelle, R.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Overview of Results of Analysis of Data from the South-Central Coast Cooperative Aerometric Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP 1985)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this paper is an overview of the data analysis collected during the comprehensive five-week South-Central Coast Cooperative Air Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP 1985) in California during September and October 1985. The various data ...

Steven R. Hanna; David G. Strimaitis; Joseph S. Scire; Gary E. Moore; Robert C. Kessler

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plan for the performance monitoring of solar systems installed by the SUIEDE program: NCAT/SUEDE interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SUEDE Grantee solar system installation programs were reviewed to determine the type, number, and quality of Grantee-installed solar systems available for monitoring consideration. An NCAT Performance Monitoring Plan is presented which identifies the service and technical assistance that NCAT will need to provide based on the Grantee review. (MHR)

Hopkins, M

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Health and safety considerations for U. S. monitors in the Russian transparency program.  

SciTech Connect

In 1993 the US and the Russian Federation signed an agreement allowing the US to purchase highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia over a 20-year period. This Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement permits the purchase of 500 metric tons of HEU from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons in the form of low-enriched uranium (LEU) for use as power reactor fuel in the US. Under the HEU Agreement, the US and Russia are cooperating in a ''Transparency Program'' to ensure that arms control and nonproliferation objectives are being met. The Transparency Program measures, which are a departure from traditional, intrusive measures of verification, include sending individuals from the US to Russia to monitor the processing of the HEU.

Boggs, C. J.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

William T. Hartwell

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance of Drought Indices for Ecological, Agricultural, and Hydrological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors provide a global assessment of the performance of different drought indices for monitoring drought impacts on several hydrological, agricultural, and ecological response variables. For this purpose, they compare the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguería; Jorge Lorenzo-Lacruz; Jesús Julio Camarero; Juan I. López-Moreno; Cesar Azorin-Molina; Jesús Revuelto; Enrique Morán-Tejeda; Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies. Finally, the CEMP provides training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs, which help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

T. Hartwell

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Expansion of Existing Smolt Trapping Program and Steelhead Spawner Surveys : March 1st, 2008 - February 28th, 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-0017) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and; (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g., Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Miller, Todd; Tonseth, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Project characteristics monitoring report: BWIP (Basalt Waste Isolation Program) repository project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This monitoring report has been prepared to show compliance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) and to provide local and state government agencies with information concerning the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP). This report contains data for the time period May 26, 1986 to February 1988. The data include employment figures, salaries, project purchases, taxes and fees paid, worker survey results, and project closedown personal interview summaries. This information has become particularly important since the decision in December 1987 to stop all BWIP activities except those for site reclamation. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 requires nonreclamation work at the Hanford Site to stop as of March 22, 1988. 7 refs., 6 figs., 28 tabs.

Friedli, E.A.; Herborn, D.I.; Taylor, C.D.; Tomlinson, K.M.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LCD liquid crystal display LED light emitting diode MEPSto light emitting diode (LED) backlit LCD monitors (likelyoptions is different for LED backlit LCD monitors compared

Park, Won Young

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Monitoring & Analysis Program of Prison Sites for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) and the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University have collaborated to extend the LoanSTAR Monitoring & Analysis Program to Texas' prison facilities. Data loggers are in place in eleven 1,000-bed prison units recording the energy use patterns of the administration, kitchen, laundry, medical, training, and inmate housing units. Specialized software has been developed that will allow TDCJ personnel to customize the data presentation and analysis in-house. A second effort involved the development of a Utility Billing Audit Database program. This database accepts customized entry of the utility bill calculation parameters from the utility company rate schedules and contracts, and provides storage of the parameters for monthly auditing of billed amounts. Storage of all the entered monthly data allows for exporting of the data to satisfy reporting requirements for the Texas State Agency Natural Resources End-Use Database (SANRED) (B. Hunn et a1 1995) and other internal TDCJ reporting needs. Bills for all monthly purchases of electricity, natural gas, water, waste water, and solid waste removal are audited using this software.

Eggebracht, J. A.; Heneghan, T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Consultation for the H/sub 2/S and meteorological monitoring program of the Ente Nazionale per l'Energia Electtrica (ENEL). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assistance in setting up a program for monitoring air quality in the vicinity of geothermal development in Larderello's vapor-dominated fields is reviewed. (MHR)

Ruff, R.E.; Cavanagh, L.A.; Collis, R.T.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of a data acquisition program for the purpose of monitoring processing statistic throughout the BABAR online computing infrastructure farm machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a data acquisition program for the purpose of monitoring processing statistic throughout the BABAR online computing infrastructure farm machines

Stonaha, P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume I, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Seelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. This is the second year of the annual systemwide program conducted by the Fish Passage Center (formerly Water Budget Center). Index reaches have been established. Travel time indices are calculated for year to year comparison. Marked groups of steelhead, spring chinook, fall chinook, and summer chinook are monitored at sampling points throughout the system. Because this program is intended to be representative of the juvenile migration, marked groups represent major hatchery production stocks. Arrival time and duration of marked groups are reported. Annual travel time indices are reported from Rock Island Dam to McNary Dam, and from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam. Hatchery and brand release information is reported.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Building Energy Monitoring Workbook Submitted to the Texas Governor’s Energy Office by the Improved Energy Audit Process Task (Aug. 1992)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This building energy monitoring workbook has been prepared for the Texas Governor's Energy Office by the Improved Energy Audit Task of the LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program. This workbook is intended to be a stand-alone survival guide to acquiring energy use and environmental data in buildings. It includes monitoring procedures and data analysis routines developed for the Texas LoanSTAR program and is copyrighted for distribution in the public domain.

Haberl, J. S.; Lopez, R.; Sparks, R. J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January--December 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period (January through December 1993), the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily, on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed along with information collected on the surface flow systems which affect the quality or quantity of surface water. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data, an activity that contributes to the Site Investigations (SI) component of the ERP. This report provides and describes sources of hydrologic data for Environmental Restoration activities that use monitoring data to quantify and assess the impact from releases of contaminants from ORNL WAGs.

Borders, D.M.; Frederick, B.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Reece, D.K.; McCalla, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watts, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Ziegler, K.S. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Nuclear Technology--Component Margins and Monitoring Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Nuclear Technology Margins and Monitoring Database, available to EPRI members, documents a consensus of experts on issues relating to equipment design margins and monitoring recommendations for large capital, balance-of-plant (BOP) components important to power production.

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2010 results. During 2010, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 10 and August 10, 2010; at UE5PW-2 on March 10, August 10, and August 25, 2010; and at UE5PW-3 on March 31, August 10, and August 25, 2010. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, April 26, August 9, and November 9, 2010. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2010 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Postremediation monitoring program baseline assessment report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) and its floodplain are contaminated with mercury (Hg) from ongoing and historical releases from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. A remedial investigation and feasibility study of LEFPC resulted in the signing of a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 1995. In response to the ROD, soil contaminated with mercury above 400 mg/kg was removed from two sites in LEFPC and the floodplain during a recently completed remedial action (RA). The Postremediation Monitoring Program (PMP) outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan was envisioned to occur in two phases: (1) a baseline assessment prior to remediation and (2) postremediation monitoring. The current report summarizes the results of the baseline assessment of soil, water, biota, and groundwater usage in LEFPC and its floodplain conducted in 1995 and 1996 by personnel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). This report also includes some 1997 data from contaminated sites that did not undergo remediation during the RA (i.e., sites where mercury is greater than 200 mg/kg but less than 400 mg/kg). The baseline assessment described in this document is distinct and separate from both the remedial investigation/feasibility study the confirmatory sampling conducted by SAIC during the RA. The purpose of the current assessment was to provide preremediation baseline data for the LEFPC PMP outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan, using common approaches and techniques, as specified in that plan.

Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Ashwood, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Rash, C.D.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc. (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Report to the Monitoring and Analysis Review Committee, August 1991 (Volume II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LoanSTAR program has now completed its second prototype year. This report is Volume II of a two volume set that documents the progress since the January 1991 MARC meeting. This second volume contains papers and supporting material prepared by the LoanSTAR staff and faculty at Texas A&M University, as well as other supporting material. The first volume contains photocopies of the material presented at the Monitoring and Advisory Review Committee (MARC) meeting held in Austin, Texas, on August 19-20,1991.

Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Athar, A.; Kissock, J. K.; Reddy, T. A.; Ruch, D. K.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Willis, D.; Lopez, R.; Sparks, R. J.; Bryant, J.; O'Neal, D. L.; Heffington, W. M.; Brown, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Smolt Monitoring Program, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Smolt Monitoring Program Annual Report, 1986, Volume I, describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the data from Fish Passage Center freeze brands used in the analysis of travel time for Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data. Data for marked fish not presented in this report will be provided upon request. Daily catch statistics (by species), flow, and sample parameters for the smolt monitoring sites, Clearwater, Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville also will be provided upon request.

Fish Passage Center

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fiscal year 1996 well installation program summary, Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1996 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge Tennessee. Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Two groundwater monitoring wells were installed during the FY 1996 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed in the Lake Reality area and was of polyvinyl chloride screened construction. The other well, installed near the Ash Disposal Basin, was of stainless steel construction.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cable Polymer Aging and Condition Monitoring Research at Sandia National Laboratories Under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes cable polymer aging and condition monitoring research performed at Sandia National Laboratories under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program from 2000 to 2005. The research results apply to low-voltage cable insulation and jacket materials that are commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants. The research builds upon and is linked to research performed at Sandia from 1977 through 1986, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Aged and unaged specimens from t...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several Hanford waste tanks have been observed to exhibit periodic releases of significant quantities of flammable gases. Because potential safety issues have been identified with this type of waste behavior, applicable tanks were equipped with instrumentation offering the capability to continuously monitor gases released from them. This document was written to cover three primary areas: (1) describe the current technical basis for requiring flammable gas monitoring, (2) update the technical basis to include knowledge gained from monitoring the tanks over the last three years, (3) provide the criteria for removal of Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System(s) (SHMS) from a waste tank or termination of other flammable gas monitoring activities in the Hanford Tank farms.

Estey, S.D.

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

The use of energy management and control systems for retrofit performance monitoring in the LoanSTAR program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of building energy consumption, operation, and weather variables are important parts of retrofit evaluation projects. However, effective monitoring can be quite expensive. In this report, we investigate the feasibility of using a building`s existing energy management and control system (EMCS) for gathering some or all of this required data, rather than installing dedicated data-logging equipment. Three case studies in the Texas LoanSTAR retrofit monitoring program were used to explore the current applicability of existing EMCSs for monitoring, and to identify areas requiring additional development It was found that data could be retrieved in each case; without installing any additional hardware or software in two of the three sites, and with the addition of only a few sensors and a minor software modification in the third. However, the process of using the EMCS for monitoring was inconvenient in several respects. It was determined that the process could be greatly simplified if EMCS manufacturers ensured that their software averaged data over an hourly interval and reliably reported them at the end of each hour, used concise and consistent formats for requesting and reporting the data, and provided a simple means of displaying or transmitting the data.

Heinemeier, K.E.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.; Poynor, B.; Belur, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The use of energy management and control systems for retrofit performance monitoring in the LoanSTAR program  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of building energy consumption, operation, and weather variables are important parts of retrofit evaluation projects. However, effective monitoring can be quite expensive. In this report, we investigate the feasibility of using a building's existing energy management and control system (EMCS) for gathering some or all of this required data, rather than installing dedicated data-logging equipment. Three case studies in the Texas LoanSTAR retrofit monitoring program were used to explore the current applicability of existing EMCSs for monitoring, and to identify areas requiring additional development It was found that data could be retrieved in each case; without installing any additional hardware or software in two of the three sites, and with the addition of only a few sensors and a minor software modification in the third. However, the process of using the EMCS for monitoring was inconvenient in several respects. It was determined that the process could be greatly simplified if EMCS manufacturers ensured that their software averaged data over an hourly interval and reliably reported them at the end of each hour, used concise and consistent formats for requesting and reporting the data, and provided a simple means of displaying or transmitting the data.

Heinemeier, K.E.; Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.; Poynor, B.; Belur, R. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An examination of extended community an oral history of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (Cemp), 1981 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

From 2002 until 2004, on behalf of the Desert Research Institute (DRI), I conducted an oral history project that focused on the participants in the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP). In the late 1970's, Nevada scientists who participated in the response to the Three Mile Island event returned to Nevada with the idea for a program similar to one being implemented in Pennsylvania. That program directly involved local stakeholders in an independent monitoring effort. As a result, the CEMP was established in 1981, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) providing the funding and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) providing technical and scientific direction, maintaining instrumentation and sampling equipment, analyzing the collected samples, and interpreting and reporting the data. Initially, DRI was largely responsible for identifying and hiring community participants and organizing annual training workshops, later assuming complete responsibility for technical operation of the monitoring network from EPA. The goal was to establish fixed monitoring stations around Nevada, Utah and California, and directly involve stakeholders in the monitoring process. Local teachers would be recruited to receive training and maintain the stations while reporting back to their communities on the monitoring activities and any risks they, or their citizens, perceived. This active stakeholder involvement was intended to provide communities with an immediate resource for any questions or concerns related to testing. It also created a vehicle through which to educate the public about radiation and testing. In the early years of nuclear weapons testing, interactions between local residents and the government were often defined by a lack of communication and understanding. The distrust that existed between government agencies and Nevada, Utah, and California residents, was a perspective that persisted for years after the testing moratorium and continues to endure, to a lesser extent, today. It was this distrust that the Community Environmental Monitoring Program was designed to ameliorate, providing communities and ranches with impartial scientific evidence to address their many concerns. A goal of the oral history project was to gain a better understanding of the CEMP by exploring and documenting its origins and allowing the people who continue to make it a part of their lives tell their stories. Within those stories, we wanted to discover if the program established trust in Nevada, Utah and California communities and ranches; what the program meant and continues to mean to the government, state institutions and local people who participate, and why the program is unique. In order to achieve these goals, DOE funded a two year oral history project. I interviewed the program founders, DOE, EPA and DRI participants, local station managers, and many people with an interest in testing and the government response to downwind communities. This paper includes the purpose, process, and development of the oral history project; why oral history was chosen as the appropriate methodology; who was chosen for an interview and why; some of the pitfalls encountered; what lessons were learned and what value the project has to DOE and the stakeholders in local communities. (authors)

Silva, S. de [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Survival of Wells Hatchery Steelhead in the Mid-Columbia River, Part I, Smolt Monitoring Program, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Survival of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) from Wells Hatchery (WDG) was studied in 1984 to derive an index of steelhead survival in the mid-Columbia. This index was determined as part of the Smolt Monitoring Program conducted by the fishery agencies and tribes through the Water Budget Center. The program in 1984 was limited because of fish availability. A major goal of the 1984 program was to adapt techniques which have largely been used for specific research purposes, to a management program that is to be repeated annually. Such a program requires that minimum disruption of the existing fishery management program occurs. Sufficient fish were allocated to the program to allow two replicate test releases from Pateros, Washington and two paired control releases below Priest Rapids Dam. These mark groups were recovered at McNary Dam, and survival was calculated as the ratio in proportion recovered for the test and control groups. Data from the second replicate release was judged to not sufficiently meet the experimental criteria and was rejected. The first replicate was judged to be suitable, and survival was calculated. Estimated survival for the first steelhead replicate from Pateros to below Priest Rapids Dam was 0.5181 with a lower 95% confidence interval of 0.4626 and an upper confidence interval of 0.5736.

McConnaha, Willis E.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WATER MANAGEMENT & HYDROLOGICAL SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hydrological Science 21 CVEN 605:Environmental Measurement CVEN 609: Environmental Control of Oil and Hazardous Architecture and Urban Planning Wetlands ESSM 628: Wetland Delineation ESSM 633: Wetland Plant Taxonomy ESSM 631: Ecological Restoration of Wetland and Riparian Systems WFSC/OCEN 629: Lower Food Web Dynamics

182

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps,Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseiller, Tom; Cotter, Michael (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps, Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008-2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseillier, Tom; Cotter, Michael [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

INFORMATION: Management Alert on the Department's Monitoring of the Weatherization Assistance Program in the State of Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion to improve the energy efficiency of homes owned or occupied by low income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety. Since the Recovery Act was enacted in February 2009, the Department has awarded weatherization grants to every state, the District of Columbia and five territories. Because of the unprecedented level of funding and the risks associated with spending vast amounts of money in a relatively short period of time, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) initiated a series of audits designed to evaluate the Program's internal control structures at both the Federal and state levels. As part of our work, we are in the process of reviewing Weatherization Program internal controls for the State of Illinois. We are also currently performing identical audits in the States of North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Under the Recovery Act and the Department's Program, the State of Illinois received $242 million to weatherize 26,933 homes. The State of Illinois awarded these funds to 35 local agencies responsible for determining recipients' eligibility, contracting for the installation of the weatherization work, and conducting final inspections to ensure that work on homes was done in accordance with requirements. Inspectors working for the local agencies are required to evaluate the quality of mechanical and architectural improvements, such as furnace installations and window caulking, and certify that the work performed meets established standards. Under a Department approved plan in place at the time of our review, state officials were required to evaluate the sufficiency of local agency monitoring controls and to inspect the work performed on at least five percent of the units weatherized with Department funds during the program year for each local agency. We identified significant internal control deficiencies in the management of the Weatherization Program in Illinois which require immediate attention. Specifically, our audit testing revealed significant problems with on-site monitoring and inspection of the Illinois Home Weatherization Assistance Program (Illinois). We noted that the Department had not fulfilled its requirement to perform monitoring visits at the State level. In addition, Illinois officials had not complied with the Department's requirements for inspecting weatherization work conducted by local agencies. Finally, we found that a weatherization inspection for one of the local agencies failed to detect substandard installation of energy saving materials. This case involved a furnace gas leak that could have resulted in serious injury to the occupants and material damage to the structure. This is an interim report and our audit work remains in progress.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2006 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2006 ORERP fish population sampling near 12 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2005 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2005 ORERP fish population sampling near the Ohio River power stations. In 2005, the program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies near 17 electric generating stations that covered nearly the entire (~1000 mile) length of the river.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2007 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2007 ORERP fish population sampling near 10 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1,000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

194

U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hammons, EPA Loretta Lehrman, EPA Region 5 Dennis Mikel, EPA Will Ollison, American Petroleum Institute Blue-Green Algae for Microcystins in Freshwater Sources Monitoring Technologies for Measuring Stored) Devices at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants These are infrared cameras that allow simultaneous

195

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wind resource assessment handbook: Fundamentals for conducting a successful monitoring program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook presents industry-accepted guidelines for planning and conducting a wind resource measurement program to support a wind energy feasibility initiative. These guidelines, which are detailed and highly technical, emphasize the tasks of selecting, installing, and operating wind measurement equipment, as well as collecting and analyzing the associated data, once one or more measurement sites are located. The handbook's scope encompasses state-of-the-art measurement and analysis techniques at multiple heights on tall towers (e.g., 40 m) for a measurement duration of at least one year. These guidelines do not represent every possible method of conducting a quality wind measurement program, but they address the most important elements based on field-proven experience. The intended audience for this handbook is any organization or individual who desires the planning framework and detailed procedures for conducting a formally structured wind measurement program. Personnel from the management level to field technicians will find this material applicable. The organizational aspects of a measurement program, including the setting of clear program objectives and designing commensurate measurement and quality assurance plans, all of which are essential to ensuring the program's successful outcome, are emphasized. Considerable attention is also given to the details of actually conducting the measurement program in its many aspects, from selecting instrumentation that meets minimum performance standards to analyzing and reporting on the collected data. 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, B.H.; McDonald, S.L.; Bernadett, D.W.; Markus, M.J.; Elsholz, K.V. [AWS Scientific, Inc., Albany, NY (US)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office environmental monitoring program summary data report, first calendar quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

The continuing moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. The onsite radiological surveillance program is shown in a table, and this report gives the first quarter results for that program. During the first calendar quarter of 1997, air samples were collected and analyzed from 45 air particulate sampling stations, 3 noble gas sampling stations, and 12 tritiated water (HTO) vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from one wastewater containment pond and nine sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from ten potable supply wells, one non-potable supply well, and seven drinking water distribution end points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 168 locations.

Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of a Real-Time Interactive Storm-Monitoring Program in Phoenix, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arizona Thunderstorm Chase (AZTC) program, a cooperative project between the National Weather Service (NWS) in Phoenix and Arizona State University (ASU), uses trained ASU students as mobile observers with real-time communications ability to ...

Randall S. Cerveny; Steven M. Calderon; Michael W. Franjevic; Norman C. Hoffmann

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Amma Radiosonde Program and its Implications for the Future of Atmospheric Monitoring Over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the upper-air program, which has been conducted as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). Since 2004, AMMA scientists have been working in partnership with operational agencies in Africa to ...

Douglas J. Parker; Andreas Fink; Serge Janicot; Jean-Blaise Ngamini; Michael Douglas; Ernest Afiesimama; Anna Agusti-Panareda; Anton Beljaars; Francis Dide; Arona Diedhiou; Thierry Lebel; Jan Polcher; Jean-Luc Redelsperger; Chris Thorncroft; George Ato Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Application of the EPRI Standard Radiation Monitoring Program for PWR Radiation Field Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NEI/INPO/EPRI RP 2020 Initiative was developed to promote radiation dose reduction by emphasizing radiological protection fundamentals and reducing radioactive source term. EPRI was charged as the technical lead in the area of source term reduction. EPRI's Radiation Management program initiated a multi-year program to develop an understanding of source term generation and transport with the eventual goal of providing plant specific recommendations for source term reduction. Reinstatement of the Stand...

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Materials Reliability Program (MRP-149, Revision 1) Fatigue Licensing Basis Monitoring Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All nuclear plants are required to operate their mechanical systems within the parameters defined by fatigue design basis requirements, analyses and assumptions. This monitoring guideline is part of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) comprehensive and integrated Fatigue Management approach designed to prevent and/or manage cracking of components due to fatigue.BackgroundThis document provides guidance for utility engineers to implement a fatigue ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Class B monitoring program handbook for southeastern sites with data based on INIT2 software (applicable to heating season)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides reference information on eight residences located in the southern part of the US which are being monitored under the Class B Passive Solar Monitoring Program. This handbook provides reference information on the sites and basic test conditions for the 1982-1983 winter heating season using software which is identified as INIT2. The manual is intended for use in data analysis work but is limited to this period of time because of basic differences in the control software and the related instrumentation system. This document is separated into individual sections for each site. The following information is provided for each site: (a) Site summary providing information on the structure, the passive solar features, the auxiliary heating system, and other related data; (b) Floor layouts with the sensor locations, etc.; (c) The One Time Value Log which records the results of field tests and calculations to determine the thermal characteristics, air infiltration rate, and other reference data; (d) The Analog/Digital Channel Log which provides calibration data; (e) The Status Channel Log which defines various event sensors; and (f) Program listings as used during the specified time periods during the heating season. Appendix A provides a summary of photographs which have been provided separately as part of the site documentation.

Gustashaw, D. H.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: Monitoring EGS-Related Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews technologies that could be applicable to Enhanced Geothermal Systems development. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from hydrothermal to hot dry rock. We monitored recent and ongoing research, as reported in the technical literature, that would be useful in expanding current and future geothermal fields. The literature review was supplemented by input obtained through contacts with researchers throughout the United States. Technologies are emerging that have exceptional promise for finding fractures in nonhomogeneous rock, especially during and after episodes of stimulation to enhance natural permeability.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel; Carwile, Clifton

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

A computer program for monitoring and controlling ultrasonic anemometers for aerodynamic measurements in animal buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic anemometers (USAs) are widely implemented in animal housing to measure the air velocity in different measuring points throughout the whole barn, which ultimately leads to determine the velocity fields and the air flow patterns drawing a clear ... Keywords: Aerodynamics, Air profile, Airflow, Computer program, Precision livestock farming, Ultrasonic anemometer

M. Samer; C. Loebsin; K. von Bobrutzki; M. Fiedler; C. Ammon; W. Berg; P. Sanftleben; R. Brunsch

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2008 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2008 ORERP fish community sampling near 11 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Short Communication: Monitoring strategies and scale-appropriate hydrologic and biogeochemical modelling for natural resource management: Conclusions and recommendations from a session held at the iEMSs 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This short communication paper presents recommendations for developing scale-appropriate monitoring and modelling strategies to assist decision making in natural resource management (NRM). These ideas presented here were discussed in the session (S5) ... Keywords: Monitoring strategies, Nutrients, Uncertainty, Water quality, Water resources

Ulrike Bende-Michl; Martin Volk; Daren Harmel; Lachlan Newham; Tommy Dalgaard

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Time Scales of Land Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper intends to investigate the time scales of land surface hydrology and enhance the understanding of the hydrological cycle between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil. A three-layer model for land surface hydrology is developed to study ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng; Samuel S. P. Shen; Qing-Cun Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

HEPEX: The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX) is an international project to advance technologies for hydrological forecasting. Its goal is “to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to demonstrate ...

John C. Schaake; Thomas M. Hamill; Roberto Buizza; Martyn Clark

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Monitoring Electricity Consumption in the Tertiary Sector- A Project within the Intelligent Energy Europe Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electricity consumption in the tertiary sector in the EU is still increasing and a further increase is expected of more than 2 % per year during the next 15 years. This sector includes companies and institutions of public and private services with heterogeneous economic and energy-related characteristics. Building managers and decision-makers are not enough informed about the electricity consumption structure and electricity-saving potentials. Within the EU Intelligent Energy project EL-TERTIARY an overview of existing studies showed that the availability of disaggregated data on electricity consumption and its use by purpose (lighting, office equipment, ventilation, air conditioning, etc.) is poor. The methods of determining the types of end-uses are weak; most studies are based on calculations and estimations, only a few on measurement. In addition, many of the results are not published. EL-TERTIARY developed an internet-based methodology for monitoring electricity consumption. It was applied in more than 120 case studies in 12 EU countries. They cover various types of buildings: offices, schools, universities, kindergartens, hotels, supermarkets, and hospitals evaluating more than 900 technical systems. On the background of ongoing activities on EU level, such as directives, research and implementation projects the paper illustrates the concept of EL-TERTIARY, the newly developed methodology for the documentation of building audits and monitoring as well as selected results.

Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.; Gruber, E.; Schlomann, B.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

TRIPLICATE SODIUM IODIDE GAMMA RAY MONITORS FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

This technical report contains recommendations from the Analytical Development (AD) organization of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a system of triplicate Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors to be used to monitor Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) content of the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) output of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process. These detectors need to be gain stabilized with respect to temperature shifts since they will be installed on top of Tank 41 at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This will be accomplished using NaI crystals doped with the alpha-emitting isotope, Americium-241({sup 241}Am). Two energy regions of the detector output will be monitored using single-channel analyzers (SCAs), the {sup 137}Cs full-energy {gamma}-ray peak and the {sup 241}Am alpha peak. The count rate in the gamma peak region will be proportional to the {sup 137}Cs content in the DSS output. The constant rate of alpha decay in the NaI crystal will be monitored and used as feedback to adjust the high voltage supply to the detector in response to temperature variation. An analysis of theoretical {sup 137}Cs breakthrough curves was used to estimate the gamma activity expected in the DSS output during a single iteration of the process. Count rates arising from the DSS and background sources were predicted using Microshield modeling software. The current plan for shielding the detectors within an enclosure with four-inch thick steel walls should allow the detectors to operate with the sensitivity required to perform these measurements. Calibration, testing, and maintenance requirements for the detector system are outlined as well. The purpose of SCIX is to remove and concentrate high-level radioisotopes from SRS salt waste resulting in two waste streams. The concentrated high-level waste containing {sup 137}Cs will be sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification and the low-level DSS will be sent to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) to be incorporated into grout.

Couture, A.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method, system and computer program product for monitoring and optimizing fluid extraction from geologic strata  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arrangement which utilizes an inexpensive flap valve/flow transducer combination and a simple local supervisory control system to monitor and/or control the operation of a positive displacement pump used to extract petroleum from geologic strata. The local supervisory control system controls the operation of an electric motor which drives a reciprocating positive displacement pump so as to maximize the volume of petroleum extracted from the well per pump stroke while minimizing electricity usage and pump-off situations. By reducing the electrical demand and pump-off (i.e., "pounding" or "fluid pound") occurrences, operating and maintenance costs should be reduced sufficiently to allow petroleum recovery from marginally productive petroleum fields. The local supervisory control system includes one or more applications to at least collect flow signal data generated during operation of the positive displacement pump. No flow, low flow and flow duration are easily evaluated using the flap valve/flow transducer arrangement.

Medizade, Masoud (San Luis Obispo, CA); Ridgely, John Robert (Los Osos, CA)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

Sherwood, D.J.

1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Second report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

On September 11, 1986, a modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site), a former uranium-enrichment production facility. As required in Part III of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) and submitted for approval to the US EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The plan described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. The objectives of the BMAP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, and to document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities. The BMAP consists of four tasks: ambient toxicity testing; bioaccumulation studies; biological indicator studies; and ecological surveys of stream communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document is the second in a series of reports presenting the results of the studies that were conducted over various periods of time between August 1987 and June 1990.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Hinzman, R.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crumby, W.D. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

First report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

A modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site is a former uranium-enrichment production facility, which is currently managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy. As required in Part III (L) of that permit, a plan for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) was prepared and submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (Loar et al. 1992b)]. The K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. Because it was anticipated that the composition of existing effluent streams entering Mitchell Branch would be altered shortly after the modified permit was issued, sampling of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities (Task 4 of BMAP) was initiated in August and September 1986 respectively.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program, Entiat River Status and Trend Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Smolt Trap Operations in Nason Creek, March 2007 through March 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP-BPA project No.2003-0017) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance; and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captured i

Collins, Matthew; Jorgensen, John; Murdock, Keely

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Fine Sediment in Spawning Gravel within the Entiat River Subbasin : July 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance; and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : U.S. Forest Service Fish Abundance and Steelhead Redd Surveys Annual Report : January 1 - December 31, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract report is one of a series of reports that document implementation components of the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) funded project: Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00, Chris Jordan, NOAA-NWFSC project sponsor). Other components of the project are separately reported, as explained below. The ISEMP project has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical data management, communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonids populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, ISEMP has adopted an approach to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot areas, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ES

Call, Justin

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

222

Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume I: Procedures, Results, and Discussion, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas LoanSTAR program is an eight year, $98 million revolving loan program, funded by oil overcharge dollars, for energy conservation retrofits in Texas state, local government and school buildings. The program began in 1988. Public sector institutions participating in the program must repay the loans according to estimated energy savings from an energy audit. As part of this program, a statewide energy Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) has been established. The major objectives of the LoanSTAR MAP are to: (1) verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits; (2) reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements; (3) improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program; (4) initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings in Texas.

Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCURACY AND CHOICE OF MODELS 5.1 Accuracy of Models Pilgrim (1975) has indicated that four levels. 30. Pilgrim, D.H., "Model Evaluation, Testing and Parameter Estimation in Hydrology", edited by T

Laio, Francesco

225

Hydrologic data bank contents, 1978: user information bulletin 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USDOE/NV Hydrologic Data Storage and Retrieval System is composed of data files and computer programs for the manipulation of these files. This publication presents the names assigned to the data files and details the file contents. 18 tables.

Friesen, H.N.; Brekke, J.C.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NOAA'S Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service: Building Pathways for Better Science in Water Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) program was established to meet our nation's need for more precise flash-flood forecast information. AHPS uses ...

John Mcenery; John Ingram; Qingyun Duan; Thomas Adams; Lee Anderson

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Smolt Monitoring Program; Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1996 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook, collected and transported. A total of 5,227,672 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite, the fewest since 1986. Of these, 5,117,685 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 4,990,798 by barge and 126,887 by truck. An additional 102,430 fish were bypassed back to the river, most of these being part of the National Marine Fisheries Service transportation evaluation study. New extended length submersible bar screens (ESBS) and new vertical barrier screens were installed in all units and a prototype surface collector was installed in front of units 4, 5 and 6 and operated from 23 April through 3 June. Smolt Monitoring Program and National Biologic Survey biologists examined 4,581 fish, collected at the separator, for symptoms of Gas Bubble Disease.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Compilation of 1984 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 2. TABS F-K. Annual progress reporT, January-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

A long-term program of monitoring for possible ELF electromagnetic influences on ecosystems in northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is being conducted. Selection of study sites, monitoring protocols, and analytical methods were initiated in 1982. These activities, as well as data collection, were continued during 1983 and 1984. Progress is described for studying the terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems for the 11 projects comprising the Ecological Monitoring Program.

Fischer, R.L.; Beaver, D.L.; Asher, J.H.; Hill, R.W.; Burton, T.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Compilation of 1984 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 1, TABS A-E. Annual progress report, January-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

A long-term program of monitoring for possible ELF electromagnetic influences on ecosystems in northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, is being conducted. Selection of study sites, monitoring protocols, and analytical methods were initiated in 1982. These activities, as well as data collection, were continued during 1983 and 1984. Progress is described for studying the terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems for the 11 projects comprising the Ecological Monitoring Program.

Anderson, M.; Bruhn, J.; Cattelino, P.; Jurgensen, M.; Lenz, G.W.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Drought Monitoring and Forecasting System for Sub-Sahara African Water Resources and Food Security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule: The development and implementation of a drought monitoring and seasonal hydrological forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa contributes to building capacity through technology and knowledge transfer.

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Nathaniel Chaney; Kaiyu Guan; Sara Sadri; Xing Yuan; Luke Olang; Abou Amani; Abdou Ali; Siegfried Demuth; Laban Ogallo

232

Shoreline monitoring program on the Upper Texas Coast utilizing a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to shoreline erosion, approximately seventeen miles of Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County Texas, have been repeatedly destroyed by storms and rebuilt. This thesis describes a shoreline monitoring program developed to obtain a comprehensive data set that will be used to define the coastal erosion problem and assist in the reconstruction of the roadway. An improved survey system similar to a concept developed by Beach et al. (1996) was designed and constructed for this project. This thesis discusses the improved survey system design and testing. The nearshore system utilizes a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS) mounted on a personal watercraft and integrated with a survey quality echo sounder. The nearshore system was tested by repeating transects in the nearshore. The repeatability of the profiles demonstrated a standard deviation of 6.2 cm from the mean absolute difference of 8.0 cm. The beach survey utilizes RTK-DGPS equipment carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The maximum expected error for the beach survey is approximately []4 cm. The system is an accurate, mobile and efficient method to obtain beach profiles. Additional accuracy may be obtained by integrating a motion sensor and CTD profiler. The survey data are processed using commercially available software packages and programs developed for this project. The processed data is integrated and stored in a geographic information system (GIS). The data collected exemplify morphological features indicative of erosion due to overwash. This is consistent with visual observations and numerical model results provided by Howard (1999). The shoreline movement since 1996 is consistent with historical data and is related to storm events. The current research has provided a survey system capable of performing fast, accurate surveys in the nearshore and a baseline data set. The survey system is fully operational and will be instrumental in the ongoing research related to the Highway 87 reconstruction project. The baseline data set, together with sediment analyses data and water level predictions, provides the foundation from which further investigations will be conducted and will provide information that can be used for the design of the new highway.

Wamsley, Ty V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Snow Hydrology in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A snow hydrology has been implemented in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The snow hydrology consists of parameterizations of snowfall and snow cover fraction, a prognostic calculation of snow temperature, and a model of the snow ...

Susan Marshall; John O. Roads; Gary Glatzmaier

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico. Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Isotope hydrology of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria 3 School

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site  

SciTech Connect

The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

None

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coupled hydrological-economic modelling for optimised irrigated cultivation in a semi-arid catchment of West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled model system, consisting of a distributed hydrological model and an economic optimisation model, communicating via model interfaces, is developed and applied to investigate regional interdependencies between irrigated agriculture and regional ... Keywords: Decision support, Distributed hydrological modelling, Economic modelling, Irrigated agriculture, Model coupling, Non-linear programming, West Africa

H. Ahrends; M. Mast; Ch. Rodgers; H. Kunstmann

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference  

SciTech Connect

The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

Sheng, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydrological consequences of global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

Miller, Norman L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Energy Management and Control Systems and their Use for Performance Monitoring in the LoanSTAR Program, Technical Report prepared for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Energy and Environment Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis program, pre- and post-retrofit energy consumption for each building is monitored using conventional field data acquisition systems. This report summarizes continuing investigations into the usefulness of existing Energy Management and Control Systems to perform this same data collection task.

Heinemeier, K. E.; Akbari, H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Volume 3, Appendix sections 8--14: Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains no text. It consists entirely of numerical data: Coke oven wastewater treatment performance; Ammonia still effluents to equalization tank; Stack gas analysis of coke oven batteries; CoaL consumption; Coke production; Supplemental OSHA employee exposure monitoring(hydrocarbons,ammonia, hydrogen sulfide); operating data; chemical products and coke oven gas production.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific region (California and Hawaii). Task 2: Regional program monitoring and progress evaluation, topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the objectives of the regional program monitoring and progress evaluation have been met through personal contacts and the review of data. They are as follows: to determine the existing status of power plant projects and future plans; to identify major problem areas for each project (technical, financial, regulatory) that are affecting progress; and to analyze the data and to develop recommendations directed toward resolving problems. The results have been presented in a tabular summary format that is accompanied by explanatory text covering 25 projects.

Not Available

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrological services, carbon sequestration, biodiversitysecond program focused on carbon sequestration, biodiversityconservation and carbon sequestration. Initiated in 1996,

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Real-Time Variational Assimilation of Hydrologic and Hydrometeorological Data into Operational Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variational assimilation (VAR) of hydrologic and hydrometeorological data into operational hydrologic forecasting is explored. The data assimilated are the hourly real-time observations of streamflow and precipitation, and climatological ...

Dong-Jun Seo; Victor Koren; Neftali Cajina

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

248

Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

489,476 1,602,500 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIntegratedChemical,Thermal,MechanicalandHydrologicalModeling&oldid313283" Category:...

249

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY2012 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspections completed by the GWPP on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2010 through 2012. In addition, this report also documents well inspections performed under the Y-12 Water Resources Restoration Program, which is administered by URS|CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). This report documents well maintenance activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2009); and provides summary tables of well inspections and well maintenance activities during the reference time period.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental. It is in this spirit that we advocate establishing a hydrologic remote sensing observatory (RSO) to advance sensing al. (2006), A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling

Katul, Gabriel

253

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Program on Technology Innovation: Wavelength-Multiplexed Diode Laser Absorption Sensors for Rapid Monitoring of Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensors are needed to monitor gas temperature and synthesis products during coal gasificationin the reactor, at the reactor exit, and along the path to potential use by gas turbines. The harsh operating conditions of coal gasification create a challenging measurement environment. In particular, an optimized gasifier is operated at pressures of 20–40 atm (2027–4053 kPa) with the expectation for operation at even higher pressures. The synthesis gas is also heavily laden with particulate, and the gasifier r...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

Program on Technology Innovation: Laser Absorption Sensors for in situ Real-time Monitoring of Syngas Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) sensors have a long history for real-time, non-intrusive in situ monitoring of combustion systems with sensitive species-specific detection capability, and Stanford University has been a leader in sensor development for practical combustion systems. Most previous sensing has been limited to gas streams near atmospheric pressure that are free of significant opacity from particulate loading. Recently, with the assistance of Electric Power ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Enhancing Water Cycle Measurements for Future Hydrologic Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc., established the Hydrologic Measurement Facility to transform watershed-scale hydrologic research by facilitating access to advanced instrumentation and expertise ...

H. W. Loescher; J. M. Jacobs; O. Wendroth; D. A. Robinson; G. S. Poulos; K. Mcguire; P. Reed; B. P. Mohanty; J. B. Shanley; W. Krajewski

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Program on Technology Innovation: Monitoring Carbon Monoxide and Nitric Oxide in Combustion Gases with Laser Absorption Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two important considerations for monitoring CO/O2 and NO/NH3 in the flue gas of coal-fired boilers include (1) optimization of the air/fuel distribution to individual burners, thereby enabling lower excess oxygen operation, reduced NOx emissions, and improved unit heat rate, and (2) optimization of NH3/NOx distribution at the inlet of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactor, thereby enabling increased NOx reduction performance while maintaining ammonia slip targets. Lower NOx emissions can be achie...

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report. Second calendar quarter--1997  

SciTech Connect

The moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. This report consists of a summary of the radiological and non-radiological data collected and analyzed during the second quarter of 1997.

Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated with Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of programs have been implemented on the Hanford Site that utilize the pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater as part of their remediation strategy. Often the treated water is reinjected into the aquifer at injection well sites. The implementation of remedial pump and treat systems, however, results in hydraulic pressure responses, both areally and vertically (i.e., with depth) within the pumped aquifer. The area within the aquifer affected by the pump and treat system (i.e., radius of influence) is commonly estimated based on detecting associated water-level responses within surrounding monitor wells. Natural external stresses, such as barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These temporal barometric effects may significantly mask water-level responses within more distant wells that are only slightly affected (< 0.10 m) by the test system. External stress effects, therefore, can lead to erroneous indications of the radius of influence of the imposed pump and treat system remediation activities and can greatly diminish the ability to analyze the associated well responses for hydraulic property characterization. When these extraneous influences are significant, adjustments or removal of the barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydrologic assessment. This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump and treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 pump and treat system monitor wells during the recent Y2K shutdown (December 1999) and restart activity (January 2000). The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

263

Hydrology Group - UNSAT-H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H Recharge Estimation UNSAT-H is a FORTRAN computer code used to simulate the one-dimensional flow of water, vapor, and heat in soils. The code addresses the processes of precipitation, evaporation, plant transpiration, storage, and deep drainage. The UNSAT-H computer code is used to understand the movement of water, heat, and vapor in soils so better decisions can be made about land use, waste disposal, and climate change. Example Tests and Typical Applications include studies of the water balance behavior of surface covers over shallow land burial waste sites and studies of land disturbance effects on recharge rates. The UNSAT-H computer code is managed by the Hydrology Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy

264

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

265

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

267

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

Harvey, Charles

268

Intensity of Hydrological Cycles in Warmer Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fact that the surface and tropospheric temperatures increase with increasing CO2 has been well documented by numerical model simulations; however, less agreement is found for the changes in the intensity of precipitation and the hydrological ...

Fanglin Yang; Arun Kumar; Michael E. Schlesinger; Wanqiu Wang

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Intercomparison of Hydrologic Processes in AMIP GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an intercomparison study under the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) to assess the abilities of 29 global climate models (GCMS) in simulating various aspects of regional and hydrologic processes in response to observed ...

K-M. Lau; Y. Sud; J. H. Kim

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Snowfall Limit Forecasts and Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological flood forecasting in mountainous areas requires accurate partitioning between rain and snowfall to properly estimate the extent of runoff contributing areas. Here a method to make use of snowfall limit information—a standard output of ...

Cara Tobin; Andrea Rinaldo; Bettina Schaefli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

L. Pan

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nonisothermal hydrologic transport experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

A field heater experimental plan is presented for investigating hydrologic transport processes in unsaturated fractured rock related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in an underground repository. The experimental plan provides a methodology for obtaining data required for evaluating conceptual and computer models related to HLW isolation in an environment where significant heat energy is produced. Coupled-process models are currently limited by the lack of validation data appropriate for field scales that incorporate relevant transport processes. Presented in this document is a discussion of previous nonisothermal experiments. Processes expected to dominate heat-driven liquid, vapor, gas, and solute flow during the experiment are explained, and the conceptual model for nonisothermal flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock is described. Of particular concern is the ability to confirm the hypothesized conceptual model specifically, the establishment of higher water saturation zones within the host rock around the heat source, and the establishment of countercurrent flow conditions within the host rock near the heat source. Field experimental plans are presented using the Apache Leap Tuff Site to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology. Both small-scale preliminary experiments and a long-term experiment are described.

Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs Title Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal...

275

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

277

Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology  

SciTech Connect

Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Use of a High-Resolution Standardized Precipitation Index for Drought Monitoring and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution drought-monitoring tool was developed to assess drought on multiple time scales using the standardized precipitation index (SPI). Daily precipitation data at 4-km resolution are obtained from the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction ...

D. Brent McRoberts; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Summary of the environmental monitoring at the Rock Springs, Wyoming Site No. 9, true in situ oil shale retorting experiment  

SciTech Connect

The environmental effects and needed control technology associated with the potential in-situ retorting of oil shale in the Green River Basin (near Rock Springs, Wyoming) has been studied for over four years. This environmental monitoring program has included previous and existing in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiments and baseline data collection for potential future retorting experiments. The most extensive environmetal monitoring effort is at Rock Springs Site No. 9, a true in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiment which was ignited April 5, 1976. The purpose of this monitoring program was to identify any significant changes in the hydrology, air quality, and soils. Data have been collected during the pre-operational (baseline) and operational phases and continues to be collected during the post-operational phase. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring conducted in support of the LETC Rock Springs No. 9 field experiment and the entire DOE oil shale program. 18 figures, 8 tables.

Virgona, J.E.; Poulson, R.E.; Spedding, T.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at DOE sites. For example, in East Fork Poplar Creek downstream of the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, bioindicators and community-level responses indicate an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Correcting Unintended Perturbation Biases in Hydrologic Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic data assimilation has become an important tool for improving hydrologic model predictions by using observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite sensors. Among existing data assimilation methods, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) ...

Dongryeol Ryu; Wade T. Crow; Xiwu Zhan; Thomas J. Jackson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Science of NOAA's Operational Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) is implementing a short- to long-range Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service (HEFS). The HEFS addresses the need to quantify uncertainty in hydrologic forecasts for flood risk management, water supply management, ...

Julie Demargne; Limin Wu; Satish Regonda; James Brown; Haksu Lee; Minxue He; Dong-Jun Seo; Robert Hartman; Henry D. Herr; Mark Fresch; John Schaake; Yuejian Zhu

283

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

285

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Research on chinese hydrological data quality management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data quality has become increasingly important in information constructions and low data quality will influence the decision-making process related to design, operation, and management of hydrology application. Although many researches could be found ... Keywords: assessment, data quality, dimension, improvement

Yufeng Yu; Yuelong Zhu; Jianxin Zhang; Jingjin Jiang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microseismic monitoring of the Sweet Lake, Louisiana, MagmaGulf-Technadril/D.O.E./Amoco Fee No. 1 Geopressured/Geothermal Energy Test Well Program: Final Report, 20 May 1980-31 May 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to study the seismic effects of fluid withdrawal from deep reservoirs and its subsequent reinjection closer to the surface. This effort included the design and installation of a hardware system and development of a study approach to monitor dynamic deformation in the Gulf Coast environment. Over the long term, insight gained into the ground deformation process (specifically ground subsidence) may potentially allow the integration of observations of individual phenomena into predictive tools for future use in ground subsidence studies. The value of a seismic monitoring network as a predictive tool can only be evaluated by an integrated program to study ground and instrument performance with time. Integrating extended real time monitoring of potential seismic precursors to significant displacements may represent the first integrated study of subsidence undertaken in the Gulf Coast region.

None

1984-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Downscaling Extended Weather Forecasts for Hydrologic Prediction  

SciTech Connect

Weather and climate forecasts are critical inputs to hydrologic forecasting systems. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) issues 8-15 days outlook daily for the U.S. based on the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model, which is a global model applied at about 2? spatial resolution. Because of the relatively coarse spatial resolution, weather forecasts produced by the MRF model cannot be applied directly to hydrologic forecasting models that require high spatial resolution to represent land surface hydrology. A mesoscale atmospheric model was used to dynamically downscale the 1-8 day extended global weather forecasts to test the feasibility of hydrologic forecasting through this model nesting approach. Atmospheric conditions of each 8-day forecast during the period 1990-2000 were used to provide initial and boundary conditions for the mesoscale model to produce an 8-day atmospheric forecast for the western U.S. at 30 km spatial resolution. To examine the impact of initialization of the land surface state on forecast skill, two sets of simulations were performed with the land surface state initialized based on the global forecasts versus land surface conditions from a continuous mesoscale simulation driven by the NCEP reanalysis. Comparison of the skill of the global and downscaled precipitation forecasts in the western U.S. showed higher skill for the downscaled forecasts at all precipitation thresholds and increasingly larger differences at the larger thresholds. Analyses of the surface temperature forecasts show that the mesoscale forecasts generally reduced the root-mean-square error by about 1.5 C compared to the global forecasts, because of the much better resolved topography at 30 km spatial resolution. In addition, initialization of the land surface states has large impacts on the temperature forecasts, but not the precipitation forecasts. The improvements in forecast skill using downscaling could be potentially significant for improving hydrologic forecasts for managing river basins.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

290

DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program - Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program DOELAP Regulatory Basis 10 CFR 835.402, Individual Monitoring, as amended DOELAP Program Administration DOE-STD 1111-98, DOE Laboratory...

291

Advanced Application Development Program Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with...

292

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analyzing harmonic monitoring data using data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic monitoring has become an important tool for harmonic management in distribution systems. A comprehensive harmonic monitoring program has been designed and implemented on a typical electrical MV distribution system in Australia. The monitoring ... Keywords: classification, clustering, data mining, harmonics, monitoring system, power quality, segmentation

Ali Asheibi; David Stirling; Danny Soetanto

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Robustness provided by internet monitoring systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internet applications such as Wealth Management Banking Programs require a very high degree of robustness. To attain this continuous testing - that is monitoring the systems over a period of time - is suggested. The preparation of an appropriate site-monitoring ... Keywords: continuous testing, internet, internet offering, monitoring systems, requirements, robustness, site monitoring, soft launch, test environment, testing recommendation, transitional state

Barry Dellar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydrologic database user`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrologic Database is an electronic filing cabinet containing water-related data for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of the database is to enhance research on hydrologic issues at the NTS by providing efficient access to information gathered by a variety of scientists. Data are often generated for specific projects and are reported to DOE in the context of specific project goals. The originators of the database recognized that much of this information has a general value that transcends project-specific requirements. Allowing researchers access to information generated by a wide variety of projects can prevent needless duplication of data-gathering efforts and can augment new data collection and interpretation. In addition, collecting this information in the database ensures that the results are not lost at the end of discrete projects as long as the database is actively maintained. This document is a guide to using the database.

Champman, J.B.; Gray, K.J.; Thompson, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

HAPEX—MOBLIHY: A Hydrologic Atmospheric Experiment for the Study of Water Budget and Evaporation Flux at the Climatic Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HAPEX-MOBILHY program is aimed at studying the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a GCM (general circulation model) grid square, i.e., 104 km2. Different surface and subsurface networks will be operated during the year ...

Jean-Claude André; Jean-Paul Goutorbe; Alain Perrier

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Characterizing Soil Physical Properties for Soil Moisture Monitoring with the North Carolina Environment and Climate Observing Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture has important implications for meteorology, climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. This has led to growing interest in development of in situ soil moisture monitoring networks. Measurement interpretation is severely limited without ...

Weinan Pan; R. P. Boyles; J. G. White; J. L. Heitman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Frogwatch Program Link  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

frog and toad monitoring program visit: http:www.nwf.orgfrogwatchUSA Berkeley Lab | ACS | Notice to Users | Whole Frog Project | Virtual Frog Page last modified: 012305...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

303

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/monitoring.pdf Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Screenshot References: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs[1] This document includes: A brief overview of MVE in the context of S&L programmes.

308

An International Haze-Monitoring Network for Students  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program is an international network of schools in 71 countries that monitors up to 20 environmental parameters. Recently GLOBE added a haze-monitoring program to its ...

Forrest M. Mims III

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of postcombustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOx control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have yi...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOX) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOX control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have y...

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

Wood, E.F. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NETL: Carbon Storage - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Focus Area An MVA program is designed to confirm permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations...

313

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

316

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary...

317

Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

often function as hydrologic barriers separating regions of distinct fluid inclusion chemistry and temperature gradient. Distributed fracture networks play only a minor role in...

318

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling...

319

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

320

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

How Well Do Large-Scale Models Reproduce Regional Hydrological Extremes in Europe?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new methodology for assessing the ability of gridded hydrological models to reproduce large-scale hydrological high and low flow events (as a proxy for hydrological extremes) as described by catalogues of historical droughts [...

Christel Prudhomme; Simon Parry; Jamie Hannaford; Douglas B. Clark; Stefan Hagemann; Frank Voss

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Influence of Precipitation Variability and Partial Irrigation within Grid Cells on a Hydrological Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of natural and anthropogenic heterogeneity on a hydrological simulation are evaluated using a distributed biosphere hydrological model (DBHM) system. The DBHM embeds a biosphere model into a distributed hydrological scheme, ...

Qiuhong Tang; Taikan Oki; Shinjiro Kanae; Heping Hu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

324

Modernization in the National Weather Service River and Flood Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic forecasting is vital not only to the National Weather Service mission of saying lives and protecting property but also to our nation's water management decision makers. Since its inception, the River and Flood Program has continually ...

D.L. Fread; R.C. Shedd; G.F. Smith; R. Farnsworth; C.N. Hoffeditz; L.A. Wenzel; S.M. Wiele; J.A. Smith; G.N. Day

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

326

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

327

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Multi-cluster processor operating only select number of clusters during each phase based on program statistic monitored at predetermined intervals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a processor having multiple clusters which operate in parallel, the number of clusters in use can be varied dynamically. At the start of each program phase, the configuration option for an interval is run to determine the optimal configuration, which is used until the next phase change is detected. The optimum instruction interval is determined by starting with a minimum interval and doubling it until a low stability factor is reached.

Balasubramonian, Rajeev (Sandy, UT); Dwarkadas, Sandhya (Rochester, NY); Albonesi, David (Ithaca, NY)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2004 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2004. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2004 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2004 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2004 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G contai

N /A

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2005 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2005. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2005 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2005 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2005 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G co

None

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

333

Tritium migration at the Gasbuggy site: Evaluation of possible hydrologic pathways  

SciTech Connect

An underground nuclear test named Gasbuggy was conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 1967. Subsequent groundwater monitoring in an overlying aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed increasing levels of tritium in monitoring well EPNG 10-36, located 132 m from the test, suggesting migration of contaminants from the nuclear cavity. There are three basic scenarios that could explain the occurrence of tritium in well 10-36: (1) introduction of tritium into the well from the land surface, (2) migration of tritium through the Ojo Alamo Formation, and (3) migration through the Pictured Cliffs Formation. The two subsurface transport scenarios were evaluated with a travel time analysis. In one, transport occurs to the Ojo Alamo sandstone either up the emplacement hole or through fractures created by the blast, and then laterally through the aquifer to the monitoring well. In the other, lateral transport occurs through fractures in the underlying Pictured Cliffs detonation horizon and then migrates up the monitoring well through plugged casing connecting the two formations. The travel time analysis indicates that the hydraulic conductivity measured in the Ojo Alamo Formation is too low for lateral transport to account for the observed arrival of tritium at the monitoring well. This suggests transport either through fractures intersecting the Ojo Alamo close to well EPNG 10-36, or through fractures in the Pictured Cliffs and up through the bottom plug in the well. The transport scenarios were investigated using hydrologic logging techniques and sampling at the monitoring well, with the fieldwork conducted after the removal of a string of 0.05-m-diameter tubing that had previously provided the only monitoring access.

Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; Lyles, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The impact of climate change on vadose zone pore waters and its implication for long-term monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protecting groundwater is of growing interest as pressure on these resources grows. Recharge of groundwater takes place through the vadose zone, where complex interactions between thermal-hydrological-geochemical processes affect water quality. Monitoring ... Keywords: climate change, massively parallel computers, monitoring, nuclear waste disposal, pore water chemistry, reactive transport, vadose zone

William E. Glassley; John J. Nitao; Charles W. Grant; James W. Johnson; Carl I. Steefel; James R. Kercher

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A method to hydrologically isolate water soluble wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural cover system with gravel used as a capillary barrier was designed and evaluated as a method to hydrologically isolate buried water soluble oil and gas wastes. Simulated cover systems were installed in 200 liter barrels and tested in a greenhouse. The treatments contained gravel barrier thicknesses of 0, 8, 15, 23, and 30 cm. Gravel was placed over a salt contaminated soil and was covered with 30 cm of a sandy clay topsoil. Drains were installed in the bottom of the barrels to collect drainage from the gravel layer and below the buried saline waste. Treatments were tested for effectiveness in both a wet and dry moisture regime using simulated monthly rainfall applications. Upward migration of soluble salts was monitored by measuring the electrical resistance of the soil by means of salinity sensors at the base of the topsoil. Electrical conductivity (EC) measurements of the leachate were used to determine the downward movement of soluble salts. Total volume of leachate from each drain was also monitored for each simulated month. Core samples were taken to determine the EC of the topsoil at the conclusion of the experiment. Electrical resistance values indicated that upward soluble salt migration occurred immediately on treatments which did not include a capillary barrier. EC values for all gravel barrier treatments indicated no upward migration of the buried saline waste. Values for EC at the base of the topsoil ranged from 10 to 20 dS M-1 in the treatments with no capillary barrier to 0.1 to 1.0 dS M-1 in treatments containing a capillary barrier. Effluent EC was significantly higher (29-56 dS M-1 ) from below the saline soil than from the gravel drain (2-9 dS M-1 ). In addition, 93 % of the leachate from both moisture regimes that permeated the cover system was collected from the gravel drain. These results indicate that a cover system which includes a capillary barrier would protect groundwater by greatly decreasing downward movement of water soluble constituents. Upward migration of buried water soluble wastes would also be prevented which would in turn protect the topsoil and surface waters.

Rooney, Daniel James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

337

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

338

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

339

The Hydrologic Feedback Pathway for Land–Climate Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of improvements in land surface initialization and specification of observed rainfall in global climate model simulations of boreal summer are examined to determine how the changes propagate around the hydrologic cycle in the coupled ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Large-Scale Aspects of the United States Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, gridpoint, atmospheric, hydrologic climatology consisting of atmospheric precipitable water, precipitation, atmospheric moisture flux convergence, and a residual evaporation for the conterminous United States is described. A large-...

John O. Roads; Shyh-C. Chen; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrologic Processes Associated with Cyclone Systems over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantial amount of precipitation in the midlatitudes occurs in association with extratropical cyclones. Using the data generated by version 1 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) Data Assimilation System for 1985-89, hydrologic ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Ming-Cheng Yen; Siegfried Schubert

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Successful Hydrologic Forecasting for California Using an Information Theoretic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Entropy Minimax technique from information theory has been applied to long-range, hydrologic forecasting in California. Based on 1852–1977 records, the technique exhibits a limited, but statistically significant, success for predictions one ...

R. A. Christensen; R. F. Eilbert; O. H. Lindgren; L. L. Rans

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

344

Quantitative Precipitation Forecast Techniques for Use in Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative hydrologic forecasting usually requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. First, it is important to accurately measure the precipitation falling over a particular watershed of interest. Second, ...

Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael D. Hudlow

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Skill of Medium-Range Hydrological Ensemble Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrological ensemble prediction system, integrating a water balance model with ensemble precipitation forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS), is evaluated for two Belgian ...

Emmanuel Roulin; Stéphane Vannitsem

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

How Essential is Hydrologic Model Calibration to Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic model calibration is usually a central element of streamflow forecasting based on the ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) method. Evaluation measures of forecast errors such as root-mean-square error (RMSE) are heavily influenced by ...

Xiaogang Shi; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nonlinear Climate and Hydrological Responses to Aerosol Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium temperature and hydrological responses to the total aerosol effects (i.e., direct, semidirect, and indirect effects) are studied using a modified version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory atmosphere general circulation ...

Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methodological Approaches to Projecting the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) is expected to have important impacts on water resources, with a variety of societal impacts. Recent research has shown that applying different methodologies to assess hydrologic impacts ...

Brent M. Lofgren; Andrew D. Gronewold; Anthony Acciaioli; Jessica Cherry; Allison Steiner; David Watkins

349

Evaluation of Precipitation Products for Global Hydrological Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate precipitation data are critical for hydrologic prediction, yet outside the developed world in situ networks are so sparse as to make alternative methods of precipitation estimation essential. Several such alternative precipitation ...

Nathalie Voisin; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Hydrologic and Thermodynamic Characteristics of the NCAR CCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological properties for selected aspects of the thermodynamic structure and hydrologic cycle are presented from a 15-yr numerical simulation conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model, version 3 (...

James J. Hack; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; James W. Hurrell

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrologic Verification: A Call for Action and Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, little attention has been focused on the systematic verification of operational hydrologic forecasts. This paper summarizes the results of forecast verification from 15 river basins in the United States. The verification scores for ...

Edwin Welles; Soroosh Sorooshian; Gary Carter; Billy Olsen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Operational Responsibilities of the National Weather Service River and Flood Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The River and Flood Program in the National Weather Service, in its mission to save lives and property, has the responsibility to gather hydrologic data from a variety of sources and to assemble the data to make timely and reliable hydrologic ...

L.W. Larson; R.L. Ferral; E.T. Strem; A.J. Morin; B. Armstrong; T.R. Carroll; M.D. Hudlow; L.A. Wenzel; G.L. Schaefer; D.E. Johnson

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 upgradient wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 downgradient monitoring wells alignedoverthreerows the entire saturated zone of interest from 1.5 to 6.1 m (11, 12). At the injection wells, the coinjected into the subsurface through the injection gallery. Here, each injection well was equipped with three injection ports

Hubbard, Susan

358

1984 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Validation and Use of a Semidistributed Hydrological Modeling System to Predict Short-Term Effects of Clear-Cutting on a Watershed Hydrological Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gestion Intégrée des Bassins versants à l'aide d'un Système Informatisé (GIBSI), a semidistributed hydrological modeling system, was evaluated for its ability to simulate the impact of deforestation on the hydrological regime of the Famine ...

Martin-Pierre Lavigne; Alain N. Rousseau; Richard Turcotte; Anne-Marie Laroche; Jean-Pierre Fortin; Jean-Pierre Villeneuve

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Impact of a Statistical Bias Correction on the Projected Hydrological Changes Obtained from Three GCMs and Two Hydrology Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate model scenarios depend crucially on the models’ adequate representation of the hydrological cycle. Within the EU integrated project Water and Global Change (WATCH), special care is taken to use state-of-the-art climate model output ...

Stefan Hagemann; Cui Chen; Jan O. Haerter; Jens Heinke; Dieter Gerten; Claudio Piani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

Nimz, G.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

370

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Technology FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP

371

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling Project Description The proposed research will make significant contributions to assessing, developing, and managing EGS systems. The research results will directly address many of key aspects of developing EGS and traditional geothermal reservoirs from site selection and characterization, reservoir creation, stimulation, and validation to reservoir sustainability. In particular, the proposed development provides a practical approach to assess long-term performance of EGS systems as well as optimum design and operation strategies, by consideration of fully coupled processes of thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and rock deformation effects. This research is strategically important to DOE's mission in the national energy resource and security. Furthermore, once the research goals are achieved, the developed simulator will substantially enhance the ability to characterized EGS systems, predict long-term performance of EGS systems, and optimize production strategies, and help energy extraction from EGS reservoir commercially feasible.

372

Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

Pompilio, R.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

374

Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan provides updates the ongoing RCRA interim status groundwater monitoring program for the U-12 crib and provides a proposed RCRA final status post-closure groundwater monitoring program.

Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

New technologies for item monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

WIRELESS MICROWAVE ACOUSTIC SENSOR SYSTEM FOR CONDITION MONITORING...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIRELESS MICROWAVE ACOUSTIC SENSOR SYSTEM FOR CONDITION MONITORING IN POWER PLANT ENVIRONMENTS Project DE-FE0007379TDD NETL, Morgantown, WV, March 14, 2012. DOE NETL Program:...

377

Guideline for Online Monitoring of Nuclear Power Plants: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues a series of guidelines that assist member utilities in developing an online monitoring (OLM) program for equipment condition assessment at nuclear power plants.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Monitoring and characterizing natural hazards with satellite InSAR imagery *, Jixian Zhangb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-temporal RADARSAT-1 and ERS backscattering signatures of coastal wetlands at Southeastern Louisiana. Photogrammetric. Monitoring dynamic water-level changes in wetlands improves hydrological modeling predictions-level changes in wetlands Both L-band and C-band InSAR imagery can be used to measure water-level changes

379

2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

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381

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

382

Isotope hydrology of a basin and range geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the geothermal resources in Dixie Valley are exploited, a complete understanding of the hydrologic system is essential in managing the geothermal system. As a reconnaissance study in an area of minimal hydrologic research, it is necessary to examine many facets of the local hydrologic cycle in Dixie Valley. To this end, this paper will discuss the isotopic composition of local precipitation, the age and origin of the hot spring waters and the type of water most important for recharge of both the thermal and nonthermal systems. This study was accomplished by using stable and radioactive environmental isotopes, and to a lesser extent, water chemistry. Dueterium and oxygen-18 were heavily relied upon in formulating conclusions, but some tritium and carbon-14 sampling were also performed.

Jacobson, R.L.; Ingraham, N.L.; Campana, M.E.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Database of Mechanical and Hydrological Properties of WIPP Anhydrite Derived from Laboratory-Scale Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the purpose of demonstrating safe management, storage, and disposal of radioactive transuranic (TRU) waste generated by U.S. defense programs. The WIPP is located in southeastern New Mexico, and the underground facilities of the WIPP (i.e., experimental rooms, disposal rooms, etc.) are sited in the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of about 660 meters. The DOE has authorized the continuance of scientific research and engineering analysis related to the performance of the WIPP repository. One area of additional research relates to characterization of the mechanical and hydrological properties of anhydrite interbeds within the Salado Formation. These anhydrite interbeds have been penetrated by the shafts that provide access to the underground facilities and also lie in close proximity to the proposed radioactive waste disposal rooms at the repository horizon. Properties of particular interest are mechanical strength, deforrnational behavior, and fluid transport properties such as permeability. These properties will be used in calculationskmalyses of the mechanical and hydrological behavior of the anhydrite, in particular, and the shaft sealing system and disposal rooms, in general.

Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

GEOtop: A Distributed Hydrological Model with Coupled Water and Energy Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new distributed hydrological model, called GEOtop. The model accommodates very complex topography and, besides the water balance, unlike most other hydrological models, integrates all the terms in the surface energy balance ...

Riccardo Rigon; Giacomo Bertoldi; Thomas M. Over

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sensitivity of the Continental Hydrological Cycle to the Spatial Resolution over the Iberian Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the broad context of the downscaling methods that are used to study climatic change impacts, the dependence of the surface hydrological processes simulated by the Organising Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystem (ORCHIDEE) land surface ...

S. Vérant; K. Laval; J. Polcher; M. De Castro

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assessing Hydrologic Impact of Climate Change with Uncertainty Estimates: Bayesian Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge in assessing the hydrologic effect of climate change remains the estimation of uncertainties associated with different sources, such as the global climate models, emission scenarios, downscaling methods, and hydrologic models. ...

Mohammad Sajjad Khan; Paulin Coulibaly

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

An empirical comparison of monitoring algorithms for access anomaly detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major disadvantages of parallel programming with shared memory is the nondeterministic behavior caused by uncoordinated access to shared variables, known as access anomalies. Monitoring program execution to detect access anomalies ...

A. Dinning; E. Schonberg

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dynamic Inversion for Hydrological Process Monitoring with Electrical Resistance Tomography Under Model Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water content using electrical resistivity tomography, WaterJ. Nitao (1992), Electrical resistivity tomography of vadoseinverse model for electrical resistivity surveys and its

Lehikoinen, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

Bomblies, Arne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alberta Program Type Environmental Regulations Generation Disclosure Provider Minister of Natural Resources This act requires that every energy enterprise file with the Minister a return setting out statistics and information relating to its ownership and control; financial information; information, including financial, about its exploration for, development, production, processing, refining and

395

WaterHUB: a resource for students and educators for learning hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of surface water hydrology involves understanding the occurrence, distribution and movement of water on the surface of the earth. Because of human impacts in the form of landuse change, the hydrologic processes at one geographic location may ... Keywords: HUBzero, WaterHUB, soil water assessment tool, surface water hydrology

Venkatesh Merwade; Wei Feng; Lan Zhao; Carol X. Song

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GRACE Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate Ole Baltazar of blood cell Delivers 10-Day / Monthly gravity field From 2002 Onwards Study gravity field changes | side 6 Range responds to Gravity #12;GRACE science results | 28. November 2007 | OA | side 7 Variations

Mosegaard, Klaus

397

Estimating the Long-Term Hydrological Budget over Heterogeneous Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the hydrological budget in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW; 5000 km2) of southern Kansas were made with a parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) model for the period 1996–2002. With its subgrid-scale distribution scheme, the ...

J. Song; M. L. Wesely; D. J. Holdridge; D. R. Cook; J. Klazura

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hydrologic budget for A/M Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation different components of the hydrologic budget for the groundwater flow system beneath the A/M Area were quantified. To accomplish this a regional groundwater flow mode, previously calibrated to the groundwater flow system beneath the A/M Area, was used to generate flux terms which could then be used to quantify specific components of the hydrologic budget. Sub-zones within the constructed model were defined in terms of groups of model nodes using the US Geological Survey code ZONEBUDGET. Cell-by-cell flux terms generated by the groundwater model for each node were used as input to calculate the hydrologic budgets for each of the defined sub-zones. Results were tabulated both as actual groundwater fluxes and as normalized quantities to allow easy comparison of flux magnitudes for different sub-zones. In the process of defining sub-zones and calculating the flux magnitude for different components of the hydrologic flow system, the adequacy of the groundwater flow model in describing the actual flow system was better determined. In effect, quantification of flux terms from the groundwater model functioned as a ``calibration tool`` in that specific changes to the groundwater model which would enhance its calibration were identified and are described in this report.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Haselow, J.S.; Jackson, D.G.; Ehrke, L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Climatic and Hydrologic Changes in the Tien Shan, Central Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze climatic and hydrologic data from 110 sites collected from the middle of the twentieth century to the present in the Tien Shan, one of the largest mountain systems of central Asia. In spite of a few confounding interregional ...

Vladimir B. Aizen; Elena M. Aizen; John M. Melack; Jeff Dozier

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality Assurance Requirements" DOE Order 414.1C, QualityConduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities UCmeet DOE, Contract or implementing requirements. An abrupt

Gravois, Melanie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological monitoring program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

varied, all evaluations examined selected aspects of applicable Federal regulations and DOE directives. In particular, independent oversight evaluations examined the...

402

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste tanks, where significant efforts have been made to develop remediation and closure strategies. The DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH)...

403

STATUS OF OTEC ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed OTEe sites: Puerto Rico, St Croix and Northern GulfFlorida; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; Keahole Point, Hawaii.Oceanographic data off Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands.

Wilde, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, and UniversityAssurance Requirements" DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance

Gravois, Melanie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

407

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 This report documents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) analysis of DOE environmental monitoring, surveillance, and control activities. The analysis is based primarily on DOE Headquarters independent oversight evaluations of environmental monitoring and surveillance activities that were conducted at 14 different sites across the DOE complex during fiscal years 1999 through 2002. Independent oversight evaluations determined that all sites had established

408

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

409

Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations,