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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

2

Harnessing the Environmental Data Flood: A Comparative Analysis of Hydrologic, Oceanographic, and Meteorological Informatics Platforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers studying large-scale questions in hydrology, oceanography, and meteorology can work with existing data through a myriad of platforms that provide access to remote datasets and render said information in various graphical outputs for ...

Andrew K. Dow; Eli M. Dow; Thomas D. Fitzsimmons; Maurice M. Materise

3

Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrkoping, Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute, NorrkoÃ?ping, Sweden 3 Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland 4 Rossby Centre, NorrkoÃ?ping, Sweden 5 German Weather Service, Offenbach, Germany 6 Institute for Marine Research, University of Kiel, Sweden A comprehensive model inter-comparison study investigating the water budget during the BALTEX

Lindau, Ralf

4

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

5

Meteorological Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pleasure of recording the commencement of the publication of meteorological observations in the Boletin de Estadistica of Puebla (Mexico). Observations taken three times a clay are published for several ...

1887-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files  

SciTech Connect

Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Career Map: Meteorological Technician  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Meteorological Technician positions.

8

Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

None

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Techniques for estimating flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds  

SciTech Connect

The Clark Method, modified slightly, was used to develop a synthetic dimensionless hydrograph that can be used to estimate flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds. Application of the technique results in a typical (average) flood hydrograph for a given peak discharge. Input necessary to apply the technique is an estimate of basin lagtime and the recurrence interval peak discharge. Equations for this purpose were obtained from a recent nationwide study on flood frequency in urban watersheds. A regression equation was developed which relates flood volumes to drainage area size, basin lagtime, and peak discharge. This equation is useful where storage of floodwater may be a part of design or flood prevention. 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Stricker, V.A.; Sauer, V.B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page 1 Lead Author L. Alexander  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9

New Hampshire, University of

11

Introduction The research area overlaps with the hydrographic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Valley at south, and the Cracul Radului­Cracul Urzicea at west. The skarn was described for the firstIntroduction The research area overlaps with the hydrographic basin of the Mraconia Valley. It is bounded by the the Poiana Mraconia and Lugojistea at north, the Satului Valley at east, the Ponicova

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999 Lynne D. Talley a,*, Pavel properties from CTD and discrete bottle sample profiles covering the Japan (East) Sea in summer, 1999: Japan sea; Ocean chemistry; Ocean atlas; Marginal seas; Water masses 1. Introduction The Japan or East

Talley, Lynne D.

13

European Meteorological Telecommunications Panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... under the auspices of the International Meteorological Organisation, which recently decided to establish a meteorological telecommunications panel under each of its six regional commissions. This was the first meeting of ... meeting of the panel for the European region, and it was attended by meteorologists and telecommunications experts from Belgium, Eire, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Norway (also ...

1948-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

15

meteorologic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

meteorologic meteorologic Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations Source NREL Date Released August 02nd, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 07th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF meteorologic NREL Sri Lanka SWERA TMY UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 2.4 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1973 - 2002 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

16

WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of marine surface winds from ships and buoys . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Report on Beaufort equivalent scales detection in gridded ship data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 A methodology/IOC TECHNICAL COMMISSION FOR OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE METEOROLOGY ADVANCES IN THE APPLICATIONS OF MARINE

Lindau, Ralf

17

High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

Vivoni, Enrique R.

18

Evaluating the performance of hydrological models via cross-spectral analysis: case study of the Thames Basin, UK.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nine distributed hydrological models, forced with common meteorological inputs, simulated naturalised daily discharge from the Thames Basin for 1963-2001. While model-dependent evaporative losses are critical for modelling mean discharge, multiple ...

Graham P. Weedon; Christel Prudhomme; Sue Crooks; Richard J. Ellis; Sonja S. Folwell; Martin J. Best

19

Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd on Hydrographic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd QC) on Hydrographic Data Toste Tanhua, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Kiel, Germany. This Matlab package will help you perform secondary cite as: Tanhua, T. 2010. Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd QC) on Hydrographic

20

Meteorological Effects on Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 June 1977 research-article Meteorological Effects on Solar Cells J. R. Mallinson P. T. Landsberg The effect of different meteorological conditions on solar cell outputs has been investigated...

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the statistical estimates of the differences between the various air-sea heat flux products tend to be largest. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;A comparison of Southern Ocean air-sea buoyancy flux from an ocean state estimate with five other products Ivana Cerovecki, Lynne D. Talley and Matthew R. Mazloff

Talley, Lynne D.

22

Hydrographic Preconditioning for Seasonal Sea Ice Anomalies in the Labrador Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates the hydrographic processes involved in setting the maximum wintertime sea ice (SI) extent in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The analysis is based on an ocean and sea ice state estimate covering ...

Fenty, Ian

23

Techniques for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-3 1966 Techniques for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas M.D. Hudlow Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Hudlow, M.D.

24

Evaluating the impact of longwall coal mining on the hydrologic balance  

SciTech Connect

An approach has been developed to evaluate changes in the hydrologic balance associated with land subsidence above longwall mining operations in the Appalachian Coal Basin. This method consists of developing hydrogeologic cross sections to define specific aquifers and aquitards which exist within the overburden. The cross sections can be used to define the premining hydrologic flow pattern within the mine overburden and the lithologic composition of a well, spring or pond where no previous data were available. Then the water sources are mapped in relationship to the mine development plan. Hydrographs are developed to evaluate changes in water level in a well or the flow characteristics of a spring or stream with respect to the passing of the longwall mine face. To demonstrate the use of the technique, two mine site case histories are presented. These case histories evaluate changes in the hydrologic balance as they relate to potential ground-water depletion of wells, developed springs, streams and surface-water impoundments.

Coe, C.J.; Stowe, S.M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVnern,Sweden Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11531163 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVänern,Sweden 1153 Hydrology dynamics in Lake Vänern, Sweden Magnus Dahl1 and B. Charlotta Pers2 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE651 88 Karlstad, Sweden 2 Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, SE601

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Meteorological Effects on Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Meteorological Effects on Solar Cells J. R. Mallinson P. T. Landsberg...different meteorological conditions on solar cell outputs has been investigated, using a model for a solar cell (p-on-n or n-on-p) which...

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydrographic observations off Savannah and Brunswick, Georgia: March, May and September 1977 and January 1978. Technical report 80-1  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume 3 contains technical reports of hydrographic observations. (ACR)

Singer, J J; Atkinson, L P; Chandler, W S; Bishop, S S

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EUMETSAT Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The EUMETSAT Application Ground Segment will be upgraded to accommodate the future processing requirements of MTG imager and sounder data. Both the Meteorological ... ) Network will be enhanced to accommodate the...

Declan Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 A Single Vessel Approach to Inter-Vessel Normalization of Seafloor Backscatter Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 A Single of the #12;Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 measured

New Hampshire, University of

30

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers solutions to the one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for unconfined flow in a homogeneous and horizontal compare analytical solutions to the linearized one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for a sloping aquifer

Tullos, Desiree

31

GIS applications for determining the hydrographic characteristics of rivers N.Ershova, G.Frolova  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS applications for determining the hydrographic characteristics of rivers N.Ershova, G. As a rule, it is connected to the use of geo-information technologies (GIS-technologies), which give greater scale, is a real challenge. GIS technologies, using map distance measuring probabilities enable speedier

Richner, Heinz

32

METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be purchased at the Bookstore. [Note: This book covers fundamentals at an introductory level. We (1986), and Doppler Radar Meteorological Observations; Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 11 (Part B

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

33

METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be purchased at the Bookstore. [Note: This book covers fundamentals at an introductory level. We will go well), and Doppler Radar Meteorological Observations; Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 11 (Part B) (1990). Grades

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

34

Meteorological Network Expansion Using Information Decay Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalized network design methodology was developed by using the basic entropy concept introduced by Shannon in communication engineering. In order to select potential sites for meteorological network expansion purposes, the meteorological ...

Tahir Husain; Mustafa A. Ukayli; Hasin U. Khan

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Computational methods in wind power meteorology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational methods in wind power meteorology Bo Hoffmann Jørgensen, Søren Ott, Niels Nørmark, Jakob Mann and Jake Badger Title: Computational methods in wind power meteorology Department: Wind in connection with the project called Computational meth- ods in wind power meteorology which was supported

36

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

37

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central America from NREL Central America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems.A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

38

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Cuba  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuba Cuba from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems.A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

39

15 JUNE 2003 1967L ' E C U Y E R A N D S T E P H E N S 2003 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 JUNE 2003 1967L ' E C U Y E R A N D S T E P H E N S 2003 American Meteorological Society, and space--enhancing reflection of solar radiation to space, trapping thermal emission from the surface. Central to this issue is the role of the hydrological cycle governing the exchange of water between

Stephens, Graeme L.

40

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8056 Hydrological principles for sustainable management of forest of the cleanest and most plentiful freshwater supplies, sustaining many downstream communities. Given the ongoing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving...

42

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from NREL Ethiopia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions

43

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

44

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

45

Meteorology: typical meteorological data for selected stations in Ghana  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data for selected stations in Ghana data for selected stations in Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations> (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

46

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Sri  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

47

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from NREL China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

48

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

49

To a physicist about to teach meteorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physics teachers have the physical science background to teach an introductory course in meteorology. Weather phenomena follow the laws of classical physics: thermodynamics fluid mechanics and radiation physics.

James O’Connell

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Meteorology of the Persian Gulf and Mekran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... UTNTIL after an international aerial route had been established along the Persian coast, meteorological information for this region was very scanty; the systematic study of its ... Ocean.

E. V. N.

1932-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh from NREL Bangladesh from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not

52

Long-term changes in acidification and recovery at nine calibrated catchments in Norway, Sweden and Finland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 339349 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Finland 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 339­349 (2001) © EGS Long-term changes in acidification and recovery at nine calibrated catchments in Norway, Sweden and Finland F. Moldan1 , R.F. Wright2, Finland 5 Finnish Meteorological Institute, Box 503, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland Email for corresponding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Jasper Vrugt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEE 271 Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Instructor Jasper Vrugt Engineering Tower #834E / #536 (LAB) Tel.: 505-231-2698 jasper @uci.edu Office Hours: By Appointment Lecture, 1 hour; discussion, 20 minutes: ICS

Vrugt, Jasper A.

54

Hydrographer of the Navy: Retirement of Vice-Admiral Sir John Edgell, K.B.E., C.B., F.R.S  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON April 30, Vice-Admiral Sir John Edgell retired from the post of Hydrographer of the Navy which he had held since ... from the post of Hydrographer of the Navy which he had held since 1932. Sir John has seen fifty-one years of service in the Navy, and had been in ...

1945-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 1 Lead Author J. Gardner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A UNCLOS Article 76 and the year each area has been mapped. #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 2 Lead Author J. Gardner Ocean Mapping

New Hampshire, University of

56

Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 WATER-COLUMN VARIABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR UNDERWAY PROFILERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 1 WATER trials and from analysis of existing data sets are presented. #12;Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 2 Introduction The application of timely measurements of sound

New Hampshire, University of

57

Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, Tampa, FL, 25-28 Apr 2011 THE PORT OF NORFOLK PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, Tampa, FL, 25-28 Apr 2011 1 THE PORT OF NORFOLK for the Port of Norfolk Project are to explore viable methods of improvement with respect to both the process intuitive fashion, or providing it in a format that is inherently more useful. The Port of Norfolk Project

New Hampshire, University of

58

World Meteorological Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Meteorological Organization World Meteorological Organization Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Meteorological Organization Name World Meteorological Organization Address 7bis, avenue de la Paix, Case postale 2300, CH-211 Place Geneva, Switzerland Coordinates 46.2038099°, 6.1399589° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2038099,"lon":6.1399589,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology Energy Technology (RET) projects. These climatological profiles are used for designing systems that have for implementing RETs, there are inherent problems in using them for resource assessment. Ground measurement

Firestone, Jeremy

60

GIS Applications in MeteorologyGIS Applications in Meteorology Adventures in a Parallel UniverseAdventures in a Parallel Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS Applications in MeteorologyGIS Applications in Meteorology (or)(or) Adventures in a Parallel Mason UniversityDept. Geography, George Mason University 24 June 200324 June 2003 GIS Meteorology, Shipley NCAR, 24 Jun 2003NCAR 24Jun03.ppt #12;NCAR 24Jun03.ppt GIS Meteorology, Shipley NCAR, 24 Jun 2003

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for This paper is a contribution to the special issue on the IPSL and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL- CM5B

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

62

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eugster2 and Reto Burkard3 1 Water Resources, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA 2 Institute of Plant the fog water inputs to ecosystems. In addition, stable isotopes may be used as a natural tracer for fog unresolved questions as to how cloud-affected ecosystems actually function hydrologically (Bruijnzeel 2001

63

Wetland Hydrology! 1. Water sources!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Flooding). #12;2. Where do wetlands occur?! Poorly drained sites! Groundwater sites: ! receive! Dominated by herbaceous vegetation.! Tidal (above, with egrets)! Non-tidal (Colorado)! #12;Riparian;Wetland Hydrology and Flood Control?! Do wetlands offer flood control benefits?! Yes, in the sense

Gray, Matthew

64

Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

Ritsche, MT

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Meteorological Support at the Savanna River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) operates many nuclear facilities on large complexes across the United States in support of national defense. The operation of these many and varied facilities and processes require meteorological support for many purposes, including: for routine operations, to respond to severe weather events, such as lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes, to support the emergency response functions in the event of a release of materials to the environment, for engineering baseline and safety documentation, as well as hazards assessments etc. This paper describes a program of meteorological support to the Savannah River Site, a DOE complex located in South Carolina.

Addis, Robert P.

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems  

SciTech Connect

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

Nimz, G. J., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is no10 isotopic fractionation between the liquid phase and the generated moist "air". The water11., A microdrop generator for the calibration of.... 1. Introduction1 2 Water vapor is a key element in the globalAMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - air medical meteorology Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

institutes Disciplines Systemanalysis science Medical science Statistics Meteorology... - Air pollution - CO2 costs - Climate + meteorology Base-line definition: Geographical...

70

Hydrologic Monitoring Summary Long Valley Caldera, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Hydrologic Monitoring Summary Long Valley Caldera, California Abstract Abstract...

71

NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy Screenshot References: Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy[1] Main Points Over 200 satellite-derived meteorology and solar energy parameters Monthly averaged from 22 years of data Data tables for a particular location Color plots on both global and regional scales Global solar energy data for 1195 ground sites References ↑ "Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy"

72

Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1979 Major Subject: Meteorology CLOUD STRUCTURES FRON DEFENSE &IETEOROLOGICAL SAT"LLIT DATA A Thesis by JOHN FREDERICK PHILLIPS Approved as to style and content by. (Cha an of Committee) (Head of Department (Me er) (Hencber) August 1975...-gray-level density wedge, provided by the Air Weather Service, enabled determinations of ap- proximate cloud heights A comparison was made between the DMSP imagery and the concurrent digital radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory at Norman...

Phillips, John Frederick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

74

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanica...

75

Hydrology Group - UNSAT-H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H Recharge Estimation UNSAT-H is a FORTRAN computer code used to simulate the one-dimensional flow of water, vapor, and heat in soils. The code addresses the processes of precipitation, evaporation, plant transpiration, storage, and deep drainage. The UNSAT-H computer code is used to understand the movement of water, heat, and vapor in soils so better decisions can be made about land use, waste disposal, and climate change. Example Tests and Typical Applications include studies of the water balance behavior of surface covers over shallow land burial waste sites and studies of land disturbance effects on recharge rates. The UNSAT-H computer code is managed by the Hydrology Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy

76

Meteorological teleconnections between the Sahel and the eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METEOROLOGICAL TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE SAHEL AND THE EASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis by JEFFREY EARL MALAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology METEOROLOGICAL TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE SAHEL AND THE EASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis by JEFFREY EARL MALAN Approved as to style and content by: J hn F. Grif s (Cha rman of Committee) Rudo f J...

Malan, Jeffrey Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

METEOROLOGY OF SO CLOUD REGIMES WORKSHOP ON SOUTHERN OCEAN CLOUDS & AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regimes Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed regimes Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed

Jakob, Christian

79

Global-scale flow routing using a source-to-sink algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrological and Earth system models. Hydrographs for somehydrological and Earth system models. FLOW ROUTING [1999

Olivera, Francisco; Famiglietti, James; Asante, Kwabena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NM, March 22 - 26, 2004 NM, March 22 - 26, 2004 1 New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP, and Their Use for Assessing Radiosonde Measurement Accuracy L.M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado B.M. Lesht and M. Ritche Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction Several recent ARM investigations have been directed toward characterizing and improving the accuracy of ARM radiosonde water vapor measurements. Tobin et al. (2002) showed that calculating the downwelling and outgoing longwave fluxes with a target accuracy of 1 W m -2 requires knowing the total-column precipitable water vapor (PW) with 2% absolute accuracy and knowing the upper troposphere (UT) water vapor with 10% absolute accuracy. Turner et al. (2003) used an empirical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied meteorology unit Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Series: Report (United States. Weather Bureau. Meteorological... : Report (United States. Weather Bureau. Meteorological Satellite Laboratory); no. 9. QC879.5 .U45 no.9... ....

82

Meteorology program status from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

The meteorology program at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) has experienced significant changes the past 18 months. The purposes of the meteorology program at the Site are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness programs for assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance operations, health and safety related activities, and remediation operations. The meteorology program includes ambient monitoring, weather forecasting, climatological analyses, air dispersion modeling, and Emergency Preparedness organizational support.

Maxwell, D.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Water Quality Modeling Hydraulics and Hydrology Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ­ Streamflows ­ Lake basin ­ Meteorology (wind/sun/precip...) · Outputs: ­ Vertical Temperature distribution ­ E. Coli · Temperature changes ­ Long term and short term · Lake circulation ­ Lake circulation ­ Outputs: · Oxygen distribution in water column · Nutrient distribution in water column (N

84

Probable hydrologic effects of subsurface mining  

SciTech Connect

This case history provides information on the ground-water system and presents the results of an analysis of present and future hydrologic effects of coal mining in the Appalachian coal basin. Although emphasis is on the probable hydrologic effects due to subsurface mining, examples and discussions are equally applicable to surface mine problems. The case history is based on an ongoing study in Greene County which will be completed in 1983. Cooperators in this project were the Pennsylvania Geologic and Topographic Survey and the Greene County Commissioners. The study stemmed from local interest in the rural water supply of the county which is predominantly groundwater.

Stoner, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

286 BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 201213 Glossary of acronyms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Meteorology Training Centre C CABLE Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (model) CASA Civil Aviation Coupled Model Intercomparison Project CO2 Carbon dioxide COAG Council of Australian Governments COMET

Greenslade, Diana

87

2797Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and associated length scales, boundary layer formulation, runoff generation, and groundwa- Modeling Root Water2797Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction Within atmospheric modeling properties may directly affect the atmospheric boundary layer. Deforestation experi- ments showed

Jackson, Robert B.

88

Analysis of Spatial Performance of Meteorological Drought Indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by policy makers and the general public. This study analyzes the spatial performance of interpolation methods for meteorological drought indices in the United States based on data from the Co-operative Observer Network (COOP) and United States Historical...

Patil, Sandeep 1986-

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

MOSAICO, a library for raster based hydrological applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents MOSAICO, a set of Fortran 90 Modules for facilitating development of raster based hydrological applications and stimulating adoption of netCDF as a common format for sharing and comparing data among hydrological community. MOSAICO ... Keywords: Fortran 90, NetCDF, Raster based hydrological model

Giovanni Ravazzani

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16C)  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to obtain total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity (TALK), hydrographic, and chemical data during the Research Vessel Thomas Washington Expedition TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (Section P16C). Conducted as a part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, on August 31, 1991, and finished in Honolulu, Hawaii, on October 1, 1991. WOCE Meridional Section P16C along 150{degree}W and between 18{degree}S and 19{degree}N was completed during the 31-day expedition. All 105 hydrographic and 8 large-volume stations were completed to the full water column depth. Station spacing was 30 nautical miles (nm), except between 3{degree}N and 3{degree}S where it was 10 nm. Twenty-five bio-optics stations were sampled for the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, and at 21 stations carbon dioxide measurements were provided for the US Department of Energy`s CO{sub 2} program. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Section P16C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor; and bottle salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11, CFC-12, TCO{sub 2}, and TALK. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

Goyet, C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Guenther, P.R.; Keeling, C.D.; Talley, L.D. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kozyr, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 13371348 (2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 1337­1348 (2009) Published online 4 February 2009-Ecosystem in Fengqiu, State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese- Ecosystem in Fengqiu, State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science

Flury, Markus

93

Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total

Hubbard, Susan

94

Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties  

SciTech Connect

Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of nuclear test TRINITY radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the TRINITY nuclear test. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. Comparisons of the WSNSO fallout analyses with analyses performed in the 1940s are presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1987 fallout patterns are tabulated in appendices.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fracture and hydrology data from field studies at Stripa, Sweden  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present the basic fracture and hydrology data collected as part of the joint LBL-KBS fracture hydrology program at Stripa, Sweden. A detailed description of the fracture-core logging and hydrology borehole testing procedures is included as well as a description of how the fracture and hydrology data were coded and organized. Based on this coding a series of computer data files for the fracture and hydrology borehole data have been constructed and these are described in detail. The fracture data file for one borehole is presented as an example in an appendix along with all of the raw and some partially processed and analyzed fracture hydrology data files. A detailed description of how this data will be analyzed to develop a thorough understanding of the fracture system and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Stripa site is presented.

Gale, J.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Annual report 2008 | 1Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Royal Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual report 2008 | 1Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Foreword ]| Annual report ]| Water ]| Interview

Stoffelen, Ad

98

Effect of Observation Network Design on Meteorological Forecasts of Asian Dust Events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To improve the prediction of Asian dust events on the Korean Peninsula, meteorological fields must be accurately predicted because dust transport models require them as input. Accurate meteorological forecasts could be obtained by integrating ...

Eun-Gyeong Yang; Hyun Mee Kim; JinWoong Kim; Jun Kyung Kay

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

2006 EUMETSAT METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE CONFERENCE Helsinki, Finland 12 -16 June 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, satellite products, method, results, conclusions and applications. INTRODUCTION TO (KNMI) WEATHER RADARS2006 EUMETSAT METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE CONFERENCE Helsinki, Finland 12 - 16 June 2006 Synergetic Satellite and radar products are important data sources for operational meteorology. They provide

Stoffelen, Ad

100

The Evolution of Objective Analysis Methodology at the National Meteorological Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective analysis of meteorological variables has been routinely performed at the National Meteorological Center (NMC) since October 1955. In the first few years, much attention was devoted to incorporating three principles of subjective ...

Clifford H. Dey

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hydrologic studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to provide a general overview of hydrologic conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by describing several key hydrologic studies that have been carried out as part of the site characterization program over the last 20 years. The paper is composed of three parts: background information about general objectives of the WIPP project; information about the geologic and hydrologic setting of the facility; and information about three aspects of the hydrologic system that are important to understanding the long-term performance of the WIPP facility. For additional detailed information, the reader is referred to the references cited in the text.

Davies, P.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Models for Hydrologic Design of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Models for Hydrologic Design of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers ... The focus of the HELP model is on the man-made features of landfills. ...

Victor L. Hauser; Dianna M. Gimon; James V. Bonta; Terry A. Howell; Robert W. Malone; Jimmy R. Williams

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nonlinear dependence and extremes in hydrology and climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of nonlinear dependence and chaos has strong implications for predictive modeling and the analysis of dominant processes in hydrology and climate. Analysis of… (more)

Khan, Shiraj

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio that the inherent variability in wind power generation and the related difficulty in predicting future generation profiles, raise major challenges to wind power integration into the electricity grid. In this work we study

Giannitrapani, Antonello

105

Characterization of wind noise by the boundary layer meteorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuations in pressure generated by turbulent motions of the atmospheric boundary layer are a principal noise source in outdoor acoustic measurements. The mechanics of wind noise involve not only stagnation pressure fluctuations at the sensor but also shearing and self-interaction of turbulence throughout the flow particularly at low frequencies. The contributions of these mechanisms can be described by the boundary-layer meteorology. An experiment was conducted at the National Wind Institute's 200-meter meteorological tower located outside Lubbock Texas in the Llano Estacado region. For two days a 44-element 400-meter diameter array of unscreened NCPA-UMX infrasound sensors recorded wind noise continuously while the tower and a Doppler SODAR measured vertical profiles of the boundary layer. Analysis of the fluctuating pressure with the meteorological data shows that the statistical structure of wind noise depends on both mean velocity distribution and buoyant stability. The root-mean-square pressure exhibits distinct scalings for stable and unstable stratification. Normalization of the pressure power spectral density depends on the outer scales. In stable conditions the kurtosis of the wind noise increases with Reynolds number. Measures of noise intermittency are explored with respect to the meteorology.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

81Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. © 1999 American Meteorological Society ABSTRACT Shipborne Doppler radar operations were conducted 50 km of each other to conduct coordinated dual-Doppler scanning. The dual- Doppler operations were and Lukas 1992) was conducted in the warm- pool region of the western Pacific Ocean. The scien- tific goals

Rutledge, Steven

107

483Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

483Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction The marine stratocumulus1 transit from the ITCZ to San Diego as an ad hoc use of the ship and its instruments for the remaining 8 days of ship time. Since TEPPS was designed as an ITCZ experiment, the ship was not equipped with many

Houze Jr., Robert A.

108

Use of Visible Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite Imagery in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 Use of Visible Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite Imagery in Mapping Reference is typically computed at specific locations based on weather station data. Estimates of incoming solar radiation (insolation, or Rs) have been made from geostationary satellite data over a 14-year period (1 June

109

Programperformance BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 201213 121  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reliably provide weather, climate, ocean and water products and services. Highly resilient and reliable's supercomputer, and maintaining data communication links to observing sites, often in remote locations or extreme of meteorological and related data from the observational network to the Central Computing Facility and Regional

Greenslade, Diana

110

The International Station Meteorological Climate Summary CD-ROM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Station Meteorological Climate Summary (ISMCS)is a Compact Disc-Read Only Memory(CD-ROM)containing climatic records for 640 primary weather-observation sites and over 5800 secondary sites around the world. When used with a ...

Terry Jarrett

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

METEOROLOGY 280 Recent Developments in Air Quality Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METEOROLOGY 280 Recent Developments in Air Quality Instrumentation San José State University Spring the student to standard air quality instrumentation and the process in setting up and calibration of those the supervision of the instructor. You will have the opportunity to build the air quality laboratory

Clements, Craig

112

Private Sector Meteorology: Using science to solve problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@dewberry.com #12;Hydro-meteorological project experience 2000-2012 (HDR and Dewberry) Flash Flood Predict ion Flood Detection Networks Climate Change #12;Dewberry is growing west #12;Our Team John Henz, CCM Senior Meteorologist Robert Rahrs, GISP Meteorologist Stuart Geiger, CFM Flood Risk Advisor Mathew Mampara, PE, CFM

113

2359Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2359Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction A devastating flash flood in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 28 July 1997 resulted in 5 deaths, 62 injuries re- quiring hospitalization frequencies. Significant flooding oc- curred in about half the city, with the most serious events taking place

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

114

Presented at the American Meteorological Society Summer Community Meeting Boulder, Colorado August 8 11, 2011 Meteorology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in "green industries", particularly the maturing wind and emerging solar power industries. New BS and MS graduates in meteorology bring an excellent tool kit of quantitative skills and a unique perspective. Their educational backgrounds complement well those of the engineers who often lead power generation programs

Colorado at Boulder, University of

115

Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers (Ligda)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10-14 W T/R switch antenna #12;Radar SystemRadar System Transmitter--produces high power pulses similar observations in the early 1940's (U.S. Air Corps meteorologists receiving "radar" training at MIT in 1943 First operational weather radar, Panama, 1943 Science of radar meteorology born from WWII research

Rutledge, Steven

116

Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

MODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic AND BACKGROUND [2] The containment of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in a geological repositoryMODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY SATURATED FRACTURED ROCK Y. W

Jellinek, Mark

118

Baseline Hydrologic Studies in the Lower Elwha River Prior to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the removal of two large, longstanding dams on the Elwha River, Washington, the additional loadChapter 4 4 Chapter Baseline Hydrologic Studies in the Lower Elwha River Prior to Dam Removal characteristics of the river and estuary before dam removal, several hydrologic data sets were collected

119

South Florida Hydrologic Society Rick Nevulis P.G.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Florida Hydrologic Society Presents Rick Nevulis P.G. South Florida Water Management District Reuse Coordinator Don't Judge Water by its History, but by its Quality: Reclaimed Water, a Valuable.johnson@mwhglobal.com The South Florida Hydrologic Society (SFHS) is a non-profit, professional society, established to provide

Sukop, Mike

120

Hydrologic conditions controlling runoff generation immediately after wildfire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrologic conditions controlling runoff generation immediately after wildfire Brian A. Ebel,1 John and hydraulic properties of soil, hydrologic states, and an ash layer immediately following wildfire. The field site is within the area burned by the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA. Physical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes by Using Airborne Multispectral and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes EVS is developing a reliable, cost-effective, repeatable method for long-term, utility-scale environmental monitoring in arid environments. Environmental monitoring is one of the primary means to ensure that impacts associated with renewable energy development are minimized. One critical aspect of water resources monitoring is the study of surface hydrologic processes - flow conveyance, sediment transport, and groundwater recharge - associated with intermittent and ephemeral streams. Surface hydrology plays an important role in local ecosystems and water availability for human use, which is particularly critical for arid environments. Knowledge about ephemeral streams is the key to understanding the hydrologic cycle and how it influences the abundance and distribution

122

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological conditions, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation of aerosol light scattering coefficient with cloud-drop effective radius [Kim et al., JGR, 2003], although aerosol light scattering coefficient is not necessarily the most suitable surrogate aerosol property for number concentration of cloud

123

Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes  

SciTech Connect

The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.

Quinn, V.E. (Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

41JUNE 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | (not shown). This warm,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

41JUNE 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | (not shown). This warm, southerly flow accelerates to intense solar radiation, which lead to an early onset of melt. Therefore, an early and pro- longed meltW South 2004 (1), 2003 (2) Egedesminde 68.7ºN, 52.8ºW Central west 2004 (2), 2003 (1) Tasiilaq 65.6ºN, 37

Box, Jason E.

125

Testing and Diagnosing the Ability of the Bureau of Meteorology’s Numerical Weather Prediction Systems to Support Prediction of Solar Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems to predict solar exposure (or insolation) was tested, with the aim of predicting large-scale solar energy several days in advance. The bureau’s ...

Paul A. Gregory; Lawrie J. Rikus; Jeffrey D. Kepert

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

127

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

128

Time changes in a subtropical cloud and weather system as revealed by meteorological satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub]ect: METEOROLOGY TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Approved as to style and content by...

Randerson, Darryl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution meteorology Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution meteorology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry...

130

Effects of valley meteorology on forest pesticide spraying  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted this study for the Missoula Technology and Development Center of the US Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The purpose of the study was to summarize recent research on valley meteorology during the morning transition period and to qualitatively evaluate the effects of the evolution of valley temperature inversions and wind systems on the aerial spraying of pesticides in National Forest areas of the western United States. Aerial spraying of pesticides and herbicides in forests of the western United States is usually accomplished in the morning hour after first light, during the period known to meteorologists as the morning transition period.'' This document describes the key physical processes that occur during the morning transition period on undisturbed days and the qualitative effects of these processes on the conduct of aerial spraying operations. Since the timing of valley meteorological events may be strongly influenced by conditions that are external to the valley, such as strong upper-level winds or the influence of clouds on the receipt of solar energy in the valley, some remarks are made on the qualitative influence of these processes. Section 4 of this report suggests ways to quantify some of the physical processes to provide useful guidance for the planning and conduct of spraying operations. 12 refs., 9 figs.

Whiteman, C.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

Nimz, G.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Master thesis in Leipzig Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni Oldenburg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master thesis in Leipzig ­ Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni in meteorology, satellite remote sensing and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good at the surface can be determined from satellite data using the Heliosat method, which is widely used for solar

Peinke, Joachim

133

Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

Peinke, Joachim

134

Solar Energy Prediction: An International Contest to Initiate1 Interdisciplinary Research on Compelling Meteorological2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of meteorological problems in-44 cluding wind energy, air pollution, winter hydrometeor classification, and storm puter scientists, and specifically machine learning and data mining researchers, are develop-18 ing of meteorological problems including wind energy,22 storm classification, winter hydrometeor classification, and air

Hamill, Tom

135

Workshop on Advances in Meteorology in Texas Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

French · Meteorological education Chair - Craig Epifanio (TAMU) 10:15 AMS education guidelines and NWS) 10:55 Mentoring broadcast meteorology interns: Bob French (KBTX) 11:15 Questions for discussion Center, radar room, broad- cast facility, and observatory will be available. · Forecasting Chair - Gene

136

AFFILIATIONS: Neggers--Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, Netherlands; siebesma--Royal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AFFILIATIONS: Neggers--Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, Netherlands; siebesma--Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, and Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Heus--Max Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg, Germany CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: R

Siebesma, Pier

137

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling Project Description The proposed research will make significant contributions to assessing, developing, and managing EGS systems. The research results will directly address many of key aspects of developing EGS and traditional geothermal reservoirs from site selection and characterization, reservoir creation, stimulation, and validation to reservoir sustainability. In particular, the proposed development provides a practical approach to assess long-term performance of EGS systems as well as optimum design and operation strategies, by consideration of fully coupled processes of thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and rock deformation effects. This research is strategically important to DOE's mission in the national energy resource and security. Furthermore, once the research goals are achieved, the developed simulator will substantially enhance the ability to characterized EGS systems, predict long-term performance of EGS systems, and optimize production strategies, and help energy extraction from EGS reservoir commercially feasible.

138

Updating the US Hydrologic Classification: An Approach to Clustering and Stratifying Ecohydrologic Data  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic classifications unveil the structure of relationships among groups of streams with differing stream flow and provide a foundation for drawing inferences about the principles that govern those relationships. Hydrologic classes provide a template to describe ecological patterns, generalize hydrologic responses to disturbance, and stratify research and management needs applicable to ecohydrology. We developed two updated hydrologic classifications for the continental US using two streamflow datasets of varying reference standards. Using only reference-quality gages, we classified 1715 stream gages into 12 classes across the US. By including more streamflow gages (n=2618) in a separate classification, we increased the dimensionality (i.e. classes) and hydrologic distinctiveness within regions at the expense of decreasing the natural flow standards (i.e. reference quality). Greater numbers of classes and higher regional affiliation within our hydrologic classifications compared to that of the previous US hydrologic classification (Poff, 1996) suggested that the level of hydrologic variation and resolution was not completely represented in smaller sample sizes. Part of the utility of classification systems rests in their ability classify new objects and stratify analyses. We constructed separate random forests to predict hydrologic class membership based on hydrologic indices or landscape variables. In addition, we provide an approach to assessing potential outliers due to hydrologic alteration based on class assignment. Departures from class membership due to disturbance take into account multiple hydrologic indices simultaneously; thus, classes can be used to determine if disturbed streams are functioning within the realm of natural hydrology.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oceanic CO{sub 2} measurements for the WOCE hydrographic survey in the Pacific Ocean, 1990--1991: Shore based analyses. Technical data report  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Health and Environmental Research, of the US Department of Energy (DOE), actively supports global survey investigations of carbon dioxide in the oceans. This large scale study is in conjunction with the hydrographic program of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE/HP). On ocean cruises operated by WOCE/HP, carbon dioxide analysis groups, from various oceanographic institutions, perform shipboard chemical measurements of the inorganic carbon system in the ocean. Measurements of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are of central importance to this carbon survey. Shipboard measurements of DIC were made by employing a coulometric technique. The majority of coulometric measurements were made on an integrated automatic device, the Single Operator Multi-Parameter Metabolic Analyzer (SOMMA). In addition to DIC determinations, shipboard analytical groups measured at least one additional parameter of sea water carbon chemistry. This was done to more fully characterize the inorganic carbon system of the sea water sample. This thechnical data report presents DIC and ALK measurements performed in the SIO laboratory on replicate samples collected on the five expedition legs of the WOCE/HP cruises.

Guenther, P.R.; Keeling, C.D.; Emanuele, G. III

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

142

Poster Sessions J. Dudhia Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Dudhia J. Dudhia Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction The concept of an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System (IDASS) ensures that the needs of data collection are partly determined by the requirements of an assimilating mesoscale model. Hence, the sounding strategy is geared towards allowing the model to do the best possible job in representing the atmosphere over CART sites, for example. It is not clear a priori what density of coverage or types of data are required for a good simulation. In this work, we address the problem of determining the impact of varying the density of coverage of an idea! network by purely numerical experimentation. We use one model run to provide data and another independent run to assimilate it.

143

Evolution of hydrological and carbon cycles under a changing climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information from climate records, flux measurements at eddy flux towers, and observations from satellites that amount (Trenberth et al., 2007). The World Meteorological Organization, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration all reported that 2000­2009 was the warmest

Montana, University of

144

Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hydrologic modeling to screen potential environmental management methods for malaria vector control in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the first use of Hydrology-Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS), a physically based distributed hydrology model, to investigate environmental management methods for malaria vector ...

Gianotti, Rebecca Louise

146

HYDROLOGY AND CHEMISTRY OF FLOODWATERS IN THE YOLO BYPASS, SACRAMENTO RIVER SYSTEM, CALIFORNIA, DURING 2000.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROLOGY AND CHEMISTRY OF FLOODWATERS IN THE YOLO BYPASS, SACRAMENTO RIVER SYSTEM, CALIFORNIA..................................................1 Introduction..............................................2 Hydrology of the Yolo Bypass....................7 Dissolved Metals....................................10 Samples collected by boat in the Yolo

147

A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

Kerkez, Branko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change and dynamics to biodiversity patterns. The focus of this paper is the key hydrologic controls crucial towards

Konar, Megan

149

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART I: BACKGROUND AND TRADITIONAL APPROACHES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART I: BACKGROUND AND TRADITIONAL APPROACHES;3 Outline (1) Historical Perspective (2) Basic Characteristics of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Traditional Statistical Analysis of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (4) Spatial/Temporal Dependence of Climate

Katz, Richard

150

Estimating Hydrologic Values for Planning Wildland Fire Protection1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Hydrologic Values for Planning Wildland Fire Protection1 Henry W. Anderson and Clinton B- quencies under various levels of protection in the area, and (c) the effects of those fires-26, 1981, San Diego, California. 2 Consulting Hydrologist, Lafayette, California, Assistant Chief of Fire

Standiford, Richard B.

151

Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a case study for fracture aperture reconstruction. The rst one is a correlation technique that estimates the normal aper techniques are applied to discontinuities extracted from a core drilled down to 20 m in a fractured marl

Toussaint, Renaud

152

Soil property database: Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement campaigns have been carried out concurrently with large-scale remote sensing hydrologic campaigns surface and the subsurface and the highly nonlinear nature of local-scale water and heat transport head, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity) and the soil thermal properties (heat capacity, heat

Mohanty, Binayak P.

153

HYDROLOGY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY OF A RARE FLOOD, BLACKBURN FORK,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-prediction. � Discharge measurements based on boulder size appear to give more reasonable estimates of flood dischargeHYDROLOGY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY OF A RARE FLOOD, BLACKBURN FORK, PUTNAM-JACKSON COUNTIES 18 AUGUST 2010) #12;Source: NOAA 17-18 Aug 2010 #12;#12;FLOOD DAMAGE #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;4 bridges

Hart, Evan

154

ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and composi- tion of aquatic communities in fluvial ecosystems. These communities depend upon the source should focus on hydrologic and geomorphic factors when evaluating ecosystem restoration (e to support their efforts for ecosystem restoration projects. Guidance on the computation of the more common

US Army Corps of Engineers

155

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012  

SciTech Connect

Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mount Kenya Global Atmosphere Watch Station (MKN): Installation and Meteorological Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The meteorological conditions at the Mount Kenya (station identifier MKN) tropical Global Atmosphere Watch Programme station are described. Like other stations in mountainous terrain, the site experiences thermally induced wind systems that ...

Stephan Henne; Wolfgang Junkermann; Josiah M. Kariuki; John Aseyo; Jörg Klausen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

767JUNE 2003AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | ositive lightning discharges (flashes) are defined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

767JUNE 2003AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | P ositive lightning discharges (flashes) are defined (flashes) that transfer to ground both positive and negative charges are termed bipolar lightning common than positive lightning. Currently available observations of bipolar lightning flashes, which can

Florida, University of

159

Meteorological parameters as an important factor on the energy recovery of landfill gas in landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of meteorological factors on the composition and the energy recovery of the landfill gas (LFG) were evaluated in this study. Landfill gas data consisting of methane carbon dioxide and oxygen content as well as LFG temperature were collected from April 2009 to March 2010 along with meteorological data. The data set were first used to visualize the similarity by using self-organizing maps and to calculate correlation factors. Then the data was used with ANN to further analyze the impacts of meteorological factors. In both analysis it is seen that the most important meteorological parameter effective on LFG energy content is soil temperatures. Furthermore ANN was found to be successful in explaining variations of methane content and temperature of LFG with correlation coefficients of 0.706 and 0.984 respectively. ANN was proved itself to be a useful tool for estimating energy recovery of the landfill gas.

?brahim Uyanik; Bestamin Özkaya; Selami Demir; Mehmet Çakmakci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Economic Valuation of a New Meteorological Information Service: Conjoint Analysis for a Pollen Forecast System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to investigate the public’s preferences for and quantitatively measure the economic value of a pollen forecast system, a new meteorological information service, in South Korea. To directly measure the economic value of the pollen ...

Joong-Woo Lee; Jinyong Jang; Kwang-Kun Ko; Youngsang Cho

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting and energy from turbines; and wind measurement technologies. Textbooks (not requiredMAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1

Delaware, University of

162

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday as atmospheric electricity and optics. Specific topics that will be covered are as follows: Cloud physics: Review Observation studies Atmospheric electricity: Electrostatics Electromagnetic wave Thunderstorm charging

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

163

Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

164

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda Problem statement Kampala is the capital city of Uganda on the northern shores of Lake Victoria. Here, future climate change

Jetten, Victor

165

Meteorological Impacts of the Cooling Tower of the Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main meteorological effect due to the Gösgen cooling tower is, in fact, the reduction ... near vicinity (1–2 km) of the power station. A network of five cinecameras provides ... on 23 points in the vicinity o...

Daniel A. Schneiter

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in situ observations, for NWP, ocean forecasting, ecosystem applications, and climate research. BY C forecasting, military and defence operations, validating or forcing ocean and atmospheric models, ecosystem11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment

Merchant, Chris

167

Meteorological tsunamis on the coasts of British Columbia and Washington  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tsunami-like sea level oscillations recently recorded by tide gauges located at offshore, as well as sheltered, sites along the coasts of British Columbia (Canada) and Washington State (USA) are identified as meteorological tsunamis. The events resemble seismically generated tsunamis but have an atmospheric, rather than seismic, origin. The event of 9 December 2005 was sufficiently strong to trigger an automatic tsunami alarm, while other events generated oscillations in several ports that were potentially strong enough to cause damage to marine craft. Analysis of coincident 1-min sea level data and high-frequency atmospheric pressure data confirms that the events originated with atmospheric pressure jumps and trains of atmospheric gravity waves with amplitudes of 1.5–3 hPa. The pronounced events of 13 July 2007 and 26 February 2008 are examined in detail. Findings reveal that the first atmospheric pressure event had a propagation speed of 24.7 m/s and an azimuth of 352°; the second event had a speed of 30.6 m/s and an azimuth of 60°. These speeds and directions are in close agreement with high-altitude geostrophic winds (the jet stream) indicating that the atmospheric disturbances generating the tsunami-like sea level oscillations are likely wind-transported perturbations rather than freely propagating atmospheric gravity waves.

R.E. Thomson; A.B. Rabinovich; I.V. Fine; D.C. Sinnott; A. McCarthy; N.A.S. Sutherland; L.K. Neil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microsoft Word - 4G_Hydrology_DEIR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G-1 ESA / 201074 G-1 ESA / 201074 Public Circulation Draft January 22, 2007 IV.G. Hydrology and Water Quality IV.G.1 Introduction This section discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential for the project to alter drainage patterns, increase stormwater runoff rates, adversely affect ground or surface water quality, or decrease groundwater recharge rates to an extent that the groundwater table is lowered. These factors were analyzed based on existing conditions within the Strawberry Creek Watershed and at the site, the extent and nature of proposed development, and future operation of the proposed facilities. IV.G.2 Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry Canyons in the East Bay hills, with the vast

169

Distributed parameter hydrologic modeling usinsg object-oriented simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED PARAMETER HYDROLOGIC MODELING USING OBJECT-ORIENTED SIMULATION A Thesis by KENNETH RAY KLANIKA Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style...). The Geographic Object-Oriented Simulation Environment [GOOSE] is linked with GRASS, and is used to create the basic patch network from GRASS ASCII vector and attribute files. The model, written in Common Lisp Object System [CLOS] language, was designed around...

Klanika, Kenneth Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding of permafrost surface hydrology. The free access to extensive archives of satellite data through the European Space Agencey (ESA) as well as the National Aeronau- tics and Space Administration (NASA) has become vital. Most importantly, access... support throughout my time at the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). At the beginning of my studies I was privileged to secure a DOC-fFORTE [Women in Research and Technology] Fellowship of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW). I would like to thank...

Trofaier, Anna Maria

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des for corresponding author: gaume@cereve.enpc.fr Abstract Recently Feed-Forward Artificial Neural Networks (FNN) have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

172

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HYDROGRAPHER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...name and reputation as an electrician are well known to all interested...far in the background. A Handbook of Descrzfitive and Practical...the first edi- tion of this handbook, which was designed as a handbook that should be attractive...

1889-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HYDROGRAPHER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...name and reputation as an electrician are well known to all interested...far in the background. A Handbook of Descrzfitive and Practical...the first edi-tion of this handbook, which was designed as a handbook that should be attractive...

1889-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Improvement of weather analysis in isolated areas of the southern hemisphere by meteorological satellite information: a case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVEMENT OF WEATHER ANALYSIS IN ISOLATED AREAS OF THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE INFORMATION: A CASE STUDY A Thesis By JOSE ANGEL ALVAREZ Argentine Navy Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1963 Major Subject: METEOROLOGY IMPROVEMENT OF WEATHER ANALYSIS IN ISOLATED AREAS OF THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE...

Alvarez, Jose? Angel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Akademik Ioffe cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, February--April 1992)  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in discrete water samples during the Research Vessel (R/V) Akademik Ioffe Expedition in the South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Montevideo, Uruguay, on February 14, 1992, and ended in Wellington, New Zealand, on April 6, 1992. WOCE Section S4P, located along {approximately}67{degree}S between 73{degree}W and 172{degree}E, was completed during the 51-day expedition. One hundred and thirteen hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Section S4P included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by a conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor; bottle salinity; bottle oxygen, phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate, TCO{sub 2}; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 4 C.

Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Rubin, S.; Sutherland, S.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Koshlyakov, M.H. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Shirshov Inst. of Oceanography; Kozyr, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones, Phaseof Characterization Technology for Fault Zones, LBNL-1635E,Characterization on Technology of Fault Zones – Phase II

Karasaki, Kenzi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics in high elevation meadows: thresholds, resiliency and change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education, in press Exceedance of historic limit of dryness triggers hydrological tipping point in high elevation peatlands In preparation CONFERENCE POSTER

Arnold, Chelsea Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

179

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

180

Changes in hydrological extremes and climate variability in the Severn Uplands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrological extremes within the UK have increased in intensity, frequency and persistence over recent years and are predicted to increase in variability throughout the 21st… (more)

Biggs, Eloise M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Alpine meteorology: translations of classic contributions by A. Wagner, E. Ekhart, and F. Defant  

SciTech Connect

The English translations of four classic research papers in Alpine meteorology, originally published in German and French in the 1930s and 1940s are presented in this report. The papers include: A. Wagner's 1938 paper entitled Theory and Observation of Periodic Mountain Winds; E. Ekhart's 1944 paper entitled Contributions to Alpine Meteorology; E. Ekhart's 1948 paper entitled On the Thermal Structure of the Mountain Atmosphere; and F. Defant's 1949 paper entitled A Theory of Slope Winds, Along with Remarks on the Theory of Mountain Winds and Valley Winds. A short introduction to these translations summarizes four recent Alpine meteorology field experients, emphasizing ongoing research that extends the research of Wagner, Ekhart, and Defant. The four experiments include the Innsbruck Slope Wind Experiment of 1978, the MESOKLIP Experiment of 1979, the DISKUS Experiment of 1980, and the ALPEX/MERKUR Experiment of 1982.

Whiteman, C.D.; Dreiseitl, E. (eds.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Analysis of Operation TEAPOT nuclear test BEE radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the BEE nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

WIPP Salado hydrology program data report No. 1. [Salado Formation  

SciTech Connect

WIPP Salado Hydrology Program Data Report {number sign}1 presents hydrologic data collected during permeability tests of the Salado Formation performed from August 1988 through December 1989. Analysis and interpretation of the test data are presented in a separate report. The report presents the results of the drilling and testing of six boreholes drilled from the WIPP underground facility 655 m below ground surface in the Salado Formation. Permeability tests were conducted using multipacker test tools with inflatable packers to isolate borehole intervals to allow formation pore-pressure buildup and subsequent pulse-withdrawal tests. Test data include pressures and temperatures in brine-filled, packer-isolated test intervals and borehole-closure and axial test-tool-movement measurements. Permeability tests were performed after installing multipacker test tools in test boreholes, inflating the packers, and allowing pressures to build up in the isolated intervals. Pulse-withdrawal tests were performed after buildup pressures approached the apparent formation pore pressure. Pulse injections were sometimes performed to increase the fluid pressures in isolated intervals. Compliance tests were conducted in lengths of steel and stainless-steel casing to evaluate the mechanical performance of the multipacker test tools. The stainless-steel compliance-test chamber was installed with externally mounted thermocouples in a downward-angled borehole in Experimental Room 4. Compliance tests included leak tests and simulated pulse-injection and pulse-withdrawal sequences. 9 refs., 143 figs., 2 tabs.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Domski, P.S.; Palmer, J.B.; Roberts, R.M.; Stensrud, W.A. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA)); Jensen, A.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed, physics-based hydrologic models require spatially explicit specification of parameters related to climate, geology, land-cover, soil, and topography. Extracting these parameters from national geodatabases requires intensive data processing. Furthermore, mapping these parameters to model mesh elements necessitates development of data access tools that can handle both spatial and temporal datasets. This paper presents an open-source, platform independent, tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework, \\{PIHMgis\\} (www.pihm.psu.edu), to improve model-data integration. Tight coupling is achieved through the development of an integrated user interface with an underlying shared geodata model, which improves data flow between the \\{PIHMgis\\} data processing components. The capability and effectiveness of the \\{PIHMgis\\} framework in providing functionalities for watershed delineation, domain decomposition, parameter assignment, simulation, visualization and analyses, is demonstrated through prototyping of a model simulation. The framework and the approach are applicable for watersheds of varied sizes, and offer a template for future GIS-Model integration efforts.

Gopal Bhatt; Mukesh Kumar; Christopher J. Duffy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reconstructing the duty of water: a study of emergent norms in socio-hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses the changing norms of water use known as the duty of water. It is a case study in historical socio-hydrology, or more precisely the history of socio-hydrologic ideas, a line of research that is useful ...

Wescoat, James

189

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Unified Approach (Extremes/Non-Extremes) (4) Complex Extreme Climate Design -- No longer only need for extreme value theory · Complex Extreme Events -- e. g., heat waves

Katz, Richard

191

Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 8, The REVIEW computer code  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) routinely collects meteorological data from sources on and off the Hanford Site. The data are averaged over both 15 minutes and 1 hour and are maintained in separate databases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS. The databases are transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) DEC VAX 11/750 computer. The EMS is part of the Unified Dose Assessment Center, which is located on on the ground-level floor of the Federal building in Richland and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program REVIEW is used to display meteorological data in graphical and alphanumeric form from either the 15-minute or hourly database. The code is available on the HMS and EMS computer. The REVIEW program helps maintain a high level of quality assurance on the instruments that collect the data and provides a convenient mechanism for analyzing meteorological data on a routine basis and during emergency response situations.

Andrews, G.L.; Burk, K.W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

THE NEW YORK MIDTOWN DISPERSION STUDY (MID-05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA REPORT.  

SciTech Connect

The New York City midtown dispersion program, MID05, examined atmospheric transport in the deep urban canyons near Rockefeller Center. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion under such conditions, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons and examined response over a much larger area. During August, 2005, a series of six gas tracer tests were conducted and sampling was conducted over a 2 km grid. A critical component of understanding gas movement in these studies is detailed wind and meteorological information in the study zone. To support data interpretation and modeling, several meteorological stations were installed at street level and on roof tops in Manhattan. In addition, meteorological data from airports and other weather instrumentation around New York City were collected. This document describes the meteorological component of the project and provides an outline of data file formats for the different instruments. These data provide enough detail to support highly-resolved computational simulations of gas transport in the study zone.

REYNOLDS,R.M.; SULLIVAN, T.M.; SMITH, S.; CASSELLA, V.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

1827DECEMBER 2003AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | otating tanks have been in use for many years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1827DECEMBER 2003AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | R otating tanks have been in use for many years in a wide variety of sizes, from small record-player-type turntables with 10-cm-diameter tanks to the world's largest turntable with its 13-m-diameter tank at Grenoble, France (Sommeria 2001). Rotating table

Schubert, Wayne H.

194

Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strong wind shear and triggers shear-flow instability, which leads to the formation of a turbulent wake of Innsbruck by Alexander Gohm Innsbruck, April 2010 #12;#12;To Eva mountain wind i #12;ii #12;Preface in the field of mountain meteorology form the basis of this habilitation thesis. The overall goal is to improve

Gohm, Alexander

195

MAY 2004 1117N A S H E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, low-mode, M2 internal tide. Based on the observed turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate , the high in the global thermohaline circulation, with energy cascading from the surface tide to baroclinic wavesMAY 2004 1117N A S H E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society Internal Tide Reflection

Kurapov, Alexander

196

The meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes: Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the systems produced greater than 50% negative CG lightning, though flash rates tended to be low nearThe meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes the stroke (1­2 min�1 on average). The results suggest that negative sprite-parent/class lightning typically

Cummer, Steven A.

197

The meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes: Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% negative CG lightning, though flash rates tended to be low near the stroke (1­2 min�1 on averageThe meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes). The results suggest that negative sprite-parent/class lightning typically occurs in precipitation systems

Rutledge, Steven

198

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 133: 21372141 (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/qj.179 A note on boundaryDepartment of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK bMet Office, Exeter, UK Abstract: The interaction between extratropical distributions and comparing the low-level winds, the differences are exposed and both of the proposed mechanisms

Reading, University of

199

15 NOVEMBER 2003 3585W A N G E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tropical to subtropical region is a relatively effective area for off-equatorial wind stress to generate-Equatorial Wind XIAOCHUN WANG* AND FEI-FEI JIN Department of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and subtropical wind stress forcing. The results show that the wind stress forcing in the tropical and subtropical

Wang, Yuqing

200

Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station Data Hans Georg Beyer*, Matthias Bromeis, Detlev Heinemann, Thomas Pahlke**, Hans-Peter Waldl Energy of a spatial wind energy potential. We have investigated two types of spatial interpolation techniques

Heinemann, Detlev

202

SEPTEMBER 2001 2205S C H U L T Z 2001 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be composed of three different airstreams: air-parcel trajectories belonging to the ascending warm conveyor belt, air-parcel trajectories belonging to the cyclonic path of the cold conveyor belt that originateSEPTEMBER 2001 2205S C H U L T Z 2001 American Meteorological Society Reexamining the Cold Conveyor

Schultz, David

203

18 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Hazards, warnings and forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and numerical prediction models. #12;19Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 2 Performance Performance programs: · Weather forecasting services; · Flood forecasting and warning services; · Hazard prediction, Warnings and Forecasts portfolio provides a range of forecast and warning services covering weather, ocean

Greenslade, Diana

204

Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1 and Sultan Hameed2 Received] Determining the rate of global sea level rise (GSLR) during the past century is critical to understanding a suite of coastal oceanographic processes. These findings reduce variability in regional sea level rise

Hameed, Sultan

205

Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research  

SciTech Connect

DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

Williamson, Samuel P

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics and results Radar observation and estimation Atmospheric electricity: Electrostatics Electromagnetic wave

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

207

STATISTICAL METHODS FOR RELATING TEMPERATURE EXTREMES TO LARGE-SCALE METEOROLOGICAL PATTERNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STATISTICAL METHODS FOR RELATING TEMPERATURE EXTREMES TO LARGE-SCALE METEOROLOGICAL PATTERNS Rick Extreme Value Analysis: Block Maxima (3) Conditional Extreme Value Analysis: Peaks over Threshold (4) Application to California Temperature Extremes (5) Remaining Work #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 (1) Introduction

Katz, Richard

208

An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans for the South Central Texas Region*1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans. The economic, hydrologic, and environmental consequences of the "best" choice of regional water management plan, and water management plans. #12;3 An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management

McCarl, Bruce A.

209

1 JUNE 2004 2213S T E P H E N S E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures that the hydrological cycle associated with the Madden­Julian oscillation acts in the mode of a self unstable by the combination of radiative cooling of the upper troposphere, the gradual build up of shallow

Webster, Peter J.

210

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

211

Hydrologic test system for fracture flow studies in crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

A hydrologic test system has been designed to measure the intrinsic permeabilities of individual fractures in crystalline rock. This system is used to conduct constant pressure-declining flow rate and pressure pulse hydraulic tests. The system is composed of four distinct units: (1) the Packer System, (2) Injection system, (3) Collection System, and (4) Electronic Data Acquisition System. The apparatus is built in modules so it can be easily transported and re-assembled. It is also designed to operate over a wide range of pressures (0 to 300 psig) and flow rates (0.2 to 1.0 gal/min). This system has proved extremely effective and versatile in its use at the Climax Facility, Nevada Test Site.

Raber, E; Lord, D.; Burklund, P.

1982-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Associations among hydrologic classifications and fish traits to support environmental flow standards  

SciTech Connect

Classification systems are valuable to ecological management in that they organize information into consolidated units thereby providing efficient means to achieve conservation objectives. Of the many ways classifications benefit management, hypothesis generation has been discussed as the most important. However, in order to provide templates for developing and testing ecologically relevant hypotheses, classifications created using environmental variables must be linked to ecological patterns. Herein, we develop associations between a recent US hydrologic classification and fish traits in order to form a template for generating flow ecology hypotheses and supporting environmental flow standard development. Tradeoffs in adaptive strategies for fish were observed across a spectrum of stable, perennial flow to unstable intermittent flow. In accordance with theory, periodic strategists were associated with stable, predictable flow, whereas opportunistic strategists were more affiliated with intermittent, variable flows. We developed linkages between the uniqueness of hydrologic character and ecological distinction among classes, which may translate into predictions between losses in hydrologic uniqueness and ecological community response. Comparisons of classification strength between hydrologic classifications and other frameworks suggested that spatially contiguous classifications with higher regionalization will tend to explain more variation in ecological patterns. Despite explaining less ecological variation than other frameworks, we contend that hydrologic classifications are still useful because they provide a conceptual linkage between hydrologic variation and ecological communities to support flow ecology relationships. Mechanistic associations among fish traits and hydrologic classes support the presumption that environmental flow standards should be developed uniquely for stream classes and ecological communities, therein.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Frimpong, Dr. Emmanuel A, [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (NDP-048) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp048 image PDF image Data image Previous Data (data through 1990, published in 1998) image Investigators Contributed by V. N. Razuvaev, E. B. Apasova, R. A. Martuganov All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information-World Data Centre Obninsk, Russia Prepared by D. P. Kaiser and G. P. Marino (contact: kaiserdp@ornl.gov) Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Published: November 2007

214

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

215

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

216

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

217

The meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance and quality assurance programs at a former nuclear weapons facility  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance, and quality assurance programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness (EP) programs at the Site in assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. The risk from the Site includes chemical and radioactive emissions historically related to nuclear weapons component production activities that are currently associated with storage of large quantities of radionuclides (plutonium) and radioactive waste forms. The meteorological monitoring program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Preparedness operations.

Maxwell, D.R. [DynCorp of Colorado, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2013) Phenomenology of Sahelian convection observed in Niamey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2013) Phenomenology SM. 2013. Phenomenology of Sahelian convection observed in Niamey during the early monsoon. Q. J. R

Guichard, Francoise

219

24 M meteorological tower data report period: January--December, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT.

Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R. [and others] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Atqasuk meteorology station (AMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point, and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity (RH) probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower.

Ritsche, MT

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

Ritsche, MT

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Correlation of meteorological variables with total suspended particulate matter in Harris County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Harris County, Texas (August 1983) G. Anderson White, III, B. S. , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. K. C. Brundidge A statistical air pollution prediction model was developed for Harris County..., Texas. Routine and readily available meteorological data from Houston Intercontinental Airport, Lake Charles, Louisiana, and Victoria, Texas provided sufficient information to describe Harris County air pollution. Pollution was expressed as total...

White, G. Anderson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Geography 547: Fluvial Geomorphology Tentative Lecture Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Field Hydrology Easterbrook, p.111-113; Adv: Simon 9 Shear stress; flow regimes: critical, subcritical, binomial probability theory -------- 18 Discharge data calibrations; hydrograph development; Water

James, L. Allan

224

Effects of meteorological variables on exergetic efficiency of wind turbine power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This present paper deals with exergy efficiency results of the Wind Turbine Power Plants (WTPPs). Effects of meteorological variables such as air density, pressure difference between state points, humidity, and ambient temperature on exergy efficiency are discussed in a satisfactory way. Some key parameters are given monthly for the three turbines. Exergy efficiency differs from 0.23 to 0.27 while temperature is changing from 268.15 K to 308.15 K with air density 1.368–1.146 (kg/m3). While pressure difference (?P) between inlet and outlet of the turbine differs from 100 to 1100 (Pa), exergy efficiency decreases fairly for different wind speeds. While specific humidity is changing from 0.001 to 0.015 (kgwater/kgdry air), exergy efficiency decreases gently. Generally these meteorological variables are neglected while planning WTPPs, but this neglect can cause important errors in calculations and energy plans. Obtained results indicate that while planning \\{WTPPs\\} meteorological variables must be taken into account.

Omer Baskut; Onder Ozgener; Leyla Ozgener

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. A previous report reported monitoring results for 1994. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1995, providing: a status of the measurement systems (including any quality assurance activities) during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.B.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

An application of a meteorological data assimilation system to an air quality simulation  

SciTech Connect

The need to calculate air pollutant exposure metrics for longer time periods, i.e., seasonal and annual, has generated a need to conduct long-term simulations using regional-scale Eulerian air quality models. Hourly-resolved meteorological and micro-meteorological fields for an entire year are required as input to the air quality models. In this paper, the authors describe the application of a meteorological data assimilation system to provide high-quality fields to drive a regional air quality model. The process of assimilation blends multiple data sources (large-scale gridded data, surface and upper air observations, satellite imagery, and radar data) into a unified atmospheric representation. The authors have used an assimilation system developed at the Center for the Analysis and Prediction of Storms at the University of Oklahoma. The modeling domain covers most of North America and 1995 was chosen as the simulation year. The data used in the assimilation include the NCAR/NCEP global reanalysis fields combined with North American surface and radiosonde data. The authors will describe modifications made to the assimilation system to enable estimation of a number of air-quality related quantities not normally calculated, such as Monin-Obhukov length and friction velocity. While the system supports a state-of-the-art three-dimensional cloud and hydrometeor field analysis based on background fields, surface observations, satellite, and radar; a simpler approach was developed in this study to estimate cloud fractional coverage based on the gridded relative humidity values.

Moon, D.; Pai, P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effects of air pollution on meteorological parameters during Deepawali festival over an Indian urban metropolis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pollutants (NO2, SO2, PM10, BC, CO, surface O3), emitted during fireworks display, have significant effects on meteorological parameters like air temperature, relative humidity, lapse rate and visibility in air over Kolkata (22°65? N, 88°45? E), a metropolitan city near the land–ocean boundary, on the eve of Deepawali festival when extensive fireworks are burnt. Long-term trend (2005–2013), indicates that the yearly average concentrations of both primary and secondary air pollutants have increased, exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) limit, on the respective Deepawali days. Short-term study (2012–2013) during the festival shows that the average pollutant concentrations have increased too compared to normal days. This study also reveals the immediate effects of the increased air pollutants on the boundary layer meteorology. PM10 has been found to be the most dominant atmospheric pollutants during this period. As a result of an increase in atmospheric heat content with elevated surface air temperature, a significant increase in the environmental lapse rate bears a signature of the influence of pollutants on the boundary layer temperature profile. A change in the diurnal pattern of relative humidity as well as in the vertical temperature profile is due to the change of the lapse rate during the festival days. Thus, the atmospheric pollutants during this festival over the urban region have significant effect on the boundary layer meteorology with bearings on environmental hazards.

Upal Saha; Shamitaksha Talukdar; Soumyajyoti Jana; Animesh Maitra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hanford meteorological station computer codes: Volume 9, The quality assurance computer codes  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) was established in 1944 on the Hanford Site to collect and archive meteorological data and provide weather forecasts and related services for Hanford Site approximately 1/2 mile east of the 200 West Area and is operated by PNL for the US Department of Energy. Meteorological data are collected from various sensors and equipment located on and off the Hanford Site. These data are stored in data bases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS (hereafter referred to as the HMS computer). Files from those data bases are routinely transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) computer at the Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC). To ensure the quality and integrity of the HMS data, a set of Quality Assurance (QA) computer codes has been written. The codes will be routinely used by the HMS system manager or the data base custodian. The QA codes provide detailed output files that will be used in correcting erroneous data. The following sections in this volume describe the implementation and operation of QA computer codes. The appendices contain detailed descriptions, flow charts, and source code listings of each computer code. 2 refs.

Burk, K.W.; Andrews, G.L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Operational Eta Model Precipitation and Surface Hydrologic Cycle of the Columbia and Colorado Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface hydrology of the United States’ western basins is investigated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction operational Eta Model forecasts. During recent years the model has been subject to changes and upgrades that ...

Yan Luo; Ernesto H. Berbery; Kenneth E. Mitchell

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An Evaluation of Proposed Representations of Subgrid Hydrologic Processes in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temporal and spatial scales that characterize surface hydrologic processes provide conceptual and practical difficulties to the development of parameterization schemes for incorporation into climate models. In particular, there is a ...

G. Thomas; A. Henderson-Sellers

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British.W. Negrave. 2007. Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British

233

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Scientist, Ecological Processes Research Branch BC Ministry of Forests and Range P.O. Box 9519, Stn Prov TR-033 March 2006 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology

234

Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on developing and evaluating efficient and effective parameter calibration and uncertainty methods for hydrologic modeling. Five single objective optimization algorithms and six multi-objective optimization algorithms were tested...

Zhang, Xuesong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Synopsis of Mackenzie GEWEX Studies on the Atmospheric-Hydrologic System of a Cold Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric-hydrologic system of the Mackenzie River Basin (MRB) shares many traits special to the world cold regions. MAGS investigators used a variety of research methods (field investigations, remote se...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INFLUENCE OF WOODY DOMINATED RANGELANDS ON SITE HYDROLOGY AND HERBACEOUS PRODUCTION, EDWARDS PLATEAU, TEXAS A Thesis by JUSTIN WAYNE HESTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996 Major Subject: Rangeland Ecology and Management INFLUENCE OF WOODY DOMINATED RANGELANDS ON SITE HYDROLOGY AND HERBACEOUS PRODUCTION, EDWARDS PLATEAU, TEXAS A Thesis by JUSTIN WAYNE HESTER...

Hester, Justin Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The simulation of natural soil pipes and their influence on catchment hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Mem er...

Barcelo, Mark David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Image use in the characterization of field parameters: incorporation of remote sensing with hydrologic simulation modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for discrepancies in values of certain temporal and This thesis foflows the style and format of Transactions of tfre ASAE. site-specific model parameters. The hydrologic simulation model will no longer depend entirely on initial conditions specified by the user... for discrepancies in values of certain temporal and This thesis foflows the style and format of Transactions of tfre ASAE. site-specific model parameters. The hydrologic simulation model will no longer depend entirely on initial conditions specified by the user...

Fox, Garey Alton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629644 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The fitness of a certain root profile was defined as the amount of water uptake over a simulation period simulated with these models is sensitive to rooting depth changes (Kleidon and Heimann, 2000). DespiteTowards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Multi-scale Hydrologic Applications of the Latest Satellite Precipitation Products in the Yangtze River Basin using a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study aims to evaluate three global satellite precipitation products (3B42 V7, 3B42 RT and CMORPH) during 2003-2012 for multi-scale hydrologic applications, including annual water budgeting, monthly and daily streamflow simulation, and ...

Zhe Li; Dawen Yang; Bing Gao; Yang Jiao; Yang Hong; Tao Xu

242

Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

Grasso, D.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrology and Hydraulic Properties of a Bedded Evaporite Formation  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin of New Mexico is an extensively studied evaporite deposit because it is the host formation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a repository for transuranic wastes. Geologic and hydrologic studies of the Salado conducted since the mid-1970's have led to the development of a conceptual model of the hydrogeology of the formation that involves far-field permeability in anhydrite layers and at least some impure halite layers. Pure halite layers and some impure halite layers may not possess an interconnected pore network adequate to provide permeability. Pore pressures are probably very close to lithostatic pressure. In the near field around an excavation, dilation, creep, and shear have created and/or enhanced permeability and decreased pore pressure. Whether flow occurs in the far field under natural gradients or only after some threshold gradient is reached is unknown. If far-field flow does occur, mean pore velocities are probably on the order of a meter per hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years. Flow dimensions inferred from most hydraulic-test responses are subradial, which is believed to reflect channeling of flow through fracture networks, or portions of fractures, that occupy a diminishing proportion of the radially available space, or through percolation networks that are not ''saturated'' (fully interconnected). This is probably related to the directional nature of the permeability created or enhanced by excavation effects. Inferred values of permeability cannot be separated from their associated flow dimensions. Therefore, numerical models of flow and transport should include heterogeneity that is structured to provide the same flow dimensions as are observed in hydraulic tests. Modeling of the Salado Formation around the WIPP repository should also include coupling between hydraulic properties and the evolving stress field because hydraulic properties change as the stress field changes.

BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; ROBERTS,RANDALL M.

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydrologic resources management program. FY 1995 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of FY 1995 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP), a multi-agency program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), to address the environmental consequences of nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A priority is to better characterize the complex near-field environment in order to assess and predict the movement of radionuclides in groundwater. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada. A radiologic source term in excess of 10{sup 8} curies of tritium, fission products, activation products and actinides is residual from more than three decades of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Burial depths to insure containment of these explosions necessitated firing approximately one third of the more than 800 underground nuclear tests within one cavity radius or below the static water table. Work at LLNL has focused on studies of radionuclide transport under saturated, partially saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as investigations of the stable, radiogenic and cosmogenic isotope systematics of NTS groundwaters. LLNL has prioritized these studies because of the significance for potential radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site. LLNL utilizes expertise in nuclear weapons testing, radiochemical diagnostics, nuclear test phenomenology, mass spectrometry, aqueous geochemistry and field and laboratory studies of radionuclide migration to bring a unique measurement and interpretative capability to this research.

Smith, D.K. [comp.] [comp.; Esser, B.K.; Kenneally, J.M. [and others] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Meteorological Monitoring on bikini atoll: system description and data summary (May 2000 - April 2001)  

SciTech Connect

Meteorological data are continuously collected at three sites on Bikini Atoll in support of radioecological research and monitoring programs conducted by the Health and Ecological Assessments Division at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Weather stations were first established on Bikini Atoll in April 1990, and provide information on rainfall, wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. These data and information are used to interpret results of remediation experiments designed to evaluate the effectiveness of potassium fertilizer on reducing the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into locally grown foods. We have also demonstrated that {sup 137}Cs is slowly leached from surface soil by the action of rain water. Long-term meteorological data are crucial to our efforts of developing an understanding of environmental processes controlling the environment loss of {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll soil. In May 2000, older data collection platforms and the DOS-based system that downloaded data from National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s Data Automatic Processing System (DAPS) was decommissioned, and new data loggers, GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) transmitters and antennas were installed. Consequently, new procedures were developed to maintain the field systems, download the data, and reduce and archive the data. This document provides an operational description and status report on the three new meteorological monitoring systems on Bikini Atoll as well as an computational summary of previously recorded data. Included are overviews of procedures for sensor exchange, data recovery and reduction, and specific information about the different sensors. We also provide a description of systems maintenance and trouble shooting activities. This report will be updated on an annual basis.

Gouveia F; Bradsher, R; Brunk, J; Hamilton, T

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

3892 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California E. SMALL Department considerable attention in the hydro- meteorology community. This is partially because most of the monsoon

Small, Eric

247

Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies.

Kock, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sub-daily Statistical Downscaling of Meteorological Variables Using Neural Networks  

SciTech Connect

A new open source neural network temporal downscaling model is described and tested using CRU-NCEP reanal ysis and CCSM3 climate model output. We downscaled multiple meteorological variables in tandem from monthly to sub-daily time steps while also retaining consistent correlations between variables. We found that our feed forward, error backpropagation approach produced synthetic 6 hourly meteorology with biases no greater than 0.6% across all variables and variance that was accurate within 1% for all variables except atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and precipitation. Correlations between downscaled output and the expected (original) monthly means exceeded 0.99 for all variables, which indicates that this approach would work well for generating atmospheric forcing data consistent with mass and energy conserved GCM output. Our neural network approach performed well for variables that had correlations to other variables of about 0.3 and better and its skill was increased by downscaling multiple correlated variables together. Poor replication of precipitation intensity however required further post-processing in order to obtain the expected probability distribution. The concurrence of precipitation events with expected changes in sub ordinate variables (e.g., less incident shortwave radiation during precipitation events) were nearly as consistent in the downscaled data as in the training data with probabilities that differed by no more than 6%. Our downscaling approach requires training data at the target time step and relies on a weak assumption that climate variability in the extrapolated data is similar to variability in the training data.

Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Bjørn-Gustaf J. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

251

Emission Controls Versus Meteorological Conditions in Determining Aerosol Concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games  

SciTech Connect

A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on August 8th-24th, 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale to improve the air quality over Beijing.

Gao, Yi; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Meigen

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

SciTech Connect

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study  

SciTech Connect

Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Abstract Deuterium (D) content of groundwater and precipitation, and tritium content of selected groundwater samples are used to infer flow paths for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area. The spatial distribution of calculated recharge elevations and residence times for groundwater samples tends to support the idea that Kilauea's rift zones comprise leaky boundaries within the regional groundwater flow system, partly isolating the groundwater in the area bounded by the rift zones and the Pacific Ocean. The south wesr

255

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Approved as to style and content by: Melv'n C. Schroeder (Chairman...

Gibson, John Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992--January 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity at Hydrographic stations as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise M22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on 27 December 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa on 31 January 1993. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. TCO{sub 2} was measured using tow automated sample processors for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples which were coupled to a Coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for total alkalinity were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-} 2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by Infra Red (IR) Photometry; precision was {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. From these cruises the large-scale three-dimensional distribution of temperature, salinity, and chemical constituents, including the carbonate system parameters will be mapped. Knowledge of these parameters and their initial conditions will allow determination of heat and water transports as well as carbon transport. An understanding of these transports will contribute to the understanding of processes which are relevant for climate change. This section in the South Atlantic subtropical Gyre is especially relevant for CO{sub 2} transport because it crosses both the Brazil and the Benguela Boundary Currents.

Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Oceanographic and Atmospheric Sciences Div.; Schneider, B. [Inst. fuer Ostseeforschung, Rostock-Warnemuende (Germany); Mintrop, L. [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Dept. of Geosciences

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

Kozyr, A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 549568, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/549/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the various objectives are sensitive to different parameters. The simulated water balance shows that 15Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 549­568, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/549/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-549 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Multi

Boyer, Edmond

260

A comparison of the gravity field over Central Europe from superconducting gravimeters, GRACE and global hydrological models, using EOF analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......To compute the ground gravity, the water in a surface layer...hydrological than for ground gravity. The slopes...due to the mixed water attraction. Of...7.3 Hydrology remediation for underground...station and the ground surface. Neumeyer......

David Crossley; Caroline de Linage; Jacques Hinderer; Jean-Paul Boy; James Famiglietti

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

Fischlin, Andreas

262

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

Katz, Richard

263

2676 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds H. W. BARKER,a G. YANGr a Meteorological Service of Canada, Downsview, Ontario, Canada b Colorado State University, Fort Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia m Meteorological Service of Canada, Victoria, British Columbia

Stephens, Graeme L.

264

Correlation Between Lightning Flash Count and Meteorological ParCorrelation Between Lightning Flash Count and Meteorological Parametersameters [[AE31AAE31A--0027]0027] Results: Mixing Ratio, CAPE, and TemperatureResults: Mixing Ratio, CAPE, and Temperatur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlation Between Lightning Flash Count and Meteorological ParCorrelation Between Lightning Flash with afternoon lightning, with average correlation coefficients [Taylor96] of 0.7. We also found, in Oklahoma, the dry-bulb temperature at 500 hPa (weakly) inversely correlates with lightning. We noted with interest

Mass, Clifford F.

265

A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerable interest in developing methods for uncertainty analysis of artificial neural network (ANN) models and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models, Water Resour. Res., 43, W10407, doi:10A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural

Chaubey, Indrajeet

266

Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal, Venezuelan Andes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal is derived from Atlantic Ocean evaporation which is modified by passage over lowland South America suggest that the decreasing 18 O reflects a decrease in the fraction of moisture entering South America

Wolfe, Alexander P.

267

Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to better understand the processes controlling the partitioning of energy and water fluxes within and out fluxes and processes. Here extensive monitoring of energy fluxes and hydrologic states are needed of the processes controlling these feedbacks will promote clearer understanding of Earth's water, energy

California at Santa Barbara, University of

268

Eos, Vol. 73, No. 3, January 21, 1992 Hydrology and Hydrochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eos, Vol. 73, No. 3, January 21, 1992 Hydrology and Hydrochemistry of Alpine Basins PAGE 33 Jeff Dozier and Mark Williams This year has seen the first strides toward a global understanding in meltwater from the snow pack dif ferentially; the first meltwater has a chemical Jeff Dozier, NASA Goddard

Dozier, Jeff

269

Aquifers and Wetlands SUMMARY: This chapter begins with an overview of the hydrological cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle and considers the flow of water in wetlands and undergraound. Special attention is paid to flow through vegetated wetlands. 14.1 The Hydrological Cycle Rivers and streams are but a link in the global cycle of water, called the hydro- logical cycle. Approximately half of the solar energy striking

Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

270

Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science for the Anthropocene M for Islamic Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, 7Department is at the core of the most difficult sustainability challenges facing humans in the modern era, involving

Konar, Megan

271

The fate of Earth's ocean Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569575 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of Earth's ocean 569 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569­575 (2001) © EGS The fate of Earth's ocean Christine Bounama, Siegfried Franck and Werner von Bloh Potsdam Institute@pik-potsdam.de Abstract Questions of how water arrived on the Earth's surface, how much water is contained in the Earth

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Abstract: Sediment rating curves are commonly used to estimate the suspended sediment load in rivers and streams under the assumption

Venditti, Jeremy G.

273

Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sites viewed as favorable for long-term disposal or storage of hazardous waste. Hydrologic responses, and as these environments are being considered as sites for long-term isolation of toxic waste. However, the flow of small the movement of water through thick vadose zones, especially on time scales encompassing long-term climate

Reiners, Peter W.

274

Process and Results of Hydrology in Long Valley Volcanoes of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process and Results of Hydrology in Long Valley Volcanoes of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Course Leigh of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, and specifically the Long Valley. In fact, many of the physical and chemical properties of the landforms in the Long Valley Caldera are the result of hydrothermal systems

Polly, David

275

Great Lakes Hydrologic Data Base Development Primary Investigator: Thomas Croley -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District), Environment Canada, Hydrologic Engineering Center of the COE (Davis) Overview The goal the Corps of Engineers, EPA, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, various states and provinces Coordinated Routing Model: GLERL, along with the US Army Corps of Engineers (Detroit District) and Environment

276

Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates

Pan, Ming

277

Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that control denitrifica- tion. Hydrological discharge regimes affect the degree of interaction of the water, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model

278

Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intercepts snow- fall, alters the snow/atmosphere energy exchange and reduces wind speed. Dense canopies tendEvaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 September 2012 Received in revised form 8 March 2013

Dozier, Jeff

279

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to habitat loss and significant declines in aquatic biodiversity. Often the health of freshwater ecosystems for mediterranean species recovery. Keywords River restoration Á Ecosystem functions model Á GIS Á SacramentoMEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat

Merenlender, Adina

280

Drinking Water Systems, Hydrology, and Childhood GastrointestinalIllnessinCentralandNorthernWisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking Water Systems, Hydrology, and Childhood Gastrointestinal, MD, and Jonathan A. Patz, MD Contaminated drinking water is responsible for a widespread disease gastrointestinal illness (GI) attributable to drinking water in the range of 2 to 19 million cases per year.2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b , Philippe Naveau c Abstract The statistics of extremes have played an important role in engineering practice for water resources design and management. How recent developments in the statistical theory of extreme values can

Katz, Richard

282

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

283

Meteorological and air quality data quarterly report. WIPP site: Eddy County, New Mexico. Summer quarter, June 1977-August 1977  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the WIPP meteorological, air quality, and radiological measurements program was to support the environmental effort for the evaluation of the site suitability. This data report is the latest in a series of seasonal quarterly data summaries to be issued for the southeastern New Mexico site.

Pocalujka, L.P.; Babij, E.; Catizone, P.A.; Church, H.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Long-period fading in atmospherics during severe meteorological activity and associated solar geophysical phenomena at low latitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-period fading in atmospherics during severe meteorological activity and associated solar activity with the solar geophysical phenomena was studied. The results are indicative of an interesting sequence of solar- terrestrial events. A tentative conclusion is reached, suggesting an origin

Boyer, Edmond

285

JANUARY 1999 5L A Z A R U S E T A L . 1999 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Chen­Zhang Single-Doppler Velocity Retrieval STEVEN LAZARUS, ALAN SHAPIRO, AND KELVIN DROEGEMEIER School address: Dr. Steven Lazarus, Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, 819 Wm. C. Browning Bldng) wind components. For example, Shapiro et al. (1995) apply a two-scalar con- servation technique whereby

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

286

Why does the Atlantic Ocean form the northern hemisphere deep Johan Nilsson, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University, Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the fact that the meridional gradients due to temperature and salinity have opposite effect on the density gradient: the temperature gradient acts to drive the surface water polewards, whereas the salinity gradient of Meteorology, Stockholm University, Sweden. Background The Atlantic Ocean stands out as the most saline

Nilsson, Johan

287

JANUARY 2004 157Z H A N G A N D Z H E N G 2004 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JANUARY 2004 157Z H A N G A N D Z H E N G 2004 American Meteorological Society Diurnal Cycles is evaluated using the 3-day mesoscale simulations of summertime weak-gradient flows over the central United is directed upward after sunrise. As more solar energy is absorbed by the earth's surface, free convective

Zhang, Da-Lin

288

MARCH 1999 857Z E N G A N D N E E L I N 1999 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARCH 1999 857Z E N G A N D N E E L I N 1999 American Meteorological Society A Land surface albedo reflects more solar radiation into space. A positive feedback by moisture convergence: central Africa, the Maritime Continent, and the Amazon. A mean an- nual rainfall of over 2000 mm sustains

Zeng, Ning

289

NOVEMBER 1999 3305Y U A N D M E C H O S O 1999 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOVEMBER 1999 3305Y U A N D M E C H O S O 1999 American Meteorological Society Links between Annual surface due to shielding from solar radiation. In addition, the cooling extended northward to the south of the equator in the eastern tropical Pacific and west- ward along the equator in the central Pacific. Ma et al

Yu, Jin-Yi

290

Annual Report 2010 | 1Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Annual Report 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report 2010 | 1Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment | Royal Netherlands of Infrastructure and the Environment | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Annual Report 2010 KNMI round the clock #12;2 | Annual report 2010 Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment | Royal Netherlands

Stoffelen, Ad

291

Buoyant thermal plumes from planetary landers and rovers: Application to sizing of meteorological masts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Landers on Mars and Titan may have warm surfaces as a result of solar heating or the carriage of radioisotope power sources. This warmth can perturb downwind meteorological measurements, but cannot be modeled as a simple aerodynamic wake because buoyant forces can be significant. Methods We use an analytic model from the industrial aerodynamics literature on smoke dispersion from fires and smokestacks to evaluate the plume trajectories. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are also performed for a Titan lander. Results CFD yields results similar to the analytic model. (Albeit with a possibly weaker dependence on windspeed than the classic model.) We apply the models to evaluate the probability of immersion of instrumentation in plumes from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity and for a Titan lander under various wind scenarios. Conclusions Lander perturbations can be easily calculated. Practice implications None.

Ralph D. Lorenz; Kristin S. Sotzen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Some Applications of Meteorology to Underwater Ambient Noise Studies in Block Island Sound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbulent atmospheric boundary?layer theory is applied to wind observations made over a shallow?water embayment to explain variations in ambient noise levels. Broad?band ambient?noise data for sea states up to 3 obtained at a fixed receiving site are presented for a shallow water acoustic test range in Block IslandSound. Hourly wind?speed averages are analyzed by means of spectra and covariance functions in order to compare the frequency composition of the acoustic and meteorological data. The power spectrum computed from the record of ambient noise pressure level as a function of time has significant peaks centered on frequencies of 0.04 and 0.10. Similar peaks at the corresponding frequencies are present in the spectra of wind speeds. The results of this experiment suggest that for wind speed fluctuations of less than 0.33 nonlinear effects of the wind are relatively unimportant in the generation of ambient noise.

Llyod C. Huff; Robert G. Williams

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fine resolution atmospheric sulfate model driven by operational meteorological data: Comparison with observations  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis that anthropogenic sulfur aerosol influences clear-sky and cloud albedo and can thus influence climate has been advanced by several investigators; current global-average climate forcing is estimated to be of comparable magnitude, but opposite sign, to longwave forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The high space and time variability of sulfate concentrations and column aerosol burdens have been established by observational data; however, geographic and time coverage provided by data from surface monitoring networks is very limited. Consistent regional and global estimates of sulfate aerosol loading, and the contributions to this loading from different sources can be obtained only by modeling studies. Here we describe a sub-hemispheric to global-scale Eulerian transport and transformation model for atmospheric sulfate and its precursors, driven by operational meteorological data, and report results of calculations for October, 1986 for the North Atlantic and adjacent continental regions. The model, which is based on the Global Chemistry Model uses meteorological data from the 6-hour forecast model of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast to calculate transport and transformation of sulfur emissions. Time- and location-dependent dry deposition velocities were estimated using the methodology of Wesely and colleagues. Chemical reactions includes gaseous oxidation of SO{sub 2} and DMS by OH, and aqueous oxidation of SO{sub 2} by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. Anthropogenic emissions were from the NAPAP and EMEP 1985 inventories and biogenic emissions based on Bates et al. Calculated sulfate concentrations and column burdens exhibit high variability on spatial scale of hundreds of km and temporal scale of days. Calculated daily average sulfate concentrations closely reproduce observed concentrations at locations widespread over the model domain.

Benkovitz, C.M.; Schwartz, S.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of indices for agricultural drought monitoring using a spatially distributed hydrologic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ? Palmer (1965) assumed runoff occurs when the top two soil layers become completely saturated. In reality, runoff depends on soil type, land use, and management practices. However, Palmer (1965) does not account for these factors while estimating... runoff. SPI Unlike PDSI, SPI takes into account the stochastic nature of the drought and is therefore a good measure of meteorological drought. However, SPI does not account for the effect of soil, land use characteristic, crop growth...

Narasimhan, Balaji

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

MeteorologicalT E C H N O L O G Y I N T E R N A T I O N A L THE INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF WEATHER, CLIMATE, AND HYDROLOGY TECHNOLOGIES AND SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meteorologist, Daryl O'Dowd, explains the impact energy wind turbines have on radar operations 42 CARIBSAT a major new upgrade initiative AIRPORT VIEW KNMI looks at the challenges of automated observations ­ this is about to change 30 WORLDWIDE GCOS PROJECTS An update on the program to help implement a number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

296

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

Wang, Lei

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

297

Winter wheat yield forecasting in Ukraine based on Earth observation, meteorological data and biophysical models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ukraine is one of the most developed agriculture countries and one of the biggest crop producers in the world. Timely and accurate crop yield forecasts for Ukraine at regional level become a key element in providing support to policy makers in food security. In this paper, feasibility and relative efficiency of using moderate resolution satellite data to winter wheat forecasting in Ukraine at oblast level is assessed. Oblast is a sub-national administrative unit that corresponds to the NUTS2 level of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) of the European Union. NDVI values were derived from the MODIS sensor at the 250 m spatial resolution. For each oblast NDVI values were averaged for a cropland map (Rainfed croplands class) derived from the ESA GlobCover map, and were used as predictors in the regression models. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, the best time for making reliable yield forecasts in terms of root mean square error was identified. For most oblasts, NDVI values taken in April–May provided the minimum RMSE value when comparing to the official statistics, thus enabling forecasts 2–3 months prior to harvest. The NDVI-based approach was compared to the following approaches: empirical model based on meteorological observations (with forecasts in April–May that provide minimum RMSE value) and WOFOST crop growth simulation model implemented in the CGMS system (with forecasts in June that provide minimum RMSE value). All three approaches were run to produce winter wheat yield forecasts for independent datasets for 2010 and 2011, i.e. on data that were not used within model calibration process. The most accurate predictions for 2010 were achieved using the CGMS system with the RMSE value of 0.3 t ha?1 in June and 0.4 t ha?1 in April, while performance of three approaches for 2011 was almost the same (0.5–0.6 t ha?1 in April). Both NDVI-based approach and CGMS system overestimated winter wheat yield comparing to official statistics in 2010, and underestimated it in 2011. Therefore, we can conclude that performance of empirical NDVI-based regression model was similar to meteorological and CGMS models when producing winter wheat yield forecasts at oblast level in Ukraine 2–3 months prior to harvest, while providing minimum requirements to input datasets.

Felix Kogan; Nataliia Kussul; Tatiana Adamenko; Sergii Skakun; Oleksii Kravchenko; Oleksii Kryvobok; Andrii Shelestov; Andrii Kolotii; Olga Kussul; Alla Lavrenyuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparing Large-Scale Hydrological Model Predictions with Observed Streamflow in the Pacific Northwest: Effects of Climate and Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing uncertainties in hydrologic models can improve accuracy in predicting future streamflow. Here, simulated streamflows using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at coarse (°) and fine (°) spatial resolutions were evaluated ...

Mohammad Safeeq; Guillaume S. Mauger; Gordon E. Grant; Ivan Arismendi; Alan F. Hamlet; Se-Yeun Lee

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Observational and Modeling Study of Impacts of Bark Beetle-Caused Tree Mortality on Surface Energy and Hydrological Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bark beetle outbreaks have killed billions of trees and affected millions of hectares of forest during recent decades. Our objective was to quantify responses of surface energy and hydrologic fluxes 2-3 years following a spruce beetle outbreak ...

Fei Chen; Guo Zhang; Michael Barlage; Ying Zhang; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Arjan Meddens; Guangsheng Zhou; William J. Massman; John Frank

300

Geologic characterization of fractures as an aid to hydrologic modeling of the SCV block at the Stripa mine  

SciTech Connect

A series of hydrologic tests have been conducted at the Stripa research mine in Sweden to develop hydrologic characterization techniques for rock masses in which fractures form the primary flow paths. The structural studies reported here were conducted to aid in the hydrologic examination of a cubic block of granite with dimensions of 150 m on a side. This block (the SCV block) is located between the 310- and 460-m depth levels at the Stripa mine. this report describes and interprets the fracture system geology at Stripa as revealed in drift exposures, checks the interpretive model against borehole records and discusses the hydrologic implications of the model, and examines the likely effects of stress redistribution around a drift (the Validation drift) on inflow to the drift along a prominent fracture zone.

Martel, S.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini 280 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) © EGU Recent advances in flood forecasting and flood risk assessment Gabriel Arduino1 , Paolo

Boyer, Edmond

302

Hydrological Cycles over the Congo and Upper Blue Nile Basins: Evaluation of General Circulation Model Simulations and Reanalysis Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The simulations and predictions of the hydrological cycle by general circulation models (GCMs) are characterized by a significant degree of uncertainty. This uncertainty is reflected in the range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) ...

Mohamed S. Siam; Marie-Estelle Demory; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Hydrological Cycles over the Congo and Upper Blue Nile Basins: Evaluation of General Circulation Model Simulations and Reanalysis Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulations and predictions of the hydrological cycle by general circulation models (GCMs) are characterized by a significant degree of uncertainty. This uncertainty is reflected in the range of Intergovernmental Panel ...

Demory, Marie-Estelle

304

Geotechnical, Geological, and Hydrologic Characterization of a 52 km Electrical Power Transmission Line Alignment Route in Southeastern Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 132 kVA electrical transmission line has been proposed to connect the towns ... hydrological study was performed to geotechnically characterize the route alignment and to provide data for design of the foundati...

A. O. Ilori; N. U. Essien; A. E. Edet

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Large-Scale Runoff from Landmasses: A Global Assessment of the Closure of the Hydrological and Atmospheric Water Balances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of hydrological and hydrometeorological water-balance-based methods to estimate monthly runoff is analyzed. Such an analysis also allows for the examination of the closure of water budgets at different spatial (continental and ...

Christof Lorenz; Harald Kunstmann; Balaji Devaraju; Mohammad J. Tourian; Nico Sneeuw; Johannes Riegger

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir depths, borehole image, temperature, and mud logs indicate fluid flow is concentrated in extensively fractured damage zones of large faults well-oriented for slip.

307

Hydrologic sensitivities of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River basin, California, to global warming  

SciTech Connect

The hydrologic sensitivities of four medium-sized mountainous catchments in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins to long-term global warming were analyzed. The hydrologic response of these catchments, all of which are dominated by spring snowmelt runoff, were simulated by the coupling of the snowmelt and the soil moisture accounting models of the U.S. National Weather Service River Forecast System. In all four catchments the global warming pattern, which was indexed to CO{sub 2} doubling scenarios simulated by three (global) general circulation models, produced a major seasonal shift in the snow accumulation pattern. Under the alternative climate scenarios more winter precipitation fell as rain instead of snow, and winter runoff increased while spring snowmelt runoff decreased. In addition, large increases in the annual flood maxima were simulated, primarily due to an increase in rain-on-snow events, with the time of occurrence of many large floods shifting from spring to winter.

Lettenmaier, D.P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Gan, Thian Yew (Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Test plan: Hydraulic fracturing and hydrologic tests in Marker Beds 139 and 140  

SciTech Connect

Combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements in this test plan are designed to evaluate the potential influence of fracture formation in anhydrite Marker Beds 139 and 140 on gas pressure in and gas flow from the disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with time. The tests have the further purpose of providing comparisons of permeabilities of anhydrite interbeds in an undisturbed (virgin) state and after fracture development and/or opening and dilation of preexisting partially healed fractures. Three sets of combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements are planned. A set of trial measurements is expected to last four to six weeks. The duration of each subsequent experiment is anticipated to be six to eight weeks.

Wawersik, W.R.; Beauheim, R.L.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge ... In this paper, we illustrate another aspect of the “water quality profile” conceptual model (4) for assessing impacts of farming systems using an analysis of the surface hydrology and nitrate distribution in surface runoff, headcut seepage, and basin drainage from a high relief landscape. ... Surface runoff resulting from snowmelt occurs whenever solar-radiated heat penetrates the snow and heats the soil surface beneath it. ...

Thomas R. Steinheimer; Kenwood D. Scoggin; Larry A. Kramer

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States  

SciTech Connect

This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 10 and 11, 2010. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, analyzed the samples. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

None

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Rio Blanco, Colorado, Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 13 and 14, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

None

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... Interval 1: 1920' s ? 41. Interval 2: 1942 ? 51. . . . . . . ~ . . - - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ Interval 5: 1952 ? 74. Interval 4: 1942 ? 74. Discharge Control During Flood Stages 20 25 25 25 51 54 54 SEDIMENTOLOGY. Suspended Load. Bed Load. Coastal...

Minter, Larry Lane

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Uncertainties associated with the definition of a hydrologic source term for the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Division is seeking to evaluate groundwater contamination resulting from 30 years of underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This evaluation requires knowledge about what radioactive materials are in the groundwater and how they are transported through the underground environment. This information coupled with models of groundwater flow (flow paths and flow rates) will enable predictions of the arrival of each radionuclide at a selected receptor site. Risk assessment models will then be used to calculate the expected environmental and human doses. The accuracy of our predictions depends on the validity of our hydrologic and risk assessment models and on the quality of the data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water at each underground nuclear test site. This paper summarizes what we currently know about radioactive material in NTS groundwater and suggests how we can best use our limited knowledge to proceed with initial modeling efforts. The amount of a radionuclide available for transport in groundwater at the site of an underground nuclear test is called the hydrologic source term. The radiologic source term is the total amount of residual radionuclides remaining after an underground nuclear test. The hydrologic source term is smaller than the radiologic source term because some or most of the radionuclide residual cannot be transported by groundwater. The radiologic source term has been determined for each of the underground nuclear tests fired at the NTS; however, the hydrologic source term has been estimated from measurements at only a few sites.

Smith, D.K.; Esser, B.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thompson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

316

Effect of meteorological data averaging times on plume concentrations from explosive ordnance disposal open burning operations. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Open Burning (OB) operations are performed to treat and dispose of unserviceable munitions in the Department of Defense (DOD) inventory. This thesis effort sought to develop a computer model, based upon the Gaussian Puff Equation. The model varies from standard plume modeling practices by not making the assumption that the wind direction, wind speed and turbulence are uniform throughout the duration of the burn. The model assigns meteorological data to each explosion (puff) generated by the OB source. The experiments in this research effort assigned meteorological data to the puffs based upon averaging the weather data over 1, 10, and 60 minute periods. The results of the research showed that there was a statistically significant difference (95% confidence) between 1 minute and 60 minute weather data plume concentrations in the receptor grid in 100% of the experiments performed.

Widmann, I.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Validation of the guidelines for portable meteorological instrument packages. Task IV. Development of an insolation handbook and instrumentation package  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to show how the objective of developing guidelines for a solar energy related portable meteorology instrument package, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA), was carried out and preliminarily demonstrated and validated. A project to develop guidelines for such packages was initiated at IEA's Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings Program Expert's Meeting held in Norrkoping, Sweden in February 1976. An international comparison of resultant devices was conducted on behalf of the IEA at a conference held in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1978. Results of the 1978 Hamburg comparison of two devices and the Swiss Mobile Solar Radiation System, using German meteorological standards, are discussed. The consensus of the IEA Task Group is that the objective of the subtask has been accomplished.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Influence of Meteorology on the Air Quality in the San Luis Obispo County-Southwestern San Joaquin Valley Region for 3?6 August 1990  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The large volume of data measured during the 1990 summer San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study/Atmospheric Utility Signatures, Predictions, and Experiments (SJVAQS/AUSPEX) provides a unique opportunity to examine the influence of meteorology on ...

Elizabeth M. Niccum; Donald E. Lehrman; William R. Knuth

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Account and Abstract of the Meteorological Diaries Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1729 and 1730. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Meteorological Diaries Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1729 and 1730. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S. Geo. Hadley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1737-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Utilizing geographic information systems technology in the Wyoming cumulative hydrologic impact assessment modeling process  

SciTech Connect

The coal-permitting process places heavy demands on both permit applicants and regulatory authorities with respect to the management and analysis of hydrologic data. Currently, this correlation is being addressed for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming by the ongoing Cumulative Hydrologic Impact Assessment (CHIA) efforts at the University of Wyoming. One critical component of the CHIA is the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for support, management, manipulation, pre-analysis, and display of data associated with the chosen groundwater and surface water models. This paper will discuss the methodology in using of GIS technology as an integrated tool with the MODFLOW and HEC-1 hydrologic models. Pre-existing GIS links associated with these two models served as a foundation for this effort. However, due to established standards and site specific factors, substantial modifications were performed on existing tools to obtain adequate results. The groundwater-modeling effort required the use of a refined grid in which cell sizes varied based on the relative locations of ongoing mining activities. Surface water modeling was performed in a semi-arid region with very limited topographic relief and predominantly ephemeral stream channels. These were substantial issues that presented challenges for effective GIS/model integration.

Hamerlinck, J.D.; Oakleaf, J.R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect

Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

Moser, Lee, Justin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Meteorological measurements in the vicinity of a coal burning power plant  

SciTech Connect

High concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are commonly observed during the cool season in the vicinity of a 2.5 GW coal burning power plant located in the Mae Moh Valley of northern Thailand. The power plant is the source for nearly all of the observed SO2 since there are no other major industrial activities in this region. These high pollution fumigation events occur almost on a daily basis, usually lasting for several hours between late morning and early afternoon. One-hour average SO2 concentrations commonly exceed 1,000 micrograms/cu m. As a result, an increase in the number of respiratory type health complaints have been observed by local clinics during this time of the year. Meteorological data were acquired from a variety of observing platforms during an intensive field study from December 1993 to February 1994. The measurements included horizontal and vertical wind velocity, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. In addition, turbulent flux measurements were acquired by a sonic anemometer. SO2 measurements were made at seven monitoring sites scattered throughout the valley. These data were used to examine the atmospheric processes which are responsible for these high pollution fumigation events.

Crescenti, G.H.; Gaynor, J.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Daily pollution forecast using optimal meteorological data at synoptic and local scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple framework to easily pre-select the most essential data for accurately forecasting the concentration of the pollutant PM$_{10}$, based on pollutants observations for the years 2002 until 2006 in the metropolitan region of Lisbon, Portugal. Starting from a broad panoply of different data sets collected at several meteorological stations, we apply a forward stepwise regression procedure that enables us not only to identify the most important variables for forecasting the pollutant but also to rank them in order of importance. We argue the importance of this variable ranking, showing that the ranking is very sensitive to the urban spot where measurements are taken. Having this pre-selection, we then present the potential of linear and non-linear neural network models when applied to the concentration of pollutant PM$_{10}$. Similarly to previous studies for other pollutants, our validation results show that non-linear models in average perform as well or worse as linear models for PM$_{10}$. F...

Russo, Ana; Raischel, Frank; Trigo, Ricardo; Mendes, Manuel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion  

SciTech Connect

The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

Hodgin, C.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations  

SciTech Connect

In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ASSESSMENT OF CONDUCTIVITY SENSORS PERFORMANCE FOR MONITORING MINED LAND DISCHARGED WATERS AND AN EVALUATION OF THE HYDROLOGIC PERFORMANCE OF THE GUY COVE STREAM RESTORATION PROJECT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The surface mining method of mountaintop removal has been shown to adversely affect the water quality and hydrologic characteristics of downstream regions. Based on recent… (more)

Maupin, Travis Pritchard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOEE A-1059 Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Health Division describe the LANL environment, including archaeology, geology, seismology, geographic setting, land use, hydrology, climatology, meteorology and...

331

Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States  

SciTech Connect

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

REGIONAL HYDROLOGY OF THE NOPAL I SITE, SIERRA DE PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored the drilling of three wells in 2003 near the Nopal I uranium deposit at the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico. Piezometric information is being collected to understand groundwater flow at local and regional levels as part of an ongoing natural analogue study of radionuclide migration. Water level monitoring reported at these and other wells in the region is combined with archival data to provide a better understanding of the hydrology at Nopal I. Initial results suggest that the local hydrology is dependent on the regional hydrologic setting and that this groundwater system behaves as an unconfined aquifer. The region is dominated by an alternating sequence of highlands and basins that step down from west to east. The Sierra de Pena Blanca was downdropped from the cratonic block to the west during Cenozoic extension. The Nopal I area is near the intersection of two large listric faults, and the questa of ash flow tuffs that hosts the deposit has been subjected to complex structural events. The Pena Blanca Uranium District was originally characterized by 105 airborne radiometric anomalies, indicating widespread uranium mineralization. The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Sierra del Pena Blanca between the Encinillas Basin to the west, with a mean elevation of 1560 m, and the El Cuervo Basin to the east, with a mean elevation of 1230 m. The Nopal I + 10 level is at an intermediate elevation of 1463 m, with a corresponding groundwater elevation of approximately 1240 m. The regional potentiometric surface indicates flow from west to east, with the El Cuervo Basin being the discharge zone for the regional flow system. However, it appears that the local groundwater potential beneath the Nopal I site is more in accordance with the water table of the El Cuervo Basin than with that of the Encinillas Basin. This might indicate that there is limited groundwater flow between the Encinillas Basin and the Nopal I area.

J.A. Rodriguez-Pineda; P. Goodell; P.F. Dobson; J. Walton; R. Oliver; De La Garza; S. Harder

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hydrological and chemical budgets of a mire pool formed on alluvial lowland of Hokkaido, northern Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Mire pools – permanently water-filled depressions on peatlands – provide important habitats for myriad organisms. Recently, water balance change and eutrophication resulting from agricultural development are increasingly evident in mire pools of alluvial lowlands. Conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry is necessary. We investigated the hydrological and chemical budgets of a pristine mire pool, Akanuma Pool (95,280 m2 area; 1.8 m mean depth), located in Kushiro Mire in Hokkaido, northern Japan, during its ice-free period (April–November) in 2007–2008. Thereby we elucidated the hydrochemical characteristics of mire pools formed on alluvial lowlands. Surface water inflow and surface water outflow dominated the hydrological budget, respectively representing 18.3 and 20.2 mm day?1. Groundwater seepage through the pool bottom and surface water inflow mainly supplied the lake water with total nitrogen and Ca2+. Total phosphorus was supplied mostly by groundwater seepage through the bottom. These chemical constituents were run off from the pool mostly by surface water outflow. The input and output fluxes of water were 16–20 times greater than those of North American mire pools because of Hokkaido’s higher values of precipitation minus evapotranspiration (P–ET). Moreover, the Ca2+ input into the Akanuma Pool was several times greater than those reported from North American studies. Alluvial mineral soil under the peat layer supplied large amounts of nutrients and mineral ions including Ca2+. These results demonstrate that Hokkaido mire pools’ hydrochemical characteristics differ greatly from those of pools in North America. Furthermore, each hydrological budget component maintained a constant fraction throughout the two year study period, although the absolute flow rate varied concomitantly with the precipitation level. Maintaining this budget stability is important for the conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry.

Toshikazu Kizuka; Hiroyuki Yamada; Takashi Hirano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Effects of thermo-erosion gullying on hydrologic flow networks, discharge and soil loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermo-erosion gullies in continuous permafrost regions where ice-wedge polygons are widespread contribute and change the drainage of periglacial landscapes. Gullying processes are causing long-term impacts to the Arctic landscape such as drainage network restructuring, permafrost erosion, sediment transport. Between 2009 and 2013, 35 gullies were mapped in a polygon terrace in the valley of the Glacier C-79 on Bylot Island, Nunavut (Canada), one of which was monitored for its hydrology. A gully (R08p) initiated in 1999 in a low-center polygon terrace. Between 1999 and 2013, 202 polygons over a surface of 28 891 m2 were breached by gullying. Overall, 1401 polygons were similarly breached on the terrace in the valley before 2013. R08p is fed by a 1.74 km2 watershed and the hydrological regime is characterized by peak flows of 0.69 m3 s?1 and a cumulative volume of 229 662 m3 for 2013. Historic aerial photography from 1972 and recent field surveys showed a change in the paths of water tracks and an increase in channelized flow in the gully area from none to 35% of the overall flow path of the section. The overall eroded area for the studied gullies in the valley up to 2013 was estimated at 158 000 m2 and a potential volume close to 200 000 m3. Gullying processes increased drainage of wetlands and the hydrological connectivity in the valley, while lowering residence time of water near gullied areas.

Etienne Godin; Daniel Fortier; Stéphanie Coulombe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment abilities. The proposal was typically described as complementing an already generous nature, not simply subduing it. Its implementation was limited by political tensions, and fifteen years later, a scaled-down version was constructed. Well levels recovered, but within a decade were declining due to increasing withdrawals. I assert that the approach in Santa Clara Valley was a forerunner to more recent innovations in natural resource management in California and beyond.

Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

EI Summary of SIC 38  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Instruments (38) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Instruments (38) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in manufacturing instruments (including professional and scientific) for measuring, testing, analyzing, and controlling, and their associated sensors and accessories; optical instruments and lenses; surveying and drafting instruments; hydrological, hydrographic, meteorological, and geophysical equipment; search, detection, navigation, and guidance systems and equipment; surgical, medical, and dental instruments, equipment and supplies; ophthalmic goods; photographic equipment and supplies; and watches and clocks.

339

Database of Mechanical and Hydrological Properties of WIPP Anhydrite Derived from Laboratory-Scale Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the purpose of demonstrating safe management, storage, and disposal of radioactive transuranic (TRU) waste generated by U.S. defense programs. The WIPP is located in southeastern New Mexico, and the underground facilities of the WIPP (i.e., experimental rooms, disposal rooms, etc.) are sited in the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of about 660 meters. The DOE has authorized the continuance of scientific research and engineering analysis related to the performance of the WIPP repository. One area of additional research relates to characterization of the mechanical and hydrological properties of anhydrite interbeds within the Salado Formation. These anhydrite interbeds have been penetrated by the shafts that provide access to the underground facilities and also lie in close proximity to the proposed radioactive waste disposal rooms at the repository horizon. Properties of particular interest are mechanical strength, deforrnational behavior, and fluid transport properties such as permeability. These properties will be used in calculationskmalyses of the mechanical and hydrological behavior of the anhydrite, in particular, and the shaft sealing system and disposal rooms, in general.

Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Soil physical and hydrological properties under three biofuel crops in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

While biofuel crops are widely studied and compared for their energy and carbon footprints, less is known about their effects on other soil properties, particularly hydrologic characteristics. Soils under three biofuel crops, corn (Zea mays), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and willow (Salix spp.), were analyzed seven years after establishment to assess the effects on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), penetration resistance (PR), water-holding capacity, and infiltration characteristics. The PR was the highest under corn, along with the lowest associated water content, while PR was 50-60% lower under switchgrass. In accordance with PR data, surface (0-10 cm) bulk density also tended to be lower under switchgrass. Both water infiltration rates and cumulative infiltration amounts varied widely among and within the three crops. Because the Philip model did not fit the data, results were analyzed using the Kostiakov model instead. Switchgrass plots had an average cumulative infiltration of 69 cm over 3 hours with a constant infiltration rate of 0.28 cm min{sup -1}, compared with 37 cm and 0.11 cm min{sup -1} for corn, and 26 cm and 0.06 cm min{sup -1} for willow, respectively. Results suggest that significant changes in soil physical and hydrologic properties may require more time to develop. Soils under switchgrass may have lower surface bulk density, higher field water capacity, and a more rapid water infiltration rate than those under corn or willow.

Bonin, Catherine [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Schmitz, Matthias [Rheinsche Friedrich/Wilhelms Universitaet Boon; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salado hydrology program data report {number_sign}3  

SciTech Connect

WIPP Salado Hydrology Program Data Report {number_sign}3 presents hydrologic data collected during permeability testing, coupled permeability and hydrofracture testing, and gas-threshold-pressure testing of the Salado Formation performed from November 1991 through October 1995. Fluid-pressure monitoring data representing August 1989 through May 1995 are also included. The report presents data from the drilling and testing of three boreholes associated with the permeability testing program, nine boreholes associated with the coupled permeability and hydrofracture testing program, and three boreholes associated with the gas-threshold-pressure testing program. The purpose of the permeability testing program was to provide data with which to interpret the disturbed and undisturbed permeability and pore pressure characteristics of the different Salado Formation lithologies. The purpose of the coupled permeability and hydrofracture testing program was to provide data with which to characterize the occurrence, propagation, and direction of pressure induced fractures in the Salado Formation lithologies, especially MB139. The purpose of the gas-threshold-pressure testing program was to provide data with which to characterize the conditions under which pressurized gas displaces fluid in the brine-saturated Salado Formation lithologies. All of the holes were drilled from the WIPP underground facility 655 m below ground surface in the Salado Formation.

Chace, D.A.; Roberts, R.M.; Palmer, J.B.; Kloska, M.B.; Fort, M.D.; Martin, G.J.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

On the relationship between uncertainties in tropical divergence and the hydrological cycle in global models  

SciTech Connect

A survey of tropical divergence from three GCMs, three global reanalyses and four insitu soundings from field campaigns shows the existence of large uncertainties in the ubiquity of shallow divergent circulation as well as the depth and strength of the deep divergent circulation. More specifically, only two GCMs out of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses show significant shallow divergent circulation, which is present in all in-situ soundings, and of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses, only two global reanalyses have deep divergence profiles that lie within the range of uncertainty of the soundings. The relationships of uncertainties in the shallow and deep divergent circulation to uncertainties in present day and projected strength of the hydrological cycle from the GCMs are assessed. In the tropics and subtropics, deep divergent circulation is the largest contributor to moisture convergence that balances the net precipitation, and inter-model differences in the present day simulations carry over onto the future projections. In comparison to the soundings and reanalyses, the GCMs are found to have deeper and stronger divergent circulation. While these two characteristics of GCM divergence affect the strength of the hydrological cycle, they tend to compensate for each other so that their combined effect is relatively modest.

Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Regional flood hydrology in a semi-arid catchment using a GLS regression model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The regional flood frequency hydrology of the 86,000 km2 and semi-arid Ebro catchment is investigated using an extended generalised least square model that includes separate descriptions for sampling errors and model errors. The Ebro catchment is characterised by large hydro-climatic heterogeneities among sub-regions. However, differences in flood processes among sites are better explained by a set of new catchment descriptors introduced into hydrological regression models, such as new characteristics derived from the slope of flow duration curves, the ratio of mean annual precipitation to extreme precipitations and the aridity index. These additions enabled a more direct link to be established between the general flow regime and the extreme flood characteristics through-out the entire catchment. The new regression models developed in this study were compared to a set of existing models recommended for flood frequency estimation in Spain. It was found that the generalised least squares model developed in this study improves the existing ordinary least squares models both at regional and trans-regional scales. An adequate description of flood processes is obtained and, as a direct consequence, more reliable flood predictions in ungauged catchments are achieved.

Luis Mediero; Thomas R. Kjeldsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into saline sedimentary basins will cause large-scale fluid pressurization and migration of native brines, which may affect valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration reservoirs. In this paper, we discuss how such basin-scale hydrologic impacts can (1) affect regulation of CO{sub 2} storage projects and (2) may reduce current storage capacity estimates. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration scenario in the Illinois Basin, which involves twenty individual CO{sub 2} storage projects in a core injection area suitable for long-term storage. Each project is assumed to inject five million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for 50 years. A regional-scale three-dimensional simulation model was developed for the Illinois Basin that captures both the local-scale CO{sub 2}-brine flow processes and the large-scale groundwater flow patterns in response to CO{sub 2} storage. The far-field pressure buildup predicted for this selected sequestration scenario suggests that (1) the area that needs to be characterized in a permitting process may comprise a very large region within the basin if reservoir pressurization is considered, and (2) permits cannot be granted on a single-site basis alone because the near- and far-field hydrologic response may be affected by interference between individual sites. Our results also support recent studies in that environmental concerns related to near-field and far-field pressure buildup may be a limiting factor on CO{sub 2} storage capacity. In other words, estimates of storage capacity, if solely based on the effective pore volume available for safe trapping of CO{sub 2}, may have to be revised based on assessments of pressure perturbations and their potential impact on caprock integrity and groundwater resources, respectively. We finally discuss some of the challenges in making reliable predictions of large-scale hydrologic impacts related to CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Zhou, Q.

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

S.J. Langan and D. Hirst Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 422435 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.J. Langan and D. Hirst 422 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 422435 (2004) © EGU (Galloway, S.W. Scotland) under contrasting land management S.J. Langan1 and D. Hirst2 1 Macaulay Land Use 114, Blindern, N-0414 Oslo, Norway Email for corresponding author: s.langan@macaulay.ac.uk Abstract

Boyer, Edmond

348

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model simulations and regional carbon budgets By Benjamin N. Sulman A dissertation submitted to the long-term storage of carbon in peat, these ecosystems contain a significant fraction of the global

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

349

The impact of groundwater-land surface interactions on hydrologic persistence in macroscale Elizabeth A. Clark and Dennis P. Lettenmaier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= layer depth z = depth to water table Commonalities: 1)Forcings: Precipitation, Tmax, Tmin, Wind 2)Sub-grid9.08 The impact of groundwater-land surface interactions on hydrologic persistence in macroscale and Energy Fluxes for GSMs, J. Geophys. Res., 99(D7), 14,415-14,428. Niu, G.-Y., Z.-L. Yang, R.E. Dickinson

Washington at Seattle, University of

350

Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Mount Simon, Illinois Basin, CO2, earthquakes, pressure, brine transport69 #12;Page | 3 1. IntroductionPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4 sharp-interface models of CO2 injection were constructed for the Illinois49 Basin in which porosity

Gable, Carl W.

351

Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328  

SciTech Connect

Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

Huff, Kathryn D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gasbuggy, New Mexico Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an evaluation of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) that has been conducted since 1972 at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico underground nuclear detonation site. The nuclear testing was conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program, which is discussed in greater detail in Appendix A. The detonation at Gasbuggy took place in 1967, 4,240 feet below ground surface, and was designed to fracture the host rock of a low-permeability natural gas-bearing formation in an effort to improve gas production. The site has historically been managed under the Nevada Offsites Project. These underground nuclear detonation sites are within the United States but outside of the Nevada Test Site where most of the experimental nuclear detonations conducted by the U.S. Government took place. Gasbuggy is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM ).

None

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Studies on unsaturated zone hydrology and radionuclide migration at a shallow-land burial site  

SciTech Connect

We studied unsaturated zone hydrology and the migration of radionuclides at a shallow-land burial site located at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. The initial results indicate that the principal pathway of water entry into the trench was by percolation through the trench caps. Tritium-bearing water was found to be moving upward from a saturated waste-burial trench through the trench cap to the soil surface. Evidence of tritium movement at a depth of 3 to 4 meters was observed to a distance of about 5 meters laterally. No /sup 137/Cs migration was observed, but very small amounts of /sup 238/Pu and /sup 60/Co were found to have migrated short distances from the trench.

Schulz, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fowler, E.B.; Essington, E.H.; Polzer, W.L.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geoenergy resources in Oregon: a review  

SciTech Connect

Geoenergy resources in Oregon, in addition to coal, include noncommercial deposits of oil shale, natural gas, and geothermal heat. Commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered at Mist in northwestern Oregon in 1979. Gas presently is being produced from five wells and additional exploratory drilling is underway. More than 2 million acres of Oregon land is under lease for petroleum and natural gas exploration, mostly in the Astoria embayment-Willamette syncline, central (Oregon) Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin, and eastern Tertiary nonmarine basin. The Cascade Range and eastern Oregon contain sizable resources of geothermal heat, of which a small part has been developed for space heating at Klamath Falls and Lakeview. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) comprising 432,000 acres have been identified, 422,000 acres are currently leased for geothermal development. KGRA's judged to have potential for generation of electrical power are Newberry Crater, Crump Geyser, and Alvord Desert. No adverse hydrologic effects have been noted to date from coal or other geoenergy exploration or development in Oregon, and no effects are expected if federal and state regulations are adhered to. The southwestern Oregon coals would have to be mined by underground methods. Potential hydrologic impacts would be local increases in sedimentation, turbidity, and mineralization of surface and ground water. Water-quality degradation, including both thermal pollution and increased concentrations of dissolved minerals, could result from geothermal development. Other potential problems include land subsidence and consumptive use of water associated with both coal and geothermal development. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Sidle, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salado hydrology program data report No. 2  

SciTech Connect

WIPP Salado Hydrology Program Data Report [number sign]2 presents hydrologic data collected during permeability testing of the Salado Formation performed from August 1989 through July 1992. The report presents the results of the drilling and testing of six boreholes drilled from the WIPP underground facility 655 m below ground surface in the Salado Formation. Permeability tests were conducted using multipacker test tools with inflatable packers to isolate borehole intervals to allow formation pore-pressure buildup and subsequent pressure-pulse and constant-pressure-withdrawal tests. The tests performed in boreholes L4P51, L4P52, SCP01, S1P71, S1P72, an S1P73 involved Marker Beds 138 and 139, anhydrites a,'' b,'' and c,'' clays B, D, E, G, H, J, and K, and several halitic strata. Test data include pressure and temperature from the brine-filled, packer- isolated test intervals, fluid and gas production during constant- pressure-withdrawal tests, and borehole-closure and axial test tool- movement measurements. The boreholes were drilled and/or cored to nominal 10.2-cm diameters using compressed air to remove drill cuttings. Compliance tests were conducted in lengths of steel and stainless-steel casing to evaluate the mechanical performance of the multipacker test tools. Compliance tests included leak tests and pulse-injection and pulse-withdrawal sequences. Following permeability testing, fluid pressures were monitored in packer- isolated sections of test boreholes C2H01, C2H02, SCP01, SlP71, SlP72, DPD01, DPD02, and DPD03.

Stensrud, W.A.; Dale, T.F.; Domski, P.S.; Palmer, J.B.; Roberts, R.M.; Fort, M.D.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)); Jensen, A.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salado hydrology program data report No. 2  

SciTech Connect

WIPP Salado Hydrology Program Data Report {number_sign}2 presents hydrologic data collected during permeability testing of the Salado Formation performed from August 1989 through July 1992. The report presents the results of the drilling and testing of six boreholes drilled from the WIPP underground facility 655 m below ground surface in the Salado Formation. Permeability tests were conducted using multipacker test tools with inflatable packers to isolate borehole intervals to allow formation pore-pressure buildup and subsequent pressure-pulse and constant-pressure-withdrawal tests. The tests performed in boreholes L4P51, L4P52, SCP01, S1P71, S1P72, an S1P73 involved Marker Beds 138 and 139, anhydrites ``a,`` ``b,`` and ``c,`` clays B, D, E, G, H, J, and K, and several halitic strata. Test data include pressure and temperature from the brine-filled, packer- isolated test intervals, fluid and gas production during constant- pressure-withdrawal tests, and borehole-closure and axial test tool- movement measurements. The boreholes were drilled and/or cored to nominal 10.2-cm diameters using compressed air to remove drill cuttings. Compliance tests were conducted in lengths of steel and stainless-steel casing to evaluate the mechanical performance of the multipacker test tools. Compliance tests included leak tests and pulse-injection and pulse-withdrawal sequences. Following permeability testing, fluid pressures were monitored in packer- isolated sections of test boreholes C2H01, C2H02, SCP01, SlP71, SlP72, DPD01, DPD02, and DPD03.

Stensrud, W.A.; Dale, T.F.; Domski, P.S.; Palmer, J.B.; Roberts, R.M.; Fort, M.D.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Jensen, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

SciTech Connect

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Analysis of flash flood-triggering rainfall for a process-oriented hydrological model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We propose an extended study of recent flood-triggering storms and resulting hydrological responses for catchments in the Pyrenean foothills up to the Aude region. For hydrometeorological sciences, it appears relevant to characterize flash floods and the storm that triggered them over various temporal and spatial scales. There are very few studies of extreme storm-caused floods in the literature covering the Mediterranean and highlighting, for example, the quickness and seasonality of this natural phenomenon. The present analysis is based on statistics that clarify the dependence between the spatial and temporal distributions of rainfall at catchment scale, catchment morphology and runoff response. Given the specific space and time scales of rainfall cell development, we show that the combined use of radar and a rain gauge network appears pertinent. Rainfall depth and intensity are found to be lower for catchments in the Pyrenean foothills than for the nearby Corbières or Montagne Noire regions. We highlight various hydrological behaviours and show that an increase in initial soil saturation tends to foster quicker catchment flood response times, of around 3 to 10 h. The hydrometeorological data set characterized in this paper constitutes a wealth of information to constrain a physics-based distributed model for regionalization purposes in the case of flash floods. Moreover, the use of diagnostic indices for rainfall distribution over catchment drainage networks highlights a unimodal trend in spatial temporal storm distributions for the entire flood dataset. Finally, it appears that floods in mountainous Pyrenean catchments are generally triggered by rainfall near the catchment outlet, where the topography is lower.

P.A. Garambois; K. Larnier; H. Roux; D. Labat; D. Dartus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

JULY 1998 1389K O W A L I K A N D P O L Y A K O V 1998 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and at a few smaller locations. The major energy sink for diurnal tides (over 60% of the total energy) is Shelikhov Bay and Penzhinskaya Guba. The major portion of semidiurnal tide energy is dissipatedJULY 1998 1389K O W A L I K A N D P O L Y A K O V 1998 American Meteorological Society Tides

Kowalik, Zygmunt

362

VARIABILITY, PREDICTABILITY AND CLIMATE RISKS Heinz Wanner, professor of climatology and meteorology, is the director of the NCCR Climate. The network of Swiss climate research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and was an assistant project leader while doing a post-doc within the framework of the NCCR Climate. She went#12;1 -- VARIABILITY, PREDICTABILITY AND CLIMATE RISKS -- #12;3 -- WHO WE ARE -- Heinz Wanner, professor of climatology and meteorology, is the director of the NCCR Climate. The network of Swiss climate

Richner, Heinz

363

1088 VOLUME 15J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2002 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1088 VOLUME 15J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2002 American Meteorological Society NOTES instability: the latter predominantly generates the seasonal phase locking of ENSO but has little effect periodic forcing, such as the annual cycle of solar insolation or monsoon wind. Using a conceptual ENSO

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

364

656 VOLUME 14J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2001 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oscillatory ocean-only mode. The insulating capacity of the variable sea ice has a negligible effect656 VOLUME 14J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2001 American Meteorological Society The Role of Ice The simulated influence of Arctic sea ice on the variability of the North Atlantic climate is discussed

365

VOLUME 12 APRIL 1999J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1999 American Meteorological Society 917  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VOLUME 12 APRIL 1999J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1999 American Meteorological Society 917 Remote the solar radiation absorbed by the ocean, thereby leading to enhanced SSTs. In the tropical North Atlantic. These relationships fit the concept of an ``atmospheric bridge'' that connects SST anomalies in the central equatorial

366

1 JULY 2000 2261Z H A N G A N D M C P H A D E N 2000 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 JULY 2000 2261Z H A N G A N D M C P H A D E N 2000 American Meteorological Society Intraseasonal in solar radiation flux and net buoyancy flux. The phase of net buoyancy flux is determined by the net heat intraseasonal Kelvin waves propagate eastward from the western Pacific into the central and eastern Pacific

Zhang, Chidong

367

872 VOLUME 14J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2001 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

872 VOLUME 14J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2001 American Meteorological Society. These spectra resemble those found for tree-ring-based precipitation reconstructions in central China as well as the western United States, and may reflect solar influences on the climate of Mongolia. 1. Introduction

Pederson, Neil

368

Data assimilation for crop yield and CO2 fixation monitoring in Asia by a photosynthetic sterility model using satellites and meteorological data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assimilates satellite and meteorological data to monitor grain yields and CO2 fixation by developing a photosynthetic-sterility model that integrates the Asian scale of meteorological data such as solar radiation, air temperature effects on photosynthesis and the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with a Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) VEGETATION sensor. Monitoring crop production using remotely sensed and daily meteorological data can provide an important early warning regarding poor crop production to Asian countries with their still-growing populations. Grain production monitoring would support orderly crisis management to maintain food security in Asia, which is facing climate fluctuations through this century of global warming. A decision-tree method classifies the distribution of crop fields in Asia using Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SPOT VEGETATION data, which include the NDVI and Land Surface Water Index (LSWI). The air temperature data are available from the National Centres for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The solar radiation data are supplied by the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) Centre and re-analysis data, by the NCEP and ECMWF. This study provides daily distributions of the photosynthesis rate, which is the CO2 fixation in Asian areas combined with the distribution of grain fields.

Daijiro Kaneko; Toshiro Kumakura; Peng Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Characterization of a Karst Coastal Ecosystem in the Mexican Caribbean: Assessing the Influence of Coastal Hydrodynamics and Submerged Groundwater Discharges on Seagrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrographic variability of this inherently vulnerable ecosystem and assess its influence on a key habitat, the seagrass. The chapters follow the three-branched nature of the study which tackled the connected ecosystem issues of coastal hydrology, physical...

Medina, Israel

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

Drici, Warda

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Investigating the Ability of a Land Surface Model to Simulate Streamflow with the Accuracy of Hydrological Models: A Case Study Using MOPEX Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) project, after calibration of model parameters, complex rainfall–runoff hydrological models (HMs) simulated streamflow better than land surface models (LSMs), including the Soil–Water–...

Olga N. Nasonova; Yeugeniy M. Gusev; Yeugeniy E. Kovalev

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector: insights from the forecast and analysis of hydrological indicators in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The World Bank has recently developed a method to evaluate the effects of climate change on six hydrological indicators across 8951 basins of the world. The indicators are designed for decision-makers and stakeholders to ...

Jacobsen, Michael

374

Suitability of Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model of the US Environmental Protection Agency for the simulation of the water balance of landfill cover systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Cover systems are widely used to safeguard landfills and contaminated sites. The evaluation of the ... water balance is crucial for the design of landfill covers. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performanc...

K. Berger; S. Melchior; G. Miehlich

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Long-Term Hydrologically Based Dataset of Land Surface Fluxes and States for the Conterminous United States: Update and Extensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a publicly available, long-term (1915–2011), hydrologically consistent dataset for the conterminous United States, intended to aid in studies of water and energy exchanges at the land surface. These data are gridded at a ...

Ben Livneh; Eric A. Rosenberg; Chiyu Lin; Bart Nijssen; Vimal Mishra; Kostas M. Andreadis; Edwin P. Maurer; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A summary and discussion of hydrologic data from the Calico Hills nonwelded hydrogeologic unit at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of available hydrologic data from in situ and laboratory testing of the Calico Hills nonwelded hydrogeologic unit, including hydraulic conductivity, porosity, saturation, pore-size distribution and parameters from curve-fits to pressure-saturation data. Sample statistics of hydraulic conductivity, porosity and saturation data for vitric, devitrified and zeolitic tuffs are presented and discussed. While a high degree of variability is observed in both laboratory and in situ hydraulic conductivity measurements, uncertainties arising from differences in size of laboratory test samples, sample handling, test procedures and insufficient number of samples point to the need for additional data of specific types to adequately characterize the unit. Hydrologic issues related to transport analysis in the Calico Hills nonwelded hydrogeologic unit at Yucca Mountain are discussed together with recommendations for future work. The compiled data are included as an appendix.

Loeven, C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in a large-scale underground heater test in partially saturated fractured tuff  

SciTech Connect

The Drift Scale Test (DST) is being conducted in an underground facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to probe the coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes likely to occur in the fractured rock mass around a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Thermal-hydrological processes in the DST have been simulated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model incorporates the realistic test configuration and all available site-specific measurements pertaining to the thermal and hydrological properties of the unsaturated fractured tuff of the test block. The modeled predictions were compared to the extensive set of measured data collected in the first year of this 8-year-long test. The mean error between the predictions and measurement at 12 months of heating for over 1600 temperature sensors is about 2 degrees C. Heat-pipe signature in the temperature data, indicating two-phase regions of liquid-vapor counterflow, is seen in both the measurements and simulated results. The redistribution of moisture content in the rock mass (resulting from vaporization and condensation) was probed by periodic air-injection testing and geophysical measurements. Good agreement also occurred between the model predictions and these measurements. The general agreement between predictions from the numerical simulations and the measurements of the thermal test indicates that our fundamental understanding of the coupled thermal-hydrologic processes at Yucca Mountain is sound. However, effects of spatial heterogeneity from discrete fractures that are observed in the temperature data are not matched by simulations from the numerical model, which treat the densely spaced fractures as a continuum.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, Y.W.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

An analysis of the hydrologic effects of proposed test drilling in the Winema National Forest near Crater Lake, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a preliminary study on the hydrologic regime underlying the Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon. The study was performed to provide a basis for evaluating the potential for polluting Crater Lake by drilling exploratory boreholes on the flanks of the mountain. A simple conceptual model of the hydrologic regime was developed by synthesizing the data from the region surrounding the Caldera. Based on the conceptual model, a series of numerical simulations aimed at establishing the basic groundwater flow patterns under and surrounding the lake were performed. In addition to the numerical simulations, we used simple volumetric techniques for estimating the distance that drilling mud would migrate away from the borehole if drilling proceeded without drilling fluid returns. Based on our calculations that show the regional flow of groundwater will oppose the flow of drilling mud toward the lake, and based on our volumetric estimate of drilling mud migration, our study concludes that drilling without returns will not pollute Crater Lake, nor will it affect the hydrologic regime in the immediate vicinity of the Crater Lake Caldera.

Sammel, E.A.; Benson, S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optimal operation of hydrothermal systems with Hydrological Scenario Generation through Bootstrap and Periodic Autoregressive Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In electrical power systems with strong hydro generation, the use of adequate techniques to generate synthetic hydrological scenarios is extremely important for the evaluation of the ways the system behaves in order to meet the forecast energy demand. This paper proposes a new model to generate natural inflow energy scenarios in the long-term operation planning of large-sized hydrothermal systems. This model is based on the Periodic Autoregressive Model, PAR (p), where the identification of the p orders is based on the significance of the Partial Autocorrelation Function (PACF) estimated via Bootstrap, an intensive computational technique. The scenarios generated through this new technique were applied to the operation planning of the Brazilian Electrical System (BES), using the previously developed methodology of Stochastic Dynamic Programming based on Convex Hull algorithm (SDP-CHull). The results show that identification via Bootstrap is considerably more parsimonious, leading to the identification of lower orders models in most cases which retains the statistical characteristics of the original series. Additionally it presents a closer total mean operation cost when compared to the cost obtained via historic series.

Reinaldo Castro Souza; André Lu?´s Marques Marcato; Bruno Henriques Dias; Fernando Luiz Cyrino Oliveira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Laboratory and field studies related to the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes research conducted in FY 1990 by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project. This multi-agency project measures the underground movement of radionuclides related to nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. This project continues the long-term experiment at the site of the Cambric nuclear test. Water pumped from a well adjacent to the explosion cavity continues to show decreasing amounts of tritium and Krypton 85 but no Cesium 139. Analyses of drillback debris shows a distinction between refractory and volatile materials in respect to both their location in the test cavity and their leachability with groundwater. We surveyed materials used during nuclear testing to evaluate any post-test hazard; we concluded that most such materials pose a minimal hazard. The Los Alamos drilling program provided an opportunity for us to sample a collapsed zone above the cavity of a test, which was fired 2 years ago. We continue our research in colloid characterization and in detection of low levels of Technetium 99 in Nevada Test Site water. During FY 1990, we drilled a new hole in the Yucca Flat area to study radionuclide migration. This report also describes Los Alamos management and planning activities in support of this project. 20 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs.

Thompson, J.L. (comp.)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Simulated climatology of a general circulation model with a hydrological cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal and dynamical structure of the tropical atmosphere which emerged from the numerical integration of our general circulation model with a simple hydrologic cycle is analyzed in detail. According to the results of our analysis, the lapse rate of zonal mean temperature in the model Tropics is supermoist-adiabatic in the lower troposphere, and is sub-moist-adiabatic above the 400-mb. level in qualitative agreement with thc observed features in the actual Tropics. The flow field in the model Tropics also displays interesting features. For example, a zone of strong convergence and a belt of heavy rain develops around the equator. Synoptic-scale disturbances such as weak tropical cyclones and shear lines with strong convergence develop and are reminiscent of disturbances in the actual tropical atmosphere. The humid towers, which result from moist convective adjustment and condensation, develop in the central core of the regions of strong upward motion, sometimes reaching the level of the tropical tropopause and thus heating the upper tropical troposphere. This heating compensates for thc cooling due to radiation and the meridional circulation. According to the analysis of the energy budget of the model Tropics, the release of eddy available potential energy, which is mainly generated by the heat of condensation, constitutes the major source of eddy kinetic energy of disturbances prevailing in the model Tropics.

Syukuro Manabe; Joseph Smagorinsky

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dynamic Inversion for Hydrological Process Monitoring with Electrical Resistance Tomography Under Model Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

We propose an approach for imaging the dynamics of complex hydrological processes. The evolution of electrically conductive fluids in porous media is imaged using time-lapse electrical resistance tomography. The related dynamic inversion problem is solved using Bayesian filtering techniques, that is, it is formulated as a sequential state estimation problem in which the target is an evolving posterior probability density of the system state. The dynamical inversion framework is based on the state space representation of the system, which involves the construction of a stochastic evolution model and an observation model. The observation model used in this paper consists of the complete electrode model for ERT, with Archie's law relating saturations to electrical conductivity. The evolution model is an approximate model for simulating flow through partially saturated porous media. Unavoidable modeling and approximation errors in both the observation and evolution models are considered by computing approximate statistics for these errors. These models are then included in the construction of the posterior probability density of the estimated system state. This approximation error method allows the use of approximate - and therefore computationally efficient - observation and evolution models in the Bayesian filtering. We consider a synthetic example and show that the incorporation of an explicit model for the model uncertainties in the state space representation can yield better estimates than a frame-by-frame imaging approach.

Lehikoinen, A.; Huttunen, J.M.J.; Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Kaipio, J.P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

385

Sequence of surface meteorological variables with the passage of winter cold fronts in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dramatically alter weather conditions. Since these surface boundaries often mark distinct weather changes, locating their positions and forecasting their movement is critical to accurate forecasting. By analyzing the timing of changes in meteorological... than synoptic-scale processes, depend upon accurate synoptic analysis. As Bosart (1989) so appropriately stated, "the evolution of mesoscale features is critically dependent upon the configuration of the synoptic-scale flow. " Therefore, forecasting...

Huckaby, Daniel Dale

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project  

SciTech Connect

Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Relating geo-meteorological parameters to global solar radiation for Egypt by Iranna-Bapat's estimation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimation of solar radiation is considered as the most important parameter for the design and development of various solar energy systems. But, the availability of the required data is very scarce and often not readily accessible. The foremost objective of the present study was to estimate the monthly average global solar radiation (GSR) at various locations for Egypt, by the generalised Iranna-Bapat's model. Iranna-Bapat's model is developed to estimate the value of global solar radiation at any location on earth surface. This model uses the most commonly measurable meteorological parameters such as ambient temperature, humidity, windspeed, moisture for a given location. A total of 11 locations spread across the country are used to validate this model. The computed values from Iranna-Bapat's model are compared with the measured values. Iranna-Bapat's model demonstrated acceptable results, and statistically displayed lower RMSE. Therefore this model could be a good estimator for predicting the global solar radiation at other locations for Egypt, where such data is not available.

Iranna Korachagaon; V.N. Bapat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hydrologic Tracer Studies Conducted August 20 - 25, 1962 Near Cape Thompson, Alaska  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S T A T E DIEPAR- O F THE IlVTERIGR GEOLOGICAL SURVEX Federal Cenzer, Denver 2 5 , C a l o r a a o DATA RELEASE - Sept. 1 0 , 1963 HYDROLOGIC TRACEEI STUDIES CONDUCTED A U G ~ T 20-25, 1962 NEAR CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA V. J. Janzer and W. A. Beetem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P l o t ? r e p a r a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , f i e l d . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , l a b o r a t o r y , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L n f i l t r a t i c n e q e r i m e n t . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stream d i s p e r s i o n s t u d y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sedan event f z l l o u t p l o t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References c i t e d ILLUSTRATIONS Figure I . Summed c o u n t s removed from cesium s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e q u i l i b r a t i o n s , . . . . . . . . 2. S m e d c o u n t s removed from s t r o n t i u m s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e a - u i l i b r a t i o n s . . . . . . . . . 3. P l

389

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Modeling SF{sub 6} plume dispersion in complex terrain and meteorology with a limited data set  

SciTech Connect

Early actions of emergency responders during hazardous material releases are intended to assess contamination and potential public exposure. As measurements are collected, an integration of model calculations and measurements can assist to better understand the situation. This study applied a high resolution version of the operational 3-D numerical models used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to a limited meteorological and tracer data set to assist in the interpretation of the dispersion pattern on a 140 km scale. The data set was collected from a tracer release during the morning surface inversion and transition period in the complex terrain of the Snake River Plain near Idaho Falls, Idaho in November 1993 by the United States Air Force. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine model input parameters that best represented the study environment. These studies showed that mixing and boundary layer heights, atmospheric stability, and rawinsonde data are the most important model input parameters affecting wind field generation and tracer dispersion. Numerical models and limited measurement data were used to interpret dispersion patterns through the use of data analysis, model input determination, and sensitivity studies. Comparison of the best-estimate calculation to measurement data showed that model results compared well with the aircraft data, but had moderate success with the few surface measurements taken. The moderate success of the surface measurement comparison, may be due to limited downward mixing of the tracer as a result of the model resolution determined by the domain size selected to study the overall plume dispersion. 8 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

Schalk, W.W. III

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Information on Hydrologic Conceptual Models, Parameters, Uncertainty Analysis, and Data Sources for Dose Assessments at Decommissioning Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses issues related to the analysis of uncertainty in dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The basic conceptual models and mathematical implementations of three dose assessment codes are outlined along with the site-specific conditions under which the codes may provide inaccurate, potentially nonconservative results. In addition, the hydrologic parameters of the codes are identified and compared. A methodology for parameter uncertainty assessment is outlined that considers the potential data limitations and modeling needs of decommissioning analyses. This methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases, sensitivity analysis, probabilistic modeling, and Bayesian updating to incorporate site-specific information. Data sources for best-estimate parameter values and parameter uncertainty information are also reviewed. A follow-on report will illustrate the uncertainty assessment methodology using decommissioning test cases.

Meyer, Philip D.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Workshop on Hydrologic Modeling with SWAT and Groundwater Modeling with MODFLOW (26-27 December 2014) International Conference on Modeling Tools for Sustainable Water Resources Management (28-29 December 2014)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014) International Conference on Modeling Tools for Sustainable Water Resources Management (28 for hydrologic data analysis, pre / post processing, and hydrologic modeling Water Resources Management Water application of SWAT model for water manage- ment Prof. Upmanu Lall Columbia University, USA Prof. A.K. Gosain

397

Regional-Scale Estimation of Electric Power and Power Plant CO2 Emissions Using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System Nighttime Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For estimation, the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) annual nighttime stable light product (NSL) for 2006 and statistical data on power generation, power consumption, and power plant CO2 emissions in 10 electric power supply regions of Japan was investigated. ... There are similar linear correlations of electricity consumption for lighting and total electricity consumption at the regional (e.g., state and province) level, but possibly not for CO2 emissions because of regional concentrations of electricity from renewable energy and nuclear power plants, which produce low CO2 emissions. ...

Husi Letu; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Fumihiko Nishio

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean projections. Mk3.5 captures a number of robust changes common to most climate models that contribute to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3), an initiative by the World Climate Research projected by climate models. However, the response of these currents to climate change may directly affect m

Feng, Ming

399

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Coastal Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany y CREST, City College of New York, NY, USA z

Siebesma, Pier

400

METEOROLOGY IN CALIFORNIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...scientific journals and local health or engineering...a hot and dry wind, usually confined...wind with the Foehn of Switzerland...temperature of 640. The winds show two diurnal maxima, indicating local control of their flow, a west wind from the Warner...Winds of the Foehn species commonly...

W. M. D.

1886-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CURRENT NOTES ON METEOROLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...warmth of the chinook winds is entirely erroneous...the warmth of the Swiss foehn, viz, that that wind, coming down warm and...dry-ness of chinook and foehn are the result of the...condensed reports upon local climates were available...

R. DEC. WARD

1900-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

CURRENT NOTES ON METEOROLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Weather Forecasts by Local Ob-servers,' 'Polarization...temperature, pressure, winds, rain-fall and cloudiness...special attention to the winds noted during the Gauss...the continent. Here the winds were found to be prevailingly...sea-board as easterly, foehn-like gales.' These...

R. DEC. WARD

1904-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992-April 1993) South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992-April 1993) NDP-065 (1998) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-065 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-065 image Contributed by Stephany Rubin,* John G. Goddard,* David W. Chipman,* Taro Takahashi,* Stewart C. Sutherland,* Joseph L. Reid,* James H. Swift,** and Lynne D. Talley** *Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Columbia University Palisades, New York **Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California Prepared by Alexander Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Abstract Contents Part 1: Overview Background Information Description of the Expeditions WOCE Section P16A/P17A

405

Unit hydrograph application to stormwater collection system design and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' 0 71 0. 77 0. Bl. 0, 6 0 116 51 52 53 ce 57 58 '9 60 61 t 2 63 6 t 65 66 6T 68 69 70 71 7 73 7'I '75 T6 77 78 BO 81 8 83 84 55 66 81 88 89 '?0 91 '9 3 94 96 '97 'I 8 100 0, '98 '?. 95 '9'3 1. 02 I... 118. 0 1 13. CI 1 13 11%. 0 115. 0 1 1'5. 1 116 0 116. e 1 17 ~ 0 CI CICI 85. 00 31. 58 50 ~ I?0 75 OII 78. 9'5 I I: n?, 00 1 85. 00 186. 38 1 '50 ~ 00 1 '57 8'9 175 00 5075. 00 6106. +3 9975. 00 1e875. 00 15390. 60 19775. 00...

Spinks, Melvin Gerald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

A hydrograph-based prediction of meander migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Fitting hyperbolic curves for flume test data ..............................................73 Figure 5.2 Fitting hyperbolic curve for Des Moines River ..........................................74 Figure 5.3 R/W=4 ?=120...? ............................................................................................76 Figure 5.4 Simulated shear stress along a channel .......................................................77 Figure 5.5 Influence of R/W.........................................................................................79 Figure 5...

Wang, Wei

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Evaluation of the WRF meteorological model results during a high ozone episode in SW Poland - the role of model initial conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In meteorological, as well as air quality, modelling, input data plays an important role in the accuracy of the results, next to the model configuration. There are many sources of meteorological data available, both global and regional, and they differ not only by spatial and temporal resolution, but also by the number of observations included in the reanalysis and method of data assimilation used. In this study, the performance of the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model with two global reanalyses (ERA-Interim and NCEP FNL) used as input datasets has been assessed for a period of high tropospheric ozone concentrations. Both WRF model runs are in good agreement with observations, with IOA statistic ranging from 0.78 for wind speed to 0.98 for surface pressure. The ERA-Interim simulation showed better results for surface pressure, temperature and wind speed, while the performance of both datasets for parameters related to atmospheric moisture (e.g., dew point temperature) was comparable.

Kinga WaÅ?aszek; Maciej Kryza; MaÅ?gorzata Werner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

PhD, 2000, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, Groundwater hydrology. M.Sc., 1996, International Institute for Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Delft,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Hydrogeology Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient Infiltration Pulses, LBNL-57539, 5:1129-1142 . · Yu-Shu Wu, S. Mukhopadhyay, K. Zhang*, and G. S. Bodvarsson, 2006, A Mountain

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

409

Climate change impacts on nutrient loads in theYorkshire Ouse catchment (UK) Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(2), 197209 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change impacts on nutrient loads in theYorkshire Ouse catchment (UK) 197 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(2), 197­209 (2002) © EGS Climate change impacts on nutrient loads for corresponding author: faycal.bouraoui@jrc.it Abstract This study assessed the impact of potential climate change

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421431 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environmental sciences, there are major management issues over the impact of man on the water qualityAssessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales 421 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421­431 (2002) © EGS Assessing environmental impacts on stream water

Boyer, Edmond

411

Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 379390 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years the 1970s. This area was included in the RECOVER:2010 project (Ferrier et al., 2001) to assess the effect 379 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 379­390 (2001) © EGS Trends in the chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

412

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Climate change as a confounding factor in reversibility of acidification: RAIN and CLIMEX projects Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 477486 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change as a confounding factor in reversibility of acidification: RAIN and CLIMEX projects to the roofed structure and a climate change manipulation (CLIMEX project) was superimposed on the clean rain 477 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 477­486 (2001) © EGS Climate change as a confounding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

Strontium isotopic record of signatures of Holocene fluvial sediments in the Loire valley, France Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 849858 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strontium isotopic record of signatures of Holocene fluvial sediments in the Loire valley, France 849 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 849­858 (2002) © EGS Strontium isotopic record for corresponding author: p.negrel@brgm.fr Abstract The distribution of Sr contents and isotopes of strontium Sr

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation 959 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 959972 (2004) © EGU Strontium isotope geochemistry for corresponding author : p.negrel@brgm.fr Abstract This study presents strontium isotope and major ion data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks 313 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) © EGU Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide a quick and flexible means of developing flood flow simulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, Norway and Sweden 19901999 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 327337 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, Norway and Sweden 1990­1999 327 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 327­337 (2001) © EGS Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, FIN-00251, Helsinki, Finland 3 University of Agricultural Sciences, PB 7050, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden

Boyer, Edmond

418

Testing the INCA model in a small agricultural catchment in southern Finland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 717728 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing the INCA model in a small agricultural catchment in southern Finland 717 Hydrology catchment in southern Finland K. Granlund, K. Rankinen and A. Lepistö Finnish Environment Institute, P.O. Box 140, FIN-00251 Helsinki, Finland Email for corresponding author: kirsti

Boyer, Edmond

419

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Forms of Soil Phosphorus in Selected Hydrologic Units of the Florida Everglades K. R. Reddy,* Y. Wang, W. F. DeBusk, M. M. Fisher, and S. Newman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

among various soil P forms. Soil samples from selected hydrologic units, including the Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) and the Holey Land Wildlife Management Area (HWMA), were obtained at various depth, with about one-third of the P stored in the inorganic pool (primarily as Ca- and Mg-bound P

Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fingerprinting of bed sediment in theTay Estuary, Scotland: an environmental magnetism approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 10071016 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fingerprinting of bed sediment in theTay Estuary, Scotland: an environmental magnetism approach 1007 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 1007­1016 (2002) © EGS Fingerprinting of bed sediment 9AL, Scotland Email of corresponding author: p.a.jenkins@dundee.ac.uk Abstract Sediment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

Geologic and hydrologic controls critical to coalbed methane producibility and resource assessment: Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwest Colorado. Topical report, December 1, 1993-November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: To further evaluate the interplay of geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane production and resource assessment; to refine and validate our basin-scale coalbed methane producibility model; and to analyze the economics of coalbed methane exploration and development in the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Our second assignment will look at hydrology how can GIS be used to create a geographic database that contains maps of Illinois rivers, their watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Atlas website (link is on next page). #12;A GIS software package stores digital maps, in a variety. ArcGIS is a package of programs: ArcMap is a new version of ArcView, which is the GIS analyticalOur second assignment will look at hydrology ­ how can GIS be used to create a geographic database

Frank, Thomas D.

424

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Site through Natural Isotopic Reactive Tracers and Geochemical Investigation presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

425

Incorporation of groundwater losses and well level data in rainfall-runoff models illustrated using the PDM Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 2538 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

groundwater storage under the influence of pumped abstractions, spring flows and underflows. This model the PDM 25 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 25­38 (2002) © EGS Incorporation of groundwater there are pumped abstractions to water supply. Many rainfall-runoff models are not formulated so as to represent

Boyer, Edmond

426

Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Study of Pre-Closure Off-Normal Thermal Scenarios at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

The proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada currently includes a minimum of 50 years forced ventilation inside of emplacement drifts prior to repository closure. To regulate the heat generated from emplaced waste packages, the ventilation during the pre-closure period should be continuous. Off-normal thermal scenarios that consider temporary shutdown of the pre-closure ventilation are investigated to determine the impacts of ventilation shutdown on the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behaviors of the emplacement drifts. In-drift heat transfer processes including radiation, convection, and conduction are studied. The analysis provides a ventilation heat removal ratio that varies on the drift location and the ventilation duration. The heat removal ratio is transferred and utilized in the NUFT thermal-hydrology software. The NUFT software is used to investigate the thermal-hydrologic impacts on the repository rock mass for the off-normal thermal scenarios with various shutdown durations at various pre-closure times. The predicted rock mass temperature evaluated from the thermal-hydrologic analysis is applied for the thermal-mechanical analysis of the off-normal thermal scenarios. The results show that degradation and rockfall of the emplacement drifts due to the off-normal thermal scenarios will be minimal, and it is concluded that the impacts of off-normal thermal scenarios on the stability of the emplacement drifts will be insignificant.

J. Leem; M. Lin; Y. Sun; D. Kicker

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes...

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September, radar engineers and science colleagues gathered in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, for the 8th European Conference on Radar in Meteorology and Hydrology. Leading ARM...

430

Study AreaIntroduction U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other things, on the continuing and increased use of hydroelectric power. However, climate change itself provision of hydropower. Index Terms-- hydroelectric power generation, hydrology, meteorology, finance, risk

431

1462 VOLUME 54J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 1997 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,* AND LIGUANG WU Department of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University experiments with a single-layer, primitive equation model. It is found that cyclonic (anticyclonic) shears of the beta gyre amplitude and phase angle is advanced to interpret the numerical model results. In this model

Wang, Bin

432

VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D 1991). This situation reinforces the importance of resuspension and mixing processes at the present and a strong concurrent increase in suspended particulate matter in the water column. Sed- iment resuspension

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

433

1462 VOLUME 33J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2003 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be thought of as a steepening of the leading edge of the internal tide. Turbulent energy dissipation may Meteorological Society Shear and Baroclinic Energy Flux on the Summer New England Shelf J. A. MACKINNON* AND M. C are presented of internal wave properties and energy fluxes through a site near the 70-m isobath on the New

MacKinnon, Jennifer

434

2312 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were selected for the analysis. Highly resolved spectra of salinity gradient exhibit an approximate k 1 Meteorological Society Microstructure Estimates of Turbulent Salinity Flux and the Dissipation Spectrum of Salinity JONATHAN D. NASH* AND JAMES N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State

Kurapov, Alexander

435

1094 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meteorological Society NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Midlatitude Wind Forcing and Subduction of Temperature Anomalies may also be generated by remote wind-forcing effects, through their impact on the position of the LPVP response to localized anomalous surface wind and buoyancy forcings. Wind stress and surface cooling

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

436

642 VOLUME 56J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 1999 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a priori. The first numerical simulations of the coupled hur- ricane­ocean system were performed with axisymmetric hurricane and ocean models neglecting the hurricane movement. Very limited computer power dictated Meteorological Society The Ocean's Effect on the Intensity of Tropical Cyclones: Results from a Simple Coupled

Emanuel, Kerry A.

437

Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating FluidFlow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect

A multidimensional, mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is presented for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone (UZ), Nevada. The model, consisting of both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the UZ repository system, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climate conditions. This mountain-scale TH model evaluates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale UZ flow. It also simulates the impact of radioactive waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including heat-driven processes occurring near and far away from the emplacement tunnels or drifts. The model simulations predict thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. These simulations provide mountain-scale thermally perturbed flow fields for assessing the repository performance under thermal loading conditions.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydrologic Data and Evaluation for Model Validation Wells, MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3 near the Project Shoal Area  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, a drilling campaign was conducted at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) to provide information for model validation, emplace long-term monitoring wells, and develop baseline geochemistry for long term hydrologic monitoring. Water levels were monitored in the vicinity of the drilling, in the existing wells HC-1 and HC-6, as well as in the newly drilled wells, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 and their associated piezometers. Periodic water level measurements were also made in existing wells HC-2, HC-3, HC-4, HC-5 and HC-7. A lithium bromide chemical tracer was added to drilling fluids during the installation of the monitoring and validation (MV) wells and piezometers. The zones of interest were the fractured, jointed and faulted horizons within a granitic body. These horizons generally have moderate hydraulic conductivities. As a result, the wells and their shallower piezometers required strenuous purging and development to remove introduced drilling fluids as evidenced by bromide concentrations. After airlift and surging well development procedures, the wells were pumped continuously until the bromide concentration was less then 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). Water quality samples were collected after the well development was completed. Tritium scans were preformed before other analyses to ensure the absence of high levels of radioactivity. Tritium levels were less than 2,000 pico-curies per liter. Samples were also analyzed for carbon-14 and iodine-129, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, as well as major cations and anions. Aquifer tests were performed in each MV well after the bromide concentration fell below acceptable levels. Water level data from the aquifer tests were used to compute aquifer hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity

B. Lyles; P. Oberlander; D. Gillespie; D. Donithan; J. Chapman; J. Healey

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

Tree-ring footprint of joint hydrologic drought in Sacramento and Upper Colorado river basins, western USA  

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Growing and changing demands on water supply, along with natural climate variability and possible anthropogenically induced climate change, make water resource management and planning increasingly challenging, particularly in arid regions. Instrumental climate and gaged streamflow records provide just a snapshop of recent natural hydrologic variability. In this paper, we use tree-ring-based annual streamflow reconstructions for the Sacramento River in California and the Blue River in western Colorado to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of widespread drought simultaneously affecting both basins over the past five centuries. Stability of joint-drought episodes and the covariation of reconstructed flows in the two basins are analyzed with sliding correlations, spectral analysis and a hypergeometric test. Year-to-year spatial patterns of moisture anomalies in a singular joint-drought episode in the late-1500s are mapped with a network of tree-ring data. Climatological aspects of joint droughts of the 20th century are investigated with 500-mb geopotential height data and climatic indices. Although flow in the two rivers is only very weakly correlated over the full 538-yr reconstruction period, more years of joint drought occur than would be expected by chance alone. Covariation in reconstructed flows is stronger in the late 1500s and mid-1700s than at any time since 1800. The late 1500s period of drought is not characterized as a decades-long unbroken drought, but as a series of drought impulses broken by wet years, with widespread moisture deficits in joint dry years. Periods of high inter-basin correlation in reconstructed flow are characterized by coherency at frequencies within the ENSO band. However, joint droughts in instrumental gage records do not display any consistent relationship with ENSO or the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and so it is difficult to infer either as a causal mechanism for joint droughts in the past.

David M. Meko; Connie A. Woodhouse

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solar energy prediction using linear and non-linear regularization models: A study on AMS (American Meteorological Society) 2013–14 Solar Energy Prediction Contest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 2013, American Meteorological Society Committees on AI (artificial intelligence) Applications organized a short-term solar energy prediction competition aiming at predicting total daily solar energy received at 98 solar farms based on the outputs of various weather patterns of a numerical weather prediction model. In this paper, a methodology to solve this problem has been explained and the performance of ordinary LSR (least-square regression), regularized LSR and ANN (artificial neural network) models has been compared. In order to improve the generalization capability of the models, more experiments like variable segmentation, subspace feature sampling and ensembling of models have been conducted. It is observed that model accuracy can be improved by proper selection of input data segments. Further improvements can be obtained by ensemble of forecasts of different models. It is observed that the performance of an ensemble of ANN and LSR models is the best among all the proposed models in this work. As far as the competition is concerned, Gradient Boosting Regression Tree has turned out to be the best algorithm. The proposed ensemble of ANN and LSR model is able to show a relative improvement of 7.63% and 39.99% as compared to benchmark Spline Interpolation and Gaussian Mixture Model respectively.

S.K. Aggarwal; L.M. Saini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area  

SciTech Connect

Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

Purtymun, W.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started collecting data in March 2011.

Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES SCIENTIFIC BRIEFING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Lawrence KS (DMW), and Oregon State University, Corvallis OR, USA (JJMcD) *Correspondence to: Tomas Vitvar

McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

448

Appendix HYDRO: Hydrological Investigations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supports the observed shift in monthly water levels (see Figure HYDRO-14 and Figure HYDRO-16). Small-scale fluctuations in downhole pressure readings are due to effects of...

449

Development of the Conceptual Models for Chemical Conditions and Hydrology Used in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations specify that the DOE must demonstrate on a sound basis that the WIPP disposal system will effectively contain long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides within its boundaries for 10,000 years following closure. In 1996, the DOE submitted the ''40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' (CCA) to the EPA. The CCA proposed that the WIPP site complies with EPA's regulatory requirements. Contained within the CCA are descriptions of the scientific research conducted to characterize the properties of the WIPP site and the probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted to predict the containment properties of the WIPP disposal system. In May 1998, the EPA certified that the TRU waste disposal at the WIPP complies with its regulations. Waste disposal operations at WIPP commenced on March 28, 1999. The 1996 WIPP PA model of the disposal system included conceptual and mathematical representations of key hydrologic and geochemical processes. These key processes were identified over a 22-year period involving data collection, data interpretation, computer models, and sensitivity studies to evaluate the importance of uncertainty and of processes that were difficult to evaluate by other means. Key developments in the area of geochemistry were the evaluation of gas generation mechanisms in the repository; development of a model of chemical conditions in the repository and actinide concentrations in brine; selecting MgO backfill and demonstrating its effects experimentally; and determining the chemical retardation capability of the Culebra. Key developments in the area of hydrology were evacuating the potential for groundwater to dissolve the Salado Formation (the repository host formation), development of a regional model for hydrologic conditions, development of a stochastic, probabilistic representation of hydraulic properties in the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation; characterization of physical transport in the Culebra, and the evaluation of brine and gas flow in the Salado. Additional confidence in the conceptual models used in the 1996 WIPP PA was gained through independent peer review in many stages of their development.

LARSON, KURT W.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

NOTES ON METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effective use of heaters involves...the U. S. Weather Bureau...military operations; but it...military operations. As the...ground, cold weather in winter...theater has colder and drier weather in winter...the west, operations there are...

Charles F. Brooks

1916-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

QUARTERLY JOURNAL ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flooding and heavy loss.In this paper we present a 12-hournumerical simulation of that eventby meansof. Meteorol. Soc. (1997), 123,pp. 537-559 Numerical simulation of an extreme rainfall event in Catalonia: Role, probably on account of the shortness of the simulation. KEYWORDS:Heavy rain Western Mediterranean Mesoscale

Romero, Romu

452

TROPICAL METEOROLOGY & Climate | Hadley Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synopsis The Hadley circulation, a prominent circulation feature characterized by rising air near the Equator and sinking air in the subtropics, defines the position of dry subtropical areas and is a fundamental regulator of the earth's energy and momentum budgets. The character of the Hadley circulation, and its related precipitation regimes, exhibits variation and change in response to both climate variability and radiative forcing changes. The strength and position of the Hadley circulation change from year to year paced by El Niño and La Niña events. Over the last few decades of the twentieth century, the Hadley cell has expanded poleward in both hemispheres, with changes in atmospheric composition (including stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse gas increases) thought to have contributed to its expansion. This article introduces the basic phenomenology and driving mechanism of the Hadley circulation and discusses its variations under both natural and anthropogenic climate forcings. This article is a revision of the previous edition article by I N James, volume 3, pp 919–924, © 2003, Elsevier Ltd.

J. Lu; G.A. Vecchi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

NOTES ON METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...national govern-ment, the local office of the Weather...of sirocco, mistral or foehn, which have an oval shape...Remarks on the General and Local Circulation " was read...solstices. If the theory of local circulation given be correct it fol-lows that the winds must continue upwards...

ANDREW H. PALMER

1911-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sandia National Laboratories: meteorological instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doppler Velocimeter EC Top Publications A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study Nonlinear Time-Domain...

455

Hanford Meteorological Station - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS...

456

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The mineralogy and chemistry of fine-grained sediments, Morphou Bay, CyprusHydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 819831 (2002) EGS The mineralogy and chemistry of fine-grained sediments,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

819 The mineralogy and chemistry of fine-grained sediments, Morphou Bay, CyprusHydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 819­831 (2002) © EGS The mineralogy and chemistry of fine-grained sediments of marine sediments at Morphou Bay, north-west Cyprus, are presented to characterise fine-grained sediment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

GIS-based methodologies for assessing nitrate,nitrite and ammonium distributions across a major UK basin,the Humber Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 823833 (2004) EGU  

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GIS-based methodologies for assessing nitrate,nitrite and ammonium distributions across a major UK basin,the Humber 823 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 823833 (2004) © EGU GIS a Geographical Information System (GIS) framework. This basin contains diverse characteristics, from areas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

Sulphur and nitrogen fluxes and budgets in the Bohemian Forest andTatra Mountains during the Industrial Revolution Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 391405 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Industrial Revolution 391 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 391­405 (2001) © EGS Sulphur and nitrogen fluxes and budgets in the Bohemian Forest and Tatra Mountains during the Industrial Revolution of the Bohemian Forest (forest lakes) and Tatra Mountains (alpine lakes) over the industrial period. Sulphur

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

460

Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Studies continue on the use of organic acids as tracers in hydrology studies of Yucca Mountain. Work performed during this time period has been concentrated in three main areas: the familiarization with, and optimization of, the LC-MS hardware and data system; the initial development of soil column test procedures, which are used for evaluation of both the columns themselves and the tracer compounds; and continuation of the batch sorption and degradation studies for the potential tracers. All three of these tasks will continue, as the addition of new tracer compounds, analytical information, and equipment will necessitate further evaluation of existing methods and procedures. Also included in this report is the final report on an information system.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Wells R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic information is essential for environmental efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Testing at new characterization wells being drilled to the regional aquifer (''R wells'') to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the Pajarito Plateau is providing such information. Field tests were conducted on various zones of saturation penetrated by the R wells to collect data needed for determining hydraulic properties. This document provides details of the design and execution of testing as well as an analysis of data for five new wells: R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31. One well (R-13) was evaluated by a pumping test and the rest (R-9i, R-19, R-22, and R-31) were evaluated by injection tests. Characterization well R-9i is located in Los Alamos Canyon approximately 0.3 mi west of the Route 4/Route 502 intersection. It was completed at a depth of 322 ft below ground surface (bgs) in March 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Both screens were tested. Screen 1 is completed at about 189-200 ft bgs in fractured basalt, and screen 2 is completed at about 270-280 ft bgs in massive basalt. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 1 data suggests that the fractured basalt has a transmissivity (T) of 589 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 7.1 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 83 ft. The injection test data from the massive basalt near screen 2 were analyzed by the Bouwer-Rice slug test methodology and suggest that K is 0.11 ft/day, corresponding to a T of about 2.8 ft{sup 2}/day based on a saturated thickness of 25 ft. Characterization well R-13 is located in Mortandad Canyon just west of the eastern Laboratory boundary. It was completed at a depth of 1029 ft bgs in February 2002. This well was constructed with one 60-ft long screen positioned about 125 ft below the regional water table. This screen is completed at about 958-1019 ft bgs and straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous units. The specific capacity analysis of a 12 minute pumping test indicates that the Puye fanglomerates near the R-13 screen have a T of 5269 ft{sup 2}/day and correspond to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 17.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 300 ft. Characterization well R-19 is located east of firing site IJ in Technical Area (TA) 36 on the mesa between Three-mile and Potrillo Canyons. It was completed at a depth of 1885 ft bgs in April 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned above the regional water table and five screens positioned below the regional water table. Only the bottom two screens were tested. Screen 6 is completed at about 1727-1734 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate, and screen 7 is completed at about 1832-1849 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 6 data suggests that T is about 6923 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 18.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 7 data suggests that T is about 8179 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 22.0 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Characterization well R-22 is located on Mesita del Buey between Canada del Buey and Pajarito Canyons immediately east of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G in TA-54. It was completed at a depth of 1489 ft bgs in October 2000. This well was constructed with five screens positioned at or below the regional water table; however, only screens 2-5 were tested. Screen 1 is completed at the regional water table at about 872-914 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 2 is completed at about 947-989 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 3 is completed at about 1272-1279 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Screen 4 is completed at about 1378-1452 ft bgs in older basalt. Screen 5 is completed at about 1447-1452 ft bgs in older fanglomerate. Bouwer-Rice analyses of the injection-test recovery data suggest K values of 0.04, 0.32, 0.54, and 0.27 ft/day for screens 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. These values correspond to

S.G.McLin; W.J. Stone

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

M.I.Stutter,M.S.Alam,S.J.Langan,S.J.Woodin,R.P.Smart and M.S.Cresser Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 392408 (2004) EGU  

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M.I.Stutter,M.S.Alam,S.J.Langan,S.J.Woodin,R.P.Smart and M.S.Cresser 392 Hydrology and Earth System of soil drainage water and pine seedlings in forest soil microcosms M.I. Stutter1,3 , M.S. Alam2,3 , S Environment Dept., University of York, Heslington. YO10 5DD, UK Email for corresponding author: m.stutter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

464

VOL. 57, NO. 20 15 OCTOBER 2000J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2000 American Meteorological Society 3353  

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American Meteorological Society 3353 Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming* TIM LI of the annual-mean solar radiation, this model is capable of simulating a realistic annual mean climate.5 C. Long-term records indicate that maximum SST in the warm pool is limited to below 31 C. A central

Wang, Yuqing

465

V-TOUGH: An enhanced version of the TOUGH code for the thermal and hydrologic simulation of large-scale problems in nuclear waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The TOUGH code developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is being extensively used to numerically simulate the thermal and hydrologic environment around nuclear waste packages in the unsaturated zone for the Yucca Mountain Project. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have rewritten approximately 80 percent of the TOUGH code to increase its speed and incorporate new options. The geometry of many problems requires large numbers of computational elements elements in order to realistically model detailed physical phenomena, and, as a result, large amounts of computer time are needed. In order to increase the speed of the code we have incorporated fast linear equation solvers, vectorization of substantial portions of code, improved automatic time stepping, and implementation of table look-up for the steam table properties. These enhancements have increased the speed of the code for typical problems by a factor of 20 on the Cray 2 computer. In addition to the increase in computational efficiency we have added several options: vapor pressure lowering; equivalent continuum treatments of fractures; energy and material volumetric, mass and flux accounting; and Stefan-Boltzmann radiative heat transfer. 5 refs.

Nitao, J.J.

1989-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

466

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

468

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

469

Application Potential of Four Nontraditional Similarity Metrics in Hydrometeorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a review and assessment of four nontraditional similarity metrics that can be applied to hydrological and meteorological data. These metrics are 1) the uncentered correlation coefficient, 2) the Hodgkin–Richards index, 3) the ...

Ruping Mo; Chengzhi Ye; Paul H. Whitfield

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Distributed quantitative precipitation forecasts combining information from radar and numerical weather prediction model outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of distributed Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPF) range from flood forecasting to transportation. Obtaining QPF is acknowledged to be one of the most challenging areas in hydrology and meteorology. ...

Ganguly, Auroop Ratan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Simulating Typhoon Floods with Gauge Data and Mesoscale-Modeled Rainfall in a Mountainous Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A physically based distributed hydrological model was applied to simulate typhoon floods over a mountainous watershed in Taiwan. The meteorological forcings include the observed gauge rainfall data and the predicted rainfall data from a mesoscale ...

Ming-Hsu Li; Ming-Jen Yang; Ruitang Soong; Hsiao-Ling Huang

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Weather observations on Whistler Mountain during five storms JULIE M. THERIAULT,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, local hydrology, transportation, and winter sport competition. The phase of precipitation is difficult projections over mountainous regions. Key words: Precipitation, winter storms, mountain meteorology, weather. ISAAC 4 Abstract--A greater understanding of precipitation formation processes over complex terrain near

Houze Jr., Robert A.

473

Comparison of PMP-Driven Probable Maximum Floods with Flood Magnitudes due to Increasingly Urbanized Catchment: The Case of American River Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since historical (predam) data are traditionally the sole criterion for dam design, future (postdam) meteorological and hydrological variability due to land-use and land-cover change cannot be considered for assessing design robustness. For ...

Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; Alfred Kalyanapu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Preliminary assessment of the geologic setting, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Hueco Tanks geothermal area, Texas and New Mexico. Geological Circular 81-1  

SciTech Connect

The Hueco Tanks geothermal area contains five known but now inactive hot wells (50/sup 0/ to 71/sup 0/C). The area trends north-south along the east side of Tularosa-Hueco Bolson astride the Texas-New Mexico border approximately 40 km northeast of El Paso. Because of its proximity to El Paso, geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area could be a significant resource. Hueco Bolson is an asymmetric graben. Greatest displacement along boundary faults is on the west side adjacent to the Franklin Mountains. Faults, probably with less displacement, also form an irregular boundary on the east side of the bolson. Several probable faults may allow the rise of thermal waters from depth. Ground water in the central part of Hueco Bolson flows southward to the Rio Grande. However, four of the five hot wells occur in a ground-water trough along the eastern margin of the bolson. The trough may be bounded by one of the postulated faults serving as a barrier to ground-water flow. Data on permeability of potential reservoir rocks, including basin fill and fractured bedrock, suggest that they may be sufficiently permeable for development of geothermal water. The concentration of dissolved solids in the geothermal waters varies from 1100 to at least 12,500 mg/L, but most waters show high concentrations. They are Na-Cl-(SO/sub 4/) waters similar in composition to nonthermal waters in basin fill. The composition probably results from contact with evaporite deposits either in basin fill or in Paleozoic bedrock. Shallow reservoirs reach maximum temperatures of about 80/sup 0/ to 110/sup 0/C. Available data are too limited to evaluate adequately the resource potential of geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area. A complete exploration program, including geological, hydrological, and geochemical investigation, is recommended.

Henry, C.D.; Gluck, J.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Evaluation of the hazardous waste landfill cap system design and clay layer thickness criteria of the Turkish Regulation on the Control of Hazardous Waste (RCHW) using the Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hazardous waste landfill design criteria of the Turkish Regulation on the Control of Hazardous Waste (RCHW) was evaluated in this study. In the first part of the study, Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model was used to determine the significance of different components of the hazardous waste landfill cap system as required by the Turkish RCHW. In the second part of the study, the top and bottom clay layer thickness requirement of the Turkish RCHW was evaluated by running the HELP model for different top/bottom clay different layer thicknesses and comparing the corresponding leachate amounts produced.

F. Yalcin Piskin; G.N. Demirer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P17C) 1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P17C) NDP-062 (1997) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-062 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-062 image Contributed by Catherine Goyet,1 Robert M. Key,2 Kevin F. Sullivan,3 and Mizuki Tsuchiya4 1Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 2Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 3Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 4Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California Prepared by Alexander Kozyr5 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 5Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division

478

AUTHOR: BRIANA SULLIVAN CENTER FOR COASTAL AND OCEAN MAPPING/JOINT HYDROGRAPHIC CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, DURHAM VERSION 1.0 JUNE 11, 2014 #12;6/11/2014 Chart Update Mashup 1 CHART that make up ChUMTM. At the base of the structure (in blue) is the data that OCS disseminates to the public via its website/web-services: Raster Nautical Charts, the CRIT data (critical corrections to the chart

New Hampshire, University of

479

ORNL/CDIAC-150 DETERMINATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA Date Published: March 2006 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

480

ORNL/CDIAC-154 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA Date Published: September 2008 Prepared Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological hydrographic meteorological" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ORNL/CDIAC-143 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge

482

ORNL/CDIAC-155 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA Date Published: May 2009 Prepared Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC

483

Techniques for hydrograph synthesis based on analysis of data from small drainage basins in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The streamflow and rainfall data were acquired from records maintained by the Blacklands Experi- mental Watersheds, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Riesel, Texas, Mr. R. W. Baird, Director. The manuscript was typed by Mrs. D... Scale in miles Table 1. Watershed Characteristics No. Watershed Major River Cate- Reference A(m. 2) L(mi) Lca(mi) S(ft(ft) Name Basins gory Honney Creek 412 Honney Creek fi'll Escondido Brazos Trinity Brazos Trl. Ill. 'ty San Antonio 0. 96 0...

Hudlow, Michael Dale

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

484

Field Trip: Hydrographic in-situ measurements, water and plankton Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field studies are an important and integral part of any course in marine biology and oceanography. Field: · All students aboard have to wear life preservers all the time. · Wear solid shoes with rubber sole

Jochem, Frank J.

485

Z .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 116 A high resolution study of surface layer hydrographic and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contemporaneously at high spatial density during a w xtransit from Chesapeake Bay, across the Middle Atlantic Bight basin at a rate ;3­31=1012 g C yeary1 , depending on the amount of water advected off the shelf. q 1999; Middle Atlantic Bight; Gulf Stream; Sargasso Sea 1. Introduction In the last decade, several

Hansell, Dennis

486

Perspective of a hydrographic LIDAR in space: Specifications and results of a simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oldenburg, Germany* ABSTRACT Long-term surveillance of coastal zones like the German Bight with airborne chlorophyll a will be given in the following section. Ocean monitoring on basin-wide global scales

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

487

Biogeochemical and hydrographic controls on chromophoric dissolved organic matter distribution in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Pacific Ocean Chantal M. Swan a,Ã?, David A. Siegel a,b , Norman B. Nelson a , Craig A. Carlson c , Elora Available online 19 September 2009 Keywords: CDOM AOU Pacific Water masses Hydrography Bio-optical a b s t r a c t Recent in situ observations of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the Pacific

Siegel, David A.

488

Hydrographic characterization of southeast Arabian Sea during the wane of southwest monsoon and spring intermonsoon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seasonal variation of the hydrography along the southeast Arabian Sea is described using data collected onboard FORV Sagar Sampada in September–October 2003 (later phase of Southwest monsoon, SWM) and March–Ap...

K. G. Vimal Kumar; P. K. Dinesh Kumar…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, February-April 1992) Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, February-April 1992) NDP-063 (1997) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-063 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-063 image Contributed by David W. Chipman,1 Taro Takahashi,1 Stephany Rubin,1 Stewart C. Sutherland,1 and Mikhail H. Koshlyakov2 1Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, New York, U.S.A. 2Shirshov Institute of Oceanography Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Prepared by Alexander Kozyr3 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. 3Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.A. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4669 Date Published: July 1997

490

Wetland Hydrology Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and designed to fit into the French ATR-42. It comprises22 three similar commercial analysers: CLD780TR (ECO-PHYSICS at a flow rate of25 9L.min-1 (3L.min-1 for each analyser). The flow rate of each analyser is controlled analyser.28 Finally, purified air (air pumped passing through three cartridges containing drierite

Gray, Matthew

491

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation (e.g. via snow reflection/insulation and soil moisture/ice control on turbulent fluxes) and timing

Haak, Hein

492

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report April 2002 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory and Hydrology, to be held in March 2003 in Geneva. An international group of 7 women met in Silver Spring April's participation in meteorology and hydrology, which was held in December 1997 in Bangkok, and will focus on women

493

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Quality Assurance Project Plan, Revision 1; Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to identify and characterize candidate conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for experiments to be conducted at the Yucca Mountain C-well complex. During this quarter the main effort was directed towards rewriting the quality assurance program in preparation for a review and audit by the USGS. However, due to budget constraints the review and audit were not carried out. The tracer QA plan and standard operating procedures (SOPs) were revised and copies are included in the report. Instrumental problems were encountered and corrected with the addition of new integration and sample control software. In the sampling, there was an unexplained peak in the chromatograms of the tracers being tested in the light tuff. This was not correctable and these experiments will be repeated in the next quarter.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1993-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

494

Meteorological Data Report for Laurel, Nebraska  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.0.60 Dec 2005 .0.60 Dec 2005 WindPRO is developed by EMD International A/S, Niels Jernesvej 10, DK-9220 Aalborg Ø, Tlf. +45 96 35 44 44, Fax +45 96 35 44 46, e-mail: windpro@emd.dk Project: Laurel Description: Data from file(s) Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 010611.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 010701.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 010801.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 010831.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 011001.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 011101.csv Y:\5000\IS\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\Completed_Sites\WAPA\Laurel\Laurel 011202.csv

495

Meteorological Data Report for YKHC Bethel, Alaska  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YKHC YKHC Description: Data from file(s) Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030223.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030327.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030506.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030603.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030701.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030806.csv Y:\5000\shared\Anemometer_Loan_Programs\WPA.NA.Loans\YKHC - Bethel Hospital - AK\Wind Data\YKHC-Bethel 030903.csv

496

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Meteorology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Impact of Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) Measurements on the Numerical Simulation of a Tropical Cyclone Lei of the DWL three-dimensional wind profile observations on the numerical simulation and prediction of tropical simulation and prediction of tropical cyclones. Other studies also indicated that including SSM/I wind

Pu, Zhaoxia

497

Dr. Droegemeier METR 4433 Mesoscale Meteorology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supercritical and subcritical flow in the context of mountain waves. 9. Understand the concept of linear of shallow water wave theory to downslope windstorms and the assumptions made. 15. Understand the physical difference between supercritical and subcritical flow in the context of downslope wind storms. 16. Understand

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

498

Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterize the solar resource potential for feasibility assessment of centralized PV solarfeasibility assessment of centralized PV solar gene ating facilities in the No theastgene ating facilities in the No theastgenerating facilities in the Northeastgenerating facilities in the Northeast ·· Expansion of the national PV solar data

Homes, Christopher C.

499

Meteorology and Atmospheric ISSN 0177-7971  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of precipitation scav- enging are calculated for wet removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ammonia (NH3) using of soluble trace gas in gaseous and liquid phases, mole l-1 c(G) Concentration of soluble trace gas Raindrop diameter, m DG Coefficient of diffusion in a gaseous phase, cm2 s-1 HA Henry's law constant, mole

Elperin, Tov

500

METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 14: 195203 (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into rainfall intensity R is non-trivial and depends heavily on the actual drop size distribution (DSD and Palmer (1948) is almost 60 years old. Uijlenhoet and Stricker (1999) have inves- tigated the inconsistency of the Z-R relations in great detail and have developed a consistent rainfall parame- terization

Stoffelen, Ad