National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrological hydrographic meteorological

  1. Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating monthly water storage from grace (M/t) #12;Datasets for assimilation: Geodesy 7 Power-law of the time-variable gravity field [mm/month] #12;Datasets for assimilation: Hydro-meteorology 9 Evapotranspiration (ETa) from era

  2. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  3. Active layer dynamics and arctic hydrology and meteorology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Man`s impact on the environment is increasing with time. To be able to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on an ecosystems, it is necessary first to understand all facets of how the ecosystems works: what the main processes (physical, biological, chemical) are, at what rates they proceed, and how they can be manipulated. Arctic ecosystems are dominated by physical processes of energy exchange. This project has concentrated on a strong program of hydrologic and meteorologic data collection, to better understand dominant physical processes. Field research focused on determining the natural annual and diurnal variability of meteorologic and hydrologic variables, especially those which may indicate trends in climatic change. Comprehensive compute models are being developed to simulate physical processes occurring under the present conditions and to simulate processes under the influence of climatic change.

  4. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  5. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  6. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  7. Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D; Famiglietti, J S

    2012-01-01

    of Meteorology and Hydrology, Barbados Tucker, C. J. ,islands of Trinidad, Barbados, and St. base period), withto reemerge. Whereas Barbados, Trinidad, and St. Kitts were

  8. METEOROLOGY 163: Meteorological Instrumentation Course Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    1 METEOROLOGY 163: Meteorological Instrumentation Course Description In this course students will learn different measurement techniques and the instrumentation used in the atmospheric sciences to the techniques of instrument calibration, deployment, and data acquisition. Students will become familiar

  9. FEBRUARY 2001 7S L A T E R E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom k Laboratoire de Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, Australia e Department of Environmental of Hydrology, NOAA, Silver Spring, Maryland o Meteorology Department, Reading University, Reading, United

  10. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  11. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  12. METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    1 METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology Course Description This course will introduce the student to meteorological phenomena associated with mountain environments

  13. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The normal, log-normal, square-root-normal, and cube-root-normal frequency distributions of hydrometeorological data, viz., precipitation, evaporation, and streamflow, were studied for selected regions of Texas. The regions were: East Texas, South...

  14. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory AOML is an environmental research laboratory Laboratory conducts research that seeks to understand the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics;Organizational Structure The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) fits within

  15. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary microbursts than in many previously documented microbursts. Alignment of Doppler radar data to reports of wind-related damage to electrical power infrastructure in Phoenix allowed a comparison of microburst wind damage

  16. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary and interpretation of information from National Weather Service watches and warnings by10 decision makers such an outlier to the regional severe weather climatology. An analysis of the synoptic and13 mesoscale

  17. Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the Okhotsk Sea by two even shallower straits ­ Soya (La Perouse) between Hokkaido and Sakhalin, and Tatar, between Sakhalin and the continent. In June through August, 1999, a hydrographic survey of the Japan (East

  18. School of Meteorology Comprehensive Exam Policy Below is the Comprehensive Exam Policy as approved by the School of Meteorology Faculty at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    , tropical meteorology, mesoscale meteorology, turbulence and computational fluid dynamics. Normally

  19. Meteorological database for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    to Indoor Air Meteorological Database for the United StatesUC-402 Meteorological Database for the United States M.G.Abstract A meteorological database has been developed to aid

  20. Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System David G Tarboton1 , David Maidment2 , Ilya Zaslavsky3 Sciences. Hydrologic Information Systems (HIS) are part of this infrastructure. Hydrologic information

  1. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  2. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    in the past 30 years, the basic concepts have changed only slightly. More detailed process representations after the last such USA-Japan hydrology seminar (see details in McDonnell et al., this issue is grounded in engineering and now motivated by explaining Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 2053 #12;J

  3. Performance and Progress Report: UNH/NOAA Joint Hydrographic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    nautical charts. Until recently, water depths were measured by dropping a lead line at periodic intervals sonar systems at rates commensurate with data collection; that is, to make the data ready for chart of the International Hydrographic Organization in Hydro International). Since our inception, we have developed new

  4. METEOROLOGY 60: Meteorology I San Jos State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    for Meteorology majors (catalog entry). Lecture: 2 hours per week (2 units). In this course (which continues, winds, water vapor, and clouds. 2. Understand how basic thermodynamic concepts relate to the study). 5. Describe the processes involved in the formation of different cloud and precipitation types. 6

  5. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Research Review March 18-20, 2008. Quality: Assess the quality of the laboratory's research and development. Assess whether appropriate." · How does the quality of the laboratory's research and development rank among Research and Development

  6. Wetland Hydrology Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . #12;2 Hydrologic Influence Model Starting Points ·Wet, Cool ·Flat, Steep ·Rivers, Tides Hydro, sediment trapping, transpiration) and animals (physical modifications) Feedbacks: Nutrients 1 2 Feedbacks

  7. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01

    DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONARY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDFRSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May I979 Ma jor Subject: Meteorology DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONAFY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDERSON Approved...

  8. Techniques for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlow, M.D.

    1966-01-01

    for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas M.D. Hudlow Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  9. Ocean Carbon and Repeat Hydrographic CLIVAR Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Effective management and archival of data is a fundamental requirement for successful scientific research endeavors, and future oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal with reference-quality global ocean CTD, water sample, and underway data, one (CDIAC) specializing in discrete CO2 and underway surface data, and the other (WHPO/CCHDO) specializing in CTD, hydrographic, and tracer data.

  10. Hydrographic Data Management using GIS Technologies Neal G. Millett and Simon Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Hydrographic Data Management using GIS Technologies Neal G. Millett and Simon Evans Environmental in marine data sensing technologies, such as multibeam echo sounders, LIDAR, and high speed, high resolution side scan sonars raises a series of data management challenges for the hydrographer. The days of small

  11. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  12. Hydrologic Science and Engineering Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrologic Science and Engineering Graduate Program Handbook Academic Year 2013-2014 Colorado. We offer programs of study in fundamental hydrologic science and applied hydrology with engineering are starting a journey through one of the best Hydrologic Science and Engineering Programs in the world

  13. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  14. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  15. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier Office: Three, 1:00 ­ 2:30 pm Required Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes and physical analysis techniques to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale

  16. TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION Mesoscale Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION ­ Mesoscale Meteorology Colorado State University The Department or associate level faculty position specializing in mesoscale meteorology. Exceptionally qualified candidates in linking models and/or theory with observations for the study of mesoscale processes. The successful

  17. ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014 TR, 1:00-2:50 PM, ATS Room 101 Course Description and Prerequisites This course will cover the theory and application of mesoscale meteorology, and how mesoscale, students will be able to: · Describe the basic theories describing mesoscale weather phenomena · Understand

  18. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier (kkd Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes. Wiley-Blackwell, 430pp to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale," radar principles and interpretation

  19. Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Jules Beersma #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. A Onderzoekschool (BBOS) #12;Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Extreme hydro

  20. Predicting GIS-Based Spatially Distributed Unit-Hydrograph from Urban Development Scenarios. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kute, Abhijeet

    2007-11-27

    Spatially distributed Unit-Hydrograph model is implemented using a Geographical Information System (GIS) in this study to investigate the effects of how increasing impervious areas may influence surface runoff in urban ...

  1. Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

  2. Snow Accumulation in a Distributed Hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    Snow Accumulation in a Distributed Hydrological Model by Bruce Davison A thesis presented of snow processes in the coupled land-surface-hydrological model WATCLASS. The processes under consideration were mixed precipitation, variable fresh snow density, maximum snowpack density, canopy

  3. 10th Annual Hydrologic Sciences Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    . Andrew Fahlund will address issues at the forefront of hydrology. Talks and posters from students, and the politics that have shaped our past and dictate the future of hydrology. Join us as we celebrate hydrologic is an interdepartmental endeavor, with participating departments that include Civil, Environmental, and Architectural

  4. Surface Meteorological Instruments for TWP (SMET) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2009-01-01

    The TWP Surface Meteorology station (SMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure and rainfall amount.

  5. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library. Many recent studies quantify historical trends in streamflow and usually attribute these trends to structure studies of streamflow responses to climate change. A wide variety of trends in streamflow have

  6. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    . Simultaneous time series for electrical conductivity, water temperature, and DO over the four-week study period. The main driver of the observed variations in DO is likely to be periodic melt-freeze cycles. We conclude perturbations have large impacts on hydrological and biological processes, via changes in rates of ice and snow

  7. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript of History, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia. MARGARET So PETERSEN WATER civilian and military engineers studied the behavior of rivers and the motion of water. They investigated

  8. School of Meteorology Graduate Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Requirements 8 2.5.a. Master of Science in Meteorology 8 2.5.b. Non-Thesis MasterM 17 2.10.c. M.S. Committees 18 2.10.d. Ph.D. Committees 18 2.10.e. Agreement Prior To Fall 2013 26 3.1.a. Master of Science in Meteorology 26 3.1.b. Non

  9. Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    for This paper is a contribution to the special issue on the IPSL and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL- CM5B

  10. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  11. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  12. Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalakes, John

    Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run John Michalakes Josh Hacker overview and petascale issues Nature run methodology Results and conclusion #12;Mesoscale & Microscale's atmosphere #12;Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR Description of Science · Kinetic energy

  13. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Backlanov, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    This is a conference summary report that will be published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  14. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 00: 110 (0000)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    upon the uses of some recently-deployed meteorological sensing devices to investigate insect migratory of aerial insect biomass) was found to be positively correlated with maximum screen temperature. Copyright c movements using traditional entomological techniques. Thus, the deployment of special-purpose ento

  15. Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community Cliff Mass University of Washington: Although the U.S. remains a leader in mesoscale model development and application, the community is not fulfilling its potential. The resources of the U.S. mesoscale forecasting community are considerable

  16. David G. Eller Oceanography and Meteorology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David G. Eller Oceanography and Meteorology Building Building # 0443 EMERGENCY EVACUATION PLAN Prepared by Maureen Reap, Building Proctor October 4, 2011 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION a building. Examples of such occasions include: smoke/fires, gas leaks, and bomb threats. Planning

  17. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg).

  18. Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    -9 2011March 8 9, 2011 #12;LISF Solar Radiation and Meteorological Sensor Network ·· Technology Needs:TechnologyCharacterize the solar resource potential for feasibility assessment of centralized PV solarfeasibility assessment of centralized PV solar gene ating facilities in the No theastgene ating facilities in the No theastgenerating

  19. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  20. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Contact Information David Tarboton Utah State University of Utah 135 South 1460 East Rm 719 Salt Lake City, Utah (801) 581-5033 wjohnson. The Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory development team is highly committed to this concept

  1. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 32333236 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    into different pathways on the land surface are altered due to wildfires, beetle infestations, urbanization; Weiskel et al., 2007). Such changes to water pathways, storage and subsequent release (the blue and green hydrologic responses of natural systems? Mathematical models of the terrestrial hydrological cycle

  2. 15th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, AMS, Atlanta, 2010 RECENT RESEARCH ON METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AND INSTRUMENTATION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    15th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, AMS, Atlanta, 2010 1 RECENT RESEARCH ON METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AND INSTRUMENTATION AT KNMI Hannelore Bloemink, Marijn de Haij are generated at about 30 locations in the meteorological network and are centrally available every 10 minutes

  3. Meteorological data for water years 1988-94 from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flint, A.L.; Davies, W.J.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes meteorological data collected from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from as early as April 1987 through September 1994. The measurements include solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind vector magnitude, wind direction, wind vector direction, barometric pressure, and precipitation. Measurements were made very 10 seconds and averaged every 15 minutes. The data were collected as part of the geologic and hydrologic site-characterization studies of Yucca Mountain, a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. Precipitation at the site ranged from a low of 12 millimeters total for water year 1989 to a high of 312 millimeters total for water year 1993. Air temperature ranged from a low of 15.1 degrees Celsius in December 1990 (water year 1991) to a high of 41.9 degrees Celsius in July 1989 (water year 1989). The weather station network also provides information on the spatial variability of precipitation and temperature.

  4. Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures in EGS reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures...

  5. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC)...

  6. Computer methods for predicting storm hydrographs based on antecedent soil moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Clarence Wade

    1967-01-01

    COMPUT-R laE HODS F' OR PRPD1C11 &C STORSi HYDROGRAPHS BAS. D OH AtilECEDESIT SOFL NIOISTJRE A . Heels By CLAREIlCE I(%DE RTCHARDSCH Submif fed ro the Graduate ColleSe of the Texas A8i~il dnivers~ ty in partiai:uifiilment of the -cqu...

  7. Meteorological Services Annual Data Report for 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-21

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2014. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  8. Meteorological services annual data report for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2013-02-01

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2012. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  9. Watershed, Climate, Hydrology Modeling Joint Projects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    monitoring Agricultural productionAgricultural production Battlefield environmentBattlefield environment for Applied Remote Sensing in Agriculture, Meteorology, and Environment #12;Purpose A cooperative effort Grant Consortium US Army Research LaboratoryUS Army Research Laboratory ­­ Battlefield Environment

  10. Water Quality Modeling Hydraulics and Hydrology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : ­ Streamflows ­ Lake basin ­ Meteorology (wind/sun/precip...) · Outputs: ­ Vertical Temperature distribution ­ E. Coli · Temperature changes ­ Long term and short term · Lake circulation ­ Lake circulation ­ Outputs: · Oxygen distribution in water column · Nutrient distribution in water column (N

  11. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Charles

    Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

  13. Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan

    2004-10-04

    This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

  14. Synoptic Sensitivities of Subtropical Clouds : Separating Aerosol Effects from Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauger, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    meteorological quantities G. Subsidence and EntrainmentEntrainment rate (cm s ?1 ) Subsidence rate (cm s ?1 ) Bulkuxes, entrainment and subsidence rates, and temperature and

  15. Synoptic sensitivities of subtropical clouds separating aerosol effects from meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauger, Guillaume S.

    2008-01-01

    meteorological quantities G. Subsidence and EntrainmentEntrainment rate (cm s ?1 ) Subsidence rate (cm s ?1 ) Bulkuxes, entrainment and subsidence rates, and temperature and

  16. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: from Canopy to Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2008-01-01

    equations  for  some  soil  hydraulic properties.  Water Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: CA 94720  lpan@lbl.gov  Modeling Hydraulic Responses to 

  17. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  18. Meteorology A network of 14 meteorological stations was installed across the Annapurna range before

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    estimated on the basis of the fission-track age, and assuming a geothermal gradient of 100 8C km21 gradient shows little sensitivity to accumulation-area ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.8. Specific stream the meteorological network to define an average precipitation gradient perpendicular to the strike of the topography

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  20. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  1. Topographic Distance Functions for Interpolation of Meteorological Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    Topographic Distance Functions for Interpolation of Meteorological Data Burkhard Lehner1 , Georg evapotranspiration ET0. It is usually estimated from other meteorological quantities measured at weather stations for agricultural and urban needs. Also for setting up a land use plan it can be a base for decisions. One important

  2. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24 Report HURRICANE SANDY Colleen Fanelli, Paul Fanelli, David Wolcott January 24, 2013 noaa National, Richard Edwing #12;NOAA NOS Hurricane Sandy Water Level & Meteorological Data Report 1 Table of Contents

  3. The Research Vessel SurfaceThe Research Vessel Surface Meteorology Data Center ArchiveMeteorology Data Center Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Research Vessel SurfaceThe Research Vessel Surface Meteorology Data Center ArchiveMeteorology Data Center Archive Shawn R. Smith and Jennifer M. Lovell In collaboration with: Mark A. Bourassa University www.coaps.fsu.edu/WOCE #12;Who we areWho we are Data center specializing in the quality review

  4. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Winds: 10 meters • Temperature and Relative Humidity: 2 meters • Barometric Pressure: 1 meter. Depending upon the geographical location, different models and types of sensors may be used to measure the core variables due to the conditions experienced at those locations. Most sites have additional sensors that measure other variables that are unique to that site or are well suited for the climate of the location but not at others.

  5. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  8. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  9. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  11. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  13. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  14. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  15. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2004-09-13

    This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

  17. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  18. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  19. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 24092414 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    2009-01-01

    (Sustainability of semi-arid hydrology and riparian areas), University of Arizona, USA 5 Department of Geography hydroclimatic variables and land- scape features in a changing environment (Milly et al., 2008). Water balance models (Schaake, 1990; Dooge, 1992) usually consider the land- scape to be invariant

  20. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 11061114 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    2007-01-01

    . The study identified significant variables for estimating soil steady-state infiltration at a micro- site (0 of animal treading effects on soil infiltration Y. Q. Tian,1 * R. McDowell,2 Q. Yu,3 G. W. Sheath,4 W. T is an important factor in hydrological modelling. We investigated the impacts of animal treading on infiltration

  1. Downscaling Extended Weather Forecasts for Hydrologic Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-03-01

    Weather and climate forecasts are critical inputs to hydrologic forecasting systems. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) issues 8-15 days outlook daily for the U.S. based on the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model, which is a global model applied at about 2? spatial resolution. Because of the relatively coarse spatial resolution, weather forecasts produced by the MRF model cannot be applied directly to hydrologic forecasting models that require high spatial resolution to represent land surface hydrology. A mesoscale atmospheric model was used to dynamically downscale the 1-8 day extended global weather forecasts to test the feasibility of hydrologic forecasting through this model nesting approach. Atmospheric conditions of each 8-day forecast during the period 1990-2000 were used to provide initial and boundary conditions for the mesoscale model to produce an 8-day atmospheric forecast for the western U.S. at 30 km spatial resolution. To examine the impact of initialization of the land surface state on forecast skill, two sets of simulations were performed with the land surface state initialized based on the global forecasts versus land surface conditions from a continuous mesoscale simulation driven by the NCEP reanalysis. Comparison of the skill of the global and downscaled precipitation forecasts in the western U.S. showed higher skill for the downscaled forecasts at all precipitation thresholds and increasingly larger differences at the larger thresholds. Analyses of the surface temperature forecasts show that the mesoscale forecasts generally reduced the root-mean-square error by about 1.5 C compared to the global forecasts, because of the much better resolved topography at 30 km spatial resolution. In addition, initialization of the land surface states has large impacts on the temperature forecasts, but not the precipitation forecasts. The improvements in forecast skill using downscaling could be potentially significant for improving hydrologic forecasts for managing river basins.

  2. Global-scale flow routing using a source-to-sink algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivera, Francisco; Famiglietti, James; Asante, Kwabena

    2000-01-01

    hydrological and Earth system models. Hydrographs for somehydrological and Earth system models. FLOW ROUTING [1999

  3. ERAD 2012 -THE SEVENTH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON RADAR IN METEOROLOGY AND HYDROLOGY Bird migration monitoring across Europe using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    monitoring across Europe using weather radar M. de Graaf1, H. Leijnse1, A. Dokter2, J. Shamoun-Baranes2, H for monitoring bird migration across Europe. Reflections from birds (around -10 dBZ) are generally much weaker data from the autumn of 2011 from several stations in western Europe. With the resulting data bird

  4. Evaporation Duct Estimation from Clutter Using Meteorological Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Evaporation Duct Estimation from Clutter Using Meteorological Statistics Caglar Yardim*, Peter under duct- ing conditions. Electromagnetic ducts result in non-standard electromagnetic prop- agation addresses how to incorporate meteo- rological statistics into evaporative duct estimation within a Bayesian

  5. Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Vol. 95, No. 9, September, Martin P. Hoerling,Thomas C. Peterson, and Peter A. Stott Special Supplement to the Bulletin

  6. Analysis of Spatial Performance of Meteorological Drought Indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sandeep 1986-

    2013-01-14

    Meteorological drought indices are commonly calculated from climatic stations that have long-term historical data and then converted to a regular grid using spatial interpolation methods. The gridded drought indices are mapped to aid decision making...

  7. 9Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Agency overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunamis and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings Hazards, Warnings and Forecasts Division Observations and Infrastructure Division Environment and Research Division Director of Meteorology Information Systems and Services Division Weather Forecasting Branch

  8. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  9. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  10. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir...

  11. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englert, A.

    2009-01-01

    Water Resources Research 2008, 44, W10412, doi:10.1029/2007WR006425. Supporting Information Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation

  12. Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre 11 Innovation Boulevard Modelling The Global Institute for Water Security (GIWS) and the School for Environment and Sustainability

  13. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the Newberry Volcano...

  14. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22,...

  15. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  16. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  17. Meteorological monitoring at LANL and the LANL weather machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baars, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The meteorological monitoring program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consists of four main components: measurements, analysis, modeling, and data management. Measurements are conducted continuously across a network of towers and other measurement stations. The current network includes four meteorological towers on the Pajarito Plateau, one tower in Los Alamos Canyon, three additional precipitation stations, and one monostatic Doppler SODAR. The towers on the plateau range in height from 46 to 92 m, and the canyon tower is 23 m high. The mean spacing of the plateau towers is {approximately}7 km, so potential sources are never more than 3.5 km from a wind measurement site.

  18. Investigating the observed sensitivities of air-quality extremes to meteorological drivers via quantile regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, D.

    Air pollution variability is strongly dependent on meteorology. However, quantifying the impacts of changes in regional climatology on pollution extremes can be difficult due to the many non-linear and competing meteorological ...

  19. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  20. The SegHidro Experience: Using the Grid to Empower a Hydro-Meteorological Scientific Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    The SegHidro Experience: Using the Grid to Empower a Hydro- Meteorological Scientific Network This paper describes our experience with SegHidro, a project that empowers hydro-meteorological researchers

  1. Hydrological Forecasting Improvements Primary Investigator: Thomas Croley -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    multiple data streams in a near-real-time manner and incorporate them into the AHPS data base, run for matching weather forecasts with historical data, and prepare extensive forecasts of hydrology probabilities maximum use of all available information and be based on efficient and true hydrological process models

  2. Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas Vic Engel,1 Esteban G of Eucalyptus camaldulensis in the Pampas grasslands of Argentina were explored for 2 years using a novel. B. Jackson (2005), Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas

  3. SNOW DISTRIBUTION OVER AN ELEVATION GRADIENT AND FOREST SNOW HYDROLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Operational bright-band snow level detection using DopplerG. 1999. Scaling issues in snow hydrology. Hydrological2149- CDEC. 2007. Historic snow sensor data. California Data

  4. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  5. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  7. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  8. Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal, Venezuelan Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: oxygen isotopes; biogenic opal; hydrologic balance; Holocene; Venezuela

  9. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B.; Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M.

    1992-05-01

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  10. Clutter-Based Evaporation Duct Estimation Performance Using Meteorological Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Clutter-Based Evaporation Duct Estimation Performance Using Meteorological Statistics Caglar Yardim in different regions of the world with varying duct strengths and statistics. The performance of evaporation duct estimation is investigated in littoral zones such as the North Sea, Wallops Island, Coast

  11. Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    profiles, raise major challenges to wind power integration into the electricity grid. In this work we studyOptimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio that the inherent variability in wind power generation and the related difficulty in predicting future generation

  12. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  13. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS component of wind velocity. Thus, there is no direct measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) wind field

  14. 227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    AviationSafetyAuthority CAWCR CentreforAustralianWeatherand ClimateResearch CCF CentralComputingFacility CDS Commonwealth227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 AppendixB GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS | A ABC AustralianFloodEstimation ARBIS Automatic RadioBurstIdentification Software ARC AustralianResearchCouncil ARM Atmospheric

  15. Gridding NCDC daily meteorological data Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Gridding NCDC daily meteorological data Version 2.0 Greg O'Donnell, Bernt V. Matheussen, Alan, and 2) appending more recent data downloaded from the NCDC On-Line Web Site. The core of the gridding;3 1.1 Basin Definition Before any preprocessing is possible the basin boundary at the gridded

  16. Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    atmosphere is of great importance for a variety of disciplines, from meteorology and urban planning to botany is highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous, since both the mean wind velocity and the turbulent diffusivity transport in a turbulent environment we adopt a standard model of turbulent diffusion, which is based

  17. Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    10 Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION 1.1 cmb_prcp.dly Daily precipitation file downloaded directly from Earthinfo CDs. One year is on one line although you can not see.2 cmb_prcp.sta Precipitation station file downloaded from Earthinfo CDs MT|24|2827|EUREKA RS Prcp|771

  18. Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel R. Gautam, G. Cervone-sea interactions associated with Hurricane Isabel, which landed on the east coast of the United States on September 18, 2003. Hurricane Isabel is considered to be one of the most significant and severe tropical

  19. Use of Visible Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite Imagery in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is typically computed at specific locations based on weather station data. Estimates of incoming solar radiation (insolation, or Rs) have been made from geostationary satellite data over a 14-year period (1 June must be included in many hydrologic models. As actual ET (AET) data are often lacking, ET is usually

  20. Gradients of meteorological parameters in convective and nonconvective areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCown, Milton Samuel

    1976-01-01

    involve horizontal gradients. For example, the equations of motion relate wind speed to pressure gradient, and the thermal wind equation relates vertical wind shear to the horizontal temperature gradient. The study of gradients may help... GRADIENTS OF METEOROLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CONVECTIVE AND NONCONVECTIVE AREAS A Thesis by Milton Samuel McCown Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  1. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  2. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  3. AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII M.A. Scholl, S.E. Ingebritsen, C.J. Janik, and J.P. Kauahikaua

  4. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  5. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    1988-01-01

    traditionally have been used in water supply planning and management are firm yield and, to a lesser extent, reliability. Firm yield is the estimated maximum release or withdrawal rate which can be maintained continuously during a repetition of the hydrologic...

  6. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  7. Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Building a Texas Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Cycle Building a Texas Hydrologic Information System TX-HIS #12;Q to couple streamflow models to GCMs · We need to break the hydro-illogical cycle and plan for the delivery

  8. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Spring characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge ---soil moisture, unsaturated flow, infiltration, evapotranspiration and recharge 5. Principles of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head

  9. Time changes in a subtropical cloud and weather system as revealed by meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, Darryl

    1962-01-01

    TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub]ect: METEOROLOGY TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  11. Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography and Marine Meteorology of the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography and Marine Meteorology.-M. Poulain, and B. Cushman-Roisin (2007), Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography

  12. Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

    2011-10-26

    In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

  13. ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology Handbook - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2008-10-30

    The ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology station (AMF MET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and rain-rate. Additional sensors may be added to or removed from the base set of sensors depending upon the deployment location, climate regime or programmatic needs. Additionally, sensor types may change depending upon the climate regime of the deployment. These changes/additions are noted in the Deployment Locations and History section.

  14. A Note on Several Meteorological Topics Related to Polar Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the meteorology of Polar Regions is fundamental to the process of understanding the global climatology of the Earth and Earth-like planets. The nature of air circulation in a polar vortex is of preliminary importance. I have show that the local and continental spatiotemporal relationship between near surface wind events is self-organized criticality. In particular, the wind event size, wind event duration, and duration of quiescent wind event are well approximated by power-law distributions. On a continental scale, the wind events in the Antarctic tend to be self-organized criticality with ergodic properties. A similar self-organized criticality wind event was also found in Taylor Valley located at McMurdo Dry Valleys discovered by Captain Scott's expedition. Captain Scott's meteorological Terra Nova record was also examined. I have also revisited and re-analyzed wind events in Hornsund at Spitsbergen Island, in terms of marginal probabilities and marginal copulas which describe positive L\\'evy pr...

  15. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 5-2 Page 1 Lead Author A. Calado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    hydrographic products distribution, particularly offshore seafloor data collected by the Portuguese Task Group geographic information systems such as Google Earth or NASA World Wind. Supported by Web-GIS some links and its interaction with the surrounding environment is one of the central subjects of ocean research

  16. NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling hurricanes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling worldwide (plus many TV & radio shows). An AOML's paper "Global warming and United States landfalling & Meteorological Laboratory Warming Occurs Almost Everywhere over the Global Ocean The first EOF mode from

  17. Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central a , Michael J. Kleeman c,* a Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, 1 Prognostic meteorological fields Data assimilation UCD/CIT air quality model California Regional Particulate

  18. Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network Jayson Maldonado-Meteorological stations. Research Objectives · Develop the hardware necessary for the collection atmospheric water content gives the real Water Vapor Content (WVC) in 3D instead of the Zenith Delay. Future Work · Testing

  19. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. High

  20. 1Bureau of Meteorology | Water Information > INFORMATION SHEET 6 > Flood Forecasting and Warning Services Flood Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    SHEET 6 1Bureau of Meteorology | Water Information > INFORMATION SHEET 6 > Flood Forecasting and Warning Services Flood Forecasting and Warning Services The Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau) is responsible for providing an effective flood forecasting and warning service in each Australian state

  1. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  2. Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Journal 62 (2012) 6370 The optimal placement of tsunameters in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    ). As part of the Australian Tsunami Warning System project, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau.greenslade@bom.gov.au As part of the Australian Tsunami Warning System project, the Australian Bu- reau of Meteorology deployed in the provision of tsunami warnings is the ability to detect tsunamis through changes in sea level

  3. Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

  4. A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou Thompson1 Joel Reynolds1 Lawrence H. Cox2 Peter Guttorp1 Paul D.larry@epamail.epa.gov ABSTRACT: A variety of statistical methods for meteorological adjustment of ozone have been proposed

  5. DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS--National Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS, Colorado CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Joshua Hacker, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 E-mail: hacker@ucar.edu DOI:10.1175/BAMS-86-12-1733 ©2005 American Meteorological

  6. Impact of meteorological data resolution on the forecasted ozone concentrations during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    al., 1997). Nested modeling with finer grids over urban area is thus often used for air quality as a complex meteorology. During the whole summer 2001, the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE was used-scale dynamics (sea breezes and orographical winds). To estimate the impact of meteorological forcing

  7. Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University Chapter 1 Overview 1.1 Introduction The so-called mesometeorology or mesoscale meteorology as mesoscale phenomena by others (e.g. Orlanski 1975; Thunis and Bornstein 1996). Therefore, a more precise

  8. Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

  9. The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomblies, Arne

    2009-01-01

    A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

  10. Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011) (IAHS Publ. 351, 2011).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011) (IAHS Publ hydrology; drop distribution; multifractals INTRODUCTION Weather radars remain the only measuring devices

  11. A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkez, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

  12. Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first, modeling, and sensing the mountain environment that will improve understanding and prediction of hydrologic

  13. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

  14. HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Osage County, Oklahoma. Salt and crude oil from oil well waste pits and accidental releases from oil DESCRIPTION As shown in the site map (figure 1), at Site "B" there is an oil tank battery and a waste pitHYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD BRINE AT THE OSAGE-SKIATOOK PETROLEUM

  15. Field Test of the Superconducting Gravimeter as a Hydrologic Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    Field Test of the Superconducting Gravimeter as a Hydrologic Sensor by Clark R. Wilson1 , Bridget of a transportable version of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) intended for groundwater storage monitoring. The test of a transportable superconducting gravimeter (SG) designed to monitor sur- face gravity and provide a direct measure

  16. Catchment hydrological responses to forest harvest amount and spatial pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    ] by decreasing evapotranspiration [Bosch and Hewlett, 1982]; (2) regrowth after harvest decreases water yield a large variability in the relationship between harvest amount and annual water yield within eachCatchment hydrological responses to forest harvest amount and spatial pattern Alex Abdelnour,1 Marc

  17. Hydrologic Variability of Small, Northern Michigan Lakes Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    different forms and units, they all require some measure of the input of water from the watershed. The hydraulic residence time is difficult to mea- sure directly and is usually inferred from other measurementsHydrologic Variability of Small, Northern Michigan Lakes Measured by the Addition of Tracers

  18. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Spring and potentiometric surface maps, aquifer characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

  19. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Fall surface maps, aquifer characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

  20. FULLYDISCRETE FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    FULLY­DISCRETE FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen element method for a nonlinear differential system for describing an air­water system in groundwater experiments using the present approach for modeling groundwater flow in porous media are reported. Key words

  1. Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a case study for fracture aperture reconstruction. The rst one is a correlation technique that estimates the normal aper techniques are applied to discontinuities extracted from a core drilled down to 20 m in a fractured marl

  2. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater NERC EQUIP;protected spring in Kampala (Uganda) · groundwater supplies 50% of world's drinking water Kundzewicz and Döll (2009) #12;maize plantation irrigated by a groundwater-fed pivot, Katwe (Zambia) · and 42

  3. Groundwater and global hydrological change current challenges and new insight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater and global hydrological change ­ current challenges and new insight R. TAYLOR1 , L Groundwater Resources Assessment Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands 11 Federal Institute for Geosciences, groundwater plays a critical role in enabling communities to adapt to freshwater shortages derived from low

  4. Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koka, Srikanth

    2004-09-30

    ....................................................................................45 4.9 Rank Attribute .....................................................................................................51 4.10 Outlet Segments...- dimensional diffusion wave model. Though this model offers a strong physical base for hydrologic modeling, can be applied only to areas where runoff production mainly assumes Hortonian patterns. A model which is based on 1 dimensional kinematic...

  5. New Meteorological and Geological Study of Acquapendente (VT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasselli, D; Bianchi, P

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the geological, meteorological and climatic data recorded in Acquapendente (VT) over 24 years. These data are compared to check local variations,long term trends, and correlation with maen annual temperature. The ultimate goal of this work is to understand logn term climatic changes in this geographic area. The analysis is performed using a statistical approach. From each long series of data calculate the hourly averages and that the monthly averages in order to reduce the fluctuations in the short time due to the day / night cycle. A particular care is used to minimize any effect due to prejudices in case of lack of data. Finally, we calculate the annual average from the monthly ones.

  6. A valuation of possible glacio-hydrological characteristics changes under global warming for Pamiro-Alay glaciation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananicheva, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Scenarios of global climate change for doubled carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is transformed into isoline maps for glaciated mountain region. Model data of monthly air temperature and precipitation are recalculated to values of annual solid precipitation and mean summer air temperature reduced to the level of 4,000 meters a.s.l. with the help of contemporary vertical gradients of air temperature and solid precipitation. The calculation algorithm is based on new techniques which analyze relationships between the spatial and altitudinal variability of meteorological parameters and their influence on snow and ice extent. Results form the basis for the calculation of the primary glaciologic and hydrologic characteristics: accumulation, ablation, melt runoff. New altitudes of main glaciological levels are calculated together with corresponding ablation and accumulation in the condition of doubled CO{sub 2}. These data are then used to produce a new spatial distribution of the input variables which can be used for improved melt water and heat resources calculation. The time period over which the model is run to obtain spatial distribution of pointed characteristics is the middle of 21 century, the situation of doubled CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Model output is in the form of isoline maps as well as digital data and covers the territory of Pamiro-Alay mountains and adjacent areas.

  7. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  8. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  9. Hydrological Sciences--Journal--des Sciences Hydrologiques, 43(1) February 1998143 Regional scale hydrology: II. Application of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    of the two- layer Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC-2L) macroscale hydrological model. The VIC-2L model'application du schéma de surface VIC-2L (Variable Infiltration Capacity). Le schéma de surface VIC-2L est, mensuelle, et annuelle. Une analyse de sensibilité a été faite. INTRODUCTION This study focuses

  10. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-05-15

    This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  11. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-01-19

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  12. Hydrologic Impacts of Saltcedar Control Along a Regulated Dryland River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Alyson Kay

    2012-02-14

    hydrology is an under-developed discipline (Tooth, 2000). At present, much of our understanding of river systems comes from studies in humid regions (Nanson et al., 2002). Transferring these concepts to arid regions is complicated at best, primarily... and prevalence of drought in arid regions has led to damming of some rivers to provide a consistent supply of water for municipalities and irrigation. Flow regulation has a variety of downstream effects such as disconnection of channels from floodplains...

  13. MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1 to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting winds; terrain and land-use effects; air turbulence; numerical modeling; wind power

  14. The influence of meteorology on the organic and inorganic properties of aerosols in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Mei

    The influence of meteorology on the organic and inorganic properties of aerosols in Hong Kong Mei, Fe) could be from coal flyash, the estimate of crustal material in the Dry-N period may include some

  15. Pollen Dispersion in Relation to Meteorological Conditions, Seasonality, Location and Elevation in College Station, Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kristen

    2012-04-30

    meteorological factors, including temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, pressure, rain, wind speed and wind direction. A biological microscope was used for identification of possible common species in College Station, Texas. Insight into the vertical...

  16. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  17. Ozone predictabilities due to meteorological uncertainties in the Mexico City basin using ensemble forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bei, Naifang

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the sensitivity of ozone (O3)[(O subscript 3)] predictions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) to meteorological initial uncertainties and planetary boundary layer ...

  18. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2014-12-04

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  19. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  20. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  1. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    precipitation regime on vernal pool hydrology. FreshwaterColburn, E.A. (2004). Vernal pools: Natural history andof California’s Puddles, Pools, and Playas. Eureka: Mad

  2. Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use: Predicting the Impact of an Emerging Aquatic Pathogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use:with infection, are the pond morphology and the topographyis that differences in the pond morphology and topography of

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  4. Analysis of 2011 Meteorological Data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluzzi, F J

    2012-02-27

    Both the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) in Schenectady, NY and the Kesselring Site Operations (KSO) facility near Ballston Spa, NY are required to estimate the effects of hypothetical emissions of radiological material from their respective facilities by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which regulates these facilities. An atmospheric dispersion model known as CAP88, which was developed and approved by the EPA for such purposes, is used by KAPL and KSO to meet this requirement. CAP88 calculations over a given time period are based on statistical data on the meteorological conditions for that period. Both KAPL and KSO have on-site meteorological towers which take atmospheric measurements at a frequency ideal for EPA regulatory model input. However, an independent analysis and processing of the meteorological data from each tower is required to derive a data set appropriate for use in the CAP88 model. The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) was contracted by KAPL to process the on-site data for the calendar year 2011. The purpose of this document is to: (1) summarize the procedures used in the preparation/analysis of the 2011 meteorological data; and (2) document adherence of these procedures to the guidance set forth in 'Meteorological Monitoring Guidance for Regulatory Modeling Applications', EPA document - EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA-454). This document outlines the steps in analyzing and processing meteorological data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations facilities into a format that is compatible with the steady state dispersion model CAP88. This process is based on guidance from the EPA regarding the preparation of meteorological data for use in regulatory dispersion models. The analysis steps outlined in this document can be easily adapted to process data sets covering time period other than one year. The procedures will need to be modified should the guidance in EPA-454 be updated or revised.

  5. Brief summary of LADHS: Los Alamos distributed hydrologic modeling system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R. E. (Regan E.); Winter, C. L. (C. Larrabee); Springer, E. P.; Costigan, K. R. (Keeley R.); Tseng, P. H. (Peng-Hsiang)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the current state of the fourth Thrust Area of the NSF Science and Technology Center for the Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA). Sustainability of semi-arid regions has become a serious political and scientific concern. Increasing population has added stress to the water supply and other natural resources, notably, underground aquifers. Recent controversies in the Rio Grande Basin involving the competing interests of endangered species and humans for water have highlighted the delicate balance of biologically diverse southwestern riparian areas. Potentially, the warming climate may intensify summer storms and affect the amount and timing of snow melt, the largest renewable source of water in the southwest. It is, therefore, of great political, social and scientific interest to determine ways in which human activities can coexist with healthy riparian areas and a plentiful, clean water supply over the long run. An understanding of how all of these processes interrelate would allow regional decision-makers to consider a wide range of options and thereby develop useful plans for meeting societal needs. To make the best use of limited fresh water resources, decision makers must be able to make predictions about the entire hydrologic cycle, which is a complex combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Only then could they explore the potential effects of increased water use and of changes in the regional climate. The important processes in the hydrologic cycle include rainfall, snowmelt, storms, runoff, and flow in ephemeral streams, rivers, and underground aquifers. Riparian communities and evaporation play key roles in reducing the available water.

  6. Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awwad, Haitham Munir

    1991-01-01

    Farland (Member) J esTR ao (Head of Department) May 1991 ABSTRACT Streamflow Forecasting for Large-Scale Hydrologic Systems. (May 1991) Haitham Munir Awwad, B. S. , University of Jordan Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Juan B. Valdes An on-line streamflow... thankful to Dr. Ralph A. Wurbs and Dr. Marshall J. McFarland for their assistance on my advisory committee. Support for this thesis by the Department of Civil Engineering through the Engineering Excellence Fund, and by the U, S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  7. Meteorology This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Hydrologist Hydrometeorological Technician Marine Meteorologist Mesoscale/Outlook Forecaster Meteorological Photographer/ Artist/Writer Solar Energy Meteorologist Statistician Storm Chaser Technical Marketer Warning

  8. Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual-to-decadal time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract An examination of a wide spectrum of hydro

  9. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  10. Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. F., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

  11. Reconstructing the duty of water: a study of emergent norms in socio-hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    This paper assesses the changing norms of water use known as the duty of water. It is a case study in historical socio-hydrology, or more precisely the history of socio-hydrologic ideas, a line of research that is useful ...

  12. Hydrological Connectivity of the Landscape of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    , and lakes) are dependent upon daily, seasonal, and annual surface energy balance. For example, glacier melt, the hydrologic cycle of the MDV is strongly driven by climate; however, in the MDV, surface energy balance has provide a unique real-world laboratory in which to study fundamental hydrologic processes (with

  13. Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright © 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro Arc Hydro: GIS in Water Resources Seminar/Workshop Gainesville, Florida ­ November 15, 2007 Christine Dartiguenave, ESRI inc. cdartiguenave@esri.com #12;Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 2 2Arc Hydro

  14. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

    2012-12-12

    [1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

  15. Meteorological conditions during the winter validation study at Rocky Flats, Colorado: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    The objective for the Winter Validation Study was to gather field data for validation of the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) under winter time meteorological conditions. Twelve tracer tests were conducted during a two-week period in February 1991. Each test lasted 12 hours, with releases of SF{sub 6} tracer from the Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado. The tests included ground-based and airborne sampling to 16 km from the release point. This presentation summarizes meteorological conditions during the testing period. Forty six viewgraphs are included.

  16. The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological, Satellite, and Model Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University dwdubois@nmsu.edu Our community data portal is using in Agriculture, Meteorology and Environment (CARSAME) and New Mexico Climate Center but not available

  17. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I: Present Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    The Impact of Climate Change on Air Quality­Related Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I on meteorology and air quality conditions in Cal- ifornia by dynamically downscaling Parallel Climate Model (PCM: Present Time Simulation Analysis ZHAN ZHAO Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University

  18. Hydrologic test system for fracture flow studies in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E; Lord, D.; Burklund, P.

    1982-05-05

    A hydrologic test system has been designed to measure the intrinsic permeabilities of individual fractures in crystalline rock. This system is used to conduct constant pressure-declining flow rate and pressure pulse hydraulic tests. The system is composed of four distinct units: (1) the Packer System, (2) Injection system, (3) Collection System, and (4) Electronic Data Acquisition System. The apparatus is built in modules so it can be easily transported and re-assembled. It is also designed to operate over a wide range of pressures (0 to 300 psig) and flow rates (0.2 to 1.0 gal/min). This system has proved extremely effective and versatile in its use at the Climax Facility, Nevada Test Site.

  19. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Hydrologic calibration of paired watersheds using a MOSUM approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ssegane, H.; Amatya, D. M.; Muwamba, A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Appelboom, T.; Tollner, E. W.; Nettles, J. E.; Youssef, M. A.; Birgand, F.; Skaggs, R. W.

    2015-01-09

    Paired watershed studies have historically been used to quantify hydrologic effects of land use and management practices by concurrently monitoring two neighboring watersheds (a control and a treatment) during the calibration (pre-treatment) and post-treatment periods. This study characterizes seasonal water table and flow response to rainfall during the calibration period and tests a change detection technique of moving sums of recursive residuals (MOSUM) to select calibration periods for each control-treatment watershed pair when the regression coefficients for daily water table elevation (WTE) were most stable to reduce regression model uncertainty. The control and treatment watersheds included 1–3 year intensively managedmore »loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with natural understory, same age loblolly pine intercropped with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), 14–15 year thinned loblolly pine with natural understory (control), and switchgrass only. Although monitoring during the calibration period spanned 2009 to 2012, silvicultural operational practices that occurred during this period such as harvesting of existing stand and site preparation for pine and switchgrass establishment may have acted as external factors, potentially shifting hydrologic calibration relationships between control and treatment watersheds. Results indicated that MOSUM was able to detect significant changes in regression parameters for WTE due to silvicultural operations. This approach also minimized uncertainty of calibration relationships which could otherwise mask marginal treatment effects. All calibration relationships developed using this MOSUM method were quantifiable, strong, and consistent with Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) greater than 0.97 for WTE and NSE greater than 0.92 for daily flow, indicating its applicability for choosing calibration periods of paired watershed studies.« less

  1. EAS 34500/B4500 Hydrology Instructor: Prof. Z. Johnny Luo, MR-927, 212-650-8936, luo@sci.ccny.cuny.edu;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    /transpiration, infiltration, streamflow, hydrograph analysis, groundwater, water quality and water pollution. This class and water pollution. Prerequisite: Math 203, Physics 208, or by permission of instructor Textbooks Review Dec 15 Guest lecture by Prof. Pengfei Zhang: Water chemistry & pollution #12;

  2. AUGUST 2004 1083L I E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    and Applications, Madison, Wisconsin FENGYING SUN Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies's (EOS's) Aqua satellite enable improved global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. MODIS is able temperature, moisture, and cloud structure. The significant new information on multilayer clouds re- trieved

  3. A Clustering Method for Identifying Ozone Episodes with Similar Meteorological Conditions: Application to Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    the Usefulness of VOC Data as Indicators of Change in Fuel Composition in the South Coast Air Basin (California113C.06 Facility Data Management and Emission Estimation Software Author(s): KJ Hickey, J Gresko: 95-FA152.03 Management of Meteorological Data at a Former Nuclear Weapon Facility Author(s): CL

  4. ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1 , and F. For- get2 to advances in computational resources and modeling techniques. Note also that mesoscale modeling and Large: general circulation models, mesoscale models, microscale models [Large-Eddy Simulations]. Figure 1

  5. 14 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 About our performance framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Perform ance #12;14 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 About our performance framework. The performance of this programme is measured by a number of deliverables and key performance indicators (KPIs.17) for the then Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities portfolio. Although the Bureau is responsible

  6. THE NEW YORK MIDTOWN DISPERSION STUDY (MID-05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; SULLIVAN, T.M.; SMITH, S.; CASSELLA, V.

    2007-01-01

    The New York City midtown dispersion program, MID05, examined atmospheric transport in the deep urban canyons near Rockefeller Center. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion under such conditions, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons and examined response over a much larger area. During August, 2005, a series of six gas tracer tests were conducted and sampling was conducted over a 2 km grid. A critical component of understanding gas movement in these studies is detailed wind and meteorological information in the study zone. To support data interpretation and modeling, several meteorological stations were installed at street level and on roof tops in Manhattan. In addition, meteorological data from airports and other weather instrumentation around New York City were collected. This document describes the meteorological component of the project and provides an outline of data file formats for the different instruments. These data provide enough detail to support highly-resolved computational simulations of gas transport in the study zone.

  7. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 113 (2002) 223243 Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 113 (2002) 223­243 Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites Kell Abstract A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure is performed across 22 sites and 50 site ecosystems and climates. En- ergy balance closure was evaluated by statistical regression of turbulent energy

  8. THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL 105.1 (2009) 2742 ANCIENT METEOROLOGICAL OPTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of these and associated phenomena are cataloged. Aristotle's streak, Octavian's halo, Vitellius' antisun and Constantine into fire and its condensation into clouds and then water. Anaxagoras and others built on this foundation the reader, a synopsis of modern meteorological optics is presented first in a non-technical format

  9. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Durante5 , Jörg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University, 34119 Kassel, Germany 5 DEWI, German Wind Energy Institute, Wilhelmshaven, Germany 6 PhysicalEWEC2006 ­ Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1

  10. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday as atmospheric electricity and optics. Specific topics that will be covered are as follows: Cloud physics: Review Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES Homework problems: 20% Quiz

  11. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics Thunderstorm charging Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES

  12. Impact of incremental changes in meteorology on thermal compliance and power system operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.A.; Alavian, V.; Bender, M.D.

    1992-02-01

    The sensitivity of the TVA reservoir and power supply systems to extreme meteorology was evaluated using a series of mathematical models to simulate the relationship between incremental changes in meteorology, associated changes in water temperature, and power plant generation. Single variable analysis techniques were applied at selected TVA facilities for representative average and extreme weather conditions. In the analysis, base case simulations were first conducted for each representative year using observed meteorology (i.e., the no change condition). The impacts of changes in meteorology were subsequently analyzed by uniformly constant at their respective base case values. Project results are generally presented in terms of deviations from base case conditions for each representative year. Based on an analysis of natural flow and air temperature patterns at Chickamauga Dam, 1974 was selected to represent extreme cold-wet conditions; 1965 as reflecting average conditions; and 1986 as an example of an extremely hot-dry year. The extreme years (i.e., 1974 and 1986) were used to illustrate sensitivities beyond historical conditions; while the average year provided a basis for comparison. Observed reservoir conditions, such as inflows, dam releases, and reservoir elevations for each representative year, were used in the analysis and were assumed to remain constant in all simulations. Therefore, the Lake Improvement Plan (which was implemented in 1991) and its consequent effects on reservoir operations were not incorporated in the assessment. In the model simulations, computed water temperatures were based on vertically well-mixed conditions in the reservoirs.

  13. FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL-POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Iain B.

    FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL- POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA D.B. Hayman Fresnel-zone holographic technique was used to obtain the radiation pattern for the upgraded antenna in the measurement of this antenna and the analysis of the results. Keywords: Antenna measurements, Fresnel zone

  14. 1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of changes in the energy of the system. This requires a holistic VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE TRENDS Kingdom; KARL--National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; MURRAY--NOAA Office for Global1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE

  15. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  16. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 8, The REVIEW computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, G.L.; Burk, K.W.

    1988-08-01

    The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) routinely collects meteorological data from sources on and off the Hanford Site. The data are averaged over both 15 minutes and 1 hour and are maintained in separate databases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS. The databases are transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) DEC VAX 11/750 computer. The EMS is part of the Unified Dose Assessment Center, which is located on on the ground-level floor of the Federal building in Richland and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program REVIEW is used to display meteorological data in graphical and alphanumeric form from either the 15-minute or hourly database. The code is available on the HMS and EMS computer. The REVIEW program helps maintain a high level of quality assurance on the instruments that collect the data and provides a convenient mechanism for analyzing meteorological data on a routine basis and during emergency response situations.

  17. 2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    that measure the exchanges of car- bon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem-Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities Dennis

  18. Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Samuel P

    2012-04-30

    DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

  19. Baldassare Bacchi and Roberto Ranzi Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 785798 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    -SOP conducted in autumn 1999 for the Mesoscale Alpine Programme MAP. The investigations were based on both field to investigate and test in an operational context the potential of both mesoscale meteorological and distributed

  20. ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs, T. Eskridge, R. Hartley, H. Pfeiffer, and C. Soderlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs mesoscale meteorological data fusion system is being developed as an intelligent interface between the U.S. Army's Integrated Meteorological System IM[ETS) mesoscale database and tactical decision aids (TDAs

  1. Evaluation of hydrologic indices for forecasting Western U.S. seasonal water supply Edwin P. Maurer1 and Andrew W. Wood2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    anomaly event (e.g., El Nino), however, creates uncertainty in the event's future hydrologic impacts

  2. Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

  3. Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Chan Yong

    2011-08-08

    maps extracted from remote sensing images; 2) examining the effect of urbanization on hydrologic regime; and 3) investigating a relationship between watershed urbanization and ecosystem invasibility of a riparian forest. I studied twelve riparian...

  4. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18

    flood peaks. Meanwhile, climate change has led to more frequent extreme events. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the hydrological processes under urbanization and climate change is indispensable for sustainable water management...

  5. Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of a floodplain ecosystem, Everglades,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of former wetlands converted to agriculture. Interactions between groundwater and sur- face water have also groundwater's changing role, from a fresh- water storage reservoir that sustained the Everglades ecosystem

  6. 36 Minimising the hydrological impact of forest harvesting in Malaysia's rainforests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    36 Minimising the hydrological impact of forest harvesting in Malaysia's rainforests H. C. Thang lorries, such extraction is slow and costly,andwouldnotgivethestateornationtherevenuetodevelop schools water sup- plies (Mohamed, 1987) and enhanced flood risk from increased channel sedimentation (Sheffield

  7. Operation of water supply reservoirs for flood mitigation : hydrologic and institutional considerations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craney, Patrick Wayne

    1996-01-01

    of water supply storage for flood control purposes. Lake Limestone in Central Texas serves as the case study. The highly variable conditions of the watershed commonly exhibit both hydrologic extremes, floods and droughts. The agency responsible...

  8. Engineering Science AB: Engineering Physics Rev. September 2014 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Climate ES 132 ­ Intro to Meteorology & Climate ES 162 ­ Hydrology and Environmental Geomechanics Select

  9. The simulation of natural soil pipes and their influence on catchment hydrology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelo, Mark David

    1982-01-01

    THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Mem er...

  10. Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2009-05-15

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major Subject: Water Management and Hydrologic Sciences EVALUATING AND DEVELOPING PARAMETER OPTIMIZATION AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS... OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Raghavan Srinivasan Committee Members, Faming Liang Patricia K. Smith Francisco Olivera Head of Department, Ronald Kaiser August 2008 Major Subject: Water Management and Hydrologic Sciences iii...

  11. Inversion of Hydrological Tracer Test Data Using TomogrpahicConstraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Niklas; Finsterle, Stefan; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-11-11

    A reasonable description of the hydraulic conductivity structure is a prerequisite for modeling contaminant transport. However, formulations of hydrogeological inverse problems utilizing hydrogeological data only often fail to reliably resolve features at a resolution required for accurately predicting transport. Incorporation of geophysical data into the inverse problem offers the potential to increase this resolution. In this study, we invert hydrological tracer test data using the shape and relative magnitude variations derived from geophysical tomographic data to regionalize a hydrogeological inverse problem in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivity structure. Our approach does not require that the petrophysical relationship be known a-priori, but that it is linear and stationary within each geophysical anomaly. However, tomograms are imperfect models of geophysical properties and geophysical properties are not necessarily strongly linked to hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, we focus on synthetic examples where the correlation between radar velocity and hydraulic conductivity, as well as the geophysical data acquisition errors, are varied in order to assess what aspects of the hydraulic conductivity structure we can expect to resolve under different conditions. The results indicate that regularization of the tracer inversion procedure using geophysical data improves estimates of hydraulic conductivity. We find that even under conditions of corrupted geophysical data, we can accurately estimate the effective hydraulic conductivity and areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity. However, given imperfect geophysical data, our results suggest that we cannot expect accurate estimates of the variability of the hydraulic conductivity structure.

  12. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  13. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  14. The meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance and quality assurance programs at a former nuclear weapons facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The purposes of the meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance, and quality assurance programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness (EP) programs at the Site in assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. The risk from the Site includes chemical and radioactive emissions historically related to nuclear weapons component production activities that are currently associated with storage of large quantities of radionuclides (plutonium) and radioactive waste forms. The meteorological monitoring program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Preparedness operations.

  15. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  16. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  18. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  19. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  20. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  1. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  4. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  7. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  8. Meteorology This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Photographer/ Artist/Writer Solar Energy Meteorologist Statistician Storm Chaser Technical Marketer Warning Hydrologist Hydrometeorological Technician Marine Meteorologist Mesoscale/Outlook Forecaster Meteorological Department of Agriculture Department of Defense Department of Energy Educational Institutions Energy

  9. Meteorological Factors Regulating the Population Expansion and Contraction of Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coburn, Jordan McQuade

    2010-10-12

    FACTORS REGULATING THE POPULATION EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM (ACARI: IXODIDAE) IN TEXAS A Thesis by JORDAN MCQUADE COBURN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Entomology METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS REGULATING THE POPULATION EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM (ACARI: IXODIDAE) IN TEXAS A Thesis by JORDAN...

  10. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01

    -11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han..., U.S.A. Abstract Building thermal performance and potential solar applications depend on the quality of the solar resource data available. Unfortunately, most of the locations do not account for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely...

  11. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  12. Six- and three-hourly meteorological observations from 223 USSR stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.B.; Martuganov, R.A.; Kaiser, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    This document describes a database containing 6- and 3-hourly meteorological observations from a 223-station network of the former Soviet Union. These data have been made available through cooperation between the two principal climate data centers of the United States and Russia: the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), in Asheville, North Carolina, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information -- World Data Centre (RIHMI-WDC) in Obninsk. Station records consist of 6- and 3-hourly observations of some 24 meteorological variables including temperature, weather type, precipitation amount, cloud amount and type, sea level pressure, relative humidity, and wind direction and speed. The 6-hourly observations extend from 1936 to 1965; the 3-hourly observations extend from 1966 through the mid-1980s (1983, 1984, 1985, or 1986; depending on the station). These data have undergone extensive quality assurance checks by RIHMI-WDC, NCDC, and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The database represents a wealth of meteorological information for a large and climatologically important portion of the earth`s land area, and should prove extremely useful for a wide variety of regional climate change studies. These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and 40 data files that are available via the Internet or on 8mm tape. The total size of the database is {approximately}2.6 gigabytes.

  13. Salt Repository Project site study plan for meteorology/air quality: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The Site Study Plan for Meteorology/Air Quality describes a field program consisting of continuous measurements of wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, dew point, and pressure neede for later modeling and dose calculations. These measurements will include upper level winds, vertical temperature structure, and vertical wind speed. All measurements will be made at a site located within the 9-m/sup 2/ site area but remote from the ESF. The SSP describes the need for each study; its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data; schedule of field activities, organization of field personnel and sample management and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. Although titled Meteorology/Air Quality, this SSP addresses only meteorology, as there are no air quality data needs in the SCP. A correction to the title will be made in a later revision. 27 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  15. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  16. Regionalization of hydrologic response in the Great Lakes basin: Considerations of temporal and spatial scales of analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to water resource management objectives; and Assess the potential for regression tree models for hydrologic scales for recreation, commerce, ecosystems, hydropower, transportation, and consumptive supply

  17. Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2009-02-14

    Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

  18. Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

  19. Hydrology of a Forested Wetland Complex in an Urbanizing Area of the Texas Gulf Coast and Clean Water Act Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Dex Daniel

    2014-12-15

    . ................................................................ 28 Fig. 5. Monthly precipitation and runoff for 2005–2009.. ............................................... 31 Fig. 6. Annual hydrographs (2005–2008) of daily precipitation and runoff data (axes plotted at different scales for clarity... methods (e.g. Smith et al. 1995, Johnson 2005, Reif et al. 2009, Lane and D’Amico 2010), nation-wide wetland extent (see the National Wetlands Inventory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, available at 6 http://www.fws.gov/wetlands), and impacts...

  20. 3892 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California E. SMALL Department considerable attention in the hydro- meteorology community. This is partially because most of the monsoon

  1. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to representmore »the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics in northern peatlands, and provides a useful foundation for investigation of northern peatland carbon exchange.« less

  2. A study of the use of meteorological factors as criteria for irrigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satterwhite, Leron Eugene

    1956-01-01

    of an atmosphere, T being the mean aiz' tempez atua??aando being Stefan's constant e = same as used in equation l. (3) ~ Combination of equation 1 and 2: K (0. 27K $+8)/(0 27 Z(A) mm. /day ?haze E = slope of vapor-pressure curve at mean aiz temperatuze (mm...IIURP. UY A & M & 'LL&ci: gp y: r&& A STUDY OF THE USE OF METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS AS CRITERIA FOR IRRICAT ICE A. Thesis LEECH EUGEEE SATTERV'HITE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial...

  3. Modeling of earthquake-induced hydrological changes and possible permeability enhancement due to the 17 January 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to the 17 January 1995 Kobe Earthquake, Japan T. Tokunaga Department of Geosystem Engineering, University Abstract Hydrologic changes associated with the 17 January 1995 Kobe Earthquake occurred in Awajishima and King, 1993; Rojstaczer et al., 1995). It has been reported that similar hydrologic fluctuations were

  4. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

  5. B. Decharme H. Douville Introduction of a sub-grid hydrology in the ISBA land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Decharme Æ H. Douville Introduction of a sub-grid hydrology in the ISBA land surface model spa- tial scales. This paper focuses on the parameterization of sub-grid hydrological processes within the ISBA land surface model. Five off-line simulations are performed over the French Rho^ ne river basin

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  7. Candidate wind-turbine-generator site summarized meteorological data for December 1976-December 1981. [Program WIND listed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    Summarized hourly meteorological data for 16 of the original 17 candidate and wind turbine generator sites collected during the period from December 1976 through December 1981 are presented. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and provide data that could be considered representative of long-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and a topographic map showing the location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for long-term average wind energy production at each site.

  8. Sub-daily Statistical Downscaling of Meteorological Variables Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Bjørn-Gustaf J. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2012-01-01

    A new open source neural network temporal downscaling model is described and tested using CRU-NCEP reanal ysis and CCSM3 climate model output. We downscaled multiple meteorological variables in tandem from monthly to sub-daily time steps while also retaining consistent correlations between variables. We found that our feed forward, error backpropagation approach produced synthetic 6 hourly meteorology with biases no greater than 0.6% across all variables and variance that was accurate within 1% for all variables except atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and precipitation. Correlations between downscaled output and the expected (original) monthly means exceeded 0.99 for all variables, which indicates that this approach would work well for generating atmospheric forcing data consistent with mass and energy conserved GCM output. Our neural network approach performed well for variables that had correlations to other variables of about 0.3 and better and its skill was increased by downscaling multiple correlated variables together. Poor replication of precipitation intensity however required further post-processing in order to obtain the expected probability distribution. The concurrence of precipitation events with expected changes in sub ordinate variables (e.g., less incident shortwave radiation during precipitation events) were nearly as consistent in the downscaled data as in the training data with probabilities that differed by no more than 6%. Our downscaling approach requires training data at the target time step and relies on a weak assumption that climate variability in the extrapolated data is similar to variability in the training data.

  9. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 1999 / 371 PARKING LOT STORAGE MODELING USING DIFFUSION WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 1999 / 371 PARKING LOT STORAGE MODELING USING DIFFUSION holding storm water in parking lots is examined by using a diffusion wave model of catchment dynamics. Four extreme storm types are applied to four typical parking lot sizes to assess the sensitivity

  12. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROLOGICAL CONTROLS ON GULLY FORMATION NEAR LAKE TANA, NORTHERN HIGHLANDS OF ETHIOPIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the millennium goal of Ethiopia by preparing seedlings and planting indigenous trees for the rehabilitation Management and Environmental Protection (LaRMEP) in 2006 from Mekelle University located in the Tigray Region and Hydrology. Tigist prepared for her Master's research that was to be conducted in the Debre-Mewi watershed

  13. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the Palaeocene The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum represents a period of rapid, extreme global warming ,55 million years ago global warming6 . The terrestrial-plant carbon isotope excursion (about 24.5 to 26 per mil

  14. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models Accepted 13 March 2013 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Snow Energy-balance Temperature that both the Isnobal energy-balance and calibrated temperature-index methods adequately reproduce snow

  15. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113­140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd Natural Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Z .PII: S0169-7722 99 00098-4 #12;( )T.P. Clement et al.rJournal

  16. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 31 1998 315335 Rapid fluid content measurement method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with potential for controlling the huge costs and extended times required to clean up these sites. However contents in rapidly changing flow fields. High intensity X-rays were used at the Cornell High Z .Energy it aids in the understanding of hydrologic control which is an essential component of cost-effective in

  17. Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain Abstract. Alpine/subalpine ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park may be sensitive to atmospherically with soil and vegetation. Because of this, waters draining granitic terrains, such as Rocky Mountain

  18. Strip mining: Hydrology. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the hydrologic impacts of strip mining. The potential impacts of strip mining on surface and ground water are examined, and techniques for control and monitoring of water pollution are discussed. Site rehabilitation is also considered. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Redwood Trees, Fog Water Subsidies, and the Hydrology of Redwood Forests1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwood Trees, Fog Water Subsidies, and the Hydrology of Redwood Forests1 Todd Dawson,2 Stephen Burgess,3 Kevin Simonin,2 Emily Limm,2 and Anthony Ambrose2 Fog is a defining feature of the coastal California redwood forest and fog inputs via canopy drip in summer can constitute between 10 to 45 percent

  20. Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b , Philippe Naveau c Abstract The statistics of extremes have played an important role in engineering practice for water resources design and management. How recent developments in the statistical theory of extreme values can

  1. Hydrological control of stream water chemistry in a glacial catchment (Damma Glacier, Switzerland)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Hydrological control of stream water chemistry in a glacial catchment (Damma Glacier, Switzerland a Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland b, Switzerland c Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ

  2. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Abstract: Sediment rating curves are commonly used to estimate the suspended sediment load in rivers and streams under the assumption

  3. Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California contamination in California's Sacramento River watershed where 8500 km2 of agricultural land influences water components were assessed for the Sacramento River watershed. To represent flood conveyance in the area

  4. Mountain-Block Hydrology and Mountain-Front Recharge* John L. Wilson and Huade Guan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    " (MFR), this process has been treated by modelers of basins as a boundary condi- tion. In general of a basin groundwater model. These methods avoid altogether the complexities of the hydrologic sys- tem include the partitioning of rainfall and snowmelt into vegetation-controlled evapotranspiration, surface

  5. Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones -- Yucca Mountain paleohydrogeology paleoclimate U-series dating secondary ion mass spectrometry Yucca Mountain Understanding to Pleistocene climate change within a deep vadose zone in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  6. Hydrologic assessment of an urban variable source watershed in the northeast United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologic assessment of an urban variable source watershed in the northeast United States Zachary by considering the impact of impervious surfaces, hydraulic control structures (detention basins), and land use and interflows increased accordingly. Both modeled and measured distributed results indicated that the more

  7. Identifying hydrologically sensitive areas: Bridging the gap between science and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    ); Water quality; Nonpoint Source (NPS) pollution; Variable source area (VSA) hydrology; Topographic index those in 1987, increasingly emphasized nonpoint source (NPS) pollution as a critical cause of water., 2000). Many current attempts to reduce NPS pollution of surface water bodies primarily utilized

  8. HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    being proposed for low-level and high-level radioactive waste disposal [Montazer and Wilson, 1984HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT Bridget R Science University of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. Analysis of unsaturated flow and transport in arid regions

  9. Hydrology, Salinity, and Salinity Control Possibilities of the Middle Pecos River: A Reconnaissance Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Anand, Shilpa; Hatler, Will

    2008-01-01

    , and upwards of 12,000 mg L-1 at Girvin. These high levels of streamflow salinity not only reduce the economic uses of the water, but also limit the biodiversity of aquatic and riparian species along the river. This report outlines the hydrology, geochemistry...

  10. Global validation of the ISBA sub-grid hydrology B. Decharme H. Douville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global validation of the ISBA sub-grid hydrology B. Decharme Æ H. Douville Received: 16 January scale is therefore a crucial task, which requires off-line simu- lations driven by realistic atmospheric and consistent set of sub-grid parametrizations in order to account for spatial heter- ogeneities of topography

  11. Scaling of hydrologic flows in polygonal ground within an Arctic ecosystem Gautam Bisht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4 as high-latitude temperatures warm. Polygonal ground, with a characteristic length Moderate Old D Low center High Moderately wet High Young BOUNDARY CONDITIONS & SOIL PROPERTIES Boundary structures, with high or low centers, dominate the local hydrologic environment, thereby impacting the energy

  12. Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood-pulsed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood;Microalgae, base of aquatic food webs Ecosystem services. Provisioning: food, fiber and fuel. Regulating estimate of algal biodiversity in the Okavango Delta A2)Explain biomass and diversity patterns in relation

  13. Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic availability is indispensable for water resources management at regional or national level. This information processes. The currently available estimates of freshwater availability by a few large international

  14. A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part I: Implementation and Synthetic Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    structure in signals and a filtering procedure, and thus is an efficient way to solve the optimal estimation in a hydrologic data assimilation system, which runs a land surface model. Assimilation experiments are carried out over the Arkansas­Red River basin, located in the central United States (;645 000 km2 ), using

  15. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies-sensor/multi-platform approach to water and energy cycle prediction is demonstrated in an effort to understand the variability to an improved understanding of water and energy cycles within the NAME region and providing a novel framework

  16. Precipitation Change Effects Evaluated For Seven Ecosystems With Distinctive Vegetation and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Precipitation Change Effects Evaluated For Seven Ecosystems With Distinctive Vegetation and Hydrology Contact: Paul J. Hanson hansonpj@ornl.gov 865-574-5361 Doubled Precipitation Contact: Paul JCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), were used to explored effects of potential precipitation changes (P) on water limitation

  17. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 00: 116 (2013) Parameterised diabatic processes in numerical simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    2013-01-01

    . S. Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom Correspondence contributions to be tracked back to their time and location of occurrence. We have used this approach. 2012). Copyright c 2013 Royal Meteorological Society Prepared using qjrms4.cls [Version: 2011/05/18 v1

  18. Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface between the two simulations. Mesoscale atmospheric models such as the Pennsylvania State University for the Phoenix metropolitan area was implemented in the fifth- generation PSU/NCAR mesoscale meteorological model

  19. Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 48 Southern Hemisphere regional precipitation and climate variability: Extremes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    a characteristic dipole pattern of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, with features of both), and rainfall anomalies are shown using sun/cloud symbols. #12;Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 49 The changed East African rainfall distribution can be explained

  20. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  1. 15 DECEMBER 2003 3021H A F N E R A N D X I E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    on the stratification and maximum elevation. For ex- ample, the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Hawaii are in a similar Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii SHANG-PING XIE International Pacific Research Center, and Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii

  2. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassar, Ray

    2003-01-01

    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91­107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal forest: evidence from towers, aircraft and remote sensing Brian D. Amiroa,, J. Ian ecosystem exchange by eddy covariance) and remote sens- ing/modeling (net primary productivity

  3. Copyright 2005, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 11/05 Knowledge Expectations for METR 2023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    meteorology, air pollution, forecasting, and climate change Topical Knowledge Expectations I. Atmospheric. Be able to use it quantitatively to solve problems related to the thermal structure of the atmosphere. · Understand the thermal wind and how it relates to backing and veering winds as well as the structure

  4. DECEMBER 2001 579D E R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    ), there is renewed interest in examining hydrometeoro- logical processes in the Arctic. With its prevailing subDECEMBER 2001 579D E´ R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society Simulation of an Arctic depression over the frozen Arctic Ocean. The event is first simulated at a horizontal grid size of 18 km

  5. 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology and the 2nd International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    More 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology and the 2nd International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress Monday, 17 November 2003 Fire severity classification: uses and abuses Theresa B. Jain, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, Idaho, ID; and R. T. Graham Burn severity (also referred

  6. The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research A partnership between CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Stewart

    --Australia--Mathematical models. Tsunami Warning System--Australia--Data bases. Tsunami Warning System--Australia-- Mathematical of Meteorology An Enhanced Tsunami Scenario Database:T2 Diana J.M. Greenslade, M. Arthur Simanjuntak, Stewart C. R. Allen CAWCR Technical Report No. 014 August 2009 #12;#12;An Enhanced Tsunami Scenario Database:T2

  7. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology Estimating Spatially Varying Severity Thresholds of the Forest Fire Danger Rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Brian J.

    State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A. 5 Brian J. Reich Dept of Statistics, North Carolina meteorological elements. It combines information on wind speed, temperature, relative humidity and recent. Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation #12;Response

  8. Copyright 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 Knowledge Expectations for METR 4233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and diffuse radiation. · For solar (short-wave) radiation, understand the definition of the albedo and know of solar radiation in the atmosphere. · For long-wave radiation in the atmosphere, understand the important for METR 4233 Physical Meteorology III: Radiation and Climate Purpose: This document describes

  9. THE APPLICATION OF AN EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; O'Steen, L.

    2008-02-11

    We show that a simple evolutionary algorithm can optimize a set of mesoscale atmospheric model parameters with respect to agreement between the mesoscale simulation and a limited set of synthetic observations. This is illustrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). A set of 23 RAMS parameters is optimized by minimizing a cost function based on the root mean square (rms) error between the RAMS simulation and synthetic data (observations derived from a separate RAMS simulation). We find that the optimization can be efficient with relatively modest computer resources, thus operational implementation is possible. The optimization efficiency, however, is found to depend strongly on the procedure used to perturb the 'child' parameters relative to their 'parents' within the evolutionary algorithm. In addition, the meteorological variables included in the rms error and their weighting are found to be an important factor with respect to finding the global optimum.

  10. Influence of meteorology in assessing energy externalities: application of the damage function approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Miller, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McIlvaine, C.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-09-14

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating energy externalities. These externalities are environmental, health, and other damages and benefits that traditionally have not been considered as part of the cost of producing and consuming goods and services. An example of externalities is the effect on human health from exposure to ozone formed by NO{sub x} and other emissions from electric power plants. These damages are valued adversely by individuals (and by society) but are not reflected in the price of electricity. The damage function approach is a methodology which is used for developing quantitative estimates of externalities. This paper describes the five major steps in the damage function approach, focuses on the use of ozone models in that framework, and points out the effects of meteorological variables on estimates of ozone concentrations.

  11. Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

    2005-01-01

    Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

  12. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  13. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  14. Spatial and hydrologic variation of Bacteroidales, adenovirus and enterovirus in a semi-arid, wastewater effluent-impacted watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambic, Dustin G.; Kildare-Hann, Beverly J.; Rajal, Veronica B.; Sturm, Belinda; Minton, Chris B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Wuertz, Stefan

    2015-05-15

    receiving waters (rather than municipal wastewater, which is the case during dry weather). As such, the approach to data segregation was dependent on hydrology/storm conditions. Storm events led to significant increases in ruminant- and dog...

  15. Hydrologic variation during the last 170,000 years in the southern hemisphere tropics of South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigsby, Catherine A.

    or tectonic processes that affected basin hydrology, or some combination of both. The dominance of salt of the penultimate glacial period. Alternating mud and salt units in a core from Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia reflect

  16. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  17. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of ...

  18. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  19. Collaborative research on the Northeast Water Polynya: NEWP92 hydrographic data report. USCGC Polar Sea cruise, July 15--August 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, D.W.R.; Behrens, W.J.; Hopkins, T.S.; Kinder, C.; Deming, J.; Smith, W.O.; Top, Z.; Walsh, I.D.

    1995-06-01

    The Northeast Water Polynya (NEW) off the northeast coast of Greenland was the focus of two cruises aboard the USCGC Polar Sea during the summers of 1992 and 1993. The cruises were supported by the National Science Foundation Arctic Systems Science (ARCSS) program and were part of the Arctic Ocean Science Board`s International Arctic Polynya Program. The Polar Sea cruises were designed as multidisciplinary studies to test hypotheses about the mechanisms of heat, water and carbon flow within and beyond the boundaries of the polynya. Preliminary results of the 1992 study have been described elsewhere. A collection of papers arising from the 1992 cruise have been published in a Special Section of the Journal of Geophysical Research. This data report presents the hydrographic and basic chemical observations made from CTD/Rosette casts during the 1992 cruise. The station positions cruise are plotted in Figure 1. Also included in the report are selected section plots and vertical profiles. A total of 130 CTD casts were made during the cruise, measuring pressure, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and light transmission. Discrete samples were collected in 10-liter, rosette-mounted, Niskin bottles and analyzed, from most casts, for: salinity, dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, anthropogenic halocarbons (e.g., Freon gases), pigments, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen. Suspended particulate matter was analyzed at selected stations and these data were used to calibrate the CTD-transmissometer. Samples were collected from selected stations and depths for tritium and helium analyses, carbonate chemistry, as well as for measurements of bacterial abundance.

  20. Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2008-08-22

    This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

  1. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  2. Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1986-12-01

    A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

  3. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01

    . Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... to account for the entire increase in the coastal erosion rates in the study area since at least 1937 Future sand losses brought about by the construction oi' new reservoirs downstream of those presently on the Brazos River, or one of its major tribu...

  4. Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Carrie J.

    2009-05-15

    )????????????????.. 4 2 Aerial photographs of Boat Ramp (BR), Pump Canal (PC) and Sundown Bay (SB) sites at site-appropriate scales???......... 5 3 Left-hand column indicates correlation between pond water level and tidal creek water level...????????????????. 13 4 Hydrologic timeline (bay water level and local precipitation) for Guadalupe estuary, February 2005 through May 2006?????.. 17 5 Tidal creek salinity (A) and average salinity by site (B)...????. 18 6 Water column algal...

  5. 15 APRIL 2001 1809C L A R K E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California RICHARD J. HARDING Centre for Ecology and Hydrology shows the observed difference in rainfall over TNA between the periods 1931­60 and 1961­90. The data come from an updated version of the gridded, gauge-based climatology described by Hulme (1992b

  6. FEBRUARY 2004 199S H A R I F E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    that of a nearer volume. In this study, we seek improved understanding of the sensitivity of a small infiltration simulator, and a two-dimensional infiltration-excess hydrologic model. A time series of simulated three-dimensional precipitation fields over a large domain and a small study watershed are used, which allows development

  7. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  8. CO$_2$ dissolution controlled by buoyancy driven shear dispersion in a background hydrological flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unwin, H Juliette T; Woods, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the long-time flow which controls the dissolution of a plume of CO$_2$ following injection into an anticline structure in a deep saline aquifer of finite vertical extent. Over times of tens to thousands of years, some of the CO$_2$ will dissolve into the underlying groundwater to produce a region of relatively dense, CO$_2$ saturated water directly below the plume of CO$_2$. Continued dissolution then requires the supply of CO$_2$ unsaturated aquifer water. This may be provided by a background hydrological flow or buoyancy driven flow caused by the density contrast between the CO$_2$ saturated and unsaturated water in the aquifer. At long times, the interaction of the cross-layer diffusive mixing with the buoyancy, leads to buoyancy driven shear dispersion of the CO$_2$. With a background hydrological flow, the upstream transport of dissolved CO$_2$ by this dispersion becomes balanced by the oncoming hydrological flow so that CO$_2$ rich water can only spread a ...

  9. Hydrology and ecology of pinyon-juniper woodlands: Conceptual framework and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Breshears, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands represent an important ecosystem in the semiarid western United States. Concern over the sustainability of, and management approaches for, these woodlands is increasing. As in other semiarid environments, water dynamics and vegetation patterns in pinyon-juniper woodlands are highly interrelated. An understanding of these relationships can aid in evaluating various management strategies. In this paper we describe a conceptual framework designed to increase our understanding of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands. The framework comprises five different scales, at each of which the landscape is divided into {open_quotes}functional units{close_quotes} on the basis of hydrologic characteristics. The hydrologic behavior of each unit and the connections between units are being evaluated using an extensive network of hydrological and ecological field studies on the Pajarito Plateau in northern New Mexico. Data from these studies, coupled with application of the conceptual model, have led to the development of a number of hypotheses concerning the interrelationships of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands.

  10. Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

  11. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests—Fiscal and Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2008-02-27

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within selected Hanford Site wells during fiscal and calendar year 2005. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, in-well vertical groundwater-flow assessments, and a single-well tracer and constant-rate pumping test. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral and vertical groundwater-flow velocity, aquifer groundwater-flow velocity, and depth-distribution profiles of hydraulic conductivity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for a site where detailed well testing was performed. Results obtained from these tests provide hydrologic information that supports the needs of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act waste management area characterization as well as sitewide groundwater monitoring and modeling programs. These results also reduce the uncertainty of groundwater-flow conditions at selected locations on the Hanford Site.

  12. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  13. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  14. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  15. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  16. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 87, No. 3, pp. 403--421, 2009. 403 DOI:10.2151/jmsj.87.403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 87, No. 3, pp. 403--421, 2009. 403 DOI:10.2151/jmsj.87.403 Sensitivity of Numerical Simulations of the Early Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Emily

  18. The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research A partnership between CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spillman, Claire

    of Meteorology ReefTemp Next Generation L.A. Garde, C.M Spillman, L. Majewski, C. Griffin, G. Kruger and H. Beggs , L. Majewski2 , C. Griffin2 , G. Kruger1, 2 and H. Beggs1 1 Centre for Australian Weather and Climate-in-Publication entry Author: L.A. Garde, C.M Spillman, L. Majewski, C. Griffin, G. Kruger and H. Beggs Title: Reef

  19. Meteorological measurements in the vicinity of a coal burning power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crescenti, G.H.; Gaynor, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    High concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are commonly observed during the cool season in the vicinity of a 2.5 GW coal burning power plant located in the Mae Moh Valley of northern Thailand. The power plant is the source for nearly all of the observed SO2 since there are no other major industrial activities in this region. These high pollution fumigation events occur almost on a daily basis, usually lasting for several hours between late morning and early afternoon. One-hour average SO2 concentrations commonly exceed 1,000 micrograms/cu m. As a result, an increase in the number of respiratory type health complaints have been observed by local clinics during this time of the year. Meteorological data were acquired from a variety of observing platforms during an intensive field study from December 1993 to February 1994. The measurements included horizontal and vertical wind velocity, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. In addition, turbulent flux measurements were acquired by a sonic anemometer. SO2 measurements were made at seven monitoring sites scattered throughout the valley. These data were used to examine the atmospheric processes which are responsible for these high pollution fumigation events.

  20. Instrumentation, recording, and processing of meteorological data near Portage, Wisconsin: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, C.R.; Falconer, P.; Weidner, G.; Bowen, B.; Dzamba, L.

    1984-03-01

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the climatic impact of the power plant. In a pilot diffusion climatology survey, local wind structure was interpreted in the context of synoptic weather patterns. A significant new low wind statistic was introduced. A case study traced the movement of an elevated level of ozone from the Southern Plains across the Midwest to the East Coast. It showed that long distance transport is necessary for elevated O3 levels to occur in most parts of the U.S. The horizontal variation of the wind field is an important factor in the transport of atmospheric pollutants from 10 to 100 km. The wind field was shown to be organized as a function of wind direction and wind speed around the Baraboo Hills. Two models for estimating concentrations of SO2 at ground level were compared. Both used the Gaussian plume equation: one estimated the required dispersion coefficients from the Hino stability model; the other was based on data for horizontal and vertical hourly wind direction range. Overall, the climatic effects of the power plant and cooling pond appear small. Fogging, condensation, and riming may occur downwind on several days each year. Temperature increases of about 1C may also be observed for a short distance downwind.

  1. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Meteorological Drought Variability in the Indian Region Using Standardized Precipitation Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M Naresh; Sai, M V R Sesha; Roy, P S

    2015-01-01

    Grid (1{\\deg} latitude x 1{\\deg} longitude) level daily rainfall data over India from June to September for the years 1951 to 2007, generated by India Meteorological Department, was analyzed to build monthly time series of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). Analysis of SPI was done to study the spatial and temporal patterns of drought occurrence in the country. Geographic spread of SPI derived Area under Dryness (AUD) in different years revealed the uniqueness of 2002 drought with wide spread dryness in July. Mann-Kendal trend analysis and moving average based trends performed on AUD indicated increasing trend in July. The area under moderate drought frequency has increased in the most recent decade. Ranking of years based on Drought Persistency Score (DPS) indicated that the year 1987 was the severe-most drought year in the country. The results of the study have revealed various aspects of drought climatology in India. A similar analysis with the SPI of finer spatial resolution and relating it to crop p...

  2. Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

    1983-08-01

    Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

  3. Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research Assessment of environmental models anf software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monte, L; Hofman, Dimitry

    2005-01-01

    Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research

  4. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  5. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  6. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  7. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  8. Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

  9. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  10. Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

  11. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  12. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  13. GIS-BASED PREDICTION OF HURRICANE FLOOD INUNDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    A simulation environment is being developed for the prediction and analysis of the inundation consequences for infrastructure systems from extreme flood events. This decision support architecture includes a GIS-based environment for model input development, simulation integration tools for meteorological, hydrologic, and infrastructure system models and damage assessment tools for infrastructure systems. The GIS-based environment processes digital elevation models (30-m from the USGS), land use/cover (30-m NLCD), stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and soils data from the NRCS (STATSGO) to create stream network, subbasins, and cross-section shapefiles for drainage basins selected for analysis. Rainfall predictions are made by a numerical weather model and ingested in gridded format into the simulation environment. Runoff hydrographs are estimated using Green-Ampt infiltration excess runoff prediction and a 1D diffusive wave overland flow routing approach. The hydrographs are fed into the stream network and integrated in a dynamic wave routing module using the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to predict flood depth. The flood depths are then transformed into inundation maps and exported for damage assessment. Hydrologic/hydraulic results are presented for Tropical Storm Allison.

  14. Explicitly integrating parameter, input, and structure uncertainties into Bayesian Neural Networks for probabilistic hydrologic forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Liang, Faming; Yu, Beibei; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-11-09

    Estimating uncertainty of hydrologic forecasting is valuable to water resources and other relevant decision making processes. Recently, Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been proved powerful tools for quantifying uncertainty of streamflow forecasting. In this study, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to incorporate the uncertainties associated with input, model structure, and parameter into BNNs. This framework allows the structure of the neural networks to change by removing or adding connections between neurons and enables scaling of input data by using rainfall multipliers. The results show that the new BNNs outperform the BNNs that only consider uncertainties associated with parameter and model structure. Critical evaluation of posterior distribution of neural network weights, number of effective connections, rainfall multipliers, and hyper-parameters show that the assumptions held in our BNNs are not well supported. Further understanding of characteristics of different uncertainty sources and including output error into the MCMC framework are expected to enhance the application of neural networks for uncertainty analysis of hydrologic forecasting.

  15. Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

  16. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  17. Published in Journal of Hydrology, 2002, v. 264, no 1-4, p. 170-184 The influence of microclimates and fog on stable isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of microclimates and fog on stable isotope signatures used in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui., Ste. 415, Honolulu, HI 96813 Key words: d18 O, dD, fog, isotope hydrology, Hawaii, ground water consideration of the influence of fog, as fog samples had isotopic signatures enriched by as much as 3 in d18 O

  18. Forms of Soil Phosphorus in Selected Hydrologic Units of the Florida Everglades K. R. Reddy,* Y. Wang, W. F. DeBusk, M. M. Fisher, and S. Newman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Forms of Soil Phosphorus in Selected Hydrologic Units of the Florida Everglades K. R. Reddy,* Y is subject to changes in hydroperiod and nutrient loading, resulting in soil P enrichment and changes P in soils from four hydrologic units of the Everglades, and (ii) develop empirical relationships

  19. EAS 44600/B4600 GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Instructor: Dr. Pengfei Zhang, MR-932, 212-650-5609, pzhang@sci.ccny.cuny.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    1 EAS 44600/B4600 GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Fall 2014 Instructor: Dr. Pengfei Zhang, MR-932, 212 a working knowledge of groundwater. Course material will cover hydrologic cycle, fundamental physics of porous media flow, aquifer evaluation, chemical properties of groundwater, and contaminant transport

  20. L a n d s c a p e H y d r o l o g y Page 1 SWS 6932 Landscape Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of research tools to analyze coupled hydrologic and environmental changes. The course will center around two cover change o Predicting water availability under variable climate 3. Roderick and Farquhar, 2011 and variability in both time and space. Observed statistical properties of hydrologic data will be related

  1. Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Zhou, Q.

    2009-04-02

    Industrial-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into saline sedimentary basins will cause large-scale fluid pressurization and migration of native brines, which may affect valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration reservoirs. In this paper, we discuss how such basin-scale hydrologic impacts can (1) affect regulation of CO{sub 2} storage projects and (2) may reduce current storage capacity estimates. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration scenario in the Illinois Basin, which involves twenty individual CO{sub 2} storage projects in a core injection area suitable for long-term storage. Each project is assumed to inject five million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for 50 years. A regional-scale three-dimensional simulation model was developed for the Illinois Basin that captures both the local-scale CO{sub 2}-brine flow processes and the large-scale groundwater flow patterns in response to CO{sub 2} storage. The far-field pressure buildup predicted for this selected sequestration scenario suggests that (1) the area that needs to be characterized in a permitting process may comprise a very large region within the basin if reservoir pressurization is considered, and (2) permits cannot be granted on a single-site basis alone because the near- and far-field hydrologic response may be affected by interference between individual sites. Our results also support recent studies in that environmental concerns related to near-field and far-field pressure buildup may be a limiting factor on CO{sub 2} storage capacity. In other words, estimates of storage capacity, if solely based on the effective pore volume available for safe trapping of CO{sub 2}, may have to be revised based on assessments of pressure perturbations and their potential impact on caprock integrity and groundwater resources, respectively. We finally discuss some of the challenges in making reliable predictions of large-scale hydrologic impacts related to CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

  2. Characterizing the geospatial features and hydrology of four pro-glacial valleys in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it is important to accurately incorporate groundwater contributions and pathways in addition to glacial melt1 Sara Knox Characterizing the geospatial features and hydrology of four pro-glacial valleys by providing melt-water throughout the year (Mark and Seltzer 2005). Many rivers draining glaciated basins

  3. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume II. Impact of geothermal development on the geology and hydrology of the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, C.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The following topics are discussed: the geological setting of the Hawaiian Islands, regional geology of the major islands, geohydrology of the Hawaiian Islands, Hawaiis' geothermal resources, and potential geological/hydrological problems associated with geothermal development. Souces of information on the geology of Hawaii are presented. (MHR)

  4. Exploring the Potential Impact of Reforestation on the Hydrology of the Upper Tana River Catchment and the Masinga Dam, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT Exploring the Potential Impact of Reforestation on the Hydrology of the Upper Tana River water and hydroelectric power for 65% of the Nation. Unregulated deforestation and expansion to assess the impact of meeting a national goal for reforestation of 30% of deforested lands

  5. High-resolution temporal record of Holocene ground-water chemistry: Tracing links between climate and hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    growth layers in Holocene spe- leothems from Barbados, West Indies, reveals high-resolution temporal. carbonate mineral reactions, as reflected in 87 Sr/86 Sr values of modern Barbados ground waters variations in rainfall on Barbados that are predicted by this hydrologic model. INTRODUCTION In spite

  6. Estimating flow parameters using ground-penetrating radar and hydrological data during transient flow in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, Michael; Finsterle, Stefan; Rubin, Yoram

    2003-05-12

    Methods for determining the parameters necessary for modeling fluid flow and contaminant transport in the shallow subsurface are in great demand. Soil properties such as permeability, porosity, and water retention are typically estimated through the inversion of hydrological data (e.g., measurements of capillary pressure and water saturation). However, ill-posedness and non-uniqueness commonly arise in such inverse problems making their solutions elusive. Incorporating additional types of data, such as from geophysical methods, may greatly improve the success of inverse modeling. In particular, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has proven sensitive to subsurface fluid flow processes. In the present work, an inverse technique is presented in which permeability distributions are generated conditional to time-lapsed GPR measurements and hydrological data collected during a transient flow experiment. Specifically, a modified pilot point framework has been implemented in iTOUGH2 allowing for the generation of permeability distributions that preserve point measurements and spatial correlation patterns while reproducing geophysical and hydrological measurements. Through a numerical example, we examine the performance of this method and the benefit of including synthetic GPR data while inverting for fluid flow parameters in the vadose zone. Our hypothesis is that within the inversion framework that we describe, our ability to predict flow across control planes greatly improves with the use of both transient hydrological measurements and geophysical measurements (GPR-derived estimates of water saturation, in particular).

  7. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  8. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  9. Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    technical constraints on the injection of CO2 into deep (>1.5 km) reservoirs under supercritical75 this amount of annual CO2 production. Assuming that CO2 is emplaced as a80 supercritical fluid havingPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4

  10. Preprint Downscaling Climate Change Salath 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salathé Jr., Eric P.

    statistics to streamflow computed from the observed data. Downscaled climate-change scenarios fromPreprint Downscaling Climate Change ­ Salathé 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic Modeling Eric P. Salathé Jr. Center for Science in the Earth System

  11. New insights into the subglacial and periglacial hydrology of Vatnajo kull, Iceland, from a distributed physical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    New insights into the subglacial and periglacial hydrology of Vatnajo« kull, Iceland, from, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 ReykjavõÂk, Iceland E-mail: flowers@geop.ubc.ca ABSTRACT. We apply a time-dependent distributed glaciohydraulic model to Vatna- jo« kull ice cap, Iceland, aiming

  12. Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion until 1 June 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Hydrological Sciences­Journal­des Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion Engineering (IHE), PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands e-mail: sol@ihe.nl N. KUKURIC The Netherlands (optimisation globale, OG). L'application de divers algorithmes de recherche aléatoire (recherche aléatoire

  13. An Extension of the TalbotOgden Hydrology Model to an Affine Multi-dimensional Moisture Content Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Craig C.

    ;2 t = - K + z( )( ), (1) where is water content, t is time, K is hydraulic conductivity, is capillary [3] [4] since both K and are highly nonlinear functions of water content or the pressure head term1 An Extension of the Talbot­Ogden Hydrology Model to an Affine Multi-dimensional Moisture Content

  14. Strengthening the link between climate, hydrological and species distribution modeling to assess the impacts of climate change on freshwater biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenouillet, Gael

    /UPMC, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Département Milieux et Peuplements Aquatiques, Paris, France d Paris 7, 5 rue Thomas Mann, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article­Garonne river basin (SW France, 116,000 km2 ), which covers distinct hydrological and thermal regions from

  15. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  16. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as straight as possible. One interpretation suggests that the Wildcat Fault is westerly dipping. This could imply that the Wildcat Fault may merge with the Hayward Fault at depth. However, due to the complex geology of the Berkeley Hills, multiple interpretations of the geophysical surveys are possible. iv An effort to construct a 3D GIS model is under way. The model will be used not so much for visualization of the existing data because only surface data are available thus far, but to conduct investigation of possible abutment relations of the buried formations offset by the fault. A 3D model would be useful to conduct 'what if' scenario testing to aid the selection of borehole drilling locations and configurations. Based on the information available thus far, a preliminary plan for borehole drilling is outlined. The basic strategy is to first drill boreholes on both sides of the fault without penetrating it. Borehole tests will be conducted in these boreholes to estimate the property of the fault. Possibly a slanted borehole will be drilled later to intersect the fault to confirm the findings from the boreholes that do not intersect the fault. Finally, the lessons learned from conducting the trenching and geophysical surveys are listed. It is believed that these lessons will be invaluable information for NUMO when it conducts preliminary investigations at yet-to-be selected candidate sites in Japan.

  17. Green River air quality model development: meteorological and tracer data, July/August 1982 field study in Brush Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Lee, R.N.; Orgill, M.M.; Zak, B.D.

    1984-06-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a 3-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The objective of the field experiments was to obtain data to evaluate a model, called VALMET, developed at PNL to predict dispersion of air pollutants released from an elevated stack located within a deep mountain valley in the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period. Three tracer experiments were conducted in the valley during the 2-week period. In these experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was released from a height of approximately 100 m, beginning before sunrise and continuing until the nocturnal down-valley winds reversed several hours after sunrise. Dispersion of the sulfur hexafluoride after release was evaluated by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations in ambient air samples taken from sampling devices operated within the valley up to about 8 km down valley from the source. An instrumented research aircraft was also used to measure concentrations in and above the valley. Tracer samples were collected using a network of radio-controlled bag sampling stations, two manually operated gas chromatographs, a continuous SF/sub 6/ monitor, and a vertical SF/sub 6/ profiler. In addition, basic meteorological data were collected during the tracer experiments. Frequent profiles of vertical wind and temperature structure were obtained with tethered balloons operated at the release site and at a site 7.7 km down the valley from the release site. 10 references, 63 figures, 50 tables.

  18. Investigation Of The Hydro-Meteorological Hazards Along The Bulgarian Coast Of The Black Sea By Reconstructions Of Historical Storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galabov, Vasko; Bogatchev, Andrey; Tsenova, Boryana

    2015-01-01

    Information about the hydro-meteorological parameters during the extreme sea storms is of significant importance for the sustainable development in the context of flood risk for the coastal areas. Usually there is a lack of sufficiently long history of instrumental measurements of the extreme winds, waves and storm surges. Simulation of historical storms is an important tool to evaluate the potential coastal hazards. In the absence of measured data hindcasts can satisfy the need for historical data. The wave and storm-surge regional numerical simulations have been carried out for the ten most severe storms over the Bulgarian coast of the Black Sea from the period 1972-2012. The ERA-Interim and ERA-40 reanalysis of wind at 10 m and mean sea level pressure have been downscaled with a high resolution atmospheric model ALADIN to the horizontal and time scales suitable for precise evaluation of hydro-meteorological parameters during the storms. The downscaled fields of wind and sea level pressure have been used as...

  19. Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

    2013-10-14

    Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

  1. USING NEXRAD AND RAIN GAUGE PRECIPITATION DATA FOR HYDROLOGIC CALIBRATION OF SWAT IN A NORTHEASTERN WATERSHED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Aisha M.; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Zhang, Xuesong; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Shirmohammadi, Adel

    2010-05-10

    The value of watershed?scale, hydrologic and water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to evaluate the effectiveness of different management scenarios and their impact on the environment. Quality of precipitation data is critical for appropriate application of watershed models. In small watersheds, where no dense rain gauge network is available, modelers are faced with a dilemma to choose between different data sets. In this study, we used the German Branch (GB) watershed (~50 km2), which is included in the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), to examine the implications of using surface rain gauge and next?generation radar (NEXRAD) precipitation data sets on the performance of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The GB watershed is located in the Coastal Plain of Maryland on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Stream flow estimation results using surface rain gauge data seem to indicate the importance of using rain gauges within the same direction as the storm pattern with respect to the watershed. In the absence of a spatially representative network of rain gauges within the watershed, NEXRAD data produced good estimates of stream flow at the outlet of the watershed. Three NEXRAD datasets, including (1)*non?corrected (NC), (2) bias?corrected (BC), and (3) inverse distance weighted (IDW) corrected NEXRAD data, were produced. Nash?Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients for daily stream flow simulation using these three NEXRAD data ranged from 0.46 to 0.58 during calibration and from 0.68 to 0.76 during validation. Overall, correcting NEXRAD with rain gauge data is promising to produce better hydrologic modeling results. Given the multiple precipitation datasets and corresponding simulations, we explored the combination of the multiple simulations using Bayesian model averaging.

  2. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    energy. This increase in the energy conversion is absent in the wind-driven case, indicating an important Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany JEFFERY R. SCOTT Massachusetts Institute

  4. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2 1. Geostrophic Flow: Should horizontal winds turn clockwise or counter diagram of press, coriolis and drag accelerations for air parcel between isobars). 2. Hydrostatic Balance

  5. September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical Geography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical University, Boston, Massachusetts Corresponding Author: Steve W. Lyon, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden E-mail: steve.lyon@natgeo.su.se DOI: 10

  6. 1302 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    model of the Arctic. The model output is compared with meteorological and energy balance observations regional models of ice sheet climate are made. 1. Introduction a. General motivation Regional models have the potential to be used as smart interpolators, yielding useful data for a wide range of times and locations

  7. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part II: Present versus Future Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    results to infer potential air pollution changes in California. Changes in both the meteorological fields of stagnation days (NNSD) integrating all stagnation events, during which most of the air pollution episodes will be stronger in the future for the two main air pollution seasons (i.e., summer and winter). Increases

  8. Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions in South Florida and its possible impacts on the number of Asthma cases: Five years of correlations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions, wind speed and direction), and air quality indicators (ozone O3 and particulate matter PM2.5) are presented in this study. Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter have been both important triggers of asthma

  9. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 140: 792804, April 2014 Sensitivity of tropical-cyclone models to the surface drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    , University of Munich, Germany b Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA cHurricane in this direction. Key Words: hurricanes; tropical cyclones; typhoons; surface drag coefficient; frictional drag in deep rotating clouds. A fraction of the angular momentum drawn inwards is lost because

  10. To appear in the Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998, Version Date: September 30, 1998. Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    . Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological measurements from TOGA COARE Sean P. Burns, 1 Djamal measurements from buoys and ships, led to proposed offsets for the aircrafts' temperature, humidity data to the individual ship and buoy sensor heights for 264 over­flight comparisons. In addition, all

  11. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1389--1397, 2004 1389 Mesoscale Assimilation of TMI Rainfall Data with 4DVAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1389--1397, 2004 1389 Mesoscale rainfall data into a mesoscale model, using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR on mesoscale forecasts (e.g., Supertyphoon Paka in 1997 (Pu et al. 2002)), as the global analysis provide

  12. With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air quality implications of a changing climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air?" noting that ". . . changing climatic conditions could significantly affect the air quality in some quality implications of a changing climate. D iscussion of the potential sensitivity of air quality

  13. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  14. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  15. The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

  16. Ground Water and Surface Water Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al., 2002, Journal of Hydrology, The influence of microclimates and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground Water and Surface Water Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii Sample Field ID Date Field Field Location Number USGS

  17. Precipitation Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al., 2002, Journal of Hydrology, The influence of microclimates and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precipitation Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al., 2002, Journal of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii Funnel Date Date Site ID Location Latitude Longitude Altitude

  18. Demographic and trophic dynamics of fishes in relation to hydrologic variation in channel and floodplain habitats of the Brazos River, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeug, Steven Christopher

    2009-06-02

    Large rivers in North America have been subjected to a variety of hydrologic alterations that have negatively impacted aquatic fauna. These impacts have triggered restoration efforts, including management of flows, to ...

  19. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-31

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  20. Hydrologic evaluation methodology for estimating water movement through the unsaturated zone at commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, P.D.; Rockhold, M.L.; Nichols, W.E.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report identifies key technical issues related to hydrologic assessment of water flow in the unsaturated zone at low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. In addition, a methodology for incorporating these issues in the performance assessment of proposed LLW disposal facilities is identified and evaluated. The issues discussed fall into four areas: estimating the water balance at a site (i.e., infiltration, runoff, water storage, evapotranspiration, and recharge); analyzing the hydrologic performance of engineered components of a facility; evaluating the application of models to the prediction of facility performance; and estimating the uncertainty in predicted facility performance. To illustrate the application of the methodology, two examples are presented. The first example is of a below ground vault located in a humid environment. The second example looks at a shallow land burial facility located in an arid environment. The examples utilize actual site-specific data and realistic facility designs. The two examples illustrate the issues unique to humid and arid sites as well as the issues common to all LLW sites. Strategies for addressing the analytical difficulties arising in any complex hydrologic evaluation of the unsaturated zone are demonstrated.

  1. Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; Scherer, Martin; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2012-01-01

    Snow accumulation is critical for water availability in the Northern Hemisphere1,2, raising concern that global warming could have important impacts on natural and human systems in snow-dependent regions1,3. Although regional hydrologic changes have been observed (for example, refs 1,3 5), the time of emergence of extreme changes in snow accumulation and melt remains a key unknown for assessing climate- change impacts3,6,7. We find that the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble exhibits an imminent shift towards low snow years in the Northern Hemisphere, with areas of western North America, northeastern Europe and the Greater Himalaya showing the strongest emergence during the near- termdecadesandat2 Cglobalwarming.Theoccurrenceof extremely low snow years becomes widespread by the late twenty-first century, as do the occurrences of extremely high early-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing flood risk), and extremely low late-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing water stress). Our results suggest that many snow-dependent regions of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience increasing stress from low snow years within the next three decades, and from extreme changes in snow-dominated water resources if global warming exceeds 2 C above the pre-industrial baseline.

  2. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  3. Bayesian Neural Networks for Uncertainty Analysis of Hydrologic Modeling: A Comparison of Two Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2012-06-01

    Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been shown as useful tools to analyze modeling uncertainty of Neural Networks (NNs). This research focuses on the comparison of two BNNs. The first BNNs (BNN-I) use statistical methods to describe the characteristics of different uncertainty sources (input, parameter, and model structure) and integrate these uncertainties into a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to estimate total uncertainty. The second BNNs (BNN-II) lump all uncertainties into a single error term (i.e. the residual between model prediction and measurement). In this study, we propose a simple BNN-II, which use Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to calibrate Neural Networks with different structures (number of hidden units) and combine the predictions from different NNs to derive predictions and uncertainty analysis. We tested these two BNNs in two watersheds for daily and monthly hydrologic simulation. The BMA based BNNs developed in this study outperforms BNN-I in the two watersheds in terms of both accurate prediction and uncertainty estimation. These results show that, given incomplete understanding of the characteristics associated with each uncertainty source, the simple lumped error approach may yield better prediction and uncertainty estimation.

  4. Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

    2001-05-29

    Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

  5. The hydrological model of the Mahanagdong sector, Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herras, E.B.; Licup, A.C. Jr.; Vicedo, R.O.

    1996-12-31

    The Mahanagdong sector of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field is committed to supply 180 MWe of steam by mid-1997. An updated hydrological model was constructed based on available geoscientific and reservoir engineering data from a total of 34 wells drilled in the area. The Mahanagdong; resource is derived from a fracture-controlled and volcano hosted geothermal system characterized by neutral to slightly alkali-chloride fluids with reservoir temperatures exceeding 295{degrees}C. A major upflow region was identified in the vicinity of MG-3D, MG-14D and MG-5D. Isochemical contours indicate outflowing fluids with temperatures of 270-275{degrees}C to the south and west. Its southwesterly flow is restricted by the intersection of the impermeable Mahanagdong Claystone near MG-10D, which delimits the southern part of the resource. Low temperature (<200{degrees}C), shallow inflows are evident at the west near MG-4D and MG-17D wells which act as a cold recharge in this sector.

  6. Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

  7. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere.more »There is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil-freezing) part of the cycle rather than during deglacial transgression (warming and thawing). The atmospheric flux response to a warming climate is small, relative to the rest of the methane sources to the atmosphere in the global budget, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. The increased methane flux due to ocean warming could be completely counteracted by a sea level rise of tens of meters on millennial timescales due to the loss of ice sheets, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The model results give no indication of a mechanism by which methane emissions from the Siberian continental shelf could have a significant impact on the near-term evolution of Earth's climate, but on millennial timescales the release of carbon from hydrate and permafrost could contribute significantly to the fossil fuel carbon burden in the atmosphere–ocean–terrestrial carbon cycle.« less

  8. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PD Meyer; RJ Serne

    1999-12-21

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

  9. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

  10. FORMATION OF CALCIUM AND SILICA FROM PERCOLATION IN A HYDROLOGICALLY UNSATURATED SETTING, Y.M.,NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.B. Paces; J.F. Whelan; Z.E. Peterman; B.D. Marshall

    2000-07-27

    Geological, mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic evidence from coatings of calcite and silica on open fractures and lithophysal cavities within welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain indicate an origin from meteoric water percolating through a thick (500 to 700 m) unsaturated zone (UZ) rather than from pulses of ascending ground water. Geologic evidence for a UZ setting includes the presence of coatings in only a small percentage of cavities, the restriction of coatings to fracture footwalls and cavity floors, and an absence of mineral high-water marks indicative of water ponding. Systematic mineral sequences (early calcite, followed by chalcedony with minor quartz and fluorite, and finally calcite with intercalated opal forming the bulk of the coatings) indicate progressive changes in UZ conditions through time, rather than repeated saturation by flooding. Percolation under the influence of gravity also results in mineral textures that vary between steeply dipping sites (thinner coatings of blocky calcite) and shallowly dipping sites (thicker coatings of coarse, commonly bladed calcite, with globules and sheets of opal). Micrometer-scale growth banding in both calcite and opal reflects slow average growth rates (scale of mm/m.y.) over millions of years rather than only a few rapidly deposited growth episodes. Isotopic compositions of C, O, Sr, and U from calcite and opal indicate a percolation-modified meteoric water source, and collectively refute a deeper ground-water source. Chemical and isotopic variations in coatings also indicate long-term evolution of water compositions. Although some compositional changes are related to shifts in climate, growth rates in the deeper UZ are buffered from large changes in meteoric input. Coatings most likely formed from films of water flowing down connected fracture pathways. Mineral precipitation is consistent with water vapor and carbon dioxide loss from films at very slow rates. Data collectively indicate that mineral coatings formed in a UZ setting that has been hydrologically stable over million-year time scales.

  11. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  13. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV. Development of an isolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The following are covered: the Sun and its radiation, solar radiation and atmospheric interaction, solar radiation measurement methods, spectral irradiance measurements of natural sources, the measurement of infrared radiation, the measurement of circumsolar radiation, some empirical properties of solar radiation and related parameters, duration of sunshine, and meteorological variables related to solar energy. Included in appendices are manufacturers and distributors of solar radiation measuring instruments and an approximate method for quality control of solar radiation instruments. (MHR)

  14. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  15. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV-Development of an insolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Recognizing a need for a coordinated approach to resolve energy problems, certain members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) met in September 1974 and agreed to develop an International Energy Program. The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established within the OECD to administer, monitor and execute this International Energy Program. In July 1975, Solar Heating and Cooling was selected as one of the sixteen technology fields for multilateral cooperation. Five project areas, called tasks, were identified for cooperative activities within the IEA Program to Develop and Test Solar Heating and Cooling Systems. The objective of one task was to obtain improved basic resource information for the design and operation of solar heating and cooling systems through a better understanding of the required insolation (solar radiation) and related weather data, and through improved techniques for measurement and evaluation of such data. At the February 1976 initial experts meeting in Norrkoeping, Sweden, the participants developed the objective statement into two subtasks. (1) an insolation handbook; and (2) a portable meteorological instrument package. This handbook is the product of the first subtask. The objective of this handbook is to provide a basis for a dialogue between solar scientists and meteorologists. Introducing the solar scientist to solar radiation and related meteorological data enables him to better express his scientific and engineering needs to the meteorologist; and introducing the meteorologist to the special solar radiation and meteorological data applications of the solar scientist enables him to better meet the needs of the solar energy community.

  16. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, A. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Painter, S. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Harp, D. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Coon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Wilson, C. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Liljedahl, A. K. [Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks, USA; Romanovsky, V. E. [Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks, USA] (ORCID:0000000295152087)

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  17. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  18. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore »to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  19. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore »to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  20. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January--December 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Frederick, B.J.; Reece, D.K.; McCalla, W.L.; Watts, J.A.; Ziegler, K.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes, for the 12-month period (January through December 1993), the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily, on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed along with information collected on the surface flow systems which affect the quality or quantity of surface water. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data, an activity that contributes to the Site Investigations (SI) component of the ERP. This report provides and describes sources of hydrologic data for Environmental Restoration activities that use monitoring data to quantify and assess the impact from releases of contaminants from ORNL WAGs.

  1. Hydrologic and geologic aspects of low-level radioactive-waste site management. [Shallow land burial at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutshall, N.H.; Vaughan, N.D.; Haase, C.S.; Olsen, C.R.; Huff, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrologic and geologic site characterization is a critical phase in development of shallow land-burial sites for low-level radioactive-waste disposal, especially in humid environments. Structural features such as folds, faults, and bedding and textural features such as formation permeability, porosity, and mineralogy all affect the water balance and water movement and, in turn, radionuclide migration. Where these features vary over short distance scales, detailed mapping is required in order to enable accurate model predictions of site performance and to provide the basis for proper design and planning of site-disposal operations.

  2. Possible Impacts of Global Warming on Hydrology of the Ogallala Aquifer Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J. ); Epstein, Daniel J. ); Wang, Dahong; Vail, Lance W. ); Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Arnold, J G.

    1998-12-01

    The Ogallala or High Plains aquifer provides water for about 20% of the irrigated land in the United States. About 20 km{sup 3} (16.6 million acre-feet) of water are withdrawn annually from this aquifer. In general, recharge has not compensated for withdrawals since major irrigation development began in this region in the 1940s. The mining of the Ogallala has been pictured as an analogue to climate change in that many GCMs predict a warmer and drier future for this region. We anticipate the possible impacts of climate change on the sustainability of the aquifer as a source of water for irrigation and other purposes in the region. We have applied HUMUS, the Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S. to the Missouri and Arkansas-White-Red water resource regions that overlie the Ogallala. We have imposed three general circulation model (GISS, UKTR and BMRC) projections of future climate change on this region and simulated the changes that may be induced in water yields (runoff plus lateral flow) and ground water recharge. Each GCM was applied to HUMUS at three levels of global mean temperature (GMT) to represent increasing severity of climate change (a surrogate for time). HUMUS was also run at three levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (hereafter denoted by[CO2]) in order to estimate the impacts of direct CO2 effects on photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. Since the UKTR and GISS GCMs project increased precipitation in the Missouri basin, water yields increase there. The BMRC GCM predicts sharply decreased precipitation and, hence, reduced water yields. Precipitation reductions are even greater in the Arkansas basin under BMRC as are the consequent water yield losses. GISS and UKTR climates lead to only moderate yield losses in the Arkansas. CO2-fertilization reverses these losses and yields increase slightly. CO2 fertilization increases recharge in the base (no climate change) case in both basins. Recharge is reduced under all three GCMs and severities of climate change.

  3. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.

    1998-12-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

  4. A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Glass, R.J.; Yeh, T.C.; LaBrecque, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from electric resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity of the vadose zone (from the ERT measurements) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related. As of the 21st month of a 36-month project, a three-dimensional stochastic hydrologic inverse model for heterogeneous vadose zones has been developed. This model employs pressure and moisture content measurements under both transient and steady flow conditions to estimate unsaturated hydraulic parameters. In this model, an innovative approach to sequentially condition the estimate using temporal measurements has been incorporated. This allows us to use vast amounts of pressure and moisture content information measured at different times while keeping the computational effort manageable. Using this model the authors have found that the relative importance of the pressure and moisture content measurements in defining the different vadose zone parameters depends on whether the soil is wet or dry. They have also learned that pressure and moisture content measurements collected during steady state flow provide the best characterization of heterogeneity compared to other types of hydrologic data. These findings provide important guidance to the design of sampling scheme of the field experiment described below.'

  5. Review of information on hydrology and radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site 1976--1988, and annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, J.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Foley, M.G.; Bierschenk, W.H.; Harrison, R.P.; IT Corp., Richland, WA; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on changes in the state of knowledge on the hydrology and radionuclide migration that have occurred at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1976. In the present study, a literature review was conducted to examine information published since 1976 about the various activities that have occurred at the NTS. Information was collected from the literature on the site's geological, hydrological, geochemical, and geomorphic characteristics related to the impacts on the ground water from weapons testing and the disposal of waste at the NTS. This information was used to identify the state of knowledge about the NTS and the potential impacts of NTS activities on the ground water. More than 250 reports were reviewed, of which about 200 contained information pertinent to the subject of this report. Because the reports have never been collected in a single location, only those that were supplied by the US Department of Energy and other cooperating organizations could be reviewed, and some pertinent documents may have been missed. Appendix A contains an annotated bibliography of the reports reviewed. 149 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  7. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  8. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-15

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physico-chemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air quality models. more »Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 ?g m?3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA; O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 28 % of total OA; O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OAs (BBOA1; 13 % of total OA; O / C = 0.33 and BBOA2; 20 % of total OA; O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63) and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a~previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010), most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 to 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemistry might also be higher in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.« less

  9. Water resources and environmental hazards: Emphasis on hydrologic and cultural insight in the Pacific Rim. Proceedings of the AWRA annual summer symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, R.; Back, W.; Sidle, R.C.; Johnson, A.V. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held June 25--28,1995 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary and international forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on water-resources management and hydrologic consequences associated with natural and human-induced hazards in various countries. Attention was focused on comparing and contrasting the experience of managers, diverse technical specialists, and public policy decision makers that arise from the application of water resources principles, technologies, and theories in different hydrologic and geologic terrains, climate regimes, and legal and cultural settings. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix B of Attachment 3: Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4: Water resources protection strategy, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Attachment 3 Groundwater Hydrology Report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the processing site and Dry Flats disposal site. The Hydrological Services calculations contained in Appendix A of Attachment 3, are presented in a separate report. Attachment 4 Water Resources Protection Strategy describes how the remedial action will be in compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater standards.

  11. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  12. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2004-01-01

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  13. 1198 Hydrological Sciences Journal Journal des Sciences Hydrologiques, 58 (6) 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2013.803183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1SS, UK 14 Water Problems Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 15 Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, The Netherlands 20 Agrocampus Ouest, INRA, UMR1069, Soil Agro and hydroSystem, F-35000 Rennes, France Chair

  14. Effects of spatially variable snow cover on thermal regime and hydrology of an Arctic ice wedge polygon landscape identified using ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Effects of spatially variable snow cover on thermal regime and hydrology of an Arctic ice wedge. Understanding the linkages between microtopography, snow cover, thermal properties, and thaw depth is critical the spatial variability of snow distribution. We compare it's distribution to microtopography, estimated using

  15. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  16. Erosion and sediment transport in a temperate forested watershed are predicted with a new sediment module linked to the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM). The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    #12;#12;ABSTRACT Erosion and sediment transport in a temperate forested watershed are predicted with a new sediment module linked to the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM). The DHSVM sediment module represents the main sources of sediment generation in forested environments: mass wasting

  17. Effects of Averaging and Separating Soil Moisture and Temperature in the Presence of Snow Cover in a SVAT and Hydrological Model for a Southern Ontario,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    in a SVAT and Hydrological Model for a Southern Ontario, Canada, Watershed S. R. FASSNACHT Watershed Science, Canada E. D. SOULIS AND N. KOUWEN Civil Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada was tested for the 1993 snowmelt period on the Upper Grand River in Southern Ontario, Canada. The results

  18. T. R . Nisbet of Forest Research and C. D. Evans of Centre for Ecology and Hydrology March 2014 Forestry and surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R . Nisbet of Forest Research and C. D. Evans of Centre for Ecology and Hydrology March 2014 and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. Pollutant scavenging is expected and harvesting, and restocking also have effects. This Research Note considers each of these factors in turn

  19. Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Si-Yong

    1994-01-01

    The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

  20. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  1. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woollings, Tim

    eddy-driven jet stream. In previous studies it has been argued that a slow decay of the autocorrelation trend of the jet stream which cannot be explained as aris- ing from climate noise. These findings have through north-south shifts of the atmospheric eddy-driven jet stream. The jet stream steers weather

  2. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lüthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warming in deep crevasses.

  3. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lüthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warmingmore »in deep crevasses.« less

  4. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution and abundance of actinides in a nuclear test cavity and chimney. This work demonstrates that early-time processes can widely disperse actinides at low concentrations outside the melt glass, implying that melt glass dissolution may not be the sole mechanism for the release of actinides to groundwater. The study also provides evidence for the isotopic fractionation of plutonium under the extreme conditions accompanying nuclear explosions. In Chapter 4, X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the redox state of Fe and U in nuclear melt glass samples from the NTS. Both elements were found to occur in mixed valence states (Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} and U{sup 5+}/U{sup 6+}) in all samples. Comparison of the Fe and U redox states with published redox studies of synthetic glasses suggests that plutonium is predominantly in the Pu{sup 4+} oxidation state in the melt glasses. In Chapter 5, alpha autoradiography is used in a NTS field study to investigate the spatial distribution and transport of actinides in soils, and to help identify the size distribution and morphology of the actinide particles. It was found that {alpha}-emitting radionuclides have moved to at least 39 cm depth in the soil profile, far deeper than expected. The methodology that was developed could easily be applied to other field locations where actinides are dispersed in the soil zone. Chapter 6 summarizes the development of a method for measuring environmental levels of {sup 241}Am on the multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The method detection limit of 0.017 pCi/L is about two times lower than the best analyses possible by alpha spectrometry. Chapter 7 describes a chlorine-36 study of vertical groundwater transport processes in Frenchman Flat. Mass balance calculations developed from a {sup 36}Cl mixing model at well ER-5-3 No.2 are used to estimate vertical transport fluxes and average vertical flow velocities through the thick volcanic section underlying the basin. The study also documents the variations in {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios within the three princ

  5. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, ...

  6. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies. Authors: Chen, J.C. ; Ueng, Tzou-Shin ;...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies. Full Text Available March 1995 Computational...

  8. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Basin: 1. A 6 year record of energy balance, radiation, andorganic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850–carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over

  9. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Ziegler, K.S.; Reece, D.K.; Watts, J.A.; Frederick, B.J.; McCalla, W.L.; Pridmore, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes, for the 12-month period January through December 1994, the available dynamic hydrologic data collected on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed as well as information collected on surface flow systems in the surrounding vicinity that may affect the quality or quantity of surface water in the watershed. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to characterize the quantity and quality of water in the surface flow system, assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities, provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance of these data, and support long-term measures of contaminant fluxes at a spatial scale to provide a comprehensive picture of watershed performance that is commensurate with future remedial actions.

  10. SOURCES OF HYDROGRAPHIC AND METERIOLOGICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clair - Detroit River Lake Erie ·· Niagara River · · · · Lake Ontario · · · · Table 2. Inland data. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, Detroit River, and Niagara River) 75 6. Orientation chart, Lake 0 nt ar io

  11. 1394 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    knowledge of wave sources and our understanding of the mechanisms for wave generation would be com- plete Meteorological Society Latitudinal Variations Observed in Gravity Waves with Short Vertical Wavelengths M. JOAN TOSHITAKA TSUDA Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan ROBERT A

  12. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D leading ISW. The leading ISW gave rise to reversed flow in an 8-m layer above the bottom. It is argued 1991). This situation reinforces the importance of resuspension and mixing processes at the present

  13. VOLUME 29 MARCH 1999J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society 313

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui Xin

    jet stream. 1. Introduction Sea surface height (SSH), as measured by a radar altimeter, contains Meteorological Society 313 Seasonal Variations of Sea Surface Height in the Gulf Stream Region* KATHRYN A. KELLY Based on more than four years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, the Gulf Stream shows

  14. 1910 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Meteorological Society Jet Streaks in the Gulf Stream STEPHAN D. HOWDEN* AND D. RANDOLPH WATTS Graduate School. The presence of the jet streaks can be explained kinematically as a superposition of the Gulf Stream differs from the canonical picture of jet streak/baroclinic wave development in the atmospheric jet stream

  15. 1488 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    Meteorological Society A Climatology of the Circulation and Water Mass Distribution near the Philippine Coast by using historical data combined with observations from dozens of recent cruises near the Philippine coast the Philippine coast. 1. Introduction Recent studies of decadal climate variability have fo- cused on the water

  16. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  17. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  18. 140 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    Meteorological Society Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative­Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection, providing a quantitative relationship between these three aspects of moist convection. The water vapor

  19. 2320 VOLUME 33J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huck, Thierry

    Meteorological Society Basin-Mode Interactions and Selection by the Mean Flow in a Reduced´ Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France THIERRY HUCK Laboratoire de Physique des Oce´ans, CNRS, Brest of Rossby basin modes are investigated in the reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic framework. The linear

  20. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  1. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  2. A resolution analysis of two geophysical imaging methods for characterizing and monitoring hydrologic conditions in the Vadose zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, James Robert; Hammond, Gary.; Alumbaugh, David L.; La Brecque, D.J.

    2007-06-01

    This research project analyzed the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR), for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. The study was based on petrophysical conversion of moisture contents and solute distributions obtained from unsaturated flow forward modeling. This modeling incorporated boundary conditions from a potable water and a salt tracer infiltration experiment performed at the Sandia-Tech Vadose Zone (STVZ) facility, and high-resolution spatial grids (6.25-cm spacing over a 1700-m domain) and incorporated hydraulic properties measured on samples collected from the STVZ. The analysis process involved petrophysical conversion of moisture content and solute concentration fields to geophysical property fields, forward geophysical modeling using the geophysical property fields to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally, inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  3. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  4. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W. -L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H. -H.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D - PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  5. Estimation of field-scale soil hydraulic and dielectric parametersthrough joint inversion of GPR and hydrological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Finsterle, Stefan; Peterson, John; Hubbard,Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Majer, Ernest; Ward, Andy; Gee, Glendon

    2005-05-05

    A method is described for jointly using time-lapse multiple-offset cross-borehole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel time measurements and hydrological measurements to estimate field-scale soil hydraulic parameters and parameters of the petrophysical function, which relates soil porosity and water saturation to the effective dielectric constant. We build upon previous work to take advantage of a wide range of GPR data acquisition configurations and to accommodate uncertainty in the petrophysical function. Within the context of water injection experiments in the vadose zone, we test our inversion methodology with synthetic examples and apply it to field data. The synthetic examples show that while realistic errors in the petrophysical function cause substantial errors in the soil hydraulic parameter estimates,simultaneously estimating petrophysical parameters allows for these errors to be minimized. Additionally, we observe in some cases that inaccuracy in the GPR simulator causes systematic error in simulated travel times, making necessary the simultaneous estimation of a correction parameter. We also apply the method to a three-dimensional field setting using time-lapse GPR and neutron probe (NP) data sets collected during an infiltration experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site in Washington. We find that inclusion of GPR data in the inversion procedure allows for improved predictions of water content, compared to predictions made using NP data alone.

  6. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Meso-scale cooling effects of high albedo surfaces: Analysis of meteorological data from White Sands National Monument and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishman, B.; Taha, H.; Akbari, H.

    1994-05-20

    Urban summer daytime temperatures often exceed those of the surrounding rural areas. Summer ``urban heat islands`` are caused by dark roofs and paved surfaces as well as the lack of vegetation. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are interested in studying the effects of increasing the albedo of roof tops and paved surfaces in order to reduce the impacts of summer urban heat islands. Increasing the albedo of urban surfaces may reduce this heat island effect in two ways, directly and indirectly. The direct effect involves reducing surface temperature and, therefore, heat conduction through the building envelope. This effect of surface albedo on surface temperatures is better understood and has been quantified in several studies. The indirect effect is the impact of high albedo surfaces on the near surface air temperatures. Although the indirect effect has been modeled for the Los Angeles basin by Sailor, direct field observations are required. The objective of this report is to investigate the meso-scale climate of a large high albedo area and identify the effects of albedo on the near surface air temperature. To accomplish this task, data from several surface weather stations at White Sands, New Mexico were analyzed. This report is organized into six sections in addition to this introduction. The first gives the general geological, topographic, and meteorological background of White Sands. The second is a discussion of the basic surface meteorology of the White Sands region. This section is followed by a general discussion of the instrumentation and available data. The fourth section is a description of the method used for data analyis. The fifth section which presents the results of this analysis. Finally, the last section is the summary and conclusion, where a discussion of the results is presented.

  8. Sensitivity studies on the impacts of Tibetan Plateau snowpack pollution on the Asian hydrological cycle and monsoon climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Flanner, M. G.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Weiguo

    2011-03-02

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP), the highest and largest plateau in the world, has long been identified to be critical in regulating the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. The snowpack and glaciers over the TP provide fresh water to billions of people in Asian countries, but the TP glaciers have been retreating extensively at a speed faster than any other part of the world. In this study a series of experiments with a global climate model are designed to simulate black carbon (BC) and dust in snow and their radiative forcing and to assess the relative impacts of anthropogenic CO2 and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere and snow, respectively, on the snowpack over the TP, as well as their subsequent impacts on the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. Results show a large BC content in snow over the TP, especially the southern slope, with concentration larger than 100 µk/kg. Because of the high aerosol content in snow and large incident solar radiation in the low latitude and high elevation, the TP exhibits the largest surface radiative forcing induced by aerosols (e.g. BC, Dust) in snow compared to other snow-covered regions in the world. The aerosol-induced snow albedo perturbations generate surface radiative forcing of 5-25 W m-2 during spring, with a maximum in April or May. BC-in-snow increases the surface air temperature by around 1.0oC averaged over the TP and reduces snowpack over the TP more than that induced by pre-industrial to present CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere during spring. As a result, runoff increases during late winter and early spring but decreases during late spring and early summer (i.e. a trend toward earlier melt dates). The snowmelt efficacy, defined as the snowpack reduction per unit degree of warming induced by the forcing agent, is 1-4 times larger for BC-in-snow than CO2 increase during April-July, indicating that BC-in-snow more efficiently accelerates snowmelt because the increased net solar radiation induced by reduced albedo melts the snow more efficiently than snow melt due to warming in the air. The TP also influences the South (SAM) and East (EAM) Asian monsoon through its dynamical and thermal forcing. During boreal spring, aerosols are transported by the southwesterly and reach the higher altitude and/or deposited in the snowpack over the TP. While BC and OM in the atmosphere directly absorb sunlight and warm the air, the darkened snow surface polluted by BC absorbs more solar radiation and increases the skin temperature, which warms the air above by the increased sensible heat flux over the TP. Both effects enhance the upward motion of air and spur deep convection along the TP during pre-monsoon season, resulting in earlier onset of the SAM and increase of moisture, cloudiness and convective precipitation over northern India. BC-in-snow has a more significant impact on the EAM in July than CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. Contributed by the significant increase of both sensible heat flux associated with the warm skin temperature and latent heat flux associated with increased soil moisture with long memory, the role of the TP as a heat pump is elevated from spring through summer as the land-sea thermal contrast increases to strengthen the EAM. As a result, both southern China and northern China become wetter, but central China (i.e. Yangtze River Basin) becomes drier - a near zonal anomaly pattern that is consistent with the dominant mode of precipitation variability in East Asia. ?

  9. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore »the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  10. Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

  11. 1182 VOLUME 21J O U R N A L O F A T M O S P H E R I C A N D O C E A N I C T E C H N O L O G Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    from nearby forest fires. It is suggested that these echoes, which are rare for the CSU­CHILL coverage either the forest fires or oncoming winter. The local meteorological conditions likely affected

  12. Maddox, R. A., M. S. Gilmore, C. A. Doswell III, R. H. Johns, C. A. Crisp, D. W. Burgess, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: Meteorological analyses of the Tri-State tornado event of March 1925. Electronic J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    . Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: Meteorological analyses of the Tri-State tornado event of March 1925. CRISP,@ DONALD W. BURGESS,@ JOHN A. HART,~ AND STEVEN F. PILTZ> *Tucson, Arizona + Department

  13. HumanImpacts HYDROLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , industry, and hydropower generation. New dam construction has the potential to increase accessible runoff

  14. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  15. Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    + Interception + Storage - Interception = evapotranspiration + evaporation + infiltration - Storage = groundwater and/or snow pack and ice Important Variables: Precipitation Release of moisture by the atmosphere into plant system prior to reaching ground surface ­ Foliage Evaporation = function of air temp. and humidity

  16. Appendix HYDRO: Hydrological Investigations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal Facility Agreement and Consent04A:E

  17. Hydrological/Geological Studies

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A T E DIEPAR-

  18. ARM - The Hydrologic Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, AlaskaManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links FacilitiesEnvironmental

  19. Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.Food DrivevehículosStudents buildObjective

  20. A detailed examination of the chemical, hydrological, and geological properties influencing the mobility of {sup 222}radon and parent radionuclides in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexsmith, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    This study examines hydrological, geological and geochemical controls on {sup 222}Rn variability in groundwater in the Front Range of Colorado. Specific objectives of the study are: (1) to determine if there are any correlations or spatial relationships between {sup 222}Rn and the geological, geochemical and hydrogeological data; and (2) to determine whether it is geochemically reasonable for observed {sup 222}Rn levels to be the result of U and {sup 226}Ra accumulation by fracture filling minerals. Domestic-water wells were sampled and tested to determine the local aquifer characteristics and aqueous geochemistry. A multivariate and staged approach was used in the data analyses. Analysis of variance tests were used to test for relationships between {sup 222}Rn and the lithology of the study wells. The effects of rock-type were then removed from the chemical and hydrological variables by subtracting the mean value for each rock-type from each of the measured values within that rock-type (a residual transformation). Linear and linear multiple regression techniques were used to test for expected relationships between residual {sup 222}Rn levels and these variables, and stepwise linear regressions were used to test for any unforeseen multivariate relationships in the data. Correlograms, distance-weighted average and inverse-distance-weighted average predictions were used to look for spatial relationships in the data.