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1

Characteristics of Short Wavelength Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes  

SciTech Connect

Most Alfvenic activity in the frequency range between Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes and roughly one half of the ion cyclotron frequency on NSTX [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557], that is, approximately 0.3 MHz up to ? 1.2 MHz, are modes propagating counter to the neutral beam ions. These have been modeled as Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE) and are excited through a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. There is also a class of co-propagating modes at higher frequency than the counter-propagating CAE and GAE. These modes have been identified as CAE, and are seen mostly in the company of a low frequency, n=1 kink-like mode. In this paper we present measurements of the spectrum of these high frequency CAE (hfCAE), and their mode structure. We compare those measurements to a simple model of CAE and present evidence of a curious non-linear coupling of the hfCAE and the low frequency kink-like mode.

Fredrickson, E D; Podesta, M; Bortolon, A; Crocker, N A; Gerhardt, S P; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; LeBlanc, B; Levinton, F M

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing deformation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing deformation in Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing deformation in a metamorphic core complex of the northeastern basin and range Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing deformation in a metamorphic core complex of the northeastern basin and range Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Analysis of shear criteria enables the kinematics of two main ductile-shearing events (D1 and D2) to be established in the Raft River, Grouse Creek and Albion 'metamorphic core complex'. The first event (D1) is a NNE-thrusting and corresponds to Mesozoic shortening. A well developed non-coaxial ductile deformation (D2), of Cenozoic age, is marked by the occurrence of opposing eastward (in Raft River) and westward shear

3

Multimodel Combination Techniques for Analysis of Hydrological Simulations: Application to Distributed Model Intercomparison Project Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines several multimodel combination techniques that are used for streamflow forecasting: the simple model average (SMA), the multimodel superensemble (MMSE), modified multimodel superensemble (M3SE), and the weighted average method ...

Newsha K. Ajami; Qingyun Duan; Xiaogang Gao; Soroosh Sorooshian

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Amplification of compressional magnetohydrodynamic waves in systems with forced entropy oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation of compressional MHD waves is studied for an externally driven system. It is assumed that the combined action of the external sources and sinks of the entropy results in the harmonic oscillation of the entropy (and temperature) in the system. It is found that with the appropriate resonant conditions fast and slow waves get amplified due to the phenomenon of parametric resonance. In addition, it is shown that the considered waves are mutually coupled as a consequence of the nonequilibrium state of the background medium. The coupling is strongest when the plasma {beta}{approx_equal}1. The proposed formalism is sufficiently general and can be applied to many dynamical systems, both under terrestrial and astrophysical conditions.

Shergelashvili, Bidzina M. [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium); Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 B, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium); Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a Kazbegi Avenue, 0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Maes, Christian [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium); Poedts, Stefaan [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 B, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium); Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V. [Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a Kazbegi Avenue, 0160 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range  

SciTech Connect

Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

WATER MANAGEMENT & HYDROLOGICAL SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hydrological Science 21 CVEN 605:Environmental Measurement CVEN 609: Environmental Control of Oil and Hazardous Architecture and Urban Planning Wetlands ESSM 628: Wetland Delineation ESSM 633: Wetland Plant Taxonomy ESSM 631: Ecological Restoration of Wetland and Riparian Systems WFSC/OCEN 629: Lower Food Web Dynamics

9

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

10

Time Scales of Land Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper intends to investigate the time scales of land surface hydrology and enhance the understanding of the hydrological cycle between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil. A three-layer model for land surface hydrology is developed to study ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng; Samuel S. P. Shen; Qing-Cun Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

HEPEX: The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX) is an international project to advance technologies for hydrological forecasting. Its goal is “to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to demonstrate ...

John C. Schaake; Thomas M. Hamill; Roberto Buizza; Martyn Clark

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Post-breakup tectonics in southeast Brazil from thermochronological data and combined inverse-forward thermal history modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-breakup tectonics in southeast Brazil from thermochronological data and combined inverse November 2012. [1] The continental margin of southeast Brazil is elevated. Onshore Tertiary basins and Late with Andean tectonics and those in NE Brazil leads us to assume a plate-wide compressional stress

13

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCURACY AND CHOICE OF MODELS 5.1 Accuracy of Models Pilgrim (1975) has indicated that four levels. 30. Pilgrim, D.H., "Model Evaluation, Testing and Parameter Estimation in Hydrology", edited by T

Laio, Francesco

15

The Hydrologic Cycle of the La Plata Basin in South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main components of the hydrologic cycle of the La Plata basin in southeastern South America are investigated using a combination of observations, satellite products, and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–National Center for ...

Ernesto Hugo Berbery; Vicente R. Barros

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Snow Hydrology in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A snow hydrology has been implemented in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The snow hydrology consists of parameterizations of snowfall and snow cover fraction, a prognostic calculation of snow temperature, and a model of the snow ...

Susan Marshall; John O. Roads; Gary Glatzmaier

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Isotope hydrology of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria 3 School

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

Uncertainty quantification and validation of combined hydrological and macroeconomic analyses.  

SciTech Connect

Changes in climate can lead to instabilities in physical and economic systems, particularly in regions with marginal resources. Global climate models indicate increasing global mean temperatures over the decades to come and uncertainty in the local to national impacts means perceived risks will drive planning decisions. Agent-based models provide one of the few ways to evaluate the potential changes in behavior in coupled social-physical systems and to quantify and compare risks. The current generation of climate impact analyses provides estimates of the economic cost of climate change for a limited set of climate scenarios that account for a small subset of the dynamics and uncertainties. To better understand the risk to national security, the next generation of risk assessment models must represent global stresses, population vulnerability to those stresses, and the uncertainty in population responses and outcomes that could have a significant impact on U.S. national security.

Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Jennings, Barbara Joan; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Brown, Theresa Jean; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydrological consequences of global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

Miller, Norman L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Real-Time Variational Assimilation of Hydrologic and Hydrometeorological Data into Operational Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variational assimilation (VAR) of hydrologic and hydrometeorological data into operational hydrologic forecasting is explored. The data assimilated are the hourly real-time observations of streamflow and precipitation, and climatological ...

Dong-Jun Seo; Victor Koren; Neftali Cajina

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

489,476 1,602,500 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIntegratedChemical,Thermal,MechanicalandHydrologicalModeling&oldid313283" Category:...

22

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental. It is in this spirit that we advocate establishing a hydrologic remote sensing observatory (RSO) to advance sensing al. (2006), A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling

Katul, Gabriel

23

Enhancing Water Cycle Measurements for Future Hydrologic Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc., established the Hydrologic Measurement Facility to transform watershed-scale hydrologic research by facilitating access to advanced instrumentation and expertise ...

H. W. Loescher; J. M. Jacobs; O. Wendroth; D. A. Robinson; G. S. Poulos; K. Mcguire; P. Reed; B. P. Mohanty; J. B. Shanley; W. Krajewski

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

25

Hydrology Group - UNSAT-H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H Recharge Estimation UNSAT-H is a FORTRAN computer code used to simulate the one-dimensional flow of water, vapor, and heat in soils. The code addresses the processes of precipitation, evaporation, plant transpiration, storage, and deep drainage. The UNSAT-H computer code is used to understand the movement of water, heat, and vapor in soils so better decisions can be made about land use, waste disposal, and climate change. Example Tests and Typical Applications include studies of the water balance behavior of surface covers over shallow land burial waste sites and studies of land disturbance effects on recharge rates. The UNSAT-H computer code is managed by the Hydrology Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy

26

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

Harvey, Charles

27

Intensity of Hydrological Cycles in Warmer Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fact that the surface and tropospheric temperatures increase with increasing CO2 has been well documented by numerical model simulations; however, less agreement is found for the changes in the intensity of precipitation and the hydrological ...

Fanglin Yang; Arun Kumar; Michael E. Schlesinger; Wanqiu Wang

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Intercomparison of Hydrologic Processes in AMIP GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an intercomparison study under the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) to assess the abilities of 29 global climate models (GCMS) in simulating various aspects of regional and hydrologic processes in response to observed ...

K-M. Lau; Y. Sud; J. H. Kim

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Snowfall Limit Forecasts and Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological flood forecasting in mountainous areas requires accurate partitioning between rain and snowfall to properly estimate the extent of runoff contributing areas. Here a method to make use of snowfall limit information—a standard output of ...

Cara Tobin; Andrea Rinaldo; Bettina Schaefli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

L. Pan

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nonisothermal hydrologic transport experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

A field heater experimental plan is presented for investigating hydrologic transport processes in unsaturated fractured rock related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in an underground repository. The experimental plan provides a methodology for obtaining data required for evaluating conceptual and computer models related to HLW isolation in an environment where significant heat energy is produced. Coupled-process models are currently limited by the lack of validation data appropriate for field scales that incorporate relevant transport processes. Presented in this document is a discussion of previous nonisothermal experiments. Processes expected to dominate heat-driven liquid, vapor, gas, and solute flow during the experiment are explained, and the conceptual model for nonisothermal flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock is described. Of particular concern is the ability to confirm the hypothesized conceptual model specifically, the establishment of higher water saturation zones within the host rock around the heat source, and the establishment of countercurrent flow conditions within the host rock near the heat source. Field experimental plans are presented using the Apache Leap Tuff Site to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology. Both small-scale preliminary experiments and a long-term experiment are described.

Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

Nimz, G.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Forecast Combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast combinations have frequently been found in empirical studies to produce better forecasts on average than methods based on the ex-ante best individual forecasting model. Moreover, simple combinations that ignore correlations between forecast errors often dominate more refined combination schemes aimed at estimating the theoretically optimal combination weights. In this chapter we analyze theoretically the factors that determine the advantages from combining forecasts (for example, the degree of correlation between forecast errors and the relative size of the individual models’ forecast error variances). Although the reasons for the success of simple combination schemes are poorly understood, we discuss several possibilities related to model misspecification, instability (non-stationarities) and estimation error in situations where thenumbersofmodelsislargerelativetothe available sample size. We discuss the role of combinations under asymmetric loss and consider combinations of point, interval and probability forecasts. Key words: Forecast combinations; pooling and trimming; shrinkage methods; model misspecification, diversification gains

Allan Timmermann; Jel Codes C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Correcting Unintended Perturbation Biases in Hydrologic Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic data assimilation has become an important tool for improving hydrologic model predictions by using observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite sensors. Among existing data assimilation methods, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) ...

Dongryeol Ryu; Wade T. Crow; Xiwu Zhan; Thomas J. Jackson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Science of NOAA's Operational Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) is implementing a short- to long-range Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service (HEFS). The HEFS addresses the need to quantify uncertainty in hydrologic forecasts for flood risk management, water supply management, ...

Julie Demargne; Limin Wu; Satish Regonda; James Brown; Haksu Lee; Minxue He; Dong-Jun Seo; Robert Hartman; Henry D. Herr; Mark Fresch; John Schaake; Yuejian Zhu

37

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Research on chinese hydrological data quality management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data quality has become increasingly important in information constructions and low data quality will influence the decision-making process related to design, operation, and management of hydrology application. Although many researches could be found ... Keywords: assessment, data quality, dimension, improvement

Yufeng Yu; Yuelong Zhu; Jianxin Zhang; Jingjin Jiang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Downscaling Extended Weather Forecasts for Hydrologic Prediction  

SciTech Connect

Weather and climate forecasts are critical inputs to hydrologic forecasting systems. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) issues 8-15 days outlook daily for the U.S. based on the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model, which is a global model applied at about 2? spatial resolution. Because of the relatively coarse spatial resolution, weather forecasts produced by the MRF model cannot be applied directly to hydrologic forecasting models that require high spatial resolution to represent land surface hydrology. A mesoscale atmospheric model was used to dynamically downscale the 1-8 day extended global weather forecasts to test the feasibility of hydrologic forecasting through this model nesting approach. Atmospheric conditions of each 8-day forecast during the period 1990-2000 were used to provide initial and boundary conditions for the mesoscale model to produce an 8-day atmospheric forecast for the western U.S. at 30 km spatial resolution. To examine the impact of initialization of the land surface state on forecast skill, two sets of simulations were performed with the land surface state initialized based on the global forecasts versus land surface conditions from a continuous mesoscale simulation driven by the NCEP reanalysis. Comparison of the skill of the global and downscaled precipitation forecasts in the western U.S. showed higher skill for the downscaled forecasts at all precipitation thresholds and increasingly larger differences at the larger thresholds. Analyses of the surface temperature forecasts show that the mesoscale forecasts generally reduced the root-mean-square error by about 1.5 C compared to the global forecasts, because of the much better resolved topography at 30 km spatial resolution. In addition, initialization of the land surface states has large impacts on the temperature forecasts, but not the precipitation forecasts. The improvements in forecast skill using downscaling could be potentially significant for improving hydrologic forecasts for managing river basins.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Combined Satellite Infrared and Passive Microwave Technique for Estimation of Small-Scale Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous applications in climatology and hydrology where accurate information at scales smaller than the existing monthly/2.5° products would be invaluable. Here, a new microwave/infrared rainfall algorithm is introduced that combines ...

Martin C. Todd; Chris Kidd; Dominic Kniveton; Tim J. Bellerby

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hydrologic database user`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrologic Database is an electronic filing cabinet containing water-related data for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of the database is to enhance research on hydrologic issues at the NTS by providing efficient access to information gathered by a variety of scientists. Data are often generated for specific projects and are reported to DOE in the context of specific project goals. The originators of the database recognized that much of this information has a general value that transcends project-specific requirements. Allowing researchers access to information generated by a wide variety of projects can prevent needless duplication of data-gathering efforts and can augment new data collection and interpretation. In addition, collecting this information in the database ensures that the results are not lost at the end of discrete projects as long as the database is actively maintained. This document is a guide to using the database.

Champman, J.B.; Gray, K.J.; Thompson, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

Wood, E.F. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

44

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary...

45

Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

often function as hydrologic barriers separating regions of distinct fluid inclusion chemistry and temperature gradient. Distributed fracture networks play only a minor role in...

46

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling...

47

Search Combinators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

How Well Do Large-Scale Models Reproduce Regional Hydrological Extremes in Europe?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new methodology for assessing the ability of gridded hydrological models to reproduce large-scale hydrological high and low flow events (as a proxy for hydrological extremes) as described by catalogues of historical droughts [...

Christel Prudhomme; Simon Parry; Jamie Hannaford; Douglas B. Clark; Stefan Hagemann; Frank Voss

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Influence of Precipitation Variability and Partial Irrigation within Grid Cells on a Hydrological Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of natural and anthropogenic heterogeneity on a hydrological simulation are evaluated using a distributed biosphere hydrological model (DBHM) system. The DBHM embeds a biosphere model into a distributed hydrological scheme, ...

Qiuhong Tang; Taikan Oki; Shinjiro Kanae; Heping Hu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

52

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes by Using Airborne Multispectral and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes Monitoring Surface Hydrologic Processes EVS is developing a reliable, cost-effective, repeatable method for long-term, utility-scale environmental monitoring in arid environments. Environmental monitoring is one of the primary means to ensure that impacts associated with renewable energy development are minimized. One critical aspect of water resources monitoring is the study of surface hydrologic processes - flow conveyance, sediment transport, and groundwater recharge - associated with intermittent and ephemeral streams. Surface hydrology plays an important role in local ecosystems and water availability for human use, which is particularly critical for arid environments. Knowledge about ephemeral streams is the key to understanding the hydrologic cycle and how it influences the abundance and distribution

53

Comparison of artificial neural network and combined models in estimating spatial distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent in Samsami basin of Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is a key parameter in hydrological cycle, and information on regional SWE is required for various hydrological and meteorological applications, as well as for hydropower production and flood forecasting. This study compares ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Combined methods, Snow depth, Spatial distribution

Hossein Tabari; S. Marofi; H. Zare Abyaneh; M. R. Sharifi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the northeastern basin and range Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Analysis of shear criteria enables the kinematics of two main ductile-shearing events (D1...

55

Large Deflection Compressional Analysis of Unsymmetric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M. Kharazi. Mechanical Engineering Department, Sahand Universiy of Technology, Tabriz, Iran. H. R. Ovesy (*). Aerospace Engineering Department and Centre ...

56

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

57

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

58

The Hydrologic Feedback Pathway for Land–Climate Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of improvements in land surface initialization and specification of observed rainfall in global climate model simulations of boreal summer are examined to determine how the changes propagate around the hydrologic cycle in the coupled ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Large-Scale Aspects of the United States Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, gridpoint, atmospheric, hydrologic climatology consisting of atmospheric precipitable water, precipitation, atmospheric moisture flux convergence, and a residual evaporation for the conterminous United States is described. A large-...

John O. Roads; Shyh-C. Chen; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrologic Processes Associated with Cyclone Systems over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantial amount of precipitation in the midlatitudes occurs in association with extratropical cyclones. Using the data generated by version 1 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) Data Assimilation System for 1985-89, hydrologic ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Ming-Cheng Yen; Siegfried Schubert

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Successful Hydrologic Forecasting for California Using an Information Theoretic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Entropy Minimax technique from information theory has been applied to long-range, hydrologic forecasting in California. Based on 1852–1977 records, the technique exhibits a limited, but statistically significant, success for predictions one ...

R. A. Christensen; R. F. Eilbert; O. H. Lindgren; L. L. Rans

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

63

Performance of Drought Indices for Ecological, Agricultural, and Hydrological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors provide a global assessment of the performance of different drought indices for monitoring drought impacts on several hydrological, agricultural, and ecological response variables. For this purpose, they compare the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguería; Jorge Lorenzo-Lacruz; Jesús Julio Camarero; Juan I. López-Moreno; Cesar Azorin-Molina; Jesús Revuelto; Enrique Morán-Tejeda; Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Quantitative Precipitation Forecast Techniques for Use in Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative hydrologic forecasting usually requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. First, it is important to accurately measure the precipitation falling over a particular watershed of interest. Second, ...

Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael D. Hudlow

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Skill of Medium-Range Hydrological Ensemble Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrological ensemble prediction system, integrating a water balance model with ensemble precipitation forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS), is evaluated for two Belgian ...

Emmanuel Roulin; Stéphane Vannitsem

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

How Essential is Hydrologic Model Calibration to Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic model calibration is usually a central element of streamflow forecasting based on the ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) method. Evaluation measures of forecast errors such as root-mean-square error (RMSE) are heavily influenced by ...

Xiaogang Shi; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nonlinear Climate and Hydrological Responses to Aerosol Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium temperature and hydrological responses to the total aerosol effects (i.e., direct, semidirect, and indirect effects) are studied using a modified version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory atmosphere general circulation ...

Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Methodological Approaches to Projecting the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) is expected to have important impacts on water resources, with a variety of societal impacts. Recent research has shown that applying different methodologies to assess hydrologic impacts ...

Brent M. Lofgren; Andrew D. Gronewold; Anthony Acciaioli; Jessica Cherry; Allison Steiner; David Watkins

69

Evaluation of Precipitation Products for Global Hydrological Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate precipitation data are critical for hydrologic prediction, yet outside the developed world in situ networks are so sparse as to make alternative methods of precipitation estimation essential. Several such alternative precipitation ...

Nathalie Voisin; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Hydrologic and Thermodynamic Characteristics of the NCAR CCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological properties for selected aspects of the thermodynamic structure and hydrologic cycle are presented from a 15-yr numerical simulation conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model, version 3 (...

James J. Hack; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; James W. Hurrell

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hydrologic Verification: A Call for Action and Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, little attention has been focused on the systematic verification of operational hydrologic forecasts. This paper summarizes the results of forecast verification from 15 river basins in the United States. The verification scores for ...

Edwin Welles; Soroosh Sorooshian; Gary Carter; Billy Olsen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Validation and Use of a Semidistributed Hydrological Modeling System to Predict Short-Term Effects of Clear-Cutting on a Watershed Hydrological Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gestion Intégrée des Bassins versants à l'aide d'un Système Informatisé (GIBSI), a semidistributed hydrological modeling system, was evaluated for its ability to simulate the impact of deforestation on the hydrological regime of the Famine ...

Martin-Pierre Lavigne; Alain N. Rousseau; Richard Turcotte; Anne-Marie Laroche; Jean-Pierre Fortin; Jean-Pierre Villeneuve

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Impact of a Statistical Bias Correction on the Projected Hydrological Changes Obtained from Three GCMs and Two Hydrology Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate model scenarios depend crucially on the models’ adequate representation of the hydrological cycle. Within the EU integrated project Water and Global Change (WATCH), special care is taken to use state-of-the-art climate model output ...

Stefan Hagemann; Cui Chen; Jan O. Haerter; Jens Heinke; Dieter Gerten; Claudio Piani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydrologic Evaluation of Rainfall Estimates from Radar, Satellite, Gauge, and Combinations on Ft. Cobb Basin, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates rainfall estimates from the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), operational rain gauges, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely ...

Jonathan J. Gourley; Yang Hong; Zachary L. Flamig; Jiahu Wang; Humberto Vergara; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Inverting the above equation and solving for the real and imaginary parts one finds G r R r rRC R r LC RC L

76

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling Project Description The proposed research will make significant contributions to assessing, developing, and managing EGS systems. The research results will directly address many of key aspects of developing EGS and traditional geothermal reservoirs from site selection and characterization, reservoir creation, stimulation, and validation to reservoir sustainability. In particular, the proposed development provides a practical approach to assess long-term performance of EGS systems as well as optimum design and operation strategies, by consideration of fully coupled processes of thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and rock deformation effects. This research is strategically important to DOE's mission in the national energy resource and security. Furthermore, once the research goals are achieved, the developed simulator will substantially enhance the ability to characterized EGS systems, predict long-term performance of EGS systems, and optimize production strategies, and help energy extraction from EGS reservoir commercially feasible.

77

Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

Pompilio, R.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

79

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

80

Isotope hydrology of a basin and range geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the geothermal resources in Dixie Valley are exploited, a complete understanding of the hydrologic system is essential in managing the geothermal system. As a reconnaissance study in an area of minimal hydrologic research, it is necessary to examine many facets of the local hydrologic cycle in Dixie Valley. To this end, this paper will discuss the isotopic composition of local precipitation, the age and origin of the hot spring waters and the type of water most important for recharge of both the thermal and nonthermal systems. This study was accomplished by using stable and radioactive environmental isotopes, and to a lesser extent, water chemistry. Dueterium and oxygen-18 were heavily relied upon in formulating conclusions, but some tritium and carbon-14 sampling were also performed.

Jacobson, R.L.; Ingraham, N.L.; Campana, M.E.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the relationship between uncertainties in tropical divergence and the hydrological cycle in global models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of tropical divergence from three GCMs, three global reanalyses and four insitu soundings from field campaigns shows the existence of large uncertainties in the ubiquity of shallow divergent circulation as well as the depth and strength of the deep divergent circulation. More specifically, only two GCMs out of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses show significant shallow divergent circulation, which is present in all in-situ soundings, and of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses, only two global reanalyses have deep divergence profiles that lie within the range of uncertainty of the soundings. The relationships of uncertainties in the shallow and deep divergent circulation to uncertainties in present day and projected strength of the hydrological cycle from the GCMs are assessed. In the tropics and subtropics, deep divergent circulation is the largest contributor to moisture convergence that balances the net precipitation, and inter-model differences in the present day simulations carry over onto the future projections. In comparison to the soundings and reanalyses, the GCMs are found to have deeper and stronger divergent circulation. While these two characteristics of GCM divergence affect the strength of the hydrological cycle, they tend to compensate for each other so that their combined effect is relatively modest.

Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

83

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

84

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

85

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

86

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

87

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

88

GEOtop: A Distributed Hydrological Model with Coupled Water and Energy Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new distributed hydrological model, called GEOtop. The model accommodates very complex topography and, besides the water balance, unlike most other hydrological models, integrates all the terms in the surface energy balance ...

Riccardo Rigon; Giacomo Bertoldi; Thomas M. Over

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sensitivity of the Continental Hydrological Cycle to the Spatial Resolution over the Iberian Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the broad context of the downscaling methods that are used to study climatic change impacts, the dependence of the surface hydrological processes simulated by the Organising Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystem (ORCHIDEE) land surface ...

S. Vérant; K. Laval; J. Polcher; M. De Castro

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessing Hydrologic Impact of Climate Change with Uncertainty Estimates: Bayesian Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge in assessing the hydrologic effect of climate change remains the estimation of uncertainties associated with different sources, such as the global climate models, emission scenarios, downscaling methods, and hydrologic models. ...

Mohammad Sajjad Khan; Paulin Coulibaly

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

Bomblies, Arne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

WaterHUB: a resource for students and educators for learning hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of surface water hydrology involves understanding the occurrence, distribution and movement of water on the surface of the earth. Because of human impacts in the form of landuse change, the hydrologic processes at one geographic location may ... Keywords: HUBzero, WaterHUB, soil water assessment tool, surface water hydrology

Venkatesh Merwade; Wei Feng; Lan Zhao; Carol X. Song

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GRACE Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate Ole Baltazar of blood cell Delivers 10-Day / Monthly gravity field From 2002 Onwards Study gravity field changes | side 6 Range responds to Gravity #12;GRACE science results | 28. November 2007 | OA | side 7 Variations

Mosegaard, Klaus

94

Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling Reza Khanbilvardi Springs, MD, USA 1 Introduction Remote sensing data and information are shown great potential in supplying measurements, remote sensing based measurements are spatially averages over the pixels can appropriate

Krakauer, Nir Y.

95

Hydrologic data bank contents, 1978: user information bulletin 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USDOE/NV Hydrologic Data Storage and Retrieval System is composed of data files and computer programs for the manipulation of these files. This publication presents the names assigned to the data files and details the file contents. 18 tables.

Friesen, H.N.; Brekke, J.C.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Estimating the Long-Term Hydrological Budget over Heterogeneous Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the hydrological budget in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW; 5000 km2) of southern Kansas were made with a parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) model for the period 1996–2002. With its subgrid-scale distribution scheme, the ...

J. Song; M. L. Wesely; D. J. Holdridge; D. R. Cook; J. Klazura

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrologic budget for A/M Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation different components of the hydrologic budget for the groundwater flow system beneath the A/M Area were quantified. To accomplish this a regional groundwater flow mode, previously calibrated to the groundwater flow system beneath the A/M Area, was used to generate flux terms which could then be used to quantify specific components of the hydrologic budget. Sub-zones within the constructed model were defined in terms of groups of model nodes using the US Geological Survey code ZONEBUDGET. Cell-by-cell flux terms generated by the groundwater model for each node were used as input to calculate the hydrologic budgets for each of the defined sub-zones. Results were tabulated both as actual groundwater fluxes and as normalized quantities to allow easy comparison of flux magnitudes for different sub-zones. In the process of defining sub-zones and calculating the flux magnitude for different components of the hydrologic flow system, the adequacy of the groundwater flow model in describing the actual flow system was better determined. In effect, quantification of flux terms from the groundwater model functioned as a ``calibration tool`` in that specific changes to the groundwater model which would enhance its calibration were identified and are described in this report.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Haselow, J.S.; Jackson, D.G.; Ehrke, L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Climatic and Hydrologic Changes in the Tien Shan, Central Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze climatic and hydrologic data from 110 sites collected from the middle of the twentieth century to the present in the Tien Shan, one of the largest mountain systems of central Asia. In spite of a few confounding interregional ...

Vladimir B. Aizen; Elena M. Aizen; John M. Melack; Jeff Dozier

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - 4G_Hydrology_DEIR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G-1 ESA / 201074 G-1 ESA / 201074 Public Circulation Draft January 22, 2007 IV.G. Hydrology and Water Quality IV.G.1 Introduction This section discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential for the project to alter drainage patterns, increase stormwater runoff rates, adversely affect ground or surface water quality, or decrease groundwater recharge rates to an extent that the groundwater table is lowered. These factors were analyzed based on existing conditions within the Strawberry Creek Watershed and at the site, the extent and nature of proposed development, and future operation of the proposed facilities. IV.G.2 Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry Canyons in the East Bay hills, with the vast

102

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Simulation of vegetation and hydrology for climate change analysis of a mountain watershed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate change is expected to have both direct and indirect effects on water resources. Hydrologic impacts of two indirect effects, vegetation density and stomata! conductance,… (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Extraction of Hydrological Proximity Measures from DEMs using Parallel Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface topography is one of the most important terrain properties which impact hydrological, geomorphological, and ecological processes active on a landscape. In our previous efforts to develop a soil depth model based upon topographic and land cover variables, we extracted a set of hydrological proximity measures (HPMs) from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) as potential explanatory variables for soil depth. These HPMs may also have other, more general modeling applicability in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology, and so are described here from a general perspective. The HPMs we derived are variations of the distance up to ridge points (cells with no incoming flow) and variations of the distance down to stream points (cells with a contributing area greater than a threshold), following the flow path. These HPMs were computed using the D-infinity flow model that apportions flow between adjacent neighbors based on the direction of steepest downward slope on the eight triangular facets constructed in a 3 x 3 grid cell window using the center cell and each pair of adjacent neighboring grid cells in turn. The D-infinity model typically results in multiple flow paths between 2 points on the topography, with the result that distances may be computed as the minimum, maximum or average of the individual flow paths. In addition, each of the HPMs, are calculated vertically, horizontally, and along the land surface. Previously, these HPMs were calculated using recursive serial algorithms which suffered from stack overflow problems when used to process large datasets, limiting the size of DEMs that could be analyzed using that method to approximately 7000 x 7000 cells. To overcome this limitation, we developed a message passing interface (MPI) parallel approach for calculating these HPMs. The parallel algorithms of the HPMs spatially partition the input grid into stripes which are each assigned to separate processes for computation. Each of those processes then uses a queue data structure to order the processing of cells so that each cell is visited only once and the cross-process communications that are a standard part of MPI are handled in an efficient manner. This parallel approach allows analysis of much larger DEMs as compared to the serial recursive algorithms. In this paper, we present the definitions of the HPMs, the serial and parallel algorithms used in their extraction and their potential applications in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Tarboton, David G.; Watson, Daniel W.; Schreuders, Kimberly A.; Baker, Matthew M.; Wallace, Robert M.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hydrologic characterization of four cores from the Geysers Coring Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of hydrologic tests on 4 representative core plugs from Geysers Coring Project drill hole SB-15-D were related to mineralogy and texture. Permeability measurements were made on 3 plugs from caprock and one plug from the steam reservoir. Late-stage microfractures present in 2 of the plugs contributed to greater permeability, but the values for the 2 other plugs indicate a typical matrix permeability of 1 to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}m{sup 2}. Klinkenberg slip factor b for these plugs is generally consistent with the inverse relation between slip factor and permeability observed by Jones (1972) for plugs of much more permeable material. The caprock and reservoir samples are nearly identical metagraywackes with slight mineralogical differences which appear to have little effect on hydrology. The late stage microfractures are suspected of being artifacts. The capillary pressure curves for 3 cores are fit by power-law relations which can be used to estimate relative permeability curves for the matrix rocks.

Persoff, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Hulen, J.B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Institute

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology  

SciTech Connect

Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Influence of Hydrologic Modeling on the Predicted Local Weather: Two-Way Coupling of a Mesoscale Weather Prediction Model and a Land Surface Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-way coupling of the operational mesoscale weather prediction model known as Lokal Modell (LM; German Weather Service) with the land surface hydrologic “TOPMODEL”-Based Land Surface–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS; Princeton University) ...

G. Seuffert; P. Gross; C. Simmer; E. F. Wood

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of a Coupled Land Surface Hydrologic Model and Evaluation at a Critical Zone Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully-coupled land surface hydrologic model, Flux-PIHM, is developed by incorporating a land-surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land-surface scheme is adapted from the Noah LSM. Because PIHM is capable of ...

Yuning Shi; Kenneth J. Davis; Christopher J. Duffy; Xuan Yu

116

Multi-objective calibration and fuzzy preference selection of a distributed hydrological model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-objective evaluation of distributed hydrological models enables an analysis of prediction behaviour of individual sub-systems within a catchment. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate an application of multi-response, multisite calibration strategy ... Keywords: Distributed hydrological model, Fuzzy set, Genetic algorithm, Multi-objective calibration, Preference selection, Streamflow uncertainty, Water balance

Rajesh Raj Shrestha; Michael Rode

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Geo-MHYDAS: A landscape discretization tool for distributed hydrological modeling of cultivated areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of landscape variabilities by means of an adequate landscape discretization is of major importance in distributed hydrological modeling. In this paper, we present Geo-MHYDAS, a landscape discretization tool that allows explicit representation ... Keywords: Cultivated catchment, Discretization, GIS, Hydrology, Landscape, Topology

P. Lagacherie; M. Rabotin; F. Colin; R. Moussa; M. Voltz

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An efficient design pattern algorithm for the environmental and hydrologic/hydraulic ubiquitous model developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an efficient design pattern algorithm for the environmental and hydrologic/hydraulic ubiquitous model developments which specifies pattern names for retrieving, exploring the adapted patterns on the stage of design without pattern ... Keywords: composite design pattern, environmental, hydrologic/hydraulic, pattern, pattern names

Hyung Moo Kim; Jae Soo Yoo

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Integrated modeling within a Hydrologic Information System: An OpenMI based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a prototype software system for integrated environmental modeling that provides interoperability between the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) Hydrologic Information System (HIS) and ... Keywords: Data management, Environmental management, Integrated modeling, Systems analysis

Anthony M. Castronova; Jonathan L. Goodall; Mehmet B. Ercan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An efficient integrated approach for global sensitivity analysis of hydrological model parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient sensitivity analysis, particularly for the global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to identify the most important or sensitive parameters, is crucial for understanding complex hydrological models, e.g., distributed hydrological models. In this paper, ... Keywords: DTVGM, Global sensitivity analysis, RSMSobol' method, Response surface model, Statistical emulator

Che-Sheng Zhan; Xiao-Meng Song; Jun Xia; Charles Tong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Use of Bayesian Merging Techniques in a Multimodel Seasonal Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction System for the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skillful seasonal hydrologic predictions are useful in managing water resources, preparing for droughts and their impacts, energy planning, and many other related sectors. In this study, a seasonal hydrologic ensemble prediction system is ...

Lifeng Luo; Eric F. Wood

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsang, Y.W. : Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in aanalyses of heterogeneity and thermal-loading factors for a2005 Lin, W. , Sun, Y. : Thermal hydrological processes in

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrological climate-impact projections for the Rhine river: GCM-RCM uncertainty and separate temperature and precipitation effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change is expected to affect the hydrological cycle with considerable impacts on water resources. Climate induced changes in the hydrology of the Rhine river (Europe) are of major importance for the riparian countries, as the Rhine river ...

Thomas Bosshard; Sven Kotlarski; Massimiliano Zappa; Christoph Schär

124

Thermal-Hydrologic Sensitivity Analysis of Engineered Barrier System Design Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sensitivity study presents the effects that changing the ventilation time and initial linear power loading can have on specific thermal-hydrologic response parameters, such as waste package peak temperatures. Results show that an approximate 55 C drop in waste package peak temperature can be expected from the reference case design if the initial line loading is reduced to 0.90 kW/m or if the ventilation time is increased to 125 years. Increasing the waste package to waste package spacing in order to reduce the linear load to 0.90 kW/m requires additional emplacement drifts and an expansion of the area that the repository occupies. Increasing the ventilation duration requires that the repository remains open and is maintained for long periods of time. The effectiveness and expense of each design alternative must be weighed in determining the best way to achieve a particular thermal goal. Also, this sensitivity study shows that certain thermal goals may not be reached if only using ventilation, sometimes only the reduction of the linear load or a combination of linear loading and ventilation can reduce the thermal response to lower temperature specifications, if considered. As an example, Figure 1 shows that waste package peak temperatures below 96 C would require both a reduction in the linear load and an increase in ventilation duration.

B. Dunlap

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bayesian Neural Networks for Uncertainty Analysis of Hydrologic Modeling: A Comparison of Two Schemes  

SciTech Connect

Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been shown as useful tools to analyze modeling uncertainty of Neural Networks (NNs). This research focuses on the comparison of two BNNs. The first BNNs (BNN-I) use statistical methods to describe the characteristics of different uncertainty sources (input, parameter, and model structure) and integrate these uncertainties into a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to estimate total uncertainty. The second BNNs (BNN-II) lump all uncertainties into a single error term (i.e. the residual between model prediction and measurement). In this study, we propose a simple BNN-II, which use Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to calibrate Neural Networks with different structures (number of hidden units) and combine the predictions from different NNs to derive predictions and uncertainty analysis. We tested these two BNNs in two watersheds for daily and monthly hydrologic simulation. The BMA based BNNs developed in this study outperforms BNN-I in the two watersheds in terms of both accurate prediction and uncertainty estimation. These results show that, given incomplete understanding of the characteristics associated with each uncertainty source, the simple lumped error approach may yield better prediction and uncertainty estimation.

Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Kaiguang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

127

Klystron-linac combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

Stein, W.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting  

SciTech Connect

There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

Miller, Norman L.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Operational Eta Model Precipitation and Surface Hydrologic Cycle of the Columbia and Colorado Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface hydrology of the United States’ western basins is investigated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction operational Eta Model forecasts. During recent years the model has been subject to changes and upgrades that ...

Yan Luo; Ernesto H. Berbery; Kenneth E. Mitchell

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation of Hydrological Variability in West Africa Using Land Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of freshwater is a particularly important issue in Africa where large portions of the continent are arid or semiarid and climate is highly variable. Sustainable water resource management requires the assessment of hydrological ...

K. Y. Li; M. T. Coe; N. Ramankutty

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reconciling Simulated Moisture Fluxes Resulting from Alternate Hydrologic Model Time Steps and Energy Budget Closure Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological model predictions are sensitive to model forcings, input parameters, and the parameterizations of physical processes. Analyses performed for the Variable Infiltration Capacity model show that the resulting moisture fluxes are ...

Ingjerd Haddeland; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Thomas Skaugen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrologic implications of different large-scale meteorological model forcing datasets in mountainous regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-based hydrologic models require extensive meteorological forcing data, including data on precipitation, temperature, shortwave and longwave radiation, humidity, surface pressure and wind speed. Observations of precipitation and temperature ...

Naoki Mizukami; Martyn Clark; Andrew Slater; Levi Brekke; Marketa Elsner; Jeffrey Arnold; Subhrendu Gangopadhyay

133

Structure and Detectability of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States at ?° spatial resolution during the period 1950–99. Geographical regions, latitude bands, and elevation ...

T. Das; H. G. Hidalgo; D. W. Pierce; T. P. Barnett; M. D. Dettinger; D. R. Cayan; C. Bonfils; G. Bala; A. Mirin

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simulations of a Boreal Grassland Hydrology at Valdai, Russia: PILPS Phase 2(d)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project for the Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) aims to improve understanding and modeling of land surface processes. PILPS phase 2(d) uses a set of meteorological and hydrological data spanning 18 yr (1966–83)...

C. Adam Schlosser; Andrew G. Slater; Alan Robock; Andrew J. Pitman; Konstantin Ya. Vinnikov; Ann Henderson-Sellers; Nina A. Speranskaya; Ken Mitchell; The PILPS 2(D) Contributors

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A One-Dimensional Interactive Soil-Atmosphere Model for Testing Formulations of Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model representing a soil-atmosphere column in a GCM is developed for off-line testing of GCM soil hydrology parameterizations. Repeating three representative GCM sensitivity experiments with this one-dimensional model demonstrates that, to ...

Randal D. Koster; Peter S. Eagleson

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Conterminous United States Multilayer Soil Characteristics Dataset for Regional Climate and Hydrology Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil information is now widely required by many climate and hydrology models and soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes. This paper describes the development of a multilayer soil characteristics dataset for the conterminous United States (...

Douglas A. Miller; Richard A. White

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Comparing Large-Scale Hydrological Model Simulations to Observed Runoff Percentiles in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale hydrological models describing the terrestrial water balance at continental and global scales are increasingly being used in earth system modeling and climate impact assessments. However, because of incomplete process understanding and ...

Lukas Gudmundsson; Lena M. Tallaksen; Kerstin Stahl; Douglas B. Clark; Egon Dumont; Stefan Hagemann; Nathalie Bertrand; Dieter Gerten; Jens Heinke; Naota Hanasaki; Frank Voss; Sujan Koirala

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Uncertainties in Hydrologic and Climate Change Impact Analyses in Headwater Basins of British Columbia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three headwater basins located across British Columbia (BC) were analyzed using a hydrologic model driven by five global climate models (GCMs) and three scenarios from the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) to project future changes in ...

Katrina E. Bennett; Arelia T. Werner; Markus Schnorbus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A seasonal shift in the frequency of extreme hydrological events in southern New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent sequence of extreme hydrological events across the eastern US (e.g. Hurricane Irene in August 2011, Tropical Storm Lee in September 2011, Hurricane Sandy in October 2012) which led to unprecedented flooding including in various parts in ...

Adao H. Matonse; Allan Frei

140

Changes of Variability in Response to Increasing Greenhouse Gases. Part II: Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines hydrological variability and its changes in two different versions of a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model developed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory ...

Richard T. Wetherald

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluating Enhanced Hydrological Representations in Noah LSM over Transition Zones: Implications for Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors introduce and compare the performance of the unified Noah land surface model (LSM) and its augments with physically based, more conceptually realistic hydrologic parameterizations. Forty-five days of 30-min data collected over nine ...

Enrique Rosero; Zong-Liang Yang; Lindsey E. Gulden; Guo-Yue Niu; David J. Gochis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NOAA'S Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service: Building Pathways for Better Science in Water Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) program was established to meet our nation's need for more precise flash-flood forecast information. AHPS uses ...

John Mcenery; John Ingram; Qingyun Duan; Thomas Adams; Lee Anderson

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effects of Resolution of Satellite-based Rainfall Estimates on Hydrologic Modeling Skill at Different Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty due to resolution of current satellite-based rainfall products is believed to be an important source of error in applications of hydrologic modeling and forecasting systems. A method to account for input’s resolution and to accurately ...

Humberto Vergara; Yang Hong; Jonathan J. Gourley; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Viviana Maggioni; Dimitrios Stampoulis; Pierre-Emmanuel Kirstetter

144

Using a Soil Hydrology Model to Obtain Regionally Averaged Soil Moisture Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soil Hydrology Model (SHM) was modified, and daily simulations of soil volumetric water content were made at 38 Oklahoma Mesonet sites for July 1997. These model results were compared with soil moisture observations made at the mesonet sites ...

Todd M. Crawford; David J. Stensrud; Toby N. Carlson; William J. Capehart

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effect of a Canopy Interception Reservoir on Hydrological Persistence in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using decadal GCM simulations, the effects of a SVAT (Surface-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer) and a “bucket” land surface parameterization on simulated hydrological persistence are contrasted. The bucket model promotes persistence, as measured by ...

Russell Scott; Randal D. Koster; Dara Entekhabi; Max J. Suarez

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Distributed Hydrologic Modeling in Northwest Mexico Reveals the Links between Runoff Mechanisms and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distributed hydrologic model is used to evaluate how runoff mechanisms—including infiltration excess (RI), saturation excess (RS), and groundwater exfiltration (RG)—influence the generation of streamflow and evapotranspiration (ET) in a ...

Agustín Robles-Morua; Enrique R. Vivoni; Alex S. Mayer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

18-Year Land-Surface Hydrology Model Simulations for a Midlatitude Grassland Catchment in Valdai, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Off-line simulations of improved bucket hydrology and Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSiB) models are performed for a grassland vegetation catchment region, located at the Valdai water-balance research station in Russia, forced by observed ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Alan Robock; Konstantin Ya Vinnikov; Nina A. Speranskaya; Yongkang Xue

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Land Surface Hydrology Parameterization for Atmospheric General Circulation models Including Subgrid Scale Spatial Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterizations are developed for the representation of subgrid hydrologic processes in atmospheric general circulation models. Reasonable a priori probability density functions of the spatial variability of soil moisture and of precipitation ...

D. Entekhabi; P. S. Eagleson

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Implementation and Validation of Improved Land-Surface Hydrology in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New land-surface hydrologic parameterizations are implemented into the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) General Circulation Model (GCM). These parameterizations are: 1) runoff and evapotranspiration functions that include the ...

Kevin D. Johnson; Dara Entekhabi; Peter S. Eagleson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Application of a GCM to Study the Surface Hydrological Budget of Amazonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using The Florida State University Global Spectral Model, hydrological budgets are calculated over the Amazon River basin for the boreal summer of 1979 with and without a complex biosphere model (BATS) coupled to the atmospheric model. ...

Loren D. White; Mukul Tewari; T. N. Krishnamurti

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Investigating Error Metrics for Satellite Rainfall Data at Hydrologically Relevant Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the following open question: What set of error metrics for satellite rainfall data can advance the hydrologic application of new-generation, high-resolution rainfall products over land? The authors’ primary aim is to initiate ...

Faisal Hossain; George J. Huffman

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Test Bed for New Seasonal Hydrologic Forecasting Approaches in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Streamflow forecasting is critical to water resources management in the western United States. Yet, despite the passage of almost 50 years since the development of the first computerized hydrologic simulation models and over 30 years since the ...

Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A 100-Yr CCM1 Simulation of North China's Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year to year variability in North China's summertime hydrologic cycle is analyzed in a 100-yr CCM1 simulation. Eastern North America is included for comparative purposes with earlier work. On the basis of the simulated inherent variability of ...

Zengquan Fan; Robert J. Oglesby

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dynamic Response of Terrestrial Hydrological Cycles and Plant Water Stress to Climate Change in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration CO2 and climate change are expected to have a major effect on terrestrial ecosystem hydrological cycles and plant water stress in the coming decades. The present study investigates the potential responses of ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Toward the Use of Coupled Atmospheric and Hydrologic Models at Regional Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to present the possibilities offered by coupled atmospheric and hydrologic models as a new tool to validate and interpret results produced by atmospheric models. The advantages offered by streamflow observations are ...

Robert Benoit; Pierre Pellerin; Nick Kouwen; Harold Ritchie; Norman Donaldson; Paul Joe; E. D. Soulis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sensitivity of a GCM Simulation of Global Climate to the Representation of Land-Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of global climate to the characterization of the land-surface hydrology is investigated using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory GCM at R15 resolution with the standard Budyko bucket and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (...

John F. Stamm; Eric F. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Method for Coupling a Parameterization of the Planetary Boundary Layer with a Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deardorff's parameterization of the planetary boundary layer is adapted to drive a hydrologic model. The method converts the atmospheric conditions measured at the anemometer height at one site to the mean values in the planetary boundary layer ...

J. D. Lin; Shu Fen Sun

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sensitivity of Hydrological Simulations of Southeastern United States Watersheds to Temporal Aggregation of Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the sensitivity of the performance of hydrological models to certain temporal variations of precipitation over the southeastern United States (SEUS). Because of observational uncertainty in the estimates of rainfall ...

Satish Bastola; Vasubandhu Misra

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The NCEP–NCAR, NCEP–DOE, and TRMM Tropical Atmosphere Hydrologic Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates for the tropical atmospheric hydrologic cycle from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis I (RI), the NCEP–Department of Energy (NCEP–DOE) reanalysis II (RII), ...

John Roads

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Complexity of Snow Schemes in a Climate Model and Its Impact on Surface Energy and Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three different complexity snow schemes implemented in the ECMWF land surface scheme Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) are evaluated within the EC-EARTH climate model. The snow schemes are (i) the original ...

Emanuel Dutra; Pedro Viterbo; Pedro M. A. Miranda; Gianpaolo Balsamo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Regional Simulation of Intraseasonal Variations in the Summertime Hydrologic Cycle over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results taken from a finescale (25 km) regional modeling simulation for the summer of 1999, intraseasonal variations in the climatological summertime hydrologic cycle over the southwestern United States are described for two previously ...

Bruce T. Anderson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Temporal Variability of Soil Moisture and Surface Hydrological Quantities in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variance budget of land surface hydrological quantities is analyzed in the second Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP2) simulation made with the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) third-generation general ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

An Operation-Based Scheme for a Multiyear and Multipurpose Reservoir to Enhance Macroscale Hydrologic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an operation-based numerical scheme for simulating storage in and outflow from a multiyear and multipurpose reservoir at a daily time step in order to enhance the simulation capacity of macroscale land surface hydrologic ...

Yiping Wu; Ji Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling the effects of groundwater-fed irrigation on terrestrial hydrology over the conterminous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the ...

Guoyong Leng; Maoyi Huang; Qiuhong Tang; Huilin Gao; L. Ruby Leung

166

Evolving Multisensor Precipitation Estimation Methods: Their Impacts on Flow Prediction Using a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates evolving methodologies for radar and merged gauge–radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to determine their influence on the flow predictions of a distributed hydrologic model. These methods include the National ...

David Kitzmiller; Suzanne Van Cooten; Feng Ding; Kenneth Howard; Carrie Langston; Jian Zhang; Heather Moser; Yu Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; Dongsoo Kim; David Riley

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Community Hydrometeorology Laboratory for Fostering Collaborative Research by the Atmospheric and Hydrologic Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new community laboratory for fostering collaborative research between the atmospheric and hydrologic sciences communities is described. This facility, located at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, allows ...

Thomas T. Warner; David N. Yates; George H. Leavesley

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Nonparametric Postprocessor for Bias Correction of Hydrometeorological and Hydrologic Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique for quantifying and removing biases from ensemble forecasts of hydrometeorological and hydrologic variables. The technique makes no a priori assumptions about the distributional form of the variables, which is ...

James D. Brown; Dong-Jun Seo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrologic Interdependencies and Human Cooperation: The Process of Adapting to Droughts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bear River Basin, which includes portions of Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming in the United States, has a dynamic history of human hydrologic adaptations in relation to a highly variable water supply. These adaptations are embedded in a geographical ...

Joanna Endter-Wada; Theresa Selfa; Lisa W. Welsh

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hydrology and radionuclide migration program 1987 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's participation in the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the fiscal year 1987. The report discussed initial data from a new well (UE20n-1) drilled at the Cheshire site; presents a description of a proposed laboratory study of migration of colloids in fractured media; lists data collected during the drilling and initial sampling of UE20n-1; and describes a tentative proposal for work to be performed in FY88 by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Groundwater sampled from the new well at the Cheshire site contains tritium concentrations comparable to those measured in previous years from locations above and within the Cheshire cavity. This presence of tritium, as well as several other radionuclides, in a well 100 m away from the cavity region indicates transport of radionuclides, validates a proposed model of the flow path, and provides data on rates of groundwater flow. Previous work at the Cheshire site has shown that radionuclides are transported by colloids through fractured media. However, we have no data that can be used for predictive modeling, and existing theories are not applicable. While physical transport mechanisms of sub-micrometer colloids to defined mineral surfaces are well known, predictions based on well-defined conditions differ from experimental observations by orders of magnitude. The U.C. Berkeley group has designed a laboratory experiment to quantify colloid retention and permeability alteration by the retained colloids.

Marsh, K.V. (comp.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geology and hydrology of the Dakota formation in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

A better understanding of the Cretaceous stratigraphy is obtained if the term Dakota is employed as used by Meek and Hayden in the type area. In this manner, the entire 400-ft section of sediments in the type area in NE. Nebraska is included in the Dakota Formation. The Dakota thins westward and is represented in the Black Hills by the newcastel tongues at the base and sporadic outcrops of the Mowry sands at the top; it includes no part of older sandstone bodies. The Inyan Kara Group which resembles the Dakota Formation and crops out in the Black Hills, is not represented either at the surface or in the subsurface at the type area of the Dakota. It is believed that the Inyan Kara Group and the Dakota Formation are separate stratigraphic and hydrologic units with distinctive water characteristics and hydraulic pressures. There are 3 distinct water types in the Dakota Formation-- sodium chloride in the W. half of the state, sodium sulfate in the E. part of the state, and a smaller area of calcium-sulfate type water in the SE. quarter of the state. The sodium-chloride water in the Dakota Formation of W. South Dakota is connate. In E. South Dakota where the Dakota yields a sodium-sulfate type water, the formation is recharged by the Roundtop-Inyan Kara interval. (63 refs.)

Schoon, R.A.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Structural load combinations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the latest results of the program entitled, ''Probability Based Load Combinations For Design of Category I Structures''. In FY 85, a probability-based reliability analysis method has been developed to evaluate safety of shear wall structures. The shear walls are analyzed using stick models with beam elements and may be subjected to dead load, live load and in-plane eqrthquake. Both shear and flexure limit states are defined analytically. The limit state probabilities can be evaluated on the basis of these limit states. Utilizing the reliability analysis method mentioned above, load combinations for the design of shear wall structures have been established. The proposed design criteria are in the load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. In this study, the resistance factors for shear and flexure and load factors for dead and live loads are preassigned, while the load factor for SSE is determined for a specified target limit state probability of 1.0 x 10/sup -6/ or 1.0 x 10/sup -5/ during a lifetime of 40 years. 23 refs., 9 tabs.

Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Estimation of hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media with an inverse method based on iterated function systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highly heterogeneous nature of most geologic media, coupled with the restricted view of the subsurface available through boreholes, makes it difficult to determine the spatial distribution of subsurface hydrologic properties. Without such a description one cannot predict how fluid flow or solute transport will occur through permeable geologic media, and these predictions are critically needed to address many important environmental problems, including toxic chemical spills, leaking underground storage tanks, and long-term radioactive waste isolation. A common concern of these problems is the possible existence of high-permeability pathways connecting the problem to the biosphere. An understanding of flow and transport behavior is also necessary to optimize energy extraction from petroleum or geothermal reservoirs, where identifying low-permeability barriers that compartmentalize reservoirs and hamper efficient resource utilization is a key problem. The present work describes the development and application of a new inverse method for determining the spatial distribution of hydrologic properties (permeability and specific storage) in heterogeneous geologic media, using pressure transients from interference well tests. The method employs fractal concepts to improve efficiency and reliability. It is applicable to any sort of heterogeneous geologic medium in which wells communicate with each other, whether it be porous, fractured, or a combination thereof. Application to field data from a shallow aquifer at Kesterson Reservoir agrees well with an independent analysis using traditional well-test analysis methods. Application to a series of interference tests conducted at the Gypsy Pilot Site produces a detailed picture of the subsurface, which compares favorably with cross-well seismic imaging studies. 53 refs.

Doughty, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal springs of the appalachians  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal springs in nine areas in the Appalachians from Georgia to New York were studied in 1975 and 1976 using satellite imagery, local well and spring data, and results of current and early studies by other investigators. All the springs investigated discharge from folded and faulted sandstone or carbonate rocks in valley areas. Where geologic structure is relatively uncomplicated, ground water discharging from thermal springs probably has circulated to great depths roughly parallel to the strike of the bedding and has moved upward rapidly where a fault or faults cross the bedding. Hydrologic and chemical data suggest that most of the water discharging from warm springs in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone is derived from recharge entering and circulating through that formation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates very little is primarily water from deep circulation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates widely is warm water mixed with variable proportions of shallow-circulating cool water. Observed temperatures of the warm springs range from 18/sup 0/ to 41/sup 0/C; the highest chemical thermometer temperature is 84/sup 0/C. Agreement among observed, chalcedony, and cation temperatures of the warmest springs suggests reservoir temperatures of 30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Dissolved helium, arsenic, potassium, and delta/sup 18/O are considered as geothermal indicators. Tritium analyses are used to calculate fractions of old and modern components of mixed waters. Computer calculations of carbonate saturation indices show (1) considerable undersaturation in silica-rock warm spring waters and (2) carbonate equilibrium in the limestone and dolomite thermal waters. Better values of saturation indices are obtained when analyzed carbon dioxide rather than field pH is used in the computer input data. A method is described for adjusting delta/sup 13/C to correct for carbon dioxide outgassing from water samples.

Hobba, W.A. Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Chemerys, J.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Superconducting combined function magnets  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Combined Diagram: A Graphical Representation of Combination Evaporation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combination methods estimate the partition of sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface by combining the surface energy balance equation with the transfer equations for temperature and water vapor in the atmospheric surface layer. This paper ...

Ricardo C. Muñoz

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Erratum to: Using meteorological data to forecast seasonal runoff on the River Jhelum, Pakistan [Journal of Hydrology 361 (2008) 1023  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pakistan [Journal of Hydrology 361 (2008) 10­23] D.R. Archer a,*, H.J. Fowler b a JBA Consulting, South

Fowler, Hayley

179

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A method to hydrologically isolate water soluble wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural cover system with gravel used as a capillary barrier was designed and evaluated as a method to hydrologically isolate buried water soluble oil and gas wastes. Simulated cover systems were installed in 200 liter barrels and tested in a greenhouse. The treatments contained gravel barrier thicknesses of 0, 8, 15, 23, and 30 cm. Gravel was placed over a salt contaminated soil and was covered with 30 cm of a sandy clay topsoil. Drains were installed in the bottom of the barrels to collect drainage from the gravel layer and below the buried saline waste. Treatments were tested for effectiveness in both a wet and dry moisture regime using simulated monthly rainfall applications. Upward migration of soluble salts was monitored by measuring the electrical resistance of the soil by means of salinity sensors at the base of the topsoil. Electrical conductivity (EC) measurements of the leachate were used to determine the downward movement of soluble salts. Total volume of leachate from each drain was also monitored for each simulated month. Core samples were taken to determine the EC of the topsoil at the conclusion of the experiment. Electrical resistance values indicated that upward soluble salt migration occurred immediately on treatments which did not include a capillary barrier. EC values for all gravel barrier treatments indicated no upward migration of the buried saline waste. Values for EC at the base of the topsoil ranged from 10 to 20 dS M-1 in the treatments with no capillary barrier to 0.1 to 1.0 dS M-1 in treatments containing a capillary barrier. Effluent EC was significantly higher (29-56 dS M-1 ) from below the saline soil than from the gravel drain (2-9 dS M-1 ). In addition, 93 % of the leachate from both moisture regimes that permeated the cover system was collected from the gravel drain. These results indicate that a cover system which includes a capillary barrier would protect groundwater by greatly decreasing downward movement of water soluble constituents. Upward migration of buried water soluble wastes would also be prevented which would in turn protect the topsoil and surface waters.

Rooney, Daniel James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Abstract Deuterium (D) content of groundwater and precipitation, and tritium content of selected groundwater samples are used to infer flow paths for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area. The spatial distribution of calculated recharge elevations and residence times for groundwater samples tends to support the idea that Kilauea's rift zones comprise leaky boundaries within the regional groundwater flow system, partly isolating the groundwater in the area bounded by the rift zones and the Pacific Ocean. The south wesr

182

Hydrologic monitoring program, Rifle Oil Shale Facility Site, Colorado. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

A hydrologic monitoring and assessment program is being developed to investigate the hydrologic characteristics of surface and ground waters in the region of the Anvil Points, Colorado, Rifle Oil Shale Facility. The objectives of the program are to: evaluate ground-water contributions to study streams; assess contaminant transport capability of surface and ground waters; determine peak discharge magnitude and frequency relationships for use in designing possible spent oil shale disposal works; and assess the impact of specified hypothetical problems, events, or scenarios. To accomplish these objectives, seven major tasks have been identified: (1) literature review of existing studies dealing with the regional, hydrological, physiographical, geological, and climatological characteristics; (2) ground-water characterization; (3) drainage basin characteristics and channel geometry; (4) streamflow and sediment transport; (5) stream travel times; (6) analysis of spent shale disposal; and (7) support of water quality sample collection.

Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL AND REGIONAL HYDROLOGIC PROCESSES AND APPROPRIATE CONSERVATION OF MOIST ENTROPY  

SciTech Connect

The research supported by DOE funding addressed the fundamental issues of understanding and modeling of hydrologic processes in relation to regional and global climate change. The emphasis of this research effort was on the application of isentropic modeling and analysis to advance the accuracy of the simulation of all aspects of the hydrologic cycle including clouds and thus the climate state regionally and globally. Simulation of atmospheric hydrologic processes by the UW hybrid isentropic coordinate models provided fundamental insight into global monsoonal circulations, and regional energy exchange in relation to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Inter-comparison of UW hybrid model simulations with those from the NCAR Community Climate Model and other climate and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models investigated the increased accuracies gained in modeling long-range transport in isentropic coordinates and isolated differences in modeling of the climate state. The inter-comparisons demonstrated advantages in the simulation of the transport of the hydrologic components of the climate system and provided insight into the more general problems of simulating hydrologic processes, aerosols and chemistry for climate. This research demonstrated the viability of the UW isentropic-eta model for long-term integration for climate and climate change studies and documented that no insurmountable barriers exist to simulation of climate utilizing hybrid isentropic coordinate models. The results provide impetus for continued development of hybrid isentropic coordinate models as a means to advance accuracies in the simulation of global and regional climate in relation to transport and the planetary distribution of heat sources and sinks.

Donald Johnson, Todd Schaack

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data http://www.agu.org/eos_elec, 1999 American Geophysical Union.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data http://www.agu.org/eos_elec, © 1999 American Geophysical Union. Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data -- Randal D. Koster, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, Md., USA Use of remote sensing

Houser, Paul R.

186

Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion until 1 June 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Johnston & Pilgrim (1976), Hendrikson et al. (1988) (surface water hydrology), and for groundwater models by Yeh (1986), Carrera & Neuman (1986), Carrera (1988), Peck et al. (1988) and Olsthoorn (1995). Most--rather, this is normally a multi-extreme function. In surface water hydrology, the problem of calibration is treated more

Neumaier, Arnold

187

Coupled hydrological-economic modelling for optimised irrigated cultivation in a semi-arid catchment of West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled model system, consisting of a distributed hydrological model and an economic optimisation model, communicating via model interfaces, is developed and applied to investigate regional interdependencies between irrigated agriculture and regional ... Keywords: Decision support, Distributed hydrological modelling, Economic modelling, Irrigated agriculture, Model coupling, Non-linear programming, West Africa

H. Ahrends; M. Mast; Ch. Rodgers; H. Kunstmann

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29127, Berkeley, CA, 1990. Forecast of Thermal-HydrologicalDecember 1996 Figures A-l Forecast ofThermal-HydrologicalT I O N A L L A B ORATORY Forecast o f T h e n n a l - H y d

Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Preliminary subsurface hydrologic considerations: Columbia River Plateau Physiographic Province. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a discussion of the hydrologic conditions of the Columbia River Plateau physiographic province. The Columbia River Plateau is underlain by a thick basalt sequence. The Columbia River basalt sequence contains both basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. These sedimentary interbeds, which are layers of sedimentary rock between lava flows, are the main aquifer zones in the basalt sequence. Permeable interflow zones, involving the permeable top and/or rubble bottom of a flow, are also water-transmitting zones. A number of stratigraphic units are present in the Pasco Basin, which is in the central part of the Columbia River Plateau. At a conceptual level, the stratigraphic sequence from the surface downward can be separated into four hydrostratigraphic systems. These are: (1) the unsaturated zone, (2) the unconfined aquifer, (3) the uppermost confined aquifers, and (4) the lower Yakima basalt hydrologic sequence. A conceptual layered earth model (LEM) has been developed. The LEM represents the major types of porous media (LEM units) that may be encountered at a number of places on the Columbia Plateau, and specifically in the Pasco Basin. The conceptual LEM is not representative of the actual three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic sequence and hydrologic conditions existing at any specific site within the Columbia Plateau physiographic province. However, the LEM may be useful for gaining a better understanding of how the hydrologic regime may change as a result of disruptive events that may interact with a waste repository in geologic media.

Veatch, M.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A tool for mapping and spatio-temporal analysis of hydrological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a need in water sciences for computational tools to integrate large spatially distributed datasets to provide insight into the spatial and temporal domains of the data while allowing visualization, analysis in the spatial and temporal dimensions, ... Keywords: Data visualization, GIS, Geospatial software, Hydrological modeling, Integrated environmental modeling, Spatio-temporal analysis

J. A. Guzman, D. N. Moriasi, M. L. Chu, P. J. Starks, J. L. Steiner, P. H. Gowda

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrologic Processes Associated with the First Transition of the Asian Summer Monsoon: A Pilot Satellite Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a pilot study of the evolution of large-scale hydrologic processes associated with the first transition of the Asian summer monsoon in conjunction with the launching of the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) in May 1998 are ...

K-M. Lau; H-T. Wu; S. Yang

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling Terrestrial Hydrological Systems at the Continental Scale: Testing the Accuracy of an Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global hydrological routing algorithm (HYDRA) that simulates seasonal river discharge and changes in surface water level on a spatial resolution of 5? long × 5? lat is presented. The model is based on previous work by M. T. Coe and incorporates ...

Michael T. Coe

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Global Hydrological Cycle and Atmospheric Shortwave Absorption in Climate Models under CO2 Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spread among the predictions by climate models for the strengthening of the global hydrological cycle [i.e., the global mean surface latent heat flux (LH), or, equivalently, precipitation] at a given level of CO2-induced global warming is of ...

Ken Takahashi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Application of a Medium-Range Global Hydrologic Probabilistic Forecast Scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003–07. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium-Range ...

Nathalie Voisin; Florian Pappenberger; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Roberto Buizza; John C. Schaake

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A first look at Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) for hydrological seasonal prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first look at Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) for hydrological seasonal prediction Xing, the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2), with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initiali- zation to improve the seasonal climate forecasts. We present a first look at the capability

Pan, Ming

198

SWAT UNGAUGED: HYDROLOGICAL BUDGET AND CROP YIELD PREDICTIONS IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physically based, distributed hydrologic models are increasingly used in assessments of water resources, best management practices, and climate and land use changes. Model performance evaluation in ungauged basins is an important research topic. In this study, we propose a framework for developing Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) input data, including hydrography, terrain, land use, soil, tile, weather, and management practices, for the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB). We also present a performance evaluation of SWAT hydrologic budget and crop yield simulations in the UMRB without calibration. The uncalibrated SWAT model ably predicts annual streamflow at 11 USGS gauges and crop yield at a four?digit hydrologic unit code (HUC) scale. For monthly streamflow simulation, the performance of SWAT is marginally poor compared with that of annual flow, which may be due to incomplete information about reservoirs and dams within the UMRB. Further validation shows that SWAT can predict base flow contribution ratio reasonably well. Compared with three calibrated SWAT models developed in previous studies of the entire UMRB, the uncalibrated SWAT model presented here can provide similar results. Overall, the SWAT model can provide satisfactory predictions on hydrologic budget and crop yield in the UMRB without calibration. The results emphasize the importance and prospects of using accurate spatial input data for the physically based SWAT model. This study also examines biofuel?biomass production by simulating all agricultural lands with switchgrass, producing satisfactory results in estimating biomass availability for biofuel production.

Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Arnold, J. G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood River Wetland,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey #12;Front Cover: Aerial view of the lower Wood River Valley showing the Wood River Wetland.S. Geological Survey, January 2003. #12;Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood­5004 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;U.S. Department of the Interior KEN

200

Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the analysis of surface, upper-air, and satellite observations it is suggested that the hydrological cycle associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation acts in the mode of a self-regulating oscillator. The regulation occurs as a feedback ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Peter J. Webster; Richard H. Johnson; Richard Engelen; Tristan L'Ecuyer

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

22nd Conference on Hydrology A Satellite View of Global Water and Energy Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water and Energy Cycling (2008 - 88Annual_22hydro) 2/6/2008http://ams.confex.com/ams/88Annual22nd Conference on Hydrology 8.1 A Satellite View of Global Water and Energy Cycling Paul R. Houser in modeling capability, satellite observations have great potential to make huge advances in water and energy

Houser, Paul R.

202

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

203

Combination moisture and hydrogen getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

Harrah, Larry A. (Albuquerque, NM); Mead, Keith E. (Peralta, NM); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Autonomous grain combine control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Information about the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies...

206

The Relationships between Climatic and Hydrological Changes in the Upper Mississippi River Basin: A SWAT and Multi-GCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in major climatic and hydrological quantities in the upper Mississippi River basin and their interrelationships are studied with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool being driven by the contemporary climate and future scenario simulations ...

Er Lu; Eugene S. Takle; Jha Manoj

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Representation of Terrestrial Hydrology and Large-Scale Drought of the Continental United States from the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) is a state-of-the-art land–atmosphere reanalysis product that provides improved representation of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle compared to previous global reanalyses, having the potential to ...

Justin Sheffield; Ben Livneh; Eric F. Wood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Generation of an Hourly Meteorological Time Series for an Alpine Basin in British Columbia for Use in Numerical Hydrologic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially distributed numerical hydrologic models are useful tools for examining the long-term impact of forest harvesting in mountainous basins on streamflow regime properties. Such models require the input of long-duration subdaily ...

Markus Schnorbus; Younes Alila

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part II: Application to Land Surface Modeling with Satellite Rainfall Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this series of studies developed procedures to implement the multiscale filtering algorithm for land surface hydrology and performed assimilation experiments with rainfall ensembles from a climate model. However, a most important ...

Ming Pan; Eric F. Wood

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development of Hourly Meteorological Values From Daily Data and Significance to Hydrological Modeling at H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic modeling depends on having quality meteorological input available at the simulation time step. Often two needs arise: disaggregation from daily to subdaily and extend an available subdaily record. Simple techniques were tested for ...

Scott R. Waichler; Mark S. Wigmosta

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydrological cycles over the Congo and Upper Blue Nile basins: Evaluation of General Circulation Models Simulations and Reanalysis Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulations and predictions of the hydrological cycle by General Circulation Models (GCMs) are characterized by a significant degree of uncertainty. This uncertainty is reflected in the range of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) ...

Mohamed S. Siam; Marie-Estelle Demory; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

213

A Comparison of Simple and Complex Treatments of Surface Hydrology and Thermodynamics Suitable for Mesoscale Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative treatments of the hydrologic and thermodynamic processes at the earth's surface within a mesoscale model are discussed in this study. Specifically, the question of under what circumstances it is necessary to use a complex surface ...

Mercedes N. Lakhtakia; Thomas T. Warner

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) and Its Utility in Hydrologic Prediction in the La Plata Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-based precipitation estimates with high spatial and temporal resolution and large areal coverage provide a potential alternative source of forcing data for hydrological models in regions where conventional in situ precipitation ...

Fengge Su; Yang Hong; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effects of Initial Soil Moisture on Rainfall Generation and Subsequent Hydrologic Response during the North American Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the use of a mesoscale meteorological model and distributed hydrologic model, the effects of initial soil moisture on rainfall generation, streamflow, and evapotranspiration during the North American monsoon are examined. A collection of ...

Enrique R. Vivoni; Kinwai Tai; David J. Gochis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hydrological Budgets and Surface Energy Balance of Seven Subbasins of the Mackenzie River from the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The liquid and frozen hydrological budgets and the surface energy budget from seven subbasins of the Mackenzie River are analyzed using hourly integrals from the operational European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts model from September 1996 to ...

Alan K. Betts; Pedro Viterbo

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Probability Forecasting in Sweden: Some Results of Experimental and Operational Programs at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes new operational and experimental forecasting programs at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) designed to provide users with more detailed and more useful weather forecasts. User groups currently ...

Karl-Ivar Ivarsson; Rune Joelsson; Erik Liljas; Allan H. Murphy

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Effect of Soil Moisture on the Short-Term Climate and Hydrology Change—A Numerical Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a series of numerical experiments simulating the effect of large-scale irrigation on short-term changes of hydrology and climate. This is done through the use of a simple general circulation model, with a limited ...

T-C. Yeh; R. T. Wetherald; S. Manabe

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluating GCM Land Surface Hydrology Parameterizations by Computing River Discharges Using a Runoff Routing Model: Application to the Mississippi Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To relate general circulation model (GCM) hydrologic output to readily available river hydrographic data, a runoff routing scheme that routes gridded runoffs through regional- or continental-scale river drainage basins is developed. By following ...

G. E. Liston; Y. C. Sud; E. F. Wood

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Determining the optimal spatial distribution of weather station networks for hydrological modelling purposes using RCM datasets: An experimental approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many hydrological studies, the main limiting factor in model performance is the low meteorological data quality. In some cases, no meteorological records even exist. Installing weather stations becomes a necessity in these areas when water ...

Richard Arsenault; François Brissette

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of the Parameter Sensitivities of a Coupled Land Surface Hydrologic Model at a Critical Zone Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models (LSMs) and hydrologic models are parameterized models. The number of involved parameters is often large. Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a key step to understand the complex relationship between state variables and parameters, and ...

Yuning Shi; Kenneth J. Davis; Fuqing Zhang; Christopher J. Duffy

222

Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Simulation of the Global Hydrological Cycle in the CCSM Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3): Mean Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal and annual climatological behavior of selected components of the hydrological cycle are presented from coupled and uncoupled configurations of the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Community ...

James J. Hack; Julie M. Caron; Stephen G. Yeager; Keith W. Oleson; Marika M. Holland; John E. Truesdale; Philip J. Rasch

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir depths, borehole image, temperature, and mud logs indicate fluid flow is concentrated in extensively fractured damage zones of large faults well-oriented for slip.

225

Long-Term Climate Modeling and Hydrological Response to Climate Cycles in the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate and its influence on hydrological conditions are important considerations in the evaluation of the Yucca Mountain (YM) site as a geologic repository for disposal of U.S. commercial spent nuclear fuel and defense high level radioactive wastes. This report updates previous EPRI studies (reports 1013445 and 1015045), which produced a quantitative and paleo-climate-calibrated/verified model of how climate, infiltration, and YM flow properties might appear in the future. The studies also supported ass...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

229

Combining optical spectroscopy and interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern optical spectrographs and optical interferometers push the limits in the spectral and spatial regime, providing important new tools for the exploration of the universe. In this contribution I outline the complementary nature of spectroscopic & interferometric observations and discuss different strategies for combining such data. Most remarkable, the latest generation of "spectro-interferometric" instruments combine the milliarcsecond angular resolution achievable with interferometry with spectral capabilities, enabling direct constraints on the distribution, density, kinematics, and ionization structure of the gas component in protoplanetary disks. I will present some selected studies from the field of star- & planet formation and hot star research in order to illustrate these fundamentally new observational opportunities.

Kraus, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

The combined Lagrangian advection method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and test a new hybrid numerical method for simulating layerwise-two-dimensional geophysical flows. The method radically extends the original Contour-Advective Semi-Lagrangian (CASL) algorithm [5] by combining three computational elements for ... Keywords: Contour advection, Pseudo-spectral, Two-dimensional turbulence, Vortex methods

David G. Dritschel; Jérôme Fontane

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SECHIBA, a New Set of Parameterizations of the Hydrologic Exchanges at the Land-Atmosphere Interface within the LMD Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple parameterization of the hydrologic exchanges between the soil-vegetation system and the atmosphere (SECHIBA) has been developed for use within atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM).

Nathale I. Ducoudré; Katia Laval; Alain Perrier

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interception of precipitation by blueberry (Juniperus ashei Buchh.) and redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii Sudw.) canopies was analyzed using gross precipitation, throughfall, and stemflow data collected at the Texas A&M University Research Station at Sonora, Texas. The objective was to characterize interception by juniper canopy and litter, and to determine the redistributive effects of throughfall and stemflow on site hydrology. Based on a 10-year distribution pattern of rainfall, 66.2% of the precipitation underneath the canopies of J. pinchotii was in the form of throughfall, and 7.9% was in the form of stemflow. Beneath the canopies of J. ashei, 58.2% was in the form of throughfall, while 5. 1 % was in the form of stemflow. 41.6% of the precipitation that fell below the canopies was intercepted by the litter layer of both trees. I The effects that the canopies of both juniper species, and live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) have on herbaceous vegetation at various distances from the trunk and the response in herbaceous production following canopy removal were also evaluated. The canopies of all three species reduced herbaceous production. Total standing biomass was greatest at the dripline of all three species. Three years after canopy removal, herbaceous vegetation was bolstered at all sample locations. Hence, the tree species were not only inhibiting herbaceous production beneath the canopies, but also in the tree/shrub interspace as well. Following canopy removal, infiltration rates and sediment production were determined to assess how oak, juniper, bunchgrass, and shortgrass vegetation types and prescribed burning influence rangeland hydrology over time. Woody dominated areas had significantly greater infiltration rates and less sediment production than did grass dominated areas. In addition, following removal, the former oak and juniper mottes retained the hydrological characteristics of woody dominated areas indefinitely. Furthermore, although prescribed burning is an effective, inexpensive means of removing woody vegetation, a cost in the form of accelerated erosion rates was incurred for a brief period after the burn.

Hester, Justin Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

None

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume IV - Hydrologic Parameter Data Documentation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume IV of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the hydrologic parameter data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

Williams, J.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Chemistry of combined residual chlorination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and human-induced environmental changes have been altering the earth's surface and hydrological processes, and thus directly contribute to the severity of flood hazards. To understand these changes and their impacts, this research developed a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data have been addressed. This research develops an object-oriented hydrological modeling framework. Compared with traditional lumped or cell-based distributed hydrological modeling frameworks, the object-oriented framework allows basic spatial hydrologic units to have various size and irregular shape. This framework is capable of assimilating various GIS and remotely-sensed data with different spatial resolutions. It ensures the computational efficiency, while preserving sufficient spatial details of input data and model outputs. Sensitivity analysis and comparison of high resolution LIDAR DEM with traditional USGS 30m resolution DEM suggests that the use of LIDAR DEMs can greatly reduce uncertainty in calibration of flow parameters in the hydrologic model and hence increase the reliability of modeling results. In addition, subtle topographic features and hydrologic objects like surface depressions and detention basins can be extracted from the high resolution LiDAR DEMs. An innovative algorithm has been developed to efficiently delineate surface depressions and detention basins from LiDAR DEMs. Using a time series of Landsat images, a retrospective analysis of surface imperviousness has been conducted to assess the hydrologic impact of urbanization. The analysis reveals that with rapid urbanization the impervious surface has been increased from 10.1% to 38.4% for the case study area during 1974 - 2002. As a result, the peak flow for a 100-year flood event has increased by 20% and the floodplain extent has expanded by about 21.6%. The quantitative analysis suggests that the large regional detentions basins have effectively offset the adverse effect of increased impervious surface during the urbanization process. Based on the simulation and scenario analyses of land subsidence and potential climate changes, some planning measures and policy implications have been derived for guiding smart urban growth and sustainable resource development and management to minimize flood hazards.

Wang, Lei

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications. Accurate quantification of the IWP is essential for characterizing the hydrological and radiation budget. For example, the reflection of shortwave radiation by ice clouds reduces the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. Ice clouds can also trap the longwave radiation

245

Combined Corex/DRI technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasible steelmaking alternative, the Corex/direct reduction/electric arc furnace combination, provides an economic route for the production of high quality steel products. This combination is a major step into a new generation of iron and steel mills. These mills are based on the production of liquid steel using noncoking coal and comply with the increasing demands of environmental protection. The favorable production costs are based on: Utilization of Corex and DRI/HBI plants; Production of hot metal equal to blast furnace quality; Use of low cost raw materials such as noncoking coal and lump ore; Use of process gas as reducing agent for DRI/HBI production; and Use of electric arc furnace with high hot metal input as the steelmaking process. The high flexibility of the process permits the adjustment of production in accordance with the strategy of the steel mills. New but proven technologies and applications of the latest state of art steelmaking process, e.g., Corex, in conjunction with DRI production as basic raw material for an electric arc furnace, will insure high quality, high availability, optimized energy generation at high efficiency rates, and high product quality for steelmaking.

Flickenschild, A.J.; Reufer, F. [Deutsche Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Dusseldorf (Germany); Eberle, A.; Siuka, D. [Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau, Linz (Austria)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Combined power plants -- Past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early history of combined power plants is described, together with the birth of the CCGT plant (the combined cycle gas turbine). Sustained CCGT development in the 1970s and 1980s, based on sound thermodynamic considerations, is outlined. Finally more recent developments and future prospects for the combined gas turbine/steam turbine combined plant are discussed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interface between land and water is often a dynamic zone that responds to relatively short-term climatic and hydrologic forces. Coastal salt marshes occupy this zone between land and sea and typically are comprised of vegetated marsh intersected by channels and shallow ponds that are subject to flooding by winds, tides, and storm surges. Coastal salt marshes are widely regarded as zones of high macrophyte productivity. However, microalgae may contribute more to salt marsh productivity than previously realized, underscoring the importance of understanding algal dynamics in such systems. Benthic and planktonic chlorophyll-a (surrogate for total algal biomass), sediment AFDW, total suspended solids, salinity, and nutrients were examined in marsh ponds in the subtropical Guadalupe Estuary, TX, USA to determine the effects of hydrologic connections on algal biomass in this system. From May 2005 – May 2006 there were several pond connection, disconnection, and desiccation events. During periods of disconnection, algal biomass was higher in both the benthos and the water column than during connection events when supposed flushing occurred. Connection events also flushed out high NH4 accumulating in pond surface waters, but did not increase NOx. Therefore, the primary source of DIN seemed to be nutrient cycling within the ponds. There was a temporal effect on surface water salinity, which increased throughout the sampling period as bay water levels and subsequent pond connections decreased, demonstrating interannual variability and the link between seasons (wet vs. dry) and marsh inundation patterns (high water periods vs. low water periods) in this estuary.

Miller, Carrie J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Database of Mechanical and Hydrological Properties of WIPP Anhydrite Derived from Laboratory-Scale Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the purpose of demonstrating safe management, storage, and disposal of radioactive transuranic (TRU) waste generated by U.S. defense programs. The WIPP is located in southeastern New Mexico, and the underground facilities of the WIPP (i.e., experimental rooms, disposal rooms, etc.) are sited in the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of about 660 meters. The DOE has authorized the continuance of scientific research and engineering analysis related to the performance of the WIPP repository. One area of additional research relates to characterization of the mechanical and hydrological properties of anhydrite interbeds within the Salado Formation. These anhydrite interbeds have been penetrated by the shafts that provide access to the underground facilities and also lie in close proximity to the proposed radioactive waste disposal rooms at the repository horizon. Properties of particular interest are mechanical strength, deforrnational behavior, and fluid transport properties such as permeability. These properties will be used in calculationskmalyses of the mechanical and hydrological behavior of the anhydrite, in particular, and the shaft sealing system and disposal rooms, in general.

Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Soil physical and hydrological properties under three biofuel crops in Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While biofuel crops are widely studied and compared for their energy and carbon footprints, less is known about their effects on other soil properties, particularly hydrologic characteristics. Soils under three biofuel crops, corn (Zea mays), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and willow (Salix spp.), were analyzed seven years after establishment to assess the effects on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), penetration resistance (PR), water-holding capacity, and infiltration characteristics. The PR was the highest under corn, along with the lowest associated water content, while PR was 50-60% lower under switchgrass. In accordance with PR data, surface (0-10 cm) bulk density also tended to be lower under switchgrass. Both water infiltration rates and cumulative infiltration amounts varied widely among and within the three crops. Because the Philip model did not fit the data, results were analyzed using the Kostiakov model instead. Switchgrass plots had an average cumulative infiltration of 69 cm over 3 hours with a constant infiltration rate of 0.28 cm min{sup -1}, compared with 37 cm and 0.11 cm min{sup -1} for corn, and 26 cm and 0.06 cm min{sup -1} for willow, respectively. Results suggest that significant changes in soil physical and hydrologic properties may require more time to develop. Soils under switchgrass may have lower surface bulk density, higher field water capacity, and a more rapid water infiltration rate than those under corn or willow.

Bonin, Catherine [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Schmitz, Matthias [Rheinsche Friedrich/Wilhelms Universitaet Boon; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An update on the SRP burial ground area water balance and hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the burial ground area prepared by Hubbard and Emslie concluded that about 15 inches, almost one-third of the average annual precipitation, normally infiltrates the land surface and recharges the groundwater. Also, evapotranspiration was estimated to average 30 inches annually, and runoff from the land surface was estimated as 1 to 3 inches. More information has become available recently from lysimeter studies, climatic stations, groundwater studies, and stream discharge measurements. These additional data generally support the conclusions above with some modifications. The type of vegetation cover on the land surface affects the site hydrology and water budget components of evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The lysimeter studies indicate that about 12 inches more water is lost annually to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration with deep-rooted pine trees present than in areas where bare soil or shallow-rooted grass cover occur. Therefore, recharge in the burial ground area may differ from that with similar soils in forested areas of the Savannah River Plant. Study of the hydrologic properties of soils in the burial ground area indicates that infiltration rates for the soils generally are relatively high, exceeding one inch per hour. Runoff as overland flow tends to occur only with intense rainfall events of 1 inch or more. The soil-water characteristic curves are representative of relatively coarse-textured soils.

Wells, D.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site; Cook, J.W.

1986-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Explicitly integrating parameter, input, and structure uncertainties into Bayesian Neural Networks for probabilistic hydrologic forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Estimating uncertainty of hydrologic forecasting is valuable to water resources and other relevant decision making processes. Recently, Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been proved powerful tools for quantifying uncertainty of streamflow forecasting. In this study, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to incorporate the uncertainties associated with input, model structure, and parameter into BNNs. This framework allows the structure of the neural networks to change by removing or adding connections between neurons and enables scaling of input data by using rainfall multipliers. The results show that the new BNNs outperform the BNNs that only consider uncertainties associated with parameter and model structure. Critical evaluation of posterior distribution of neural network weights, number of effective connections, rainfall multipliers, and hyper-parameters show that the assumptions held in our BNNs are not well supported. Further understanding of characteristics of different uncertainty sources and including output error into the MCMC framework are expected to enhance the application of neural networks for uncertainty analysis of hydrologic forecasting.

Zhang, Xuesong; Liang, Faming; Yu, Beibei; Zong, Ziliang

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluating the SWAT Model for Hydrological Modeling in the Xixian Watershed and A Comparison with the XAJ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already declining water availability in Huaihe River, the 6th largest river in China, is further stressed by climate change and intense human activities. There is a pressing need for a watershed model to better understand the interaction between land use activities and hydrologic processes and to support sustainable water use planning. In this study, we evaluated the performance of SWAT for hydrologic modeling in the Xixian River Basin, located at the headwaters of the Huaihe River, and compared its performance with the Xinanjiang (XAJ) model that has been widely used in China

Shi, Peng; Chen, Chao; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Cai, Tao; Fang, Xiuqin; Qu, Simin; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiongfang

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evolution of the conceptual model of unsaturated zone hydrology at yucca mountain, nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is an arid site proposed for consideration as the United States' first underground high-level radioactive waste repository. Low rainfall (approximately 170 mm/yr) and a thick unsaturated zone (500-1000 m) are important physical attributes of the site because the quantity of water likely to reach the waste and the paths and rates of movement of the water to the saturated zone under future climates would be major factors in controlling the concentrations and times of arrival of radionuclides at the surrounding accessible environment. The framework for understanding the hydrologic processes that occur at this site and that control how quickly water will penetrate through the unsaturated zone to the water table has evolved during the past 15 yr. Early conceptual models assumed that very small volumes of water infiltrated into the bedrock (0.5-4.5 mm/yr, or 2-3 percent of rainfall), that much of the infiltrated water flowed laterally within the upper nonwelded units because o f capillary barrier effects, and that the remaining water flowed down faults with a small amount flowing through the matrix of the lower welded, fractured rocks. It was believed that the matrix had to be saturated for fractures to show. However, accumulating evidence indicated that infiltration rates were higher than initially estimated, such as infiltration modeling based on neutron borehole data, bomb-pulse isotopes deep in the mountain, perched water analyses and thermal analyses. Mechanisms supporting lateral diversion did not apply at these higher fluxes, and the flux calculated in the lower welded unit exceeded the conductivity of the matrix, implying vertical flow of water into the high permeability fractures of the potential repository host rock, and disequilibrium between matrix and fracture water potentials. The development of numerical modeling methods and parameter values evolved concurrently with the conceptual model in order to account for the observed field data, particularly fracture flow deep in the unsaturated zone. This paper presents the history of the evolution of conceptual models of hydrology and numerical models of unsaturated zone flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Flint, A.L., Flint, L.E., Kwicklis, E.M., Bodvarsson, G.S., Fabryka-Martin, J.M., 2001. Hydrology of Yucca Mountain. Reviews of Geophysics in press). This retrospective is the basis for recommendations for optimizing the efficiency with which a viable and robust conceptual model can be developed for a complex site. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [References: 87

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Bodvarsson, G. S.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Optimizing Feedstock Logistics and Assessment of Hydrologic Impacts for Sustainable Bio-Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising world petroleum prices and global warming are contributing to interest in renewable energy sources, including energy produced from agricultural crops and waste sources of biomass. A network of small mobile pyrolysis units may be the most cost effective system to convert biomass from agricultural feedstocks to bio-crude oil. Mobile pyrolysis units could be moved to the feedstock production fields thereby greatly simplifying feedstock logistics. In the North Central (NC) region of the U.S., possible feedstocks are corn stover, energy sorghum, and switchgrass. A grid-based Geographic Information System (GIS) program was developed to identify optimum locations for mobile pyrolysis units based on feedstock availability in the NC region. Model builder was used to automate the GIS analysis. Network analysis was used to find the best route to move the mobile pyrolysis units to new locations and to identify the closest refinery to transport the bio-crude oil. To produce bioenergy from feedstocks, the removal of biomass from agricultural fields will impact the hydrology and sediment transport in rural watersheds. Therefore, the hydrologic effects of removing corn stover from corn production fields in Illinois (IL) were evaluated using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated and validated for streamflow and sediment yields in the Spoon River basin in IL using observed data from the USGS. The modeling results indicated that as residue removal rates increased, evapotranspiration (ET) and sediment yields increased, while streamflows decreased. Biochar is a carbon-based byproduct of pyrolysis. To ensure that the mobile pyrolysis system is economically and environmental sustainable, the biochar must be land applied to the feedstock production fields as a soil amendment. An assessment of hydrologic changes due to the land application of biochar was made using the SWAT model in the Spoon River basin and changes in soil properties due to incorporation of biochar into the soil obtained from laboratory experiments by Cook et al. (2012). Model simulations indicated that a biochar application rate of 128 Mg/ha decreased water yield, and sediment yield in surface runoff and increased soil moisture and ET.

Ha, Mi-Ae 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3{times}3.0{times}3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992.

Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses  

SciTech Connect

Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Internal Variability of the Canadian RCM’s Hydrological Variables at the Basin Scale in Quebec and Labrador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a regional climate model’s (RCM’s) internal variability (IV) on climate statistics of annual series of hydrological variables is investigated at the scale of 21 eastern Canada watersheds in Quebec and Labrador. The analysis is ...

Marco Braun; Daniel Caya; Anne Frigon; Michel Slivitzky

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon J. FASULLO Program in Atmospheric, in final form 7 April 2005) ABSTRACT The 2002 Indian summer monsoon season is unique because of its in which ENSO events fail to be associated with significant monsoon anomalies. In this study, atmospheric

Fasullo, John

266

Development of an AutoWEP distributed hydrological model and its application to the upstream catchment of the Miyun Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the physically characterized distributed hydrological modeling scheme - WEP-L - a more generalized and expandable method - AutoWEP - has been developed that is equipped with updated modules for pre-processing and automatic parameter identification. ... Keywords: AutoWEP modeling, Parameter identification, Parameter optimization, Parameter partition, Sensitivity analysis

Xiaohui Lei; Yu Tian; Weihong Liao; Wei Bai; Yang Wen Jia; Yun Zhong Jiang; Hao Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An Efficient Approach to Modeling the Topographic Control of Surface Hydrology for Regional and Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current generation of land-surface models used in GCMs view the soil column as the fundamental hydrologic unit. While this may be effective in simulating such processes as the evolution of ground temperatures and the growth/ablation of a ...

Marc Stieglitz; David Rind; James Famiglietti; Cynthia Rosenzweig

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

HAPEX—MOBLIHY: A Hydrologic Atmospheric Experiment for the Study of Water Budget and Evaporation Flux at the Climatic Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HAPEX-MOBILHY program is aimed at studying the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a GCM (general circulation model) grid square, i.e., 104 km2. Different surface and subsurface networks will be operated during the year ...

Jean-Claude André; Jean-Paul Goutorbe; Alain Perrier

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Hydrologic-geophysical Method for Characterizing Flow and Transport Processes Within The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project was to employ two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar, to image a controlled infiltration of a saline tracer under unsaturated flow conditions. The geophysical techniques have been correlated to other more traditional hydrologic measurements including neutron moisture measurements and induction conductivity logs. Images that resulted during two successive infiltrations indicate the development of what appear to be preferential pathways through the finer grained materials, although the results could also be produced by cationic capture of free ions in clays. In addition the site as well as the developing solute plume exhibits electrical anisotropy which is likely related to flow properties. However the geologic significance of this phenomenon is still under investigation.

David Alumbaugh; Douglas LaBrecque; James Brainard; T.C. (Jim) Yeh

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

Management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base management plan documents the development and maintenance of the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base objectives; roles and responsibilities of the personnel involved; and flow, updating, and storage of the data.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Low Head/Low Power Hydropower Resource Assessment of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical assessment of the hydropower potential of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was the amount of low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) potential in the region and the fractions of this potential that corresponded to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW) technologies. To obtain these estimates, the hydropower potential of all the stream segments in the region, which averaged 2 miles in length, were calculated. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower in the

Power Hydropower; Douglas G. Hall; Gregory R. Carroll; Shane J. Cherry; Y D. Lee; Garold L. Sommers

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as straight as possible. One interpretation suggests that the Wildcat Fault is westerly dipping. This could imply that the Wildcat Fault may merge with the Hayward Fault at depth. However, due to the complex geology of the Berkeley Hills, multiple interpretations of the geophysical surveys are possible. iv An effort to construct a 3D GIS model is under way. The model will be used not so much for visualization of the existing data because only surface data are available thus far, but to conduct investigation of possible abutment relations of the buried formations offset by the fault. A 3D model would be useful to conduct 'what if' scenario testing to aid the selection of borehole drilling locations and configurations. Based on the information available thus far, a preliminary plan for borehole drilling is outlined. The basic strategy is to first drill boreholes on both sides of the fault without penetrating it. Borehole tests will be conducted in these boreholes to estimate the property of the fault. Possibly a slanted borehole will be drilled later to intersect the fault to confirm the findings from the boreholes that do not intersect the fault. Finally, the lessons learned from conducting the trenching and geophysical surveys are listed. It is believed that these lessons will be invaluable information for NUMO when it conducts preliminary investigations at yet-to-be selected candidate sites in Japan.

Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase- stresses-reflectivity determination by x #12;Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-stresses- reflectivity determination ................................................................................................. 83 2.10.1 The phase problem in diffraction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Machine translation system combination by confusion forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art system combination method for machine translation (MT) is based on confusion networks constructed by aligning hypotheses with regard to word similarities. We introduce a novel system combination framework in which hypotheses are ...

Taro Watanabe; Eiichiro Sumita

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Model combination by decomposition and aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on a general problem in statistical modeling, namely model combination. It proposes a novel feature-based model combination method to improve model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty. In this method, ...

Xu, Mingyang, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider static analyses based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains potentially provide more information than obtainable by performing the independent abstract ...

M. Codish; A. Mulkers; M. Bruynooghe; M. García de la Banda; M. Hermenegildo

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and fracturing'' of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Andersson, O. (VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden)); Willemsen, A. (IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and ``fracturing`` of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Andersson, O. [VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden); Willemsen, A. [IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Moana geothermal system in Reno, Nevada: A hydrologic, geochemical, and thermal analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Moana geothermal systems, located in Reno, Nevada, is a moderate-temperature geothermal resource used for space heating applications. Both historic and new hydrologic, thermal, and groundwater chemistry data were collected to evaluate the Moana system and to develop a calibrated numerical model of the geothermal aquifer for investigation of resource development scenarios. The new data collection consisted of static water level measurements and temperature with depth measurements for a 13-month period at 26 geothermal wells to investigate hydrologic and thermal changes with time. In addition, groundwater chemistry sampling at 10 wells was used to evaluate mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Collected information indicates that in the most heavily used portion of the geothermal aquifer, the hydraulic heads have declined. This decline may induce additional leakage of cooler water from the overlying unconfined aquifer and lead to decreased temperatures at well locations in the geothermal aquifer. The groundwater chemistry data show concentration changes with temperature for boron, chloride, fluoride, lithium, and bicarbonate that are a function of the degree of mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Temporal changes in these constituents may be used as an indication of relative temperature changes in the geothermal system caused by mixing at a given location. An attempt was made to use the hydraulic head and maximum temperature data to develop a calibrated numerical model for the Moana geothermal system. However, lack of information about the horizontal and vertical thermal and fluid fluxes made the development of a calibrated model not possible at this time. 25 refs., 54 figs., 6 tabs.

Jacobson, E.A.; Johnston, J.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geoenergy resources in Oregon: a review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geoenergy resources in Oregon, in addition to coal, include noncommercial deposits of oil shale, natural gas, and geothermal heat. Commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered at Mist in northwestern Oregon in 1979. Gas presently is being produced from five wells and additional exploratory drilling is underway. More than 2 million acres of Oregon land is under lease for petroleum and natural gas exploration, mostly in the Astoria embayment-Willamette syncline, central (Oregon) Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin, and eastern Tertiary nonmarine basin. The Cascade Range and eastern Oregon contain sizable resources of geothermal heat, of which a small part has been developed for space heating at Klamath Falls and Lakeview. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) comprising 432,000 acres have been identified, 422,000 acres are currently leased for geothermal development. KGRA's judged to have potential for generation of electrical power are Newberry Crater, Crump Geyser, and Alvord Desert. No adverse hydrologic effects have been noted to date from coal or other geoenergy exploration or development in Oregon, and no effects are expected if federal and state regulations are adhered to. The southwestern Oregon coals would have to be mined by underground methods. Potential hydrologic impacts would be local increases in sedimentation, turbidity, and mineralization of surface and ground water. Water-quality degradation, including both thermal pollution and increased concentrations of dissolved minerals, could result from geothermal development. Other potential problems include land subsidence and consumptive use of water associated with both coal and geothermal development. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Sidle, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

The use of hydrologically altered wetlands to treat wastewater in coastal Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two major environmental problems currently affecting Louisiana are a high rate of coastal wetland loss and high levels of surface water pollution. The application of secondarily treated wastewater to wetlands is proposed to dealing with these problems. The benefits of wetland wastewater treatment include improved surface water quality, increased accretion rates to balance subsidence, improved plant productivity, and decreased capital outlays for conventional engineering treatment systems. Wetland treatment systems can be designed and operated to restore deteriorating wetlands to previous levels of productivity. Hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are appropriate for receiving municipal and some industrial effluent. While the US EPA has determined that wetland wastewater treatment is effective in treating municipal effluent, it has discouraged the use of natural wetlands for this purpose. As a result, hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are being neglected and ultimately lost, while scarce funds are used to construct artificial wetlands to treat municipal effluent. Effluent discharge to existing wetlands can be incorporated into a comprehensive management plan designed to increase sediment and nutrient input into subsiding wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone. Secondarily treated effluent discharged from industrial and municipal facilities in the Louisiana coastal zone were reviewed for suitability for wetland wastewater treatment. Selection criteria for wetland treatment systems were developed for both dischargers and receiving wetlands. Designs for two potential case studies based on established selection criteria for wetland wastewater treatment systems are presented. An economic analysis of the four case studies indicates a high potential for financial savings when wetlands replace conventional engineering methods for tertiary treatment.

Breaux, A.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

287

Combined Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline (EPRI report 1023971) was developed in 2012 to provide plant owners and operators with a comprehensive guideline for identifying and quantifying combined-cycle performance losses and appropriate recovery activities for a generic F-Class combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). This report, Combined-Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline, has been developed as an adjunct ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen-vacancy Transport in Heavily Doped Cubic Zirconia: Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies.

289

Hydrological parameter estimations from a conservative tracer test with variable-density effects at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site  

SciTech Connect

Reliable predictions of groundwater flow and solute transport require an estimation of the detailed distribution of the parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity) controlling these processes. However, such parameters are difficult to estimate because of the inaccessibility and complexity of the subsurface. In this regard, developments in parameter estimation techniques and investigations of field experiments are still challenging and necessary to improve our understanding and the prediction of hydrological processes. Here we analyze a conservative tracer test conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site in 2001 in a heterogeneous unconfined fluvial aquifer. Some relevant characteristics of this test include: variable-density (sinking) effects because of the injection concentration of the bromide tracer, the relatively small size of the experiment, and the availability of various sources of geophysical and hydrological information. The information contained in this experiment is evaluated through several parameter estimation approaches, including a grid-search-based strategy, stochastic simulation of hydrological property distributions, and deterministic inversion using regularization and pilot-point techniques. Doing this allows us to investigate hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity distributions and to compare the effects of assumptions from several methods and parameterizations. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of variabledensity transport processes and the hydrological relevance of incorporating various sources of information in parameter estimation approaches. Among others, the variable-density effect and the effective porosity distribution, as well as their coupling with the hydraulic conductivity structure, are seen to be significant in the transport process. The results also show that assumed prior information can strongly influence the estimated distributions of hydrological properties.

Dafflon, Baptisite; Barrash, Warren; Cardiff, Michael A.; Johnson, Timothy C.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Perface: Research advances in vadose zone hydrology throughsimulations with the TOUGH codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulators are playing an increasingly important role in advancing our fundamental understanding of hydrological systems. They are indispensable tools for managing groundwater resources, analyzing proposed and actual remediation activities at contaminated sites, optimizing recovery of oil, gas, and geothermal energy, evaluating subsurface structures and mining activities, designing monitoring systems, assessing the long-term impacts of chemical and nuclear waste disposal, and devising improved irrigation and drainage practices in agricultural areas, among many other applications. The complexity of subsurface hydrology in the vadose zone calls for sophisticated modeling codes capable of handling the strong nonlinearities involved, the interactions of coupled physical, chemical and biological processes, and the multiscale heterogeneities inherent in such systems. The papers in this special section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' are illustrative of the enormous potential of such numerical simulators as applied to the vadose zone. The papers describe recent developments and applications of one particular set of codes, the TOUGH family of codes, as applied to nonisothermal flow and transport in heterogeneous porous and fractured media (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGH2). The contributions were selected from presentations given at the TOUGH Symposium 2003, which brought together developers and users of the TOUGH codes at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California, for three days of information exchange in May 2003 (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGHsymposium). The papers presented at the symposium covered a wide range of topics, including geothermal reservoir engineering, fracture flow and vadose zone hydrology, nuclear waste disposal, mining engineering, reactive chemical transport, environmental remediation, and gas transport. This Special Section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' contains revised and expanded versions of selected papers from the symposium, with special attention to issues related to the vadose zone and unsaturated flow systems. The first paper, written by the original developer of TOUGH, Karsten Pruess, provides an overview of the history of the TOUGH codes, the main physical processes considered, their mathematical and numerical implementation, and case studies. That paper is followed by a review article summarizing inverse modeling applications performed by iTOUGH2. A subsequent group of papers deals with diverse unsaturated zone systems, highlighting the versatility of the code to handle a variety of processes in different geologic settings. Simulation capabilities of the TOUGH codes are increasingly used for geologic carbon sequestration studies as testified by the next group of papers. The final series of papers demonstrates the use of the TOUGH codes in support of remediation and engineering applications. These studies discuss biological and reactive chemical transport simulations, the design of clean-up operations and landfill management, and the analysis of engineered soil stabilization. As guest editors, we thank the authors for their interesting contributions, and the many reviewers for their careful and constructive review comments. Finally, on behalf of all of the authors and ourselves, we express our sincerest appreciation to Rien van Genuchten for providing the opportunity to publish these papers together in a Special Section of ''Vadose Zone Journal''.

Finsterle, Stefan; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

292

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article considers static analysis based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains provide more information potentially than obtained by the independent analyses. However, the construction of a combined analysis often requires redefining the basic operations for the combined domain. A practical ap-proach to maintain precision in combined analyses of logic programs which reuses the individual analyses and does not redefine the basic operations is illustrated, The advantages of the approach are that (1) proofs of correctness for the new domains are not required and (2) implementations can be reused. The approach is demonstrated by showing that a combined sharing analysis — constructed from “old” proposals — compares well with other “new” proposals suggested in recent

Michael Codish; Anne Mulkers; Maurice Bruynooghe; Maria Garcia De La Banda; Manuel Hermenegildo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ultrasonic Fatigue Testing System Combined with Nondestructive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ultrasonic Fatigue Testing System Combined with ... High and Very High Cycle Fatigue in Al and Cu Thin Films on Si Substrate.

294

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana. (Photos courtesy of Duke Energy.) Gasification...

295

Enhancing Open Circuit Voltage by Combining Thermoelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancing Open Circuit Voltage by Combining Thermoelectric Materials and Dye -Sensitized Solar Cell in Series · Estimation of Compressive Strength of High ...

296

Combining Nanotubes and Antibodies for Breast Cancer ' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the special combination—the antibody and the nanotube—have critical ... The carbon nanotubes attached to the antibodies also become linked to ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery Speaker(s): Anubhav Jain Date: December 18, 2012 - 12:00pm...

298

Impacts of Climate Variation and Catchment Area on Water Balance and Lake Hydrologic Type in Groundwater-Dominated Systems: A Generic Lake Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes are a major geologic feature in humid regions, and multiple lake hydrologic types exist with varying physical and chemical characteristics, connections among lakes, and relationships to the landscape. The authors developed a model of water ...

Jeffrey Cardille; Michael T. Coe; Julie A. Vano

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Limits to Flood Forecasting in the Colorado Front Range for Two Summer Convection Periods using Radar Nowcasting and a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood forecasting in mountain basins remains a challenge given the difficulty in accurately predicting rainfall and in representing hydrologic processes in complex terrain. This study identifies flood predictability patterns in mountain areas ...

Hernan A. Moreno; Enrique R. Vivoni; David J. Gochis

300

Limits to Flood Forecasting in the Colorado Front Range for Two Summer Convection Periods Using Radar Nowcasting and a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood forecasting in mountain basins remains a challenge given the difficulty in accurately predicting rainfall and in representing hydrologic processes in complex terrain. This study identifies flood predictability patterns in mountain areas ...

Hernan A. Moreno; Enrique R. Vivoni; David J. Gochis

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coupling the ISBA Land Surface Model and the TOPMODEL Hydrological Model for Mediterranean Flash-Flood Forecasting: Description, Calibration, and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative coupling between the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) and the hydrological model TOPMODEL has been specifically designed for flash-flood forecasting in the ...

Ludovic Bouilloud; Katia Chancibault; Béatrice Vincendon; Véronique Ducrocq; Florence Habets; Georges-Marie Saulnier; Sandrine Anquetin; Eric Martin; Joel Noilhan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part II: Uncertainties in River Routing Simulation Related to Flow Velocity and Groundwater Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the companion paper to this one (Part I), the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere–Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (ISBA-TRIP) continental hydrological system of the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques is evaluated ...

B. Decharme; R. Alkama; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Verification of Precipitation Forecasts from NCEP’s Short-Range Ensemble Forecast (SREF) System with Reference to Ensemble Streamflow Prediction Using Lumped Hydrologic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation forecasts from the Short-Range Ensemble Forecast (SREF) system of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) are verified for the period April 2006–August 2010. Verification is conducted for 10–20 hydrologic basins in ...

James D. Brown; Dong-Jun Seo; Jun Du

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Investigating the Ability of a Land Surface Model to Simulate Streamflow with the Accuracy of Hydrological Models: A Case Study Using MOPEX Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) project, after calibration of model parameters, complex rainfall–runoff hydrological models (HMs) simulated streamflow better than land surface models (LSMs), including the Soil–Water–...

Olga N. Nasonova; Yeugeniy M. Gusev; Yeugeniy E. Kovalev

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A long-term hydrologically based data set of land surface fluxes and states for the conterminous U.S.: Update and extensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a publicly available, long-term (1915 – 2011), hydrologically consistent data set for the conterminous United States, intended to aid in studies of water and energy exchanges at the land surface. These data are gridded at a spatial ...

Ben Livneh; Eric A. Rosenberg; Chiyu Lin; Bart Nijssen; Vimal Mishra; Kostas M. Andreadis; Edwin P. Maurer; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

306

An analysis of the hydrologic effects of proposed test drilling in the Winema National Forest near Crater Lake, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a preliminary study on the hydrologic regime underlying the Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon. The study was performed to provide a basis for evaluating the potential for polluting Crater Lake by drilling exploratory boreholes on the flanks of the mountain. A simple conceptual model of the hydrologic regime was developed by synthesizing the data from the region surrounding the Caldera. Based on the conceptual model, a series of numerical simulations aimed at establishing the basic groundwater flow patterns under and surrounding the lake were performed. In addition to the numerical simulations, we used simple volumetric techniques for estimating the distance that drilling mud would migrate away from the borehole if drilling proceeded without drilling fluid returns. Based on our calculations that show the regional flow of groundwater will oppose the flow of drilling mud toward the lake, and based on our volumetric estimate of drilling mud migration, our study concludes that drilling without returns will not pollute Crater Lake, nor will it affect the hydrologic regime in the immediate vicinity of the Crater Lake Caldera.

Sammel, E.A.; Benson, S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrological Cycle over South and Southeast Asian River Basins as Simulated by PCMDI/CMIP3 Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how CMIP3 climate models describe the hydrological cycle over four major South Asian river basins (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for the XX, XXI, and XXII centuries. For the XX century, models simulated water balance and total runoff quantities are neither consistent with the observed mean river discharges nor among the models. Most of the models underestimate the water balance for the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong basin and overestimate it for the Indus basin. The only modest inter-model agreement is found for the Indus basin in terms of precipitation, evaporation and the strength of the hydrological cycle and for the Brahmaputra basin in terms of evaporation. While some models show inconsistencies for the Indus and the Ganges basins, most of the models seem to conserve water at the river basin scale up to a good degree of approximation. Models agree on a negative change of the water balance for Indus and a positive change in the strength of the hydrological cycle, whereas for Brahma...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Pascale, Salvatore

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming  

SciTech Connect

Snow accumulation is critical for water availability in the Northern Hemisphere1,2, raising concern that global warming could have important impacts on natural and human systems in snow-dependent regions1,3. Although regional hydrologic changes have been observed (for example, refs 1,3 5), the time of emergence of extreme changes in snow accumulation and melt remains a key unknown for assessing climate- change impacts3,6,7. We find that the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble exhibits an imminent shift towards low snow years in the Northern Hemisphere, with areas of western North America, northeastern Europe and the Greater Himalaya showing the strongest emergence during the near- termdecadesandat2 Cglobalwarming.Theoccurrenceof extremely low snow years becomes widespread by the late twenty-first century, as do the occurrences of extremely high early-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing flood risk), and extremely low late-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing water stress). Our results suggest that many snow-dependent regions of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience increasing stress from low snow years within the next three decades, and from extreme changes in snow-dominated water resources if global warming exceeds 2 C above the pre-industrial baseline.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; Scherer, Martin [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Recent developments in stochastic modeling and upscaling of hydrologic properties in tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of detailed geostatistical simulations of porosity has been produced for a layered stratigraphic sequence of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The simulations are produced using a composite. model of spatial continuity and they are highly conditioned to abundant drill hole (core) information. A set of derivative simulations of saturated hydraulic conductivity has been produced, in the absence of conditioning data, using a cross-variable relationship developed from similar data elsewhere. The detailed simulations reproduce both the major stratigraphic units and finer scale layering indicated by the drill hole data. These simulations have been scaled up several order of magnitude to represent block-scale effective hydrologic properties suitable for use in numerical modeling of groundwater flow and transport. The upscaling process involves the reformulation of a previously reported method that iteratively adapts an initial arbitrary grid to ``homogenize`` the detailed hydraulic properties contained within the adjusted cell limits and to minimize the size of cell in highly heterogeneous regions. Although the computation of the block-effective property involves simple numerical averaging, the blocks over which these averages are computed are relatively homogeneous, which reduces the numerical difficulties involved in averaging non-additive properties, such as permeability. The entire process of simulation and upscaling is rapid and computationally efficient compared with alterative techniques. It is thus suitable for the Monte Carlo evaluation of the uncertainty in site characterization as it affects the results of groundwater flow and transport calculations.

Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrological and solute budgets of Lake Qinghai, the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water level and chemistry of Lake Qinghai are sensitive to climate changes and are important for paleoclimatic implications. An accurate understanding of hydrological and chemical budgets is crucial for quantifying geochemical proxies and carbon cycle. Published results of water budget are firstly reviewed in this paper. Chemical budget and residence time of major dissolved constituents in the lake are estimated using reliable water budget and newly obtained data for seasonal water chemistry. The results indicate that carbonate weathering is the most important riverine process, resulting in dominance of Ca2+ and DIC for river waters and groundwater. Groundwater contribution to major dissolved constituents is relatively small (4.2 ± 0.5%). Wet atmospheric deposition contributes annually 7.4–44.0% soluble flux to the lake, resulting from eolian dust throughout the seasons. Estimates of chemical budget further suggest that (1) the Buha-type water dominates the chemical components of the lake water, (2) Na+, Cl?, Mg2+, and K+ in lake water are enriched owing to their conservative behaviors, and (3) precipitation of authigenic carbonates (low-Mg calcite, aragonite, and dolomite) transits quickly dissolved Ca2+ into the bottom sediments of the lake, resulting in very low Ca2+ in the lake water. Therefore, authigenic carbonates in the sediments hold potential information on the relative contribution of different solute inputs to the lake and the lake chemistry in the past.

Jin, Zhangdong; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Yi; Shi, Yuewei

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article considers static analysis based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains provide more information potentially than obtained by the independent analyses. However, ... Keywords: abstract interpretation, logic programming, program analysis

Michael Codish; Anne Mulkers; Maurice Bruynooghe; Maria García de la Banda; Manuel Hermenegildo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search All power plants release a certain amount of heat during electricity generation. This heat can be used to serve thermal loads, such as building heating and hot water requirements. The simultaneous production of electrical (or mechanical) and useful thermal power from a single source is referred to as a combined heat and power (CHP) process, or cogeneration. Contents 1 Combined Heat and Power Basics 2 Fuel Types 2.1 Rural Resources 2.2 Urban Resources 3 CHP Technologies 3.1 Steam Turbine 3.2 Gas Turbine 3.3 Microturbine 3.4 Reciprocating Engine 4 Example CHP Systems[7] 4.1 University of Missouri (MU) 4.2 Princeton University 4.3 University of Iowa 4.4 Cornell University 5 Glossary 6 References Combined Heat and Power Basics

317

Crankshaft position sensing with combined starter alternator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A crankshaft position sensing apparatus for use with an engine (16) having a combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The crankshaft position sensing apparatus includes a tone ring (38) with a sensor (36) and bandpass filter (46), having a cylinder identification input from a camshaft sensor (48), and a gain limiter (54). The sensing apparatus mounts near the rotor (30) of the combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The filtered crankshaft position signal can then be input into a vehicle system controller (58) and an inner loop controller (60). The starter/alternator assembly (18) in combination with an internal combustion engine is particularly useful for a hybrid electric vehicle system.

Brandenburg, Larry Raymond (Plymouth, MI); Miller, John Michael (Saline, MI)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrologic Tracer Studies Conducted August 20 - 25, 1962 Near Cape Thompson, Alaska  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S T A T E DIEPAR- O F THE IlVTERIGR GEOLOGICAL SURVEX Federal Cenzer, Denver 2 5 , C a l o r a a o DATA RELEASE - Sept. 1 0 , 1963 HYDROLOGIC TRACEEI STUDIES CONDUCTED A U G ~ T 20-25, 1962 NEAR CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA V. J. Janzer and W. A. Beetem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P l o t ? r e p a r a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , f i e l d . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , l a b o r a t o r y , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L n f i l t r a t i c n e q e r i m e n t . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stream d i s p e r s i o n s t u d y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sedan event f z l l o u t p l o t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References c i t e d ILLUSTRATIONS Figure I . Summed c o u n t s removed from cesium s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e q u i l i b r a t i o n s , . . . . . . . . 2. S m e d c o u n t s removed from s t r o n t i u m s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e a - u i l i b r a t i o n s . . . . . . . . . 3. P l

319

Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

PD Meyer; RJ Serne

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tritium migration at the Gasbuggy site: Evaluation of possible hydrologic pathways  

SciTech Connect

An underground nuclear test named Gasbuggy was conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 1967. Subsequent groundwater monitoring in an overlying aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed increasing levels of tritium in monitoring well EPNG 10-36, located 132 m from the test, suggesting migration of contaminants from the nuclear cavity. There are three basic scenarios that could explain the occurrence of tritium in well 10-36: (1) introduction of tritium into the well from the land surface, (2) migration of tritium through the Ojo Alamo Formation, and (3) migration through the Pictured Cliffs Formation. The two subsurface transport scenarios were evaluated with a travel time analysis. In one, transport occurs to the Ojo Alamo sandstone either up the emplacement hole or through fractures created by the blast, and then laterally through the aquifer to the monitoring well. In the other, lateral transport occurs through fractures in the underlying Pictured Cliffs detonation horizon and then migrates up the monitoring well through plugged casing connecting the two formations. The travel time analysis indicates that the hydraulic conductivity measured in the Ojo Alamo Formation is too low for lateral transport to account for the observed arrival of tritium at the monitoring well. This suggests transport either through fractures intersecting the Ojo Alamo close to well EPNG 10-36, or through fractures in the Pictured Cliffs and up through the bottom plug in the well. The transport scenarios were investigated using hydrologic logging techniques and sampling at the monitoring well, with the fieldwork conducted after the removal of a string of 0.05-m-diameter tubing that had previously provided the only monitoring access.

Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; Lyles, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Combine Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combine Hills Wind Farm Combine Hills Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Combine Hills Wind Farm Facility Combine Hills Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Near Umapine OR Coordinates 45.94152°, -118.589137° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.94152,"lon":-118.589137,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Axisymmetric Inlet Design for Combined Cycle Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Performance considerations for a turbine-based combined-cycle engine inlet are presented using the inlet of the Lockheed SR-71 as a baseline. A numerical model is developed… (more)

Colville, Jesse

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Combining sustainability criteria with discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper attempts to highlight shortcomings in the concept of sustainability and ways to make the concept more workable by presenting the development of an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) as a combination of discrete event simulation ...

Andi H. Widok; Volker Wohlgemuth; Bernd Page

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved combined cycle power plant performance continue to grow as the cost of fuel rises and international concerns over global warming increase.This guideline provides a framework for performance monitoring, assessment, recovery and optimization of combined cycle power plants. The guideline distills existing experience and documents on heat rate recovery and capacity improvement into a comprehensive manual for plant implementation and training applications. The purpose ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January--December 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period (January through December 1993), the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily, on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed along with information collected on the surface flow systems which affect the quality or quantity of surface water. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data, an activity that contributes to the Site Investigations (SI) component of the ERP. This report provides and describes sources of hydrologic data for Environmental Restoration activities that use monitoring data to quantify and assess the impact from releases of contaminants from ORNL WAGs.

Borders, D.M.; Frederick, B.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Reece, D.K.; McCalla, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watts, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Ziegler, K.S. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Clinton Combined Utility Sys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clinton Combined Utility Sys Clinton Combined Utility Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name Clinton Combined Utility Sys Place South Carolina Utility Id 3804 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Large General Service Commercial General Electric Service Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1140/kWh Industrial: $0.0851/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

329

Combine Hills II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combine Hills II Combine Hills II Facility Combine Hills II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Clark County PUD Location Near Milton-Freewater OR Coordinates 45.946742°, -118.56828° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.946742,"lon":-118.56828,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Easley Combined Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easley Combined Utility System Easley Combined Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name Easley Combined Utility System Place South Carolina Utility Id 6709 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Church electric service rate (Inside city limits) Commercial Church electric service rate (Outside city limits) Commercial Residential service rate (Inside city limits) Residential Residential service rate (Outside city limits) Residential

331

Development of a Unified Land Model for Prediction of Surface Hydrology and Land–Atmosphere Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified land model (ULM) is described that combines the surface flux parameterizations in the Noah land surface model (used in most of NOAA’s coupled weather and climate models) with the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting model (Sac; used for ...

Ben Livneh; Pedro J. Restrepo; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrological Cycle in the Danube basin in present-day and XXII century simulations by IPCCAR4 global climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of 20 GCMs included in the 4th IPCC assessment report regarding their representation of the hydrological cycle on the Danube river basin for 1961-2000 and for the 2161-2200 SRESA1B scenario runs. The basin-scale properties of the hydrological cycle are computed by spatially integrating the precipitation, evaporation, and runoff fields using the Voronoi-Thiessen tessellation formalism. The span of the model simulated mean annual water balances is of the same order of magnitude of the observed Danube discharge of the Delta; the true value is within the range simulated by the models. Some land components seem to have deficiencies since there are cases of violation of water conservation when annual means are considered. The overall performance and the degree of agreement of the GCMs are comparable to those of the RCMs analyzed in a previous work, in spite of the much higher resolution and common nesting of the RCMs. The reanalyses are shown to feature severa...

Lucarini, Valerio; Kriegerova, Ida; Speranza, Antonio; 10.1029/2007JD009167

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Review of information on hydrology and radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site 1976--1988, and annotated bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on changes in the state of knowledge on the hydrology and radionuclide migration that have occurred at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1976. In the present study, a literature review was conducted to examine information published since 1976 about the various activities that have occurred at the NTS. Information was collected from the literature on the site's geological, hydrological, geochemical, and geomorphic characteristics related to the impacts on the ground water from weapons testing and the disposal of waste at the NTS. This information was used to identify the state of knowledge about the NTS and the potential impacts of NTS activities on the ground water. More than 250 reports were reviewed, of which about 200 contained information pertinent to the subject of this report. Because the reports have never been collected in a single location, only those that were supplied by the US Department of Energy and other cooperating organizations could be reviewed, and some pertinent documents may have been missed. Appendix A contains an annotated bibliography of the reports reviewed. 149 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

Raymond, J.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Foley, M.G.; Bierschenk, W.H.; Harrison, R.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); IT Corp., Richland, WA (USA); Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Combinational domain encryption for still visual data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image data has distinct regions of different importance. This property of image data has extensively been used to develop partial encryption techniques, but it is still unnoticed for total encryption. Providing similar security level to data of varied ... Keywords: Arnold cat map, Combinational domain, Edge detection, Net pixel change ratio, Statistical analysis

Nidhi Taneja; Balasubramanian Raman; Indra Gupta

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

337

On linear combinations of -terms Lionel Vaux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On linear combinations of -terms Lionel Vaux Institut de Math´ematiques de Luminy, CNRS UMR 6206, endowing the set of terms with a structure of R-module, where R is a fixed set of scalars. Terms with values in a vector space. We then extend -reduction on those algebraic -terms as follows: at + u reduces

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Combining forecast weights: Why and how?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a procedure called forecast weight averaging which is a specific combination of forecast weights obtained from different methods of constructing forecast weights for the purpose of improving the accuracy of pseudo out of sample forecasting. It is found that under certain specified conditions

Yip Chee Yin; Ng Kok-Haur; Lim Hock-Eam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and their performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, to be combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a W boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. The in situ combination method has advantages of scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and of insensitivity to correlations between triggers. We compare the inclusion and in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF WH search.

Buzatu, Adrian; Warburton, Andreas; /McGill U.; Krumnack, Nils; /Baylor U.; Yao, Wei-Ming; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix B of Attachment 3: Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4: Water resources protection strategy, Final  

SciTech Connect

Attachment 3 Groundwater Hydrology Report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the processing site and Dry Flats disposal site. The Hydrological Services calculations contained in Appendix A of Attachment 3, are presented in a separate report. Attachment 4 Water Resources Protection Strategy describes how the remedial action will be in compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater standards.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Combine, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combine, Texas: Energy Resources Combine, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.5884683°, -96.5085994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5884683,"lon":-96.5085994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas More builder's wanting to use gas-fired tankless water heaters, and with solar pre-heat  Endless hot water  Helps HERS Index  Space saving 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Problem with elevated TWH inlet temperature 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 Maximum Inlet Temperature (F) DHW flow rate (gpm) Maximum TWH inlet temperature to stay below 125 F delivered temperature, with 15 kBtu/h minimum firing rate Typical shower temperature 4 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting

345

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and their performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, to be combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a W boson at the Collider Detector at F...

Buzatu, Adrian; Krumnack, Nils; Yao, Wei-Ming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Additive combinations and fuels containing them  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An additive combination for improving the cold flow properties of distillate fuels comprises a combination of: (A) a distillate flow improver which is an ethylene containing polymer, preferably a copolymer of ethylene with unsaturated esters, e.g., vinyl acetate; (B) a hydrocarbon polymer of C/sub 2/ to C/sub 3/0 olefin of number average molecular weight of 103 to 106 or derivatized version thereof, for example copolymers of ethylene and propylene, or polyisobutylene, which are used as lubricating oil V.I. improvers; and (C) a polar oil soluble compound which includes amides, salts, carboxylates, sulfonates, sulfates, phosphates, phenates and borates, having hydrocarbon solubilizing groups, for example salts and amides of polycarboxylic acid such as phthalic anhydride reacted with hydrogenated secondary tallow amine.

Lewtas, K.; Oswald, A.A.; Rehrer, D.H.; Rossi, A.; Tack, R.D.

1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Combined Operating License Model Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Program Plan (MPP) provides functional guidance on how to prepare a Combined Operating License (COL) application for a new nuclear power facility when incorporating previous findings from both design certification (DC) and an early site permit (ESP) proceedings. The plan identifies the activities necessary to prepare an application and provides guidance on planning and managing a COL program, including working with DC and ESP holders and using subcontracted resources to develop necessary new in...

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and system performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, that were combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a $W$ boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. We compare the inclusion and novel in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF $WH$ search. This new combination method, by virtue of its scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and insensitivity to correlations between triggers, will benefit future long-running collider experiments, including those currently operating on the Large Hadron Collider.

Adrian Buzatu; Andreas Warburton; Nils Krumnack; Wei-Ming Yao

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation  

SciTech Connect

The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

Brown, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models  

SciTech Connect

Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management...

353

Combined Heat and Power: A Technology Whose Time Has Come  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid, the few buildings equipped with Combined Heat andthe grid system. 29 Source: EPA Combined Heat and Powergrid system. 21 Alternatively, a CHP system collects the wasted heat

Ferraina, Steven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation" A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation...

355

Energy Efficiency Improvements Through the Use of Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) in Buildings Combined technology helps Federal energy managers meet mission critical energy needs Buildings Cooling, Heating and Power...

356

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers? Title Can combining economizers with...

357

Ensemble Evaluation of Hydrologically Enhanced Noah-LSM: Partitioning of the Water Balance in High-Resolution Simulations over the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of two versions of the Noah land surface model (LSM) to simulate the water cycle of the Little Washita River experimental watershed is evaluated. One version that uses the standard hydrological parameterizations of Noah 2.7 (STD) is ...

Enrique Rosero; Lindsey E. Gulden; Zong-Liang Yang; Luis G. De Goncalves; Guo-Yue Niu; Yasir H. Kaheil

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Earthquake dates and water level changes in wells in the Eskisehir region,Turkey Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 777781 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquake dates and water level changes in wells in the Eskisehir region,Turkey 777 Hydrology changes in wells in the Eskisehir region, Turkey Galip Yuce and Didem Ugurluoglu Department of Geological common indicators of an anomalous precursor is a change in groundwater level in existing wells. Further

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

The representation of rainfall drop-size distribution and kinetic energy Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 10011007 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The representation of rainfall drop-size distribution and kinetic energy 1001 Hydrology and Earth-size distribution and kinetic energy Neil I. Fox Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences373 Mc component of drop velocity. Keywords: drop-size distribution, drop kinetic energy, soil erosion Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Coupling an Advanced Land Surface–Hydrology Model with the Penn State–NCAR MM5 Modeling System. Part I: Model Implementation and Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses and documents a number of issues related to the implementation of an advanced land surface–hydrology model in the Penn State–NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). The concept adopted here is that the land surface model ...

Fei Chen; Jimy Dudhia

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

HydroTrend v.3.0: A climate-driven hydrological transport model that simulates discharge and sediment load leaving a river system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HydroTrend v.3.0 is a climate-driven hydrological water balance and transport model that simulates water discharge and sediment load at a river outlet, by incorporating drainage basin properties (river networks, hypsometry, relief, reservoirs) together ... Keywords: Human impacts, Modeling distributary channels, River model, Sediment concentration, Sediment discharge

Albert J. Kettner; James P. M. Syvitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi by deuterium excess Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 115118 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi by deuterium excess 115 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 115118 (2004) © EGU The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi for corresponding author: phx_anu@hotmail.com Abstract The deuterium excess in summer monsoon precipitation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

The Global Hydrologic and Energy Cycles: Suggestions for Studies in the Pre-Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the importance of a quantitative understanding of the way in which water and energy are moved from place to place and from component to component of the earth's climate system, it is necessary to obtain reliable estimates of the hydrologic ...

J. L. Kinter; J. Shukla

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Optimizing Patterns of Land Use to Reduce Peak Runoff Flow and Nonpoint Source Pollution with an Integrated Hydrological and Land-Use Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to develop and apply a methodology for delineating optimal land-use patterns that minimize peak runoff flow at watershed outlets by coupling a hydrological model and a land-use model. Under the assumption supported in ...

In-Young Yeo; Steven I. Gordon; Jean-Michel Guldmann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NUREG/CR-6695 PNNL-13375 Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses for NRC-licensed facilities. This methodology was presented previously in NUREG/CR-6656. The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physical setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases for estimating

P. D. Meyer; R. Y. Taira

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Combined Multisensor Optimal Estimation Retrieval Algorithm for Oceanic Warm Rain Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complicated interactions between cloud processes in the tropical hydrologic cycle and their responses to changes in environmental variables have been the focus of many recent investigations. Most studies that examine the response of the ...

Anita D. Rapp; G. Elsaesser; C. Kummerow

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated with Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of programs have been implemented on the Hanford Site that utilize the pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater as part of their remediation strategy. Often the treated water is reinjected into the aquifer at injection well sites. The implementation of remedial pump and treat systems, however, results in hydraulic pressure responses, both areally and vertically (i.e., with depth) within the pumped aquifer. The area within the aquifer affected by the pump and treat system (i.e., radius of influence) is commonly estimated based on detecting associated water-level responses within surrounding monitor wells. Natural external stresses, such as barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These temporal barometric effects may significantly mask water-level responses within more distant wells that are only slightly affected (< 0.10 m) by the test system. External stress effects, therefore, can lead to erroneous indications of the radius of influence of the imposed pump and treat system remediation activities and can greatly diminish the ability to analyze the associated well responses for hydraulic property characterization. When these extraneous influences are significant, adjustments or removal of the barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydrologic assessment. This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump and treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 pump and treat system monitor wells during the recent Y2K shutdown (December 1999) and restart activity (January 2000). The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

372

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Combined fluidized bed retort and combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a combined fluidized bed retorting and combustion system particularly useful for extracting energy values from oil shale. The oil-shale retort and combustor are disposed side-by-side and in registry with one another through passageways in a partition therebetween. The passageways in the partition are submerged below the top of the respective fluid beds to preclude admixing or the product gases from the two chambers. The solid oil shale or bed material is transported through the chambers by inclining or slanting the fluidizing medium distributor so that the solid bed material, when fluidized, moves in the direction of the downward slope of the distributor.

Shang, Jer-Yu (Fairfax, VA); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Zeng, Li-Wen (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

Bevc, F.P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

Kenton K. Yee

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Combined SM Higgs Limits at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D{sup 0} on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b} have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D{sup 0}, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Krumnack, N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Combined Cycle Cogeneration at NALCO Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nalco Chemical Company, while expanding their corporate headquarters, elected to investigate the potential for cogeneration. The headquarters complex has a central physical plant for heating and chilling. The authors describe the analysis approach for determining the most economical system design. Generation capacity ranging from 2.7 MW up to 7.0 MW in both simple cycle cogeneration and combined cycle cogeneration was analyzed. Both single pressure and dual pressure waste heat boilers were included in the evaluation. In addition, absorption chilling and electrical centrifugal chilling capacity expansion were integrated into the model. The gas turbine selection procedure is outlined. Bid evaluation procedure involved a life cycle cost comparison wherein the bid specification responses for each model turbine were incorporated into the life cycle facility program. The recommendation for the facility is a 4.0MW combined cycle cogeneration system. This system is scheduled for startup in October of 1985. Most major equipment has been purchased and the building to house the system is nearing completion. A discussion of the purchase and scheduling integration will be included.

Thunem, C. B.; Jacobs, K. W.; Hanzel, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Combined experiment Phase 2 data characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` has yielded a large quantity of experimental data on the operation of a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine under field conditions. To fully utilize this valuable resource and identify particular episodes of interest, a number of databases were created that characterize individual data events and rotational cycles over a wide range of parameters. Each of the 59 five-minute data episodes collected during Phase 11 of the Combined Experiment have been characterized by the mean, minimum, maximum, and standard deviation of all data channels, except the blade surface pressures. Inflow condition, aerodynamic force coefficient, and minimum leading edge pressure coefficient databases have also been established, characterizing each of nearly 21,000 blade rotational cycles. In addition, a number of tools have been developed for searching these databases for particular episodes of interest. Due to their extensive size, only a portion of the episode characterization databases are included in an appendix, and examples of the cycle characterization databases are given. The search tools are discussed and the FORTRAN or C code for each is included in appendices.

Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Luttges, M.W. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Simms, D.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Compatibility of Stand Basal Area Predictions Based on Forecast Combination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compatibility of Stand Basal Area Predictions Based on Forecast Combination Xiongqing Zhang Carr.) in Beijing, forecast combination was used to adjust predicted stand basal areas from these three types of models. The forecast combination method combines information and disperses errors from

Cao, Quang V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

382

Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle is disclosed. The braking system is responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

Venkataperumal, R.R.; Mericle, G.E.

1979-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Combining Modeling and Gaming for Predictive Analytics  

SciTech Connect

Many of our most significant challenges involve people. While human behavior has long been studied, there are recent advances in computational modeling of human behavior. With advances in computational capabilities come increases in the volume and complexity of data that humans must understand in order to make sense of and capitalize on these modeling advances. Ultimately, models represent an encapsulation of human knowledge. One inherent challenge in modeling is efficient and accurate transfer of knowledge from humans to models, and subsequent retrieval. The simulated real-world environment of games presents one avenue for these knowledge transfers. In this paper we describe our approach of combining modeling and gaming disciplines to develop predictive capabilities, using formal models to inform game development, and using games to provide data for modeling.

Riensche, Roderick M.; Whitney, Paul D.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Combining Triggers in HEP Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern high-energy physics experiments collect data using dedicated complex multi-level trigger systems which perform an online selection of potentially interesting events. In general, this selection suffers from inefficiencies. A further loss of statistics occurs when the rate of accepted events is artificially scaled down in order to meet bandwidth constraints. An offline analysis of the recorded data must correct for the resulting losses in order to determine the original statistics of the analysed data sample. This is particularly challenging when data samples recorded by several triggers are combined. In this paper we present methods for the calculation of the offline corrections and study their statistical performance. Implications on building and operating trigger systems are discussed.

Victor Lendermann; Johannes Haller; Michael Herbst; Katja Krueger; Hans-Christian Schultz-Coulon; Rainer Stamen

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Combining Triggers in HEP Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern high-energy physics experiments collect data using dedicated complex multi-level trigger systems which perform an online selection of potentially interesting events. In general, this selection suffers from inefficiencies. A further loss of statistics occurs when the rate of accepted events is artificially scaled down in order to meet bandwidth constraints. An offline analysis of the recorded data must correct for the resulting losses in order to determine the original statistics of the analysed data sample. This is particularly challenging when data samples recorded by several triggers are combined. In this paper we present methods for the calculation of the offline corrections and study their statistical performance. Implications on building and operating trigger systems are discussed.

Lendermann, Victor; Herbst, Michael; Krueger, Katja; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Stamen, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

Veyo, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

Venkataperumal, Rama R. (Troy, MI); Mericle, Gerald E. (Mount Clemens, MI)

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

388

Combined Experiment Phase 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT)? The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Lynnwood, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Combined current collector and electrode separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This relates to reactive metal cells wherein there is a cathode and a consumable anode. It is necessary to separate the cathode from the anode so that an electrolyte may constantly flow over the face of the anode opposing the cathode. It has been found that this separator may also beneficially function as a current collector. The combined current collector and separator includes a peripheral supporting frame of which a portion may function as a bus-bar. A plurality of bars or ribs extend in parallel relation across the opening defined by the supporting frame and are electrically connected to the bus-bar portion. It is preferred that each bar or rib have a pointed or line edge which will engage and slightly bite into the associated anode to maintain the bar or rib in electrical contact with the anode. This abstract forms no part of the specification of this application and is not to be construed as limiting the claims of the application. 6 figs.

Gerenser, R.J.; Littauer, E.L.

1983-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

For The Calvert Cliffs Combined License Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to respond to the requests for additional information (RAIs) identified in the NRC letter to UniStar dated February 3, 2009 (Reference 1). The RAIs address figures needed to publish the environmental impact statement (EIS) and information necessary for completion of regulatory reviews. UniStar Regulatory Affairs staff, UniStar vendors for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 (CCNPP3) project, NRC headquarters staff, and NRC contractors supporting review of the CCNPP3 Combined License Application (COLA) environmental report discussed the scope of the RAIs (Reference 1) during four telephone conferences on February 13, 18, 19, and 24. The discussions focused on how UniStar can provide the NRC with graphics needed to develop the CCNPP3 Draft EIS and necessary additional details of environmental reviews performed by UniStar. The telephone conferences resulted in a common understanding of the NRC requests and how UniStar can provide the needed information (Reference 2).UN#09-1140 Page 2 of 2 The NRC staff agreed that certain information regarding alternate sites is available in the

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Inexpensive solar-wood water heating combinations  

SciTech Connect

A promising batch heater recently built and now being tested consists of lengths of eight-inch galvanized culvert pipe painted with semiselective black coating, hooked in series and tied in as part of a passive closed loop, unpressurized solar-wood water heating combination. One 10-foot length of eight-inch culvert contains 14.6 gallons of water. Eight-inch culvert provides a near optimum surface area per unit volume ratio, resulting in quicker, more efficient solar water heating. Moreover, the proposed arrangement minimizes the mixing of hot with cold water as warm water is used, often a problem with many types of batch heaters. Details for constructing this type of batch heater are provided. The system is an unpressurized, closed loop set-up, which means that the same liquid circulates continually from solar heater to wood heater to storage tank heat exchanger. The collector design is a variation on the inverted batch heater which takes its inspiration from a number of solar designers of similar units and introduces several additional measures to take advantage of the wood heating connection and to improve the design based on operating experience.

Poitras, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Conceptual, experimental and computational approaches to support performance assessment of hydrology and chemical transport at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The authors of this report have been participating in the Sandia National Laboratory`s hydrologic performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, since 1983. The scope of this work is restricted to the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and to technical questions about hydrology and chemical transport. The issues defined here are not to be confused with the elaborate hierarchy of issues that forms the framework of the US Department of Energy plans for characterizing the site (DOE, 1989). The overall task of hydrologic performance assessment involves issues related to hydrology, geochemistry, and energy transport in a highly heterogeneous natural geologic system which will be perturbed in a major way by the disposal activity. Therefore, a rational evaluation of the performance assessment issues must be based on an integrated appreciation of the aforesaid interacting processes. Accordingly, a hierarchical approach is taken in this report, proceeding from the statement of the broad features of the site that make it the site for intensive studies and the rationale for disposal strategy, through the statement of the fundamental questions that need to be answered, to the identification of the issues that need resolution. Having identified the questions and issues, the report then outlines the tasks to be undertaken to resolve the issues. The report consists essentially of two parts. The first part deals with the definition of issues summarized above. The second part summarizes the findings of the authors between 1983 and 1989 under the activities of the former Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) and the current YMP.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effectiveness Analysis of Corn Combine Based on DEA Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper used DEA method to analyze the production efficiency of corn combine??pointed out how to find the waste of resources??then put forward the way to optimize resource utilization. Keywords: DEA, Corn combine, Efficiency, Evaluation

Xinjie Liu; Baoling Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Combining Predictive Schemes in Short-Term Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the theory is presented for a linear combination of two independent predictive techniques (either probabilistic or binary). It is shown that substantial gains might be expected for optimal weighting of the combination. The theory ...

K. Fraedrich; L. M. Leslie

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Satellite Rainfall Estimation Using Combined Passive Microwave and Infrared Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a combined infrared and passive microwave satellite rainfall estimation technique is outlined. Infrared data from geostationary satellites are combined with polar-orbiting passive microwave estimates to provide 30-min rainfall ...

Chris Kidd; Dominic R. Kniveton; Martin C. Todd; Tim J. Bellerby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onsite or exporting it to the grid. The feasibility of meeting the state's combined heat and power goals FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning. Neff , Bryan. A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning for 2030. 2012. California

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reliability analysis of RC containment structures under combined loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a reliability analysis method and load combination design criteria for reinforced concrete containment structures under combined loads. The probability based reliability analysis method is briefly described. For load combination design criteria, derivations of the load factors for accidental pressure due to a design basis accident and safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) for three target limit state probabilities are presented.

Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Kagami, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

EVALUATION OF MODAL COMBINATION METHODS FOR SEISMIC RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory Guide 1.92 ''Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'' was last revised in 1976. The objective of this project was to re-evaluate the current regulatory guidance for combining modal responses in response spectrum analysis, evaluate recent technical developments, and recommend revisions to the regulatory guidance. This paper describes the qualitative evaluation of modal response combination methods.

MORANTE,R.

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coal combined cycle system study. Volume I. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential advantages for proceeding with demonstration of coal-fueled combined cycle power plants through retrofit of a few existing utility steam plants have been evaluated. Two combined cycle concepts were considered: Pressurized Fluidized Bed (PFB) combined cycle and gasification combined cycle. These concepts were compared with AFB steam plants, conventional steam plants with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), and refueling such as with coal-oil mixtures. The ultimate targets are both new plants and conversion of existing plants. Combined cycle plants were found to be most competitive with conventional coal plants and offered lower air emissions and less adverse environmental impact. A demonstration is a necessary step toward commercialization.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Sensitivity studies on the impacts of Tibetan Plateau snowpack pollution on the Asian hydrological cycle and monsoon climate  

SciTech Connect

The Tibetan Plateau (TP), the highest and largest plateau in the world, has long been identified to be critical in regulating the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. The snowpack and glaciers over the TP provide fresh water to billions of people in Asian countries, but the TP glaciers have been retreating extensively at a speed faster than any other part of the world. In this study a series of experiments with a global climate model are designed to simulate black carbon (BC) and dust in snow and their radiative forcing and to assess the relative impacts of anthropogenic CO2 and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere and snow, respectively, on the snowpack over the TP, as well as their subsequent impacts on the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. Results show a large BC content in snow over the TP, especially the southern slope, with concentration larger than 100 µk/kg. Because of the high aerosol content in snow and large incident solar radiation in the low latitude and high elevation, the TP exhibits the largest surface radiative forcing induced by aerosols (e.g. BC, Dust) in snow compared to other snow-covered regions in the world. The aerosol-induced snow albedo perturbations generate surface radiative forcing of 5-25 W m-2 during spring, with a maximum in April or May. BC-in-snow increases the surface air temperature by around 1.0oC averaged over the TP and reduces snowpack over the TP more than that induced by pre-industrial to present CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere during spring. As a result, runoff increases during late winter and early spring but decreases during late spring and early summer (i.e. a trend toward earlier melt dates). The snowmelt efficacy, defined as the snowpack reduction per unit degree of warming induced by the forcing agent, is 1-4 times larger for BC-in-snow than CO2 increase during April-July, indicating that BC-in-snow more efficiently accelerates snowmelt because the increased net solar radiation induced by reduced albedo melts the snow more efficiently than snow melt due to warming in the air. The TP also influences the South (SAM) and East (EAM) Asian monsoon through its dynamical and thermal forcing. During boreal spring, aerosols are transported by the southwesterly and reach the higher altitude and/or deposited in the snowpack over the TP. While BC and OM in the atmosphere directly absorb sunlight and warm the air, the darkened snow surface polluted by BC absorbs more solar radiation and increases the skin temperature, which warms the air above by the increased sensible heat flux over the TP. Both effects enhance the upward motion of air and spur deep convection along the TP during pre-monsoon season, resulting in earlier onset of the SAM and increase of moisture, cloudiness and convective precipitation over northern India. BC-in-snow has a more significant impact on the EAM in July than CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. Contributed by the significant increase of both sensible heat flux associated with the warm skin temperature and latent heat flux associated with increased soil moisture with long memory, the role of the TP as a heat pump is elevated from spring through summer as the land-sea thermal contrast increases to strengthen the EAM. As a result, both southern China and northern China become wetter, but central China (i.e. Yangtze River Basin) becomes drier - a near zonal anomaly pattern that is consistent with the dominant mode of precipitation variability in East Asia. ?

Qian, Yun; Flanner, M. G.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Weiguo

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

ARM - PI Product - Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCombined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & ProductsCombined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating Rates Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals & Heating Rates 2011.10.11 - 2012.02.07 Site(s) GAN General Description Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval. The PNNL Combined Remote Sensor retrieval algorithm (CombRet) is designed to retrieve cloud and precipitation properties for all sky conditions. The retrieval is based on a combination of several previously published retrievals, with new additions related to the retrieval of cloud microphysical properties when only one instrument is able to detect cloud (i.e. radar only or lidar only).

406

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

407

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

408

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

409

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

410

Combining CSP and B for Specification and Property Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. ProB is a model checking tool for the B Method. In this paper we present an extension of ProB that supports checking of specifications written in a combination of CSP and B. We explain how the notations are combined semantically and give an overview of the implementation of the combination. We illustrate the benefit that appropriate use of CSP, in conjunction with our tool, gives to B developments both for specification and for verification purposes.

Michael Butler; Michael Leuschel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Control Demonstration on a Combined Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company, Electricit de France (EDF), and EPRI have undertaken a project to demonstrate the applicability of advanced control techniques on a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This report describes progress on the project during 2005 including model identification, the advanced controller design, controller program development, and controller testing in a simulation environment. A combined-cycle plant was selected as the host plant because many combined-cycle plants have chang...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRELFS-2700-58559 | July 2013 Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs Highlights in Science Two biomass-degrading enzyme systems that work in very...

413

Modeling Metal Powder Compaction Using Combined Finite and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modeling Metal Powder Compaction Using Combined Finite ... Optimization of Thermal Cycle for Rails with Respect to the Wear Resistance.

414

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results...

415

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and FY 2008 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results...

416

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Annual Performance Results and FYs 2013 and 2014 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results...

417

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System ...  

Wind power generators ; Industrial power generators; More Information John S. Hsu. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Invertor Drive System, U.S ...

419

Combining Positive and Negative Thermal Expansion Materials to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Combining Positive and Negative Thermal Expansion Materials to Tailor the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion in Metal/Ceramic Composites.

420

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Background Thermoelectric power plants are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined heat and power (CHP), also called cogeneration, is an efficient approach to generating electric power and useful thermal energy for heating ...

422

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

423

Alaska Subsistence Use Combined 10 Years | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsistence Use Combined 10 Years Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Alaska...

424

Grain Refinement by Combined ECAE/Extrusion and Dieless ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furthermore, the tubes fabricated by combined ECAE/extrusion process is applied to ... LCA Study of Rare Earth Metals for Magnesium Alloy Applications.

425

Optimization Online - On Efficiently Combining Limited Memory and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 25, 2013... the limited memory methods are usually combined with a line search. ... by the Euclidean norm with an insignificant computational overhead ...

426

New Quantum Dot Technique Combines Best of Optical and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Quantum Dot Technique Combines Best of Optical and Electron ... over a sample that has been coated with specially engineered quantum dots. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

427

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system efficiency. Capstone Turbine Corporation is designing a combined 65 kilowatt CHP system and biomass gasifier that can use stalks, grass and other material to generate...

428

W-11: Combined Cavitation and Particle Erosion of Brass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method is employed that combines the effect of particle erosion and cavitation erosion, in order to test brass under laboratory conditions. Triangular ...

429

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most ... Combined heat and power technology fills an important ... CHP capacity additions followed the pattern of the electric power industry ...

430

Equilibrium Modeling of Combined Heat and Power deployment in Philadelphia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combined heat and power (CHP) generates electricity and heat from the same fuel source and can provide these services at higher equivalent conversion efficiency relative… (more)

Govindarajan, Anand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission Control System for Anode Bake Furnaces. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus, ...

432

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

private lands owned by GZC. Operation of the proposed Combined Power and Biomass Heating System would help stabilize volatile fuel prices and provide economic development...

433

Combined Phase Field – Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Dendritic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Combined Phase Field – Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Dendritic Solidification with Fluid Flow and Solid Particle Motion. Author(s), Dmitry ...

434

A Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study on the Gas Phase Formation of Prototype Aromatic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Ralf I. Kaiser Dept....

435

Off-design Simulations of Offshore Combined Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents an off-design simulation of offshore combined cycles. Offshore installations have a substantial power demand to facilitate the oil and gas production.… (more)

Flatebø, Øystein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Materials Project: Combining Density Functional Theory Calculation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project The Materials Project: Combining Density Functional Theory Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery May 2, 2013 jain2 Anubhav Jain...

437

Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains...

438

Optimization Online - A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for Combined ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2008 ... A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for Combined Location and Routing Problems Under Capacity Restrictions. Z. Akca (zelihaakca ***at*** ...

439

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined marketed natural gas production from the top five natural gas producing states—Texas, Louisiana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Colorado—increased by about 7.5% ...

440

Combination process for the conversion of heavy distillates to LPG  

SciTech Connect

Maximum conversion of heavy distillates to LPG is achieved through a combination process involving two-stage hydrocracking. 9 claims, no drawings.

Hilfman, L.

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ablation laser mass spectrometer molecular beam REMPI laser NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation pulsed sample introductionmass spectrometry platform that...

442

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and FY 2012 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results...

443

Measurement of Effect of Chemical Reactions on the Hydrologic Properties of Fractured Glass Media Using a Tri-axial Flow and Transport Apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of sub-surface media is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Methods and information for such characterization of fractured media are severely lacking. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured glass blocks HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted in such randomly and multiply fractured ILAW glass blocks, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using Vapor Hydration Testing (VHT) at 200 oC temperature and 200 psig (1379 KPa) pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. A tri-axial fractured media flow and transport experimental apparatus, which allows the simultaneous measurement of flow and transport properties and their anisotropy, has been designed and built for this purpose. Such apparatus for fractured media characterization are being reported in the literature only recently. Hydraulic properties of fractured blocks were measured in different orientations and along different cardinal directions, before and after glass corrosion reactions. Miscible displacement experiments using a non-reactive dye were also conducted, before and after glass corrosion reactions, to study the tracer transport behavior through such media. Initial efforts to analyze breakthrough curve (BTC) data using a 1D Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) solution revealed that a different fractured media transport model may be necessary for such interpretation. It was found that glass reactions can have a significant influence on the hydrologic properties of fractured ILAW glass media. The methods and results are unique and useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured geomedia in general and glass media in particular.

Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Transistor sizing for large combinational digital CMOS circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a new method to determine the device sizes of combinational digital CMOS circuits for an upper limit on the signal propagation delays. By modeling gate delay and area or power consumption of a circuit as a simple analytical function ... Keywords: Transistor sizing, digital combinational CMOS circuits, timing optimization

Lucas S. Heusler; Wolfgang Fichtner

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Adaptive Medical Information Delivery Combining User, Task and Situation Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Medical Information Delivery Combining User, Task and Situation Models Luis Francisco, USA +1409 845 4924 {lOfO954,shipman} @cs.tamu.edu ABSTRACT Medical information delivery for users for communication with Earth. The Mars Medical Assistant (MMA) uses a combination of user, situation, and task

Francisco-Revilla, Luis

446

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

447

A linear combination of classifiers via rank margin maximization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method we present aims at building a weighted linear combination of already trained dichotomizers, where the weights are determined to maximize the minimum rank margin of the resulting ranking system. This is particularly suited for real applications ... Keywords: combination of classifiers, margin, ranking

Claudio Marrocco; Paolo Simeone; Francesco Tortorella

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dynamic linear combination of two-class classifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In two-class problems, the linear combination of the outputs (scores) of an ensemble of classifiers is widely used to attain high performance. In this paper we investigate some techniques aimed at dynamically estimate the coefficients of the linear combination ... Keywords: biometric systems, classifier ensembles, two-class classification

Carlo Lobrano; Roberto Tronci; Giorgio Giacinto; Fabio Roli

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Improving hierarchical document signature performance by classifier combination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a classifier-combination experimental framework for part-of-speech (POS) tagging in which four different POS taggers are combined in order to get a better result for sentence similarity using Hierarchical Document Signature (HDS). It is important ... Keywords: different tagging methods, hierarchical document signature, part-of-speech taggers

Jieyi Liao; B. Sumudu U. Mendis; Sukanya Manna

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren �stergaard Jensen

452

Combined Negotiations in E-Commerce: Concepts and Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined Negotiations are a novel and general type of negotiation, in which the user is interested in many goods or services and consequently engages in many negotiations at the same time. The negotiations are independent of each other, whereas the goods ... Keywords: auction, combined negotiation, commitment, electronic commerce, electronic negotiation, negotiation strategy, rule engine, software agent, workflow

Morad Benyoucef; Hakim Alj; Mathieu Vézeau; Rudolf K. Keller

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Scan Test Response Compaction Combined with Diagnosis Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As today's process technologies are combined with ever increasing design sizes, the result is a dramatic increase in the number of scan test vectors that must be applied during manufacturing test. The increased chip complexities, in combination with ... Keywords: ATE, ATPG, Design for test, Diagnosis, Scan compression, Yield

Sverre Wichlund; Frank Berntsen; Einar Johan Aas

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Improving tree survival prediction with forecast combination and disaggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving tree survival prediction with forecast combination and disaggregation Xiongqing Zhang was successful in improving tree survival prediction. This method was used in this study to forecast tree the forecast combination method. Our results show that the disaggregation approach improved the performance

Cao, Quang V.

455

Forecast Calibration and Combination: A Simple Bayesian Approach for ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new simple approach for combining empirical with raw (i.e., not bias corrected) coupled model ensemble forecasts in order to make more skillful interval forecasts of ENSO. A Bayesian normal model has been used to combine ...

C. A. S. Coelho; S. Pezzulli; M. Balmaseda; F. J. Doblas-Reyes; D. B. Stephenson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Review: Stability of nonlinear masonry members under combined load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under examination is the post buckling of unreinforced load-bearing masonry walls or piers subject to a combined load consisting of a uniformly distributed axial load and a concentrated eccentric load at the top end. Fixed free-ended prismatic columns ... Keywords: Brick walls, Combined load, Instability, Masonry, No-tension material, Nonlinear constitutive law

Igino Mura

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System October 3, 2011 - 4:43pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system will help Portland Community College save on its energy bills and help achieve its energy efficiency and sustainability goals. Students at the College will also learn about the fuel cell technology used in the project as part of a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum offered by the school. "The benefits of a combined heat and power fuel cell system, coupled with

458

Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference  

SciTech Connect

The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hydrology Group - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Bonneville Project Powerhouse 2 Fish Guidance Efficiency Simulations Bonneville Tailrace Project: Three-Dimensional CFD Models and Flow Measurements Chandler Fish Handling...

460

Hydrology Group - Technologies & Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Products Systems & Sensors Water Fluxmeter Software & Models Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS ) FRAMES 1.x ReActive Flow and Transport of Groundwater...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrological combining compressional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrology Group - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

links to relevant web pages within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Hanford Site. . Battelle Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Energy and...

462

Hydrology Group - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MS, and LR Leung. 2003. "Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Streamflow and Flooding in Snow Dominated Forest Basins." Chapter 2 in Environmental Change and Geomorphic...

463

Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Combined Federal Campaign: Scoring a Touchdown in Giving | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Combined Federal Campaign: Scoring a Touchdown in Giving The Combined Federal Campaign: Scoring a Touchdown in Giving The Combined Federal Campaign: Scoring a Touchdown in Giving October 6, 2010 - 1:55pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director It has been said that Federal employees are big-hearted people. We could not agree more, and nothing demonstrates that caring spirit year after year better than the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), the Federal government's annual giving drive. Today Department of Energy employees kicked off the CFC, themed "Scoring a Touchdown in Giving," with a goal to raise $1,446,220.00 as a Department. I just wrapped up mc'ing our kick-off event in front of a packed auditorium at DOE headquarters, and listening to inspiring stories to help DOE get in the game of CFC giving. Employees heard from Secretary

467

Statistical Methods for Combining Measurements and Models, with Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistical Methods for Combining Measurements and Models, with Application Statistical Methods for Combining Measurements and Models, with Application to Mapping Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Chris Paciorek Date: February 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn Modern statistical methods, in particular Bayesian hierarchical models, provide a framework for combining various types of measurements in a single analysis. I'll describe a basic latent variable framework for dealing with spatial and spatio-temporal data. The approach is to represent the spatial and spatio-temporal field of interest as a latent field and relate observations to that field. An observation may represent a single point in space and time or an average over space and time. Then I'll describe how to use the approach to combine measurements with proxies such as computer code

468

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

469

Combined Heat and Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is: A process flow diagram showing efficiency benefits of CHP CHP Process Flow Diagram The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. A type of distributed generation, which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption. A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling. CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few

470

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

471

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southeast www.southeastCHPTAP.org Isaac Panzarella North Carolina State University 919-515-0354 ipanzarella@ncsu.edu Alabama View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Alabama. Arkansas Fourche Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, Little Rock View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Arkansas. Florida Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant, Tampa Shands Hospital, Gainesville View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Florida.

472

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

473

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Northwest www.northwestCHPTAP.org David Sjoding Washington State University 360-956-2004 sjodingd@energy.wsu.edu Alaska Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Anvik Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Grayling Exit Glacier - Kenai Fjords National Park, Seward Golovin City, Golovin Inside Passage Electric Cooperative, Angoon Kokhanok City, Kokhanok St. Paul Island, St. Paul Island Village Council, Kongiganak City Village Council, Kwigillingok City Village Council, Stevens Village

474

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southwest www.southwestCHPTAP.org Christine Brinker Southwest Energy Efficiency Project 720-939-8333 cbrinker@swenergy.org Arizona Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility, Tucson University of Arizona, Tucson View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Arizona. Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver MillerCoors, Golden New Belgium Brewery, Fort Collins Trailblazer Pipeline, Fort Collins View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Colorado.

475

Consejos para Ahorrar Gasolina - Planee y Combine Viajes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planee y Combine Viajes Combinar Viajes Combinar viajes puede ahorrarle tiempo y dinero. Varios viajes cortos en los que usted enciende su coche estando este fro, pueden usar el...

476

Combined Satellite- and Surface-Based Observations of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for combining satellite and surface-based cloud observations into a self-consistent three-dimensional field is presented. This method derives the probabilities of the cloud states, which are most consistent with all of the ...

Bryan C. Weare

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

478

Error weighted classifier combination for multi-modal human identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a technique of classifier combination used in a human identification system. The system integrates all available features from multi-modal sources within a Bayesian framework. The framework allows ...

Ivanov, Yuri

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

479

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA APPENDIX C DRAFT FORT YUKON WOODY BIOMASS FUEL IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (RBEGR 2011) C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4 C-5 C-6 C-7 C-8...

480

Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment from Oakridge National Laboratory. The presentation is from the FUPWG Spring Meeting, held on May 22, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

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481

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Determination of Liquid Water Altitudes Using Combined Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods by which attitude ranges of supercooled cloud liquid water in the atmosphere may be estimated are explored using measurements from a combination of ground-based remote sensors. The tests were conducted as part of the Winter Icing and ...

Marcia K. Politovich; B. Boba Stankov; Brooks E. Martner

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Linear Bellman combination for control of character animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controllers are necessary for physically-based synthesis of character animation. However, creating controllers requires either manual tuning or expensive computer optimization. We introduce linear Bellman combination as a method for reusing existing ... Keywords: optimal control, physically based animation

Marco da Silva; Frédo Durand; Jovan Popovi?

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Combining COMIS and Potential Flow Theory to Predict Airflows...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combining COMIS and Potential Flow Theory to Predict Airflows in Buildings for