Sample records for hydrological combining compressional

  1. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  2. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  3. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. (Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. (Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  4. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification. Scha¨r (2008), Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent

  5. Non-linear modulation of short wavelength compressional Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bortolon, A. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Crocker, N. A. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most Alfvenic activity in the frequency range between toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and roughly one half of the ion cyclotron frequency on National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], that is, approximately 0.3 MHz up to Almost-Equal-To 1.2 MHz, are modes propagating counter to the neutral beam ions. These have been modeled as Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE) and are excited through a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. There is also a class of co-propagating modes at higher frequency than the counter-propagating CAE and GAE. These modes have been identified as CAE, and are seen mostly in the company of a low frequency, n = 1 kink-like mode. In this paper, we present measurements of the spectrum of these high frequency CAE (hfCAE) and their mode structure. We compare those measurements to a simple model of CAE and present a predator-prey type model of the curious non-linear coupling of the hfCAE and the low frequency kink-like mode.

  6. Compressional-wave and shear-wave velocities from long-spaced sonic waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Leonard Cornelius

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITIES FROM LONG- SPACED SONIC WAVEFORMS A Thesis LEONARD CORNELIUS LAKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulftllment of the requirements for thc degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE Mav 19S6 Major Subject: Geophystcs COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITIES FROM LONG- SPACED SONIC WAVEFORMS A Thesis LEONARD CORNELIUS LAKE Approved as to style and content by: erry W. neer (C)tairman of Commtttee) R bert. R. Unterb...

  7. Theory of compressional and shear waves in fluidlike marine Michael J. Buckinghama)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    possesses no skeletal frame, implying that the elastic rigidity modulus of the material is zero. A theory, and is thus a genuine wave equation, even though the sediment shows no elastic rigidity. In effect, the medium to yield expressions relating the compressional and shear wave speeds to the grain size, the porosity

  8. A three-parameter dispersion relationship for Biot's fast compressional wave in a marine sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    A three-parameter dispersion relationship for Biot's fast compressional wave in a marine sediment as a defining feature of an unconsolidated sediment. Two types of wave emerge from Buckingham's model, a fast Biot theory of wave propagation in a porous medium such as a marine sediment reduces to Williams

  9. Office of Hydrologic Development Hydrology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2010 Office of Hydrologic Development Hydrology Laboratory Strategic Science Plan #12;OHD This Strategic Science Plan (Plan) establishes the directions for research in hy- drology at the Hydrology Laboratory of the Office of Hydrologic Development. It first establishes a cross-reference between the Plan

  10. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  11. Large amplitude inertial compressional Alfvťnic shock and solitary waves, and acceleration of ions in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Rizvi, H.; Ryu, C. M. [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Hyoja-Dong San 31, KyungBuk, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Hyoja-Dong San 31, KyungBuk, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amplitude inertial compressional Alfvťnic shock and solitary waves in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas are investigated. Dispersive effect caused by non-ideal electron inertia currents perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can balance the nonlinear steepening of waves leading to the formation of a soliton. A Sagdeev-potential formalism is employed to derive an energy-balance like equation. The range of allowed values of the soliton speed, M (Mach number), plasma ? (ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the pressure in the confining magnetic field), and electron inertia, wherein solitary waves may exist, are determined. Depth of the potential increases with increasing the Mach number and plasma ?, however decreases with the increasing electron inertia. The height of soliton increases with increasing in Mach number and decreases with plasma ?. And with increasing electron inertial length, the width of soliton increases. The electron-ion collisional dissipation results a dissipative inertial compressional Alfvťn wave, which can produce a shock like structure and can efficiently accelerate ions to the order of the local Alfvťn velocity. The shock height increases with the increasing collision frequency, but shock height decreases with increasing plasma ?.

  12. Dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, P., E-mail: pintu@ipr.res.in; Dey, R.; Sen, Abhijit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Kadyan, Sangeeta [Department of Physics, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124001 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Generalised-Hydrodynamic (GH) fluid model, we study the influence of strong coupling induced modification of the fluid compressibility on the dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a dusty plasma medium. A significant structural change of lateral wakes for a given Mach number and Epstein drag force is found in the strongly coupled regime. With the increase of fluid compressibility, the peak amplitude of the normalised perturbed dust density first increases and then decreases monotonically after reaching its maximum value. It is also noticed that the opening angle of the cone structure decreases with the increase of the compressibility of the medium and the arm of the Mach cone breaks up into small structures in the velocity vector profile when the coupling between the dust particles increases.

  13. Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  15. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  16. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  17. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

  18. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  19. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 21 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 27 MAY 2002 Nonlinear Compressional Pulses in a 2D Crystallized Dusty Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    .1, but no steepening of the pulse was detected. The pulse propagation speed was found to be comparable to the sound speed of compressional waves launched with sinusoidal excitation. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88 liquid phase, transverse shear waves [5­12]. Here we report experiments with pulsed compressional waves

  20. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    , kinematic waves, transmissivity feedback, exchange between matrix and macropores, and so forth (Beven, 1989 these observations in the following way may prove useful. Paradox 1: Rapid Mobilization of Old Water The hydrology of old water' paradox, exemplified by Figure 1. In many small catchments, streamflow responds promptly

  1. Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling variability as well as characteristics and hydrological behavior of catchments, we have proceeded simulator and a distributed hydrological model (with four production functions and a distributed transfer

  2. Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Sciences The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System David G Tarboton1 , David Maidment2 , Ilya Zaslavsky3 Sciences. Hydrologic Information Systems (HIS) are part of this infrastructure. Hydrologic information--Hydrologic Information System; Web services; Data Model; Hydrology I. INTRODUCTION The advancement of hydrologic science

  3. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Ph. D. Student: Christopher captures the hydrology is important for determining the effectiveness of a terrain simplification technique also present a novel ter- rain simplification algorithm based on the compression of hydrology features

  4. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Jonathan Muckella , Marcus network. A quan- titative measurement of how accurately a drainage network captures the hydrology to preserve the important hydrology features. This method and other simplification schemes are then evaluated

  5. Teaching Estuarine Hydrology with Online Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed . Coastal ocean . Hydrology . Education . SanSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007a. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay andSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007b. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay and

  6. Overpressure prediction by mean total stress estimate using well logs for compressional environments with strike-slip or reverse faulting stress state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozkale, Aslihan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    OVERPRESSURE PREDICTION BY MEAN TOTAL STRESS ESTIMATE USING WELL LOGS FOR COMPRESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTS WITH STRIKE-SLIP OR REVERSE FAULTING STRESS STATE A Thesis by ASLIHAN OZKALE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OVERPRESSURE PREDICTION BY MEAN TOTAL STRESS ESTIMATE USING WELL LOGS...

  7. Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 63, April 1 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deinert, Mark

    Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 ­ 63, April 1 ­ 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002 Real radiography can be used for quantitative imaging of hydrologic phenomena at video frame rates, with great

  8. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in theAN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARYGeochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in the

  9. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECHNOLOGY FOR FAULT ZONE HYDROLOGY Kenzi Karasaki Lawrencefor characterizing the hydrology of fault zones, recognizingstructure of faults to hydrology, that it still may be

  10. TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Citation: Hudson, R., and G. Horel. 2007. An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver Island and south

  11. Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs Jeffrey C, before a hydrologic and climatic transition in the late Noachian led to a decrease in erosion rates the temporal evolution of Martian groundwater hydrology during the Noachian and early Hesperian epochs using

  12. Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and QuestionsQuestions Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University Hydrologic Model Schematic state variables e.g. snow, soil moisture Hydrologic Models streamflow Meteorological Data ( )station, gridded Land Cover

  13. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  14. RREC -October 2014 Use of Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    RREC - October 2014 Use of Hydrology and Hydraulics to Support Environmental Response Hydrology ­ the study of the movement of water. Usage for this application is to mean the quantification at the site was Broad scale steps: ­ Prepare hydrologic model to estimate river flow at points of interest

  15. Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

  16. 5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/5/547/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions Papers published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  17. Uncertainty quantification and validation of combined hydrological and macroeconomic analyses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Jennings, Barbara Joan; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Brown, Theresa Jean; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in climate can lead to instabilities in physical and economic systems, particularly in regions with marginal resources. Global climate models indicate increasing global mean temperatures over the decades to come and uncertainty in the local to national impacts means perceived risks will drive planning decisions. Agent-based models provide one of the few ways to evaluate the potential changes in behavior in coupled social-physical systems and to quantify and compare risks. The current generation of climate impact analyses provides estimates of the economic cost of climate change for a limited set of climate scenarios that account for a small subset of the dynamics and uncertainties. To better understand the risk to national security, the next generation of risk assessment models must represent global stresses, population vulnerability to those stresses, and the uncertainty in population responses and outcomes that could have a significant impact on U.S. national security.

  18. Curso 7-Modelos Digitais de Elevao na Hidrologia: Extrao de Atributos Hidrolgicos da Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic Attributes from Topography Data

  19. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  20. Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation Induced Biogeochemical, intensively studied over the last 20 years (4), has potential to further impact bioremediation efforts

  1. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  2. Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological information B. Devaraju, N. Sneeuw Institute of Geodesy, Universit¨at Stuttgart, Germany estimates of mass changes with observed hydrological data, which is available for 20% of the land area

  3. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  4. TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production in Two Partially Harvested Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Forest ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  5. TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest: effects of partial retention harvesting, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Abstract

  6. Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU Center for Contaminant Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU ­ Center for Contaminant Hydrology Coordinator The Center for Contaminant Hydrology (CCH) ( HYPERLINK "http://www.engr.colostate.edu/CCH/" www

  7. Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks Quatre remarques sur la online xxx Presented by Ghislain de Marsily Keywords: Geomorphology Hydrology River network Mots cle

  8. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  9. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  10. Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis Tom Fricker University discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (logSPM, Kuczera et al., 2006). The purpose). 1 #12;3 The Saturated Path Hydrology Model We consider the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (log

  11. 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Charles

    Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

  12. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  13. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  14. Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

  15. Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Marla Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

  16. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regime on vernal pool hydrology. Freshwater Biology 50:and L. Stromberg. (1998). Hydrology of vernal pools on non-Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools

  17. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-IMPLICIT SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-arising in subsurface hydrology. These problems includeFinite Element Method in Hydrology," Int. Jour. Num. Meth.

  18. Research connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistry in California oak woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Dahlgren, Randy A; Swarowsky, Alexandre; Tate, Kenneth W; Lewis, David J; Singer, Michael J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dahlgren RA, Tate KW. 2000. Hydrology in a California oakResearch connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistrybetween nitrogen cycling and soil hydrology in a manner that

  19. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

  20. Journal of Hydrology (NZ) 47 (2): 67-83 2008 New Zealand Hydrological Society (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of intensified irrigation practices on catchment #12;68 hydrology. The report `Growing for good the economic value of irrigation with environmental costs and sustainable agricultural practices (Poff etal) Hydrological impacts of irrigated agriculture in the Manuherikia catchment, Otago, New Zealand S. W. Kienzle1

  1. Power combiner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  2. Influence of deterministic geologic trends on spatial variability of hydrologic properties in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States); Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Fling, L.E. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic properties have been measured on outcrop samples taken from a detailed, two-dimension grid covering a 1.4 km outcrop exposure of the 10-m thick non-welded-to-welded, shardy base microstratigraphic unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paintbrush Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These data allow quantification of spatial trends in rock matrix properties that exist in this important hydrologic unit. Geologic investigation, combined with statistical and geostatistical analyses of the numerical data, indicates that spatial variability of matrix properties is related to deterministic geologic processes that operated throughout the region. Linear vertical trends in hydrologic properties are strongly developed in the shardy base microstratigraphic unit, and they are more accurately modeled using the concept of a thickness-normalized stratigraphic elevation within the unit, rather than absolute elevation. Hydrologic properties appear to be correlated over distances of 0.25 to 0.3 of the unit thickness after removing the deterministic vertical trend. The use of stratigraphic elevation allows scaling of identified trends by unit thickness which may be of particular importance in a basal, topography-blanketing unit such as this one. Horizontal changes in hydrologic properties do not appear to form obvious trends within the limited lateral geographic extent of the ash-flow environment that was examined. Matrix properties appear to be correlated horizontally over distances between 100 and 400 m. The existence and quantitative description of these trends and patterns of vertical spatial continuity should increase confidence in models of hydrologic properties and groundwater flow in this area that may be constructed to support the design of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  4. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  5. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  8. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  9. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  10. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  11. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  13. Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) © EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling? Keith hydrological models in hydrology as an expression of a pragmatic realism. Some of the problems of distributed

  14. Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data Jonathan Muckella , Marcus Andradeb , W present a new data structure for simplifing terrain that captures hydrology significant features using. This allows better compression ratios the standard Triangu- lated Irregular Networks with highier hydrology

  15. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  16. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Hudson and Axel Anderson KEYWORDS: Water management, Coastal watersheds, hydrological modeling CITATIONPractice. ResearchSection,Coast ForestRegion, BCMOF,Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-022. EN-022 Hydrology March 2006

  17. Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Jim

    : Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology . James O. Berger potential use in hydrology. These tools include Bayesian model selection, new computational techniques be applied to problems in hy­ drology. Keywords: Bayesian Inference, Hydrology, Model Selection, Bayes

  18. Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

  19. CONTINUOUSTIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUS­TIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen­water system in groundwater hydrology is given. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation, i for an air­water system in groundwater hydrology, ff = a; w [1], [11], [26]: @(OEae ff s ff ) @t +r \\Delta

  20. Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland Paula J. Mousera,*, W. Cully to hydrologic changes is imperative for successful conservation and remediation efforts. We studied a 1.25-ha Vermont kettlehole bog for one year (September 2001­October 2002) to identify hydrologic controls

  1. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology,Tsitika Watershed.Research Section,CoastForest Region,BCMOF, Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-021. EN-021 Hydrology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-021 March 2006 Forest Research

  2. 2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN Yoram Rubin, Professor of Civil hydrology. Starting from 1987, Yoram has published a considerable body of important articles, primarily works have always addressed central problems of hydrologic modeling, on both fundamental and applied

  3. Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dr Measurements with Hydrologic Data H. Kindt 1, J. Riegger 1, A. B√°rdossy 1, B. Devaraju 2 and N. Sneeuw 2 henry pattern for which storage changes can be constrained within the limits of hydrological data uncertainty. 2

  4. Hydrology in Practice Elizabeth M. Shaw -Former Lecturer and Hydrologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Hydrology in Practice 4th Edition Elizabeth M. Shaw - Former Lecturer and Hydrologist Keith J Environment Centre, University of Lancaster, UK Rob Lamb - Consultant, JBA Consulting About the book Hydrology in Practice is an excellent and very successful introductory text for engineering hydrology students who go

  5. Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1 1 Great Lakes forecasts in operational hydrology builds a sample of possibilities for the future, of climate series from-parametric method can be extended into a new weighted parametric hydrological forecasting technique to allow

  6. Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research Christian Skalka gathering system for snow hydrology field re- search campaigns conducted in harsh climates and remote areas for understanding hydrological and ecological processes and incorporating those pro- cesses in agricultural

  7. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  8. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 2902≠2914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

  9. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 20952101 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2006; Lis et al., 2008). The capital cost is much lower, as well as the operation costs per analysed, Stockholm, Sweden 2 University of Arizona, Hydrology and Water Resources, Tucson, AZ, USA *Correspondence to), Pearce (1990), Burns (2002), Buttle and McDonnell (2004)] stream water comes. Such estimates can help

  10. bor is an e g hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Jon Harb managin North Am environm Atmosph Research founding served a Denver a Harbor i extensive has co-a papers in sciences geograph from the American Society, New Zea Science Physical and the G bor is an e g hydrologic merica, Eur mental scien heric Science h, Interim D co-director as Dean

  11. Ch.10 Connections Why is hydrology important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    , irrigation engineers have designed drainage systems to carry unwanted salts away from the agricultural areas in transporting dissolved and suspended materials through phases of biogeochemical cycles. #12;Irrigation Impacts The main purpose of irrigation is to modify the hydrological cycle in a way that allow crops to flourish

  12. Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

  13. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 2447≠2457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

  14. Hydrology of the Texas Blackland Prairie: Riesel Watershed Data and Published Hydrologic Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    , OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas..., OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas...

  15. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  16. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  17. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

  18. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Geological Survey, Water Res. Investigations Rep. 95-United States. J. Amer. Water Resources Assoc, 35, 1525-hydrology. J. American Water Resources Association, 39, 771-

  19. assessing hydrological alteration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (SFHS) is a non-profit, professional society, established to provide Sukop, Mike 217 South Florida Hydrologic Society Dr Joseph D Hughes Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  20. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. yushuwuthmcmodelingpeer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Me...

  2. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  3. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the...

  4. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Eric Sonnenthal (PI) Jonny...

  5. Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527537 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees 527 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527­537 (2002) © EGS Hydrological processes in the catchments, playing a relevant hydrological and geomorphic role. Annual precipitation is 924 mm and potential

  6. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) © EGU The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology

  7. Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas 891 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) © EGU Recession-based hydrological.R. Young1 and S.R. Kansakar2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK 2

  8. The Pipe vs. The Shed: Waste Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lather, Alaska; Wozniak, Monika

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting Bypaper was to compare the hydrology of the East Bay Municipala stream and watershed hydrology. Using stream flow data for

  9. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  11. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  12. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  13. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  15. Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    INSIGHT: Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools Laura Paeglis, IWM and GeoHydrologic Tools #12;What is INSIGHT? · Interactive, web-based maps. · Evaluations of basins and their status as fully or overappropriated. · Educational tool for water managers and the public. · One

  16. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  17. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given.

  18. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  19. Economic, Hydrologic and Environmental Appraisal of Texas Inter-basin Water Transfers: Model Development and Initial Appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia; McCarl, Bruce A.

    impacts and water quality changes. Water-related models that deal with hydrologic and environmental issues commonly focus on the quantity issues such as water supply and water flow but do not have economic or water quality dimensions (Wurbs, 2003... on combining surface and ground water by integrating the Edwards Aquifer Groundwater and River System Simulation Model (EDSIMR). 2 Modeling framework Economic theory indicates that water should be allocated to the highest valued users in order to achieve...

  20. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site.

  1. Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco Dear Hydrology Section president Rafael Bras and President-elect George Hornberger, members of the hydrology of the breadth of possibilities that hydrology represents overall. Hence, I was grateful to be reminded, during

  2. Course offer (1/2) Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Course offer (1/2) · Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc) · advanced engineering hydrology course focused on hydrological monitoring, processunderstanding and new analysis and modelling techniques · Fluvial Systems (1st management and riverine ecosystem sustainability · Hydrology of Glaciers (2nd Sem. MSc) · study of ice

  3. Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist ­ Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015 runoff. This position requires applied, working knowledge of forest hydrology, hydrology modelling to support the use of i-Tree-related hydrologic models and tools. Develop framework for i-Tree Hydro

  4. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  5. active layer hydrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SFHS) is a non information, contact: - Neil JohnsonMWH - Jayantha ObeysekeraSFWMD - Mike SukopFIU - Chris PetersCH2M HILL Sukop, Mike 199 Eco-hydrological controls on...

  6. Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Building a Texas Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Cycle Building a Texas Hydrologic Information System TX-HIS #12;Q to couple streamflow models to GCMs · We need to break the hydro-illogical cycle and plan for the delivery

  7. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  8. Review of soil water models with respect to savanna hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derry, Julian F; Russell, Graham; Liedloff, Adam C

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective management leading towards sustainable rangeland production in arid and semi-arid regions will stem from effective soil water management and comprehension of the hydrological properties of the soil in relation to pastoralism. However...

  9. Hydrological and Oceanographic Considerations for Integrated Coastal Zone Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainable economic development. This study aims to support environmental management at the scaleHydrological and Oceanographic Considerations for Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Southern reduce soil fertility in the uplands and nega- tively affect mangrove, seagrass, and coral reef

  10. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  11. Modelling the hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karatay, Mehmet Rahmi

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to better understand the relationships between basal water pressure, friction, and sliding mechanisms at ice sheet scales. In particular, it develops a new subglacial hydrology model (Hydro) to explicitly ...

  12. CE 372 Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics Learning objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmann, Chris

    time of concentration in two ways. Compute time of concentration using the kinematic-wave, Kerby for exams. 1. Identify and explain processes in the hydrologic cycle. Carry out a water balance. 2. Define

  13. Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awwad, Haitham Munir

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Approved as to style and content by: uan B. Valdes (Chair of Committee) alph A. Wurbs (Member) Marshall J. Mc...

  14. The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status 345 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) © EGU Anatomy of a catchment: the relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status C

  15. Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability 325 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) © EGU Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability: the River Irthing

  16. Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629644 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution 629 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629­644 (2001) © EGS Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution M.T. van Wijk and W

  17. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615627 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology 615 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615­627 (2001) © EGS Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity­rain rate relationships for radar hydrology* Remko Uijlenhoet1 Sub-department Water Resources

  18. Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) © EGU Over-parameterisation, a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des

  19. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  20. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

  1. Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frťdťric

    for This paper is a contribution to the special issue on the IPSL and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL- CM5B

  2. Combining hydraulic knowledge and uncertain gaugings in the estimation of hydrometric rating curves: A Bayesian approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Combining hydraulic knowledge and uncertain gaugings in the estimation of hydrometric rating curves HHLY, Hydrology-Hydraulics 5 rue de la Doua CS70077 69626 Villeurbanne cedex, France bCETE Ile analysis of rating curves arises from the quantitative as- sessment of (i) the hydraulic controls

  3. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  4. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  5. Updating the US Hydrologic Classification: An Approach to Clustering and Stratifying Ecohydrologic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic classifications unveil the structure of relationships among groups of streams with differing stream flow and provide a foundation for drawing inferences about the principles that govern those relationships. Hydrologic classes provide a template to describe ecological patterns, generalize hydrologic responses to disturbance, and stratify research and management needs applicable to ecohydrology. We developed two updated hydrologic classifications for the continental US using two streamflow datasets of varying reference standards. Using only reference-quality gages, we classified 1715 stream gages into 12 classes across the US. By including more streamflow gages (n=2618) in a separate classification, we increased the dimensionality (i.e. classes) and hydrologic distinctiveness within regions at the expense of decreasing the natural flow standards (i.e. reference quality). Greater numbers of classes and higher regional affiliation within our hydrologic classifications compared to that of the previous US hydrologic classification (Poff, 1996) suggested that the level of hydrologic variation and resolution was not completely represented in smaller sample sizes. Part of the utility of classification systems rests in their ability classify new objects and stratify analyses. We constructed separate random forests to predict hydrologic class membership based on hydrologic indices or landscape variables. In addition, we provide an approach to assessing potential outliers due to hydrologic alteration based on class assignment. Departures from class membership due to disturbance take into account multiple hydrologic indices simultaneously; thus, classes can be used to determine if disturbed streams are functioning within the realm of natural hydrology.

  6. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 18, 343355 (2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    on phosphorus retention in Everglades stormwater treatment area wetlands John R. White,1 * K. Ramesh Reddy1 treatment areas (STAs) comprising a series of constructed wetlands. A series of mesocosms were established on P retention/release by the wetland soil and on effluent water quality. Four treatment combinations

  7. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  8. The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomblies, Arne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

  9. Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

  10. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  11. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  12. 2 Executive Summary Figure 1 Location of White Salmon subbasin, topography, vegetation, demographics, and hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , demographics, and hydrology #12;xii 2.1 Purpose and Scope The White Salmon subbasin management plan

  13. A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkez, Branko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

  14. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  15. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

  16. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

  17. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-11:50 AM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  18. Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS To obtain (choose 4 hours) Core Courses [Requireda ] CEE 450: Surface Hydrology CEE 451: Env. Fluid Mech. CEE 457: Groundwater Hydrology CEE 434: Environmental Systems I CEE 595W: Seminar CEE 595W: Seminar Choose at least

  19. Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology Environmental, Earth and Ocean. 9758 1998 M.S. CIVIL ENGINEERING, University of New Hampshire 1994 B.S. in HYDROLOGY, University of New Hampshire, GPA 3.94/4.00 1991 Summa Cum Laude , University Honors in Hydrology AWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING

  20. Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman 358 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) © EGU The role of wetlands in the hydrological cycle Andy Bullock1 and Mike Acreman2 1 Independent Consultant, Ledbury, Herefordshire, HR8 2DX, UK 2 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxon. OX10 8BB, UK

  1. Franois Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    François Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon 940 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004.lauzon@golder.com Abstract Since the 1990s, neural networks have been applied to many studies in hydrology and water and stacking having been applied regularly in hydrology and water resources for some years, while Bayesian

  2. HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA Alonso Caballero #12;HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST and dry periods. Consequently, the tropical hydrology of cloud-forest watersheds is not well studied

  3. Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook 62 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) ¬© EGU, Wasserwirtschaftsamt Bamberg, Kasernstra√?e 4, 96047 Bamberg, Germany 2 University of Freiburg, Institute of Hydrology, Fahnenbergplatz, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany E-mail for corresponding author: stefan.uhlenbro@hydrology

  4. GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-12:00PM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  5. Simulated Global Atmospheric Dust Distribution: Sensitivity to Regional Topography, Geomorphology, and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    , and Hydrology Charles S. Zender, Earth System Science Dept., UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (zender@uci.edu) David for predicting future trends in dust production. We identify three related geomorphologic and hydrologic hydrologically disturbed/renewed sed- iments. Dust models which attempt to account for sediment-rich source

  6. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography:50 AM or by appointment. Email: feifei.pan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  7. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 7389 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73¬≠89 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17√?ironmental Engineering, Uni√?ersity of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA d Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, Uni-7722 98 00143-0 #12;( )D.G. Jewett et al.rJournal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73¬≠8974 the interface

  8. Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H, population growth, and land use change drive the need for new hydrologic knowledge and understanding. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first

  9. Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation Centre for Hydrology, ``Dino Tonini'', Padua, Italy a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change

  10. Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj 322 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) © EGU Precipitation forecasts and their uncertainty as input into hydrological models Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj the weather forecasts with the information on catchment conditions and a hydrological forecasting model can

  11. Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science for the Anthropocene M socio-hydrology as a use-inspired scientific discipline to focus on understanding, interpretation scales. A key aspect of socio-hydrology is explicit inclusion of two-way feedbacks between human

  12. Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994)91-108 Variably saturated modeling of transient drainage: sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Journal of Hydrology ELSEVIER [1] Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994)91-108 Variably saturated modeling-1694(94)02509-A #12;92 W.R. Wise et al. / Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 91-108 transient unconfined flow through

  13. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

  14. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    -WATCH Ensemble: WaterGAP ∑ contemporaneous hindcast of subsurface runoff using the Global Hydrological Model WaterGAP does not ≠ linear relationship plot prepared by Roz Price and Prof Martin Todd (USussex model (WaterGAP) is problematic DŲll and Florke (2005) cited in AR4 ∑ a further stumbling block

  15. Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    · GRACE and Geophysics ­ 2004 Sumatra Earthquake · GRACE and Climate Change ­ East Greenland Melting ­ Observe changes with unprecidented accuracy GRACE can not discriminate between sources/causes Water: Atmosphere (Transport of water, pressure) Climate (Glaciers, Ice mass melting -> Run off) Hydrology

  16. Urban Hydrology: theory and new approaches for stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    management practices and strategies. "water is a precious resource, keep it here, clean it, save it for laterUrban Hydrology: theory and new approaches for stormwater management Jack Ahern, Professor Dept source(s), and infiltrating as much as possible into the soil through the implementation of best

  17. A method to hydrologically isolate water soluble wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooney, Daniel James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural cover system with gravel used as a capillary barrier was designed and evaluated as a method to hydrologically isolate buried water soluble oil and gas wastes. Simulated cover systems were installed in 200 liter barrels and tested in a...

  18. DIVISION S-3-NOTES HYDROLOGIC TRACER EFFECTS ON SOIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    ,* ARTHUR J. GOLD, AND GALEN HOWARD Abstract While muchresearch has shown thatthecommonly used hydrologic such P.M. Groffman, Inst. of Ecosystem Studies, Box AB, Millbrook, NY 12545; A.J. Gold and G. Howard, Dep. Methods The soil used for these experiments is a Rainbow silt loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, mesic Aquic

  19. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englert, A.; Hubbard, S.S.; Williams, K.H.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For guiding optimal design and interpretation of in-situ treatments that strongly perturb subsurface systems, knowledge about the spatial and temporal patterns of mass transport and reaction intensities are important. Here, a procedure was developed and applied to time-lapse concentrations of a conservative tracer (bromide), an injected amendment (acetate) and reactive species (iron(II), uranium(VI) and sulfate) associated with two field scale biostimulation experiments, which were conducted successively at the same field location over two years. The procedure is based on a temporal moment analysis approach that relies on a streamtube approximation. The study shows that biostimulated reactions can be considerably influenced by subsurface hydrological and geochemical heterogeneities: the delivery of bromide and acetate and the intensity of the sulfate reduction is interpreted to be predominantly driven by the hydrological heterogeneity, while the intensity of the iron reduction is interpreted to be primarily controlled by the geochemical heterogeneity. The intensity of the uranium(VI) reduction appears to be impacted by both the hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. Finally, the study documents the existence of feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and remediation-induced biogeochemical transformations at the field scale, particularly the development of precipitates that may cause clogging and flow rerouting.

  20. High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R.

    Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

  1. Soil property database: Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    measurement campaigns have been carried out concurrently with large-scale remote sensing hydrologic campaigns surface and the subsurface and the highly nonlinear nature of local-scale water and heat transport head, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity) and the soil thermal properties (heat capacity, heat

  2. ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 March 2011 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream Restoration Design by J. Craig quantified element in stream restoration, working across and governing multiple disciplines and system, and management decisions to be made (Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (FISRWG) 1998). Figure

  3. Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada Stephen J. De¬īry,1 for 45 rivers spanning 5.2 √? 106 km2 of northern Canada are investigated. Discharge averages 1153 km3 yr of northern Canada, excluding some rivers with outlets to the Labrador Sea and eastern James Bay

  4. Economic and Hydrologic Implications of Proposed Edwards Aquifer Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Carl R.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Williams, R. Lynn; Jordan, Wayne R.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    on water elevation in a reference well located in San Antonio. Four variants of the plans were analyzed using an annual economic/hydrologic simulation model of the aquifer. The model simulates water use by the agricultural, industrial and municipal sectors...

  5. Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    1 Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling Reza Khanbilvardi Springs, MD, USA 1 Introduction Remote sensing data and information are shown great potential in supplying measurements, remote sensing based measurements are spatially averages over the pixels can appropriate

  6. CRWR Online Report 1006 Hydrologic Analysis Before and After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    as an integral part of the water management. As a result, the environmental condition in this reach has beenCRWR Online Report 1006 Hydrologic Analysis Before and After Reservoir Alteration Reservoir. Important habitats such as the Big Ben national and state park in the U.S. and Maderas del

  7. Groundwater and global hydrological change current challenges and new insight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Groundwater and global hydrological change ≠ current challenges and new insight R. TAYLOR1 , L Groundwater Resources Assessment Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands 11 Federal Institute for Geosciences, groundwater plays a critical role in enabling communities to adapt to freshwater shortages derived from low

  8. Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

  9. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  10. Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339350 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339­350 (2002) © EGS Hydrological ), this paper focuses on calibration of the hydrological part of the model and nitrogen (N) dynamics

  11. ELSEVIER Journal of Hydrology 199 (1997) 88-120 Linking the hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    -stream saturated zones, centering on stream environments of the northern, teml~rate-forested zone. N retention and hydrodynamic scenarios relating N biogeochemistry and its response to hydrologic events (of both varying-state in terms of biological aggradation and N demand (Sullivan, 1993). The environmental consequences

  12. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  13. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  14. Getting the right answers for the right reasons: linking measurements, analyses, and models to advance the science of hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    to advance the science of hydrology James W. Kirchner, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 U.S.A. The day-to-day business of hydrology has largely been shaped the science of hydrology, as opposed to the operational practice of hydrology -- that is, to improve our

  15. Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

  16. General soil hydrology files for GOSSYM/COMAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akins, Dennis C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil hydrology files. Bulk density and hydraulic conductivity values corresponding to the final soil groups. Yield predictions on Westwood silt loam when bubbling pressure snd sir dry water content are varied. Deviation from average yield... predictions on Westwood silt loam when bubbling pressure and air dry water content are varied. Sensitivity of GOSSYM yield predictions to changes in saturated hydraulic conductivity. Sensitivity of GOSSYM yield predictions to changes in beta (P...

  17. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) River System Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    monthly evaporation less precipitation depths. The primary HYD output is SIM input FLO and EVA files of IN and EV records or these SIM hydrology input data as a data storage system DSS file. HYD also includes options for reading and writing stream flow... reservoir surface net evaporation less precipitation depths which are input to SIM as a file with filename extension EVA or DSS Chapter 1 Introduction 3 The monthly stream flow volumes and net evaporation-precipitation depths cover a specified...

  18. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  20. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  1. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  2. Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

  3. Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  4. Extraction of Hydrological Proximity Measures from DEMs using Parallel Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Tarboton, David G.; Watson, Daniel W.; Schreuders, Kimberly A.; Baker, Matthew M.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land surface topography is one of the most important terrain properties which impact hydrological, geomorphological, and ecological processes active on a landscape. In our previous efforts to develop a soil depth model based upon topographic and land cover variables, we extracted a set of hydrological proximity measures (HPMs) from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) as potential explanatory variables for soil depth. These HPMs may also have other, more general modeling applicability in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology, and so are described here from a general perspective. The HPMs we derived are variations of the distance up to ridge points (cells with no incoming flow) and variations of the distance down to stream points (cells with a contributing area greater than a threshold), following the flow path. These HPMs were computed using the D-infinity flow model that apportions flow between adjacent neighbors based on the direction of steepest downward slope on the eight triangular facets constructed in a 3 x 3 grid cell window using the center cell and each pair of adjacent neighboring grid cells in turn. The D-infinity model typically results in multiple flow paths between 2 points on the topography, with the result that distances may be computed as the minimum, maximum or average of the individual flow paths. In addition, each of the HPMs, are calculated vertically, horizontally, and along the land surface. Previously, these HPMs were calculated using recursive serial algorithms which suffered from stack overflow problems when used to process large datasets, limiting the size of DEMs that could be analyzed using that method to approximately 7000 x 7000 cells. To overcome this limitation, we developed a message passing interface (MPI) parallel approach for calculating these HPMs. The parallel algorithms of the HPMs spatially partition the input grid into stripes which are each assigned to separate processes for computation. Each of those processes then uses a queue data structure to order the processing of cells so that each cell is visited only once and the cross-process communications that are a standard part of MPI are handled in an efficient manner. This parallel approach allows analysis of much larger DEMs as compared to the serial recursive algorithms. In this paper, we present the definitions of the HPMs, the serial and parallel algorithms used in their extraction and their potential applications in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology.

  5. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  6. Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

  7. Hydrologic Monitoring Summary Long Valley Caldera, California | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms |Information Hydrologic

  8. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  9. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  10. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

  11. Towards Better Utilization of NEXRAD Data in Hydrology: an Overview of Hydro-NEXRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Ramon

    Towards Better Utilization of NEXRAD Data in Hydrology: an Overview of Hydro-NEXRAD Witold F metadata extraction and management techniques are required. The authors describe and discuss the Hydro of the Hydro-NEXRAD project is to increase the use of NEXRAD data in hydrologic research. The project

  12. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  13. Reconstructing the duty of water: a study of emergent norms in socio-hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    This paper assesses the changing norms of water use known as the duty of water. It is a case study in historical socio-hydrology, or more precisely the history of socio-hydrologic ideas, a line of research that is useful ...

  14. Representing the influence of subgrid topography on hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, L.R.; Ghan, S.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of the impact of global climate change on land surface hydrology require climate information on scales far smaller than those explicitly resolved by global climate models of today and the foreseeable future. To bridge the gap between what is required and what is resolved, we propose a subgrid-scale parameterization of the influence of topography on clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The parameterization represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of discrete elevation classes. Separate cloud and surface processes are calculated for each elevation class. The simulated surface temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and soil moisture for each elevation class can then be distributed according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. The scheme is being applied to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s climate version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model. Validation is being addressed by driving the model with observed lateral boundary conditions for the Pacific Northwest and comparing with surface observations. Preliminary results from the simulation will be presented.

  15. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  16. Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach 833 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) © EGU Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach R. Ludwig1

  17. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 3148, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 31­48, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-31 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova, via Loredan 20

  18. Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht, Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht. Precipitation and temperature are the main drivers of hydrological systems, which influence water availability in those temperatures has decreased. Hydrologic changes are occurring due to a changing climate. For snow

  19. Nordic Hydrology, 33 (5),2002,331-346 No part may be reproducedby any process without complete reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Nordic Hydrology, 33 (5),2002,331-346 No part may be reproducedby any process without complete models. Considerable time and effort has been directed to model this process, and many hydrologic models models. Considerable time and effort has been devoted to model these processes, and many hydrologic

  20. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111­126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-111 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Constraints of artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff modelling: trade-offs in hydrological state representation

  1. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 1929, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 19­29, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-19 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport. Marani International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova

  2. Inferring catchment precipitation by doing hydrology backward: A test in 24 small and mesoscale catchments in Luxembourg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Inferring catchment precipitation by doing hydrology backward: A test in 24 small and mesoscale September 2012; published 10 October 2012. [1] The complexity of hydrological systems and the necessary simplification of models describing these systems remain major challenges in hydrological modeling. Kirchner

  3. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127­137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-127 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Centre, Maun, Botswana Received: 11 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

  4. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 314, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 3­14, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-3 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Bringing it all, Dublin, Ireland Received: 6 December 2004 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  5. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139­155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-139 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Using stable isotope tracers to assess hydrological flow paths, residence times and landscape influences in a nested

  6. Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 A physically based, two-dimensional, finite-difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Journal of Hydrology ELSEVIER [1] Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 A physically based, two SSDI 0022-1694(94)02512-A #12;72 T.P. Clement et al. / Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 present

  7. DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner 1016 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) © EGU The hydrological significance of mountains: from regional to global scale Daniel Viviroli and Rolf share of the worlds population with fresh water. Quantification of the hydrological significance

  8. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95­109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-95 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences A conceptual glacio-hydrological model for high mountainous catchments B. Schaefli, B. Hingray, M. Niggli, and A. Musy

  9. Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand 334 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) © EGU and stream flow generation Atul H. Haria1 and Paul Shand2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean, groundwater, Hafren, hillslope hydrology, Plynlimon, recharge, soil water, streamflow generation Introduction

  10. Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner 680 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) © EGU Reduction of Monte-Carlo simulation runs for uncertainty estimation in hydrological modelling Soon applied for the estimation of uncertainties in hydrological models due to uncertain parameters. One

  11. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 7991, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 79­91, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-79 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Scale, USA Received: 1 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 30 August

  12. Klystron-linac combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  13. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines Steven Simmons February 27 2014 1 #12;CCCT Today's Discussion 1 Meeting Pricing of 4 advanced units using information from Gas Turbine World Other cost estimates from E E3 EIA Gas Turbine World California Energy Commission Date 2010 Oct 2012, Dec 2013 Apr 2013 2013 Apr

  14. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  15. Satellite remote sensing for hydrology and water management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, E.C.; Power, C.H. (Univ. of Bristol (GB)); Micallef, A. (Univ. of Malta, Valletta (IT)); Voute, C. (International Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences, Enschede (NL))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in satellite remote sensing is fast moving away from pure science and individual case studies towards truly operational applications. At the same time the micro-computer revolution is ensuring that data reception and processing facilities need no longer be the preserve of a small number of global centers, but can be common-place installations in smaller countries and even local regional agency offices or laboratories. As remote sensing matures, and its applications proliferate, a new type of treatment is required to ensure both that decision makers, managers and engineers with problems to solve are informed of today's opportunities and that scientists are provided with integrated overviews of the ever-growing need for their services. This book addresses these needs uniquely focusing on the area bounded by satellite remote sensing, pure and applied hydrological sciences, and a specific world region, namely the Mediterranean basin.

  16. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  17. A combination of air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.L.; Niederhofer, J.D.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural geologic information available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior basin documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air/fluid drilling technique may be advantageous to coalbed-methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. The authors successfully used this technique recently on coalbed-methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, AL.

  18. Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    --Research Approaches and Results: Water Quantity/Hydrologic Impacts Water and energy balance in a forested stand University Union, Parlor A (3rd Floor) University of Utah Salt Lake City, December 1, 2011 Video Conference

  19. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 52 2001 85108 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 52 2001 85≠108 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd Multi components, and precipitation≠dissolution of six minerals. Transport simulation was performed rights reserved. Keywords: Geochemical modeling; Contaminant; Transport; Coupled processes 1

  20. Hydrology and channel form of an urban creek : Rheem Creek in the context of restoration efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balazs, Carolina; Lang, Micah

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Reach 3 Hydrology and Channel Form of an Urban Creek:Rheem Creek in the Context of Restoration Efforts CarolinaChannel Form of an Urban Creek: Rheem Creek in the Context

  1. The influence of subglacial hydrology on the flow of West Antarctic ice streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Narelle Paula Marie

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Subglacial hydrology is known to influence the flow of ice. However, difficulty in accessing the base of large ice sheets has made determining the interaction between ice streams, basal sediment and water difficult to discern. The aim of this thesis...

  2. Hydrology and dynamics of a land-terminating Greenland outlet glacier†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholomew, Ian David

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the hydrology and dynamics of a land-terminating outlet glacier on the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The investigations are motivated by uncertainty about ...

  3. Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Justin Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station at Sonora, Texas. The objective was to characterize interception by juniper canopy and litter, and to determine the redistributive effects of throughfall and stemflow on site hydrology. Based on a 10-year distribution pattern of rainfall, 66...

  4. Combined Heat and Power

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEANSprings Gets anColoring andCombined Heat

  5. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACT OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON THE HYDROLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Geology IMPACT OF WATER RESOURCE DEVFLOPMENT ON THE HYDROLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by LARRY LANE MINTER Approved as to style snd. content by: (Chairman of Committee) n (Head...

  6. Hydrologic, diel and lunar factors affecting fishes on artificial reefs off Panama City, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Richard Morgan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROLOGIC, DIEL AND LUNAR FACTORS AFFECTING FISHES ON ARTIFICIAL REEFS OFF PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA A Thesis RICHARD MORGAN SANDERS, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HYDROLOGIC, DIEL AND LUNAR FACTORS AFFECTING FISHES ON ARTIFICIAL REEFS OFF PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA A Thesis RICHARD MORGAN SANDERS, Jr. Approved as to style...

  7. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

  8. Estimation of hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media with an inverse method based on iterated function systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly heterogeneous nature of most geologic media, coupled with the restricted view of the subsurface available through boreholes, makes it difficult to determine the spatial distribution of subsurface hydrologic properties. Without such a description one cannot predict how fluid flow or solute transport will occur through permeable geologic media, and these predictions are critically needed to address many important environmental problems, including toxic chemical spills, leaking underground storage tanks, and long-term radioactive waste isolation. A common concern of these problems is the possible existence of high-permeability pathways connecting the problem to the biosphere. An understanding of flow and transport behavior is also necessary to optimize energy extraction from petroleum or geothermal reservoirs, where identifying low-permeability barriers that compartmentalize reservoirs and hamper efficient resource utilization is a key problem. The present work describes the development and application of a new inverse method for determining the spatial distribution of hydrologic properties (permeability and specific storage) in heterogeneous geologic media, using pressure transients from interference well tests. The method employs fractal concepts to improve efficiency and reliability. It is applicable to any sort of heterogeneous geologic medium in which wells communicate with each other, whether it be porous, fractured, or a combination thereof. Application to field data from a shallow aquifer at Kesterson Reservoir agrees well with an independent analysis using traditional well-test analysis methods. Application to a series of interference tests conducted at the Gypsy Pilot Site produces a detailed picture of the subsurface, which compares favorably with cross-well seismic imaging studies. 53 refs.

  9. Inversion of Hydrological Tracer Test Data Using TomogrpahicConstraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Niklas; Finsterle, Stefan; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A reasonable description of the hydraulic conductivity structure is a prerequisite for modeling contaminant transport. However, formulations of hydrogeological inverse problems utilizing hydrogeological data only often fail to reliably resolve features at a resolution required for accurately predicting transport. Incorporation of geophysical data into the inverse problem offers the potential to increase this resolution. In this study, we invert hydrological tracer test data using the shape and relative magnitude variations derived from geophysical tomographic data to regionalize a hydrogeological inverse problem in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivity structure. Our approach does not require that the petrophysical relationship be known a-priori, but that it is linear and stationary within each geophysical anomaly. However, tomograms are imperfect models of geophysical properties and geophysical properties are not necessarily strongly linked to hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, we focus on synthetic examples where the correlation between radar velocity and hydraulic conductivity, as well as the geophysical data acquisition errors, are varied in order to assess what aspects of the hydraulic conductivity structure we can expect to resolve under different conditions. The results indicate that regularization of the tracer inversion procedure using geophysical data improves estimates of hydraulic conductivity. We find that even under conditions of corrupted geophysical data, we can accurately estimate the effective hydraulic conductivity and areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity. However, given imperfect geophysical data, our results suggest that we cannot expect accurate estimates of the variability of the hydraulic conductivity structure.

  10. Role of modern climate and hydrology in world oil preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szatmari, P. (Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of oil requires a favorable source, a reservoir, good seal-rock quality, and suitably timed thermal history and structuring. The accumulated oil, especially its light fractions, may be subsequently removed by hydrologically controlled processes such as water washing, biodegradation, and tilting of the oil-water contact. These processes are dependent on the climate. In regions that have become increasingly cold or dry during late Cenozoic time, low rainfall, low ground-water flow rates, and low input of nutrients and microorganisms have protected the oil; in warm or temperate rainy climates, high flow rates and high input of nutrients and microorganisms have led to partial or total removal of oil. Thus, most of the rich (>500,000 barrels/day) oil provinces on land are in cold or dry regions, where water is recharged in highlands that receive little rain (<500 mm/yr), such as Texas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Alaska's North Slope, California, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, the Middle East, the Volga-Ural basin, and western Siberia. Where upland recharge areas are warm or temperate and rainy, as in the eastern United States, western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, Brazil, India, and most of China, rich oil provinces on land (outside young deltas) are rare, and biodegradation is widespread. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  11. An Investigation of Hydrological Aspects of Water Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, O.; Runkles, J.; Wendt, C.

    Water harvesting is a potential source of water for arid and semiarid lands. The objectives of this study were to determine combinations of land surface treatments and land forming which result in efficient but inexpensive water harvesting...

  12. 4.10 Earthquake Hydrology M. Manga and C.-Y. Wang, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    4.10 Earthquake Hydrology M. Manga and C.-Y. Wang, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA ª 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 4.10.1 Introduction 293 4.10.2 Hydrologic Response.10.3.3 Mud Volcanoes 310 4.10.3.4 Geysers 311 4.10.4 Feedback between Earthquakes and Hydrology 312 4

  13. Desiccant-Based Combined Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .4 Regeneration and Parasitic Energy Optimization .........................................................22 5Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Development;ORNL/SUB/01/4000010402 Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid

  14. Influence of soil physicochemical properties on hydrology and restoration response in Carolina Bay wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C. D.; Andrews, D.M.; Kolka, R.K.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina Bays are shallow depression wetlands found in the southeast US that have been severely altered by human activity. The need to restore these complex and diverse systems is well established, but our understanding of basic wetland hydrological processes is limited, hence our ability to predict the need for and/or assess the effectiveness of bay restorations is hindered. Differing physicochemical properties of soils within bay interiors may control bay hydrology. However, previous efforts to establish relationships between soil characteristics and bay hydrology have been inconclusive and the question still remains as to why some bays are ponded throughout the year while others, within a similar landscape unit, are predominantly dry. An assessment of soil and hydrologic characteristics was initiated in restored and unrestored control bays to determine if a relationship exists. Soil morphology was described and permanent monitoring wells were installed at each site. Soil samples were collected by horizon to a depth of 2 meters at the topographic center of each site, and then analyzed. After three years, multiple regression analysis (stepwise backward and forward) was used to establish relationships between the soil physicochemical characteristics and bay hydroperiod in the undisturbed sites. Results from surface soils indicated that exchangeable acidity (EA) was the best single predictor of hydrology. The best double predictor was EA and total N and EA, total N and total C as the best triple predictor. A significant relationship (r2 = 0.96) between hydroperiod and clay content in the argillic horizon (Bt) was also observed. Subsequently, this relationship was utilized to predict hydrologic response using pre-restoration hydroperiod data. The model accurately identified sites that did not need hydrologic restoration (too wet), and effectively showed sites that responded well to restoration activities.

  15. Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith A. Kieffer

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

  16. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  17. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  18. Hydrology and Hydraulic Properties of a Bedded Evaporite Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; ROBERTS,RANDALL M.

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin of New Mexico is an extensively studied evaporite deposit because it is the host formation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a repository for transuranic wastes. Geologic and hydrologic studies of the Salado conducted since the mid-1970's have led to the development of a conceptual model of the hydrogeology of the formation that involves far-field permeability in anhydrite layers and at least some impure halite layers. Pure halite layers and some impure halite layers may not possess an interconnected pore network adequate to provide permeability. Pore pressures are probably very close to lithostatic pressure. In the near field around an excavation, dilation, creep, and shear have created and/or enhanced permeability and decreased pore pressure. Whether flow occurs in the far field under natural gradients or only after some threshold gradient is reached is unknown. If far-field flow does occur, mean pore velocities are probably on the order of a meter per hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years. Flow dimensions inferred from most hydraulic-test responses are subradial, which is believed to reflect channeling of flow through fracture networks, or portions of fractures, that occupy a diminishing proportion of the radially available space, or through percolation networks that are not ''saturated'' (fully interconnected). This is probably related to the directional nature of the permeability created or enhanced by excavation effects. Inferred values of permeability cannot be separated from their associated flow dimensions. Therefore, numerical models of flow and transport should include heterogeneity that is structured to provide the same flow dimensions as are observed in hydraulic tests. Modeling of the Salado Formation around the WIPP repository should also include coupling between hydraulic properties and the evolving stress field because hydraulic properties change as the stress field changes.

  19. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  20. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    - fortunately, useful in-situ observations are rarely available as area representative measurements and scatterometers is of- ten considered to impede hydrological applications. Nev- ertheless, even if most hydrologic moisture products are compared to measured runoff of the Zambezi River in south-eastern Africa for several

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF HYDRATED SULFATES ACROSS ARABIA TERRA USING CRISM DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR MARTIAN HYDROLOGY. S. M. Wiseman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Saint Louis, MO. Introduction: Hydrologic modeling relevant to late Noachian through Hesperian conditions on Mars predicts that Arabia Terra was a region of enhanced groundwater upwelling that resulted topography (Fig. 1). The most well preserved deposit explained by the Andrews-Hanna hydrologic model

  3. Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing deformation in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,KasVinod Privatea metamorphic core

  4. ERB and Northern European FRIEND Project 5 Conference, Demnovsk dolina, Slovakia, 2002 Evaluation of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration efforts in small watersheds with limited data: from to assist in decision making. Distributed hydrologic modeling in geographic information systems (GIS) has scale, or they require excessive calibration, or they are not based on the dominant hydrologic processes

  5. Revisiting Experimental Catchment Studies in Forest Hydrology (Proceedings of a Workshop held during the XXV IUGG General Assembly in Melbourne, JuneJuly 2011) (IAHS Publ. 353, 2012).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Revisiting Experimental Catchment Studies in Forest Hydrology (Proceedings of a Workshop held, 50080 Zaragoza, Spain Abstract The hydrological response of two neighbouring catchments in the central for this switching behaviour could be an increase in the hydrological connectivity within the slopes of the forested

  6. Multivariate synthetic streamflow generation using a hybrid model based on artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(4), 641654 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    networks 641 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(4), 641­654 (2002) © EGS Multivariate synthetic associated with hydrological processes, making it valuable as a practical tool for synthetic generation backpropagation, hydrological scenario generation, multivariate time-series. Introduction It has been almost four

  7. H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser 862 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) © EGU Use of remote sensing for hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments H. Bach1 , M. Braun2, which makes the hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments difficult. Within a few kilometres

  8. Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration in a soil profile during the 1999 MAP-Riviera Campaign Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Riviera Campaign 903 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) © EGU Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration scheme in hydrological models. This study presents the validation of soil moisture soil plot at the edge of a corn field. The hydrological model PREVAH was driven using three

  9. Modelling water flow and seasonal soil moisture dynamics in an alluvial groundwater-fed wetland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 5766 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 57­66 (2003) © EGU Modelling water flow and seasonal soil between groundwater, surface water and climatic conditions. Knowledge of the hydrology of these systems tool to capture their hydrological complexity. In this study, a 2D-model describing saturated

  10. Chapter 4 Regional Hydrology [Draft August 2007] 2007 FORREX Forest Research Extension Society and B.C. Ministry of Forests and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Brett

    Chapter 4 ­ Regional Hydrology [Draft August 2007] © 2007 FORREX Forest Research Extension Society and B.C. Ministry of Forests and Range Eaton B., and R.D. Moore. 2007. Chapter 4 ­ Regional Hydrology [Draft]. In Compendium of Forest Hydrology and Geomorphology in British Columbia [In Prep.] R.G. Pike et

  11. Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Bowling (bowling@purdue.edu) and Keith A. Cherkauer, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkauer, Keith

    Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Adam, now at Washington State University, Pullman, WA · Observations of dramatic hydrologic change hydrology under a changing climate (e.g. Smith et al. 2005; Adam & Lettenmaier 2008). Although mathematical

  12. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43­55 (2003) © EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

  13. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  14. Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  15. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  16. SWOT Satellite Mission: Combined State Parameter Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    -parameter estimation problem Data assimilation experiments ≠ Water depth ≠ Discharge ≠ Channel width ≠ Roughness coefficient #12;3 Need for a surface water mission Importance to hydrology ≠ gauge measurements insufficient hydraulics Amazon Siberia Ohio #12;4 Global gauge measurements #12;5 SWOT Technology These surface water

  17. April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of LST Derived from AVHRR;April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Outline ∑ Introduction ∑ All about LST ∑ Model Modeling ∑ Drought Indices (KBDI, PDSI) ∑ Conclusion #12;April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX

  18. Hydrologic responses to earthquakes and a general metric CHI-YUEN WANG AND MICHAEL MANGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to earthquakes, including liquefaction, changes in stream and spring discharge, changes in the properties to relate and compare the various hydrologic responses. We show that liquefaction, eruption of mud volcanoes seismicity may respond to seismic energy density as small as 10)3 and 10)4 J m)3 , respectively. Com- paring

  19. Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b , Philippe Naveau c Abstract The statistics of extremes have played an important role in engineering practice for water resources design and management. How recent developments in the statistical theory of extreme values can

  20. Comparison of three downscaling methods in simulating the impact of climate change on the hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of three downscaling methods in simulating the impact of climate change on the hydrology change on water resources usually fol- low a top to bottom approach: a scenario of emissions is used a demand in assessments on the impact of climate change hy- drological systems. The purpose of the study

  1. FOG AND DEW COLLECTION PROJECTS IN CROATIA Metorological and Hydrological lnstitiute of Croatia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FOG AND DEW COLLECTION PROJECTS IN CROATIA M. Mileta* Metorological and Hydrological lnstitiute of Croatia Zagreb, Croatia D. Beysens*, V. Nikolayev* CEA-Grenoble, and ESPCI, Paris, France) I. Milimouk and dew water collection in Croatia. Zavizan, the highest meteorological station in Croatia( 1594m

  2. Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert Oglesby**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert shadow effect. Recent studies have tried to quantify this effect on Alpine terrain [Smith et al. 2003a model of this is the response to heating in a steady stratified stream [Smith and Lin, 1982

  3. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems John S. Selker,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems John S. Selker,1,2 Luc The; accepted 27 October 2006; published 6 December 2006. [1] Instruments for distributed fiber-optic m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used

  4. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates

  5. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects. In this study, we used a mixed-effects linear model to estimate an average SSC≠Q relation for different periods the performance of the mixed-effects model against the standard rating curve, represented by a generalized least

  6. Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic availability is indispensable for water resources management at regional or national level. This information processes. The currently available estimates of freshwater availability by a few large international

  7. A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaubey, Indrajeet

    considerable interest in developing methods for uncertainty analysis of artificial neural network (ANN) models and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models, Water Resour. Res., 43, W10407, doi:10A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural

  8. Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers William L. Graf including more than 75,000 dams. One hundred thirty-seven of the very large dams, each storing 1.2 km3 (106 effects of these very large dams emerge from an analysis of the stream gage records of 72 river reaches

  9. The fate of Earth's ocean Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569575 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The fate of Earth's ocean 569 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569­575 (2001) © EGS The fate of Earth's ocean Christine Bounama, Siegfried Franck and Werner von Bloh Potsdam Institute@pik-potsdam.de Abstract Questions of how water arrived on the Earth's surface, how much water is contained in the Earth

  10. Using X-ray computed tomography in hydrology: systems, resolutions, and limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Using X-ray computed tomography in hydrology: systems, resolutions, and limitations D to characterize phase distribution and pore geometry in porous media using non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT). We present qualitative and quantitative CT results for partially saturated media, obtained

  11. Scaling of hydrologic flows in polygonal ground within an Arctic ecosystem Gautam Bisht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4 as high-latitude temperatures warm. Polygonal ground, with a characteristic length Moderate Old D Low center High Moderately wet High Young BOUNDARY CONDITIONS & SOIL PROPERTIES Boundary structures, with high or low centers, dominate the local hydrologic environment, thereby impacting the energy

  12. RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    CMWRXVI 1 RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS STEPHEN has been made by rock physics investigations that define how pore-scale variations in properties like in pore-scale rock properties with an understanding of geophysical sampling at the field

  13. Category: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    have to be measured with accuracy. Index terms: Physical properties of rocks: 5199 GeneralCategory: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks from in situ specific storage coefficient Ph. Cosenza1 '2 , M. Ghoreychi3 , G. de Marsily \\ G

  14. Hydrologic Modeling of a Canal-Irrigated Agricultural Watershed with Irrigation Best Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a hydrologic perspective. In this study, an approach is developed to model canal irrigation systems understanding of irrigation systems and a proper represen- tation of them in watershed models are required it for modeling purposes. Therefore, the next alternative is to use a model to simulate irrigation systems

  15. Sensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    and is the largest nonpolar ice cap in Europe. Because it is temperate (isothermal at the melting point) and storesSensitivity of Vatnajo®kull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2] The sensitivity of Vatnajo®kull ice cap to future climate change is examined using spatially distributed coupled

  16. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113≠140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd Natural Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Z .PII: S0169-7722 99 00098-4 #12;( )T.P. Clement et al.rJournal

  17. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modelling Groundwater flow Solute transport INTRODUCTION Predicting any natural process is a very difficultHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE MODELLING Scales of heterogeneity, REV, dispersion and measurement scale groundwater flow and convection

  18. BEE 6740 2012 http://www.hydrology.bee.cornell.edu/BEE6740Index.htm (coming)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    the Cornell Soil & Water Lab Content & Objective: This course is an introduction to simulation modeling ecohydrology Modeling Session: Introduction to R Soil Water Budget: The keystone to hydrological modeling Soil, groundwater recharge, and some simplifications Modeling Session: the Thornthwaite-Mather model

  19. Identifying hydrologically sensitive areas: Bridging the gap between science and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    nutrient management plans, lack a sound hydrological underpinning for pollutant transport processes S. Steenhuisa , M. Todd Waltera, * a Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701, USA b Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

  20. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Accepted 13 March 2013 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Snow Energy-balance Temperature intercepts snow- fall, alters the snow/atmosphere energy exchange and reduces wind speed. Dense canopies tendEvaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

  1. Autonomous grain combine control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

  2. Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

  3. HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE Daniel, nitrates, iodine, and lithium. Some of the gold and silverandallofthemolybdenumareproducedasby- products

  4. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of abiotic and biotic variables...

  5. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  6. Results from an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in hydrological rock properties caused by the thermallyEuropean countries. The initial rock properties for the twoTABLE II. Some basic rock properties defined for Phase 1 (

  7. Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

  8. Validation study of a multidimensional hydrologic model of rainfall, and the simulation of orographic influences, using data from Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Hiraldo, Roberto

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Meteorology VALIDATION STUDY OF A MULTIDIMENSIONAL HYDROLOGIC MODEL OF RAINFALL, AND THE SIMULATION OF OROGRAPHIC INFLUENCES, USING... University of P. R. Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dennis M. Driscoll Dr. Juan B. Valdes The main purpose of this research was validate an existing multidimensional stochastic hydrologic model of precipitation, which attempts to characterize...

  9. Uncertainties associated with the definition of a hydrologic source term for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.; Esser, B.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thompson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Division is seeking to evaluate groundwater contamination resulting from 30 years of underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This evaluation requires knowledge about what radioactive materials are in the groundwater and how they are transported through the underground environment. This information coupled with models of groundwater flow (flow paths and flow rates) will enable predictions of the arrival of each radionuclide at a selected receptor site. Risk assessment models will then be used to calculate the expected environmental and human doses. The accuracy of our predictions depends on the validity of our hydrologic and risk assessment models and on the quality of the data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water at each underground nuclear test site. This paper summarizes what we currently know about radioactive material in NTS groundwater and suggests how we can best use our limited knowledge to proceed with initial modeling efforts. The amount of a radionuclide available for transport in groundwater at the site of an underground nuclear test is called the hydrologic source term. The radiologic source term is the total amount of residual radionuclides remaining after an underground nuclear test. The hydrologic source term is smaller than the radiologic source term because some or most of the radionuclide residual cannot be transported by groundwater. The radiologic source term has been determined for each of the underground nuclear tests fired at the NTS; however, the hydrologic source term has been estimated from measurements at only a few sites.

  10. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF PAVER SYSTEMS ON URBAN DEVELOPMENT USING A DISTRIBUTED HYDROLOGICAL MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politte, Alyssa

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    the characteristics of the natural flow regime and in stream ecosystem health (Poff et al. 1997). Engineers typically use Best Management Practices (BMPs) to control increased volumes of stormwater. BMPs, such as detention ponds, have been able to control some... stormwater runoff, but it has been found that the natural hydrology of the watershed is still negatively affected and can degrade ecosystem health (USEPA 2000). Alternatively, Low Impact Development (LID) is a newer type of stormwater management that has...

  11. Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ? weights for river stage prediction (Chau, 2006). Other evolutionary algorithms, such as Differential Evaluation (DE) (Storn and Price, 1997) and Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) (de Castro and Von Zuben, 2002a; de Castro and Von Zuben, 2002b), although... is to structure the hydrologic model as a probability model, then the confidence interval of model output can be computed (Montanari et al., 1997). Representative methods of this category include Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and a Generalized Likelihood...

  12. Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

  13. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  14. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  15. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  16. Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

  17. Conceptual combination: does similarity predict emergence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkenfeld, Merryl Joy

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about emergence. 24 EXPERIMENT ONE: CONCEPTUAL COMBINATION This phase was the actual conceptual combination task. In it, the subjects performed conceptual combination on all 16 pairs of words. The subjects gave two definitions for each pmr...

  18. LHC Higgs boson mass combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adye, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is $m_{H} = 125.09\\pm0.21\\,\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm0.11\\,\\mathrm{(syst.)}~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  19. Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel...

  20. BBFor2BBFor2 ResearchResearch ProjectsProjects ForensicForensic CombinationCombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    Phillip HarrisonHarrison University of York #12;CombinationCombination ofof EvidenceEvidence inin Forensics phonetic units of a speech sample #12;CombinationCombination ofof EvidenceEvidence inin Forensics

  1. Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research Assessment of environmental models anf software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monte, L; Hofman, Dimitry

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research

  2. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  3. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feng, Zhe

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  4. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

  6. Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

  7. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of initial cell concentration and flow rate on U(VI) reduction.

  8. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  9. Geochemical evidence for the hydrology of a Tamarack-peat bog, Brimfield Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.; Miller, L.A. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology and Water Resources)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat Bogs and wetlands represent unique environmental settings what are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic stresses involving inputs of water and chemicals. This study used geochemical and hydrologic monitoring to determine the inputs and fates of elements of the Kent-Brimfield bog located in Portage County, Ohio. Based on physical and chemical information collected over one year, a model is proposed here describing the hydrologic connection between a bog and shallow ground water surrounding the bog. The chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and ground water in the bog vicinity were monitored for one year. Field measurements included water levels, pH, Eh, alkalinity and temperature. Trace metal content of the peat, the pore waters, soil water and ground waters were determined by GFAA, ICP and LIC methods. This bog was found to function as part of a perched water table aquifer. Water in the upper 3 m of the bog is found to be chemically similar to precipitation, but modified by reactions involving dissolution of mineral matter and biologic processes. The chemistry of water deeper in the bog (> 3m) resembles shallow ground water surrounding the bog, modified by weathering of underlying geologic materials and sulfate reduction. This similarity, along with ground water elevations within and outside of the bog, supports that shallow ground water interacts with, and helps maintain water levels in the upper surface of the bog. From these results, a model is proposed for the seasonal variations in hydrologic processes operating in the wetland and surrounding basin, and describes how wetlands may change seasonally from being influent to effluent systems.

  10. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  11. Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment abilities. The proposal was typically described as complementing an already generous nature, not simply subduing it. Its implementation was limited by political tensions, and fifteen years later, a scaled-down version was constructed. Well levels recovered, but within a decade were declining due to increasing withdrawals. I assert that the approach in Santa Clara Valley was a forerunner to more recent innovations in natural resource management in California and beyond.

  12. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R&D-1 project titled ``Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.`` The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  13. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  14. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig L. (Setauket, NY); Rooney, William (Miller Place, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Stoll, Sean (Wading River, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  15. Combination drilling and skiving tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

  16. Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. R. Reddy, and J. Majer-Newman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. The restoration plan for the Everglades includes construction of large stormwater treatment areas (STAs) decreased by 49% for the SAV treatments compared with 41% for the EAV treatments, irrespective of hydrology

  17. Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

  18. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  19. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: The effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apul, Defne S. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Mail Stop 307, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)], E-mail: Defne.apul@utoledo.edu; Gardner, Kevin H. [Environmental Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, 35 Colovos Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)], E-mail: Kevin.gardner@unh.edu; Eighmy, T. Taylor [Environmental Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, 35 Colovos Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)], E-mail: Taylor.eighmy@unh.edu

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m{sup 3}/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

  20. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

  1. 612 SOIL SCI. SOC. AM. J., VOL. 66, MARCHAPRIL 2002 model: User's manual. Communications 91:6, Swedish University Linsley, R.K., M.A. Kohler, and J.L.H. Paulus. 1975. Hydrology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    .J. Morel-Sey- toux (ed.) Unsaturated flow in hydrologic modeling theory andquium, 12th, Perth, Western

  2. Model combination by decomposition and aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Mingyang, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on a general problem in statistical modeling, namely model combination. It proposes a novel feature-based model combination method to improve model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty. In this method, ...

  3. Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the Department of Energyís Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

  4. Analysis of the spatial variation in the parameters of the SWAT model with application in Flanders,Northern Belgium Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 931939 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,Northern Belgium 931 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 931939 (2004) © EGU Analysis of the spatial.heuvelmans@agr.kuleuven.ac.be Abstract Operational applications of a hydrological model often require the prediction of stream flow of a large river basin. Keywords: hydrological model, regionalisation, parameterisation, spatial variability

  5. Integration of spatial datasets to suppor t the review of hydrometric networks and the identification of representative catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the identification of representative catchments 1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) © EGU of representative catchments C.L.R. Laize Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK E into account the reduction in hydrological uncertainty brought about by the data added since the last network

  6. Uncertainty of solute flux estimation in ungauged small streams:potential implications for input-output nutrient mass balances Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -output nutrient mass balances 675 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) © EGU Uncertainty of stream nutrient retention/release under a wide spectrum of hydrological conditions. Providing good estimates of the mass balances for nutrients depends on precise hydrological monitoring and good chemical

  7. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  8. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  9. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  10. Characterization of the geology, geochemistry, hydrology and microbiology of the in-situ air stripping demonstration site at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, C.A.; Looney, B.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Kaback, D.S.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is the location of an Integrated Demonstration Project designed to evaluate innovative remediation technologies for environmental restoration at sites contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. This demonstration utilizes directionally drilled horizontal wells to deliver gases and extract contaminants from the subsurface. Phase I of the Integrated Demonstration focused on the application and development of in-situ air stripping technologies to remediate soils and sediments above and below the water table as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The objective of this report is to provide baseline information on the geology, geochemistry, hydrology, and microbiology of the demonstration site prior to the test. The distribution of contaminants in soils and sediments in the saturated zone and groundwater is emphasized. These data will be combined with data collected after the demonstration in order to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping. New technologies for environmental characterization that were evaluated include depth discrete groundwater sampling (HydroPunch) and three-dimensional modeling of contaminant data.

  11. Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

  12. Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects 545 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) © EGU Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Robert A. Briers and John H The impacts of coniferous plantation forestry on the biology of upland streams in the UK are firmly

  13. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  14. Estimation of hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media with an inverse method based on iterated function systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media are estimated by simultaneously inverting multiple observations from well-test data. A set of pressure transients observed during one or more interference tests is compared to the corresponding values obtained by numerically simulating the tests using a mathematical model. The parameters of the mathematical model are varied and the simulation repeated until a satisfactory match to the observed pressure transients is obtained, at which point the model parameters are accepted as providing a possible representation of the hydrologic property distribution. Restricting the search to parameters that represent fractal hydrologic property distributions can improve the inversion process. Far fewer parameters are needed to describe heterogeneity with a fractal geometry, improving the efficiency and robustness of the inversion. Additionally, each parameter set produces a hydrologic property distribution with a hierarchical structure, which mimics the multiple scales of heterogeneity often seen in natural geological media. Application of the IFS inverse method to synthetic interference-test data shows that the method reproduces the synthetic heterogeneity successfully for idealized heterogeneities, for geologically-realistic heterogeneities, and when the pressure data includes noise.

  15. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

  16. Changes in glaciers in the Swiss Alps and impact on basin hydrology: Current state of the art and future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffel, Markus

    Review Changes in glaciers in the Swiss Alps and impact on basin hydrology: Current state of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland H I G H L I G H T S ∑ Comprehensive review of glacier changes in the Swiss forcing. ∑ Extrapolation of air temperature can affect model projections of glacier evolution. ∑ Debris

  17. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model,14 and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper15 Bow River basin, a tributary of the South

  18. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume II. Impact of geothermal development on the geology and hydrology of the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, C.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics are discussed: the geological setting of the Hawaiian Islands, regional geology of the major islands, geohydrology of the Hawaiian Islands, Hawaiis' geothermal resources, and potential geological/hydrological problems associated with geothermal development. Souces of information on the geology of Hawaii are presented. (MHR)

  19. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  20. Effect of grid size on runoff and soil moisture for a variable-source-area hydrology model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    landscapes are dependent on the distribution and pattern of soil moisture and water transport. In this paper for efficient manage- ment of water quality [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1994, 1995, 1996Effect of grid size on runoff and soil moisture for a variable-source-area hydrology model Wen

  1. Aerosol Effects on Clouds, Energy & Hydrologic Cycle Steven Ghan, Trond Iversen, Jon Egill Kristjansson, Athanasios Nenes, Joyce Penner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cycle and a "semi-direct" effect by suppressing cloud formation due to absorption of solar radiation cloud coverage. The increased cloud albedo and cloud cover decrease solar insolation at the surfaceAerosol Effects on Clouds, Energy & Hydrologic Cycle Steven Ghan, Trond Iversen, Jon Egill

  2. James W. Jawitz 2169 McCarty Hall/PO Box 110290 Assistant Professor, Environmental Hydrology Gainesville, FL 32611

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . Hydraulic analysis of cell-network treatment wetlands. Journal of Hydrology, 330, pp. 721-724, doi:10.1016/j treatment wetland in Florida. Ecological Engineering, 26, 132­146, doi: 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2005 zone treatment: Experimental and modeling assessment of the benefits of partial source removal $991

  3. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  4. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2012 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 8, 2012. The samples were shipped to GEL Laboratories in Charleston, South Carolina, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry; tritium was analyzed using two methods. The conventional tritium method has a detection limit on the order of 400 pCi/L, and a select set of samples was analyzed for tritium using the enriched method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  6. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 18, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method. The laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  7. Multi-scale Characterization and Prediction of Coupled Subsurface Biogeochemical-Hydrological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Banfield, Jill; Long, Phil; Slater, Lee; Pride, Steve; Jinsong Chen

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations.

  8. Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Kathryn D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

  9. Gasbuggy, New Mexico Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) that has been conducted since 1972 at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico underground nuclear detonation site. The nuclear testing was conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program, which is discussed in greater detail in Appendix A. The detonation at Gasbuggy took place in 1967, 4,240 feet below ground surface, and was designed to fracture the host rock of a low-permeability natural gas-bearing formation in an effort to improve gas production. The site has historically been managed under the Nevada Offsites Project. These underground nuclear detonation sites are within the United States but outside of the Nevada Test Site where most of the experimental nuclear detonations conducted by the U.S. Government took place. Gasbuggy is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM ).

  10. Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

  11. The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earthís albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65įN, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

  12. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  13. Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

  14. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Technology Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sector - Directed toward 1 - 10 MW systems including combined modes, e.g. solid oxide fuel cell plus turbine. Materials development and characterization Investigating...

  15. Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compounds in Automotive Emissions Discusses a novel combination of multi-component scanning direct absorption spectroscopy, resonant cavity and low-pressure sampling to...

  16. Correlated Topographic and Spectroscopic Imaging by Combined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Combined Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy. Abstract: Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic...

  17. Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.†

  18. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  19. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  20. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  1. Field scale evaluation of the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor and assessment of river-aquifer interaction at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site / by Andrew Scott Alden†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alden, Andrew Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors (ISPFS), recently developed by Dr. Sanford Ballard at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas. The Flow Sensors use a thermal...

  2. Field scale evaluation of the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor and assessment of river-aquifer interaction at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site / by Andrew Scott Alden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alden, Andrew Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors (ISPFS), recently developed by Dr. Sanford Ballard at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas. The Flow Sensors use a thermal...

  3. Demographic and trophic dynamics of fishes in relation to hydrologic variation in channel and floodplain habitats of the Brazos River, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeug, Steven Christopher

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Large rivers in North America have been subjected to a variety of hydrologic alterations that have negatively impacted aquatic fauna. These impacts have triggered restoration efforts, including management of flows, to restore or maintain ecological...

  4. The effect of fractures, faults, and sheared shale zones on the hydrology of Bear Creek Burial Grounds A-South, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollon, Dwight Mitchell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous hydrologic models of flow in Bear Creek Valley have presented lateral flow as occurring through the Nolichucky Shale in parallel to strike fractures within thin carbonate beds; the effects of faults were not considered. This study presents...

  5. The effect of fractures, faults, and sheared shale zones on the hydrology of Bear Creek Burial Grounds A-South, Oak Ridge, Tennessee†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollon, Dwight Mitchell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous hydrologic models of flow in Bear Creek Valley have presented lateral flow as occurring through the Nolichucky Shale in parallel to strike fractures within thin carbonate beds; the effects of faults were not considered. This study presents...

  6. Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drici, Warda

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  7. Data Combinations Accounting for LISA Spacecraft Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Shaddock; Massimo Tinto; Frank B. Estabrook; J. W. Armstrong

    2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    LISA is an array of three spacecraft in an approximately equilateral triangle configuration which will be used as a low-frequency gravitational wave detector. We present here new generalizations of the Michelson- and Sagnac-type time-delay interferometry data combinations. These combinations cancel laser phase noise in the presence of different up and down propagation delays in each arm of the array, and slowly varying systematic motion of the spacecraft. The gravitational wave sensitivities of these generalized combinations are the same as previously computed for the stationary cases, although the combinations are now more complicated. We introduce a diagrammatic representation to illustrate that these combinations are actually synthesized equal-arm interferometers.

  8. Scalability of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Voisin, Nathalie; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the relative merits of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations, with a focus on their scalability (i.e., abilities to perform consistently across a range of spatial resolutions) in simulating runoff generation. Simulations produced by the grid- and subbasin-based configurations of the Community Land Model (CLM) are compared at four spatial resolutions (0.125o, 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o) over the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Using the 0.125o resolution simulation as the ďreferenceĒ, statistical skill metrics are calculated and compared across simulations at 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o spatial resolutions of each modeling approach at basin and topographic region levels. Results suggest significant scalability advantage for the subbasin-based approach compared to the grid-based approach for runoff generation. Basin level annual average relative errors of surface runoff at 0.25o, 0.5o, and 1o compared to 0.125o are 3%, 4%, and 6% for the subbasin-based configuration and 4%, 7%, and 11% for the grid-based configuration, respectively. The scalability advantages of the subbasin-based approach are more pronounced during winter/spring and over mountainous regions. The source of runoff scalability is found to be related to the scalability of major meteorological and land surface parameters of runoff generation. More specifically, the subbasin-based approach is more consistent across spatial scales than the grid-based approach in snowfall/rainfall partitioning, which is related to air temperature and surface elevation. Scalability of a topographic parameter used in the runoff parameterization also contributes to improved scalability of the rain driven saturated surface runoff component, particularly during winter. Hence this study demonstrates the importance of spatial structure for multi-scale modeling of hydrological processes, with implications to surface heat fluxes in coupled land-atmosphere modeling.

  9. Long-Term Hydrologic Responses To Shrub Removal In A SW Texas Rangeland: Using Soil Chloride To Estimate Deep Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barre, David Anthony

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    LONG-TERM HYDROLOGIC RESPONSES TO SHRUB REMOVAL IN A SW TEXAS RANGELAND: USING SOIL CHLORIDE TO ESTIMATE DEEP DRAINAGE A Thesis by DAVID ANTHONY BARRE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... of the study were to identify those biotic and abiotic factors facilitating deep drainage and to examine differences in recharge for the years following clearing of natural shrub vegetation. Soil chloride was examined to estimate long-term recharge rates...

  10. A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

  11. Hydrologic evaluation methodology for estimating water movement through the unsaturated zone at commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, P.D.; Rockhold, M.L.; Nichols, W.E.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies key technical issues related to hydrologic assessment of water flow in the unsaturated zone at low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. In addition, a methodology for incorporating these issues in the performance assessment of proposed LLW disposal facilities is identified and evaluated. The issues discussed fall into four areas: estimating the water balance at a site (i.e., infiltration, runoff, water storage, evapotranspiration, and recharge); analyzing the hydrologic performance of engineered components of a facility; evaluating the application of models to the prediction of facility performance; and estimating the uncertainty in predicted facility performance. To illustrate the application of the methodology, two examples are presented. The first example is of a below ground vault located in a humid environment. The second example looks at a shallow land burial facility located in an arid environment. The examples utilize actual site-specific data and realistic facility designs. The two examples illustrate the issues unique to humid and arid sites as well as the issues common to all LLW sites. Strategies for addressing the analytical difficulties arising in any complex hydrologic evaluation of the unsaturated zone are demonstrated.

  12. Crankshaft position sensing with combined starter alternator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Larry Raymond (Plymouth, MI); Miller, John Michael (Saline, MI)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A crankshaft position sensing apparatus for use with an engine (16) having a combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The crankshaft position sensing apparatus includes a tone ring (38) with a sensor (36) and bandpass filter (46), having a cylinder identification input from a camshaft sensor (48), and a gain limiter (54). The sensing apparatus mounts near the rotor (30) of the combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The filtered crankshaft position signal can then be input into a vehicle system controller (58) and an inner loop controller (60). The starter/alternator assembly (18) in combination with an internal combustion engine is particularly useful for a hybrid electric vehicle system.

  13. Coupling Hydrological and Geochemical Simulations to Assess Spatial Heterogeneity and Chemical Evolution of Groundwaters at Two Candidate Repository Sites in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auque, Luis Francisco; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Gomez, Javier B. [Petrologia y Geoquimica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Depto. Ciencias de la Tierra, Facultad de Ciencias, c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, Zaragoza, E-50009 (Spain); Puigdomenech, Ignasi [Safety and Science, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical composition of groundwater surrounding a high level radioactive waste repository is of importance to many factors that affect repository performance. The geochemical characteristics of Swedish groundwater systems are governed by successive mixing events between several end-member waters during their paleogeographic evolution. An approach is proposed here to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater geochemical conditions by coupling hydrogeological and geochemical models in a sequential way. The procedure combines hydrogeological results by others [1,2] of a discrete fracture network using CONNECTFLOW with a mixing and reaction-path simulation using PHREEQC. The hydrological results contain mixing proportions of four reference waters (a deep brine, glacial meltwater, marine water, and meteoric infiltration) at each time step and at every node of the 3D model domain. In this work, mixing fractions are fed into PHREEQC using software developed to build formatted input files and to extract the information from output files for subsequent plotting and analysis. The geochemical calculations included both chemical mixing and equilibrium reactions with selected minerals: calcite, chalcedony and an Fe(III) oxyhydroxide. Some results for the Forsmark site, about 170 km north of Stockholm, Sweden, are graphically presented. Cross sections, where each node is color-coded with respect to an important variable (pH, Eh or concentrations of main elements), are used to visualize the future evolution of the site. Sensitivity analyses were made to evaluate the effects of the different reactions and/or assumptions. The proposed methodology has proved useful for evaluating the future geochemical evolution of the repository sites and to increase the confidence in the site descriptions. (authors)

  14. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  15. Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfallĖrunoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storageĖdischarge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a topĖdown empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storageĖdischarge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storageĖdischarge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  17. Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; Scherer, Martin [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Snow accumulation is critical for water availability in the Northern Hemisphere1,2, raising concern that global warming could have important impacts on natural and human systems in snow-dependent regions1,3. Although regional hydrologic changes have been observed (for example, refs 1,3 5), the time of emergence of extreme changes in snow accumulation and melt remains a key unknown for assessing climate- change impacts3,6,7. We find that the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble exhibits an imminent shift towards low snow years in the Northern Hemisphere, with areas of western North America, northeastern Europe and the Greater Himalaya showing the strongest emergence during the near- termdecadesandat2 Cglobalwarming.Theoccurrenceof extremely low snow years becomes widespread by the late twenty-first century, as do the occurrences of extremely high early-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing flood risk), and extremely low late-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing water stress). Our results suggest that many snow-dependent regions of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience increasing stress from low snow years within the next three decades, and from extreme changes in snow-dominated water resources if global warming exceeds 2 C above the pre-industrial baseline.

  18. Hydrological and solute budgets of Lake Qinghai, the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Zhangdong; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Yi; Shi, Yuewei

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water level and chemistry of Lake Qinghai are sensitive to climate changes and are important for paleoclimatic implications. An accurate understanding of hydrological and chemical budgets is crucial for quantifying geochemical proxies and carbon cycle. Published results of water budget are firstly reviewed in this paper. Chemical budget and residence time of major dissolved constituents in the lake are estimated using reliable water budget and newly obtained data for seasonal water chemistry. The results indicate that carbonate weathering is the most important riverine process, resulting in dominance of Ca2+ and DIC for river waters and groundwater. Groundwater contribution to major dissolved constituents is relatively small (4.2 Ī 0.5%). Wet atmospheric deposition contributes annually 7.4Ė44.0% soluble flux to the lake, resulting from eolian dust throughout the seasons. Estimates of chemical budget further suggest that (1) the Buha-type water dominates the chemical components of the lake water, (2) Na+, Cl?, Mg2+, and K+ in lake water are enriched owing to their conservative behaviors, and (3) precipitation of authigenic carbonates (low-Mg calcite, aragonite, and dolomite) transits quickly dissolved Ca2+ into the bottom sediments of the lake, resulting in very low Ca2+ in the lake water. Therefore, authigenic carbonates in the sediments hold potential information on the relative contribution of different solute inputs to the lake and the lake chemistry in the past.

  19. GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo- physics, geochemistry, geomechanics Geotechnics Environmental Geotechnics Experimental Methods in Research Foundation Systems Geomechanics Theoretical Geomechanics Wave-based Characterization of Particulate Materials FACULTY Glenn J. Rix, Ph

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Available of MEPV Talk at September 6th TEDxABQ Event Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with Solar Cells for Increased...

  1. The Econometrics of Data Combination Geert Ridder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    The Econometrics of Data Combination Geert Ridder Department of Economics, University of Southern University,Baltimore E-mail: moffitt@jhu.edu Chapter for the Handbook of Econometrics April 1, 2005 We thank

  2. Master Thesis Combined Neural Networks and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    in steel design Joo, Min Sung ( ) Department of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology Pohang University of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Pohang, Korea June 23th , 2008 Approved by #12;Combined

  3. Harmonic Representation of Combinations and Partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Psimopoulos

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present article a new method of deriving integral representations of combinations and partitions in terms of harmonic products has been established. This method may be relevant to statistical mechanics and to number theory.

  4. Combining confinement and conventional beef production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Michael Ronald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF AGRICULTURE December, 1985 Major Subject: Animal Science Department of Animal Science COMBINING CONFINEMENT AND CONVENTIONAL BEEF PRODUCTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael Ronald Gregg Approved as to style and content by: Chairman, Advzso ommit ee...

  5. Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined...

  6. Early Mars hydrology: Meridiani playa deposits and the sedimentary record of Arabia Terra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.

    The Meridiani Planum region of Mars has been identified as a region of past aqueous activity by a combination of orbital and in situ observations that revealed evidence for sulfate-rich dirty evaporites formed in a playa ...

  7. Geology, hydrology, chemistry, and microbiology of the in situ bioremediation demonstration site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Hall, S.H.; Truex, M.J.; Vermeul, V.R.; Engelman, R.E.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes characterization information on the geology, hydrology, microbiology, contaminant distribution, and ground-water chemistry to support demonstration of in situ bioremediation at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this information is to provide baseline conditions, including a conceptual model of the aquifer being utilized for in situ bioremediation. Data were collected from sampling and other characterization activities associated with three wells drilled in the upper part of the suprabasalt aquifer. Results of point-dilution tracer tests, conducted in the upper 9 m (30 ft) of the aquifer, showed that most ground-water flow occurs in the upper part of this zone, which is consistent with hydraulic test results and geologic and geophysical data. Other tracer test results indicated that natural ground-water flow velocity is equal to or less than about 0.03 m/d (0.1 ft/d). Laboratory hydraulic conductivity measurements, which represent the local distribution of vertical hydraulic conductivity, varied up to three orders of magnitude. Based on concentration data from both the vadose and saturated zone, it is suggested that most, if not all, of the carbon tetrachloride detected is representative of the aqueous phase. Concentrations of carbon tetrachloride, associated with a contaminant plume in the 200-West Area, ranged from approximately 500 to 3,800 {mu}g/L in the aqueous phase and from approximately 10 to 290 {mu}g/L in the solid phase at the demonstration site. Carbon tetrachloride gas was detected in the vadose zone, suggesting volatilization and subsequent upward migration from the saturated zone.

  8. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Online Forecast Combination for Dependent Heterogeneous Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancetta, Alessio

    the single individual forecasts. Several studies have shown that combining forecasts can be a useful hedge against structural breaks, and forecast combinations are often more stable than single forecasts (e.g. Hendry and Clements, 2004, Stock and Watson, 2004... in expectations. Hence, we have the following. Corollary 4 Suppose maxt?T kl (Yt, hwt,Xti)kr ? A taking expectation on the left hand side, adding 2A ? T and setting ? = 0 in mT (?), i.e. TX t=1 E [lt (wt)? lt (ut...

  10. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  11. Chasing megawatts in combined cycle plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. [Power Plant Performance Specialist, Lansdowne, PA (United States); DeGeeter, S. [Ocean State Power, Harrisville, RI (United States); Haynes, C.J. [New England Power Co., Somerset, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined cycle owners do not have to accept that combined cycle performance must degrade over time. Through low cost testing using existing instrumentation, a method is presented to identify causes for lost generation. A 500 MW combined cycle plant, with two STAG 207EA units, had lost 17 MW since initial operation, and found that: Gas side fouling on A four HRSG`s accounted for 8 MW of the total loss LP steam turbine efficiency was below design on one unit, contributing 3 MW Condenser air removal was poor on both units, a loss of an additional 2 MW Compressor and turbine section efficiency losses on 2 of 4 GT`s cost over 4 MW The test also revealed that the other two GT`s, both cooling towers, and one of the two steam turbines, were performing at or near design. Thus far 3 MW has been recovered, with planning underway for recovery of another 3 MW. The remaining 11 MW, though not immediately recoverable, will be the focus of planning for the next major outage. This simple method can be used at any combined cycle using existing instrumentation, with minimal intrusion on daily operations. The use of redundant measurements and uncertainty analysis assures valid and useful results.

  12. Combining Fuzzy Information: an Overview Ronald Fagin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsotras, Vassilis J.

    is a reasonable property to demand of an aggregation function: if for every attribute, the grade of object R using a fixed monotone aggregation function, or combining rule, such as min or average. In this overview red). In response to a query asking for red objects, a multimedia system might typically assign

  13. ccsd00003923, Combination of carbon nanotubes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of composite optical limiters, in which two complementary nonlinear optical materials are mixed togetherccsd­00003923, version 1 ­ 18 Jan 2005 Combination of carbon nanotubes and two-photon absorbers-linear scattering from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiphoton absorption (MPA) from organic

  14. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas...

  15. Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

  16. Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

  17. 2014 Argonne Combined Appeal Reception | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Combined Appeal Reception 2014 Argonne Combined Appeal 1 of 3 2014 Argonne Combined Appeal Argonne Director Peter B. Littlewood speaks with veterans of the U.S. Armed...

  18. Review of information on hydrology and radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site 1976--1988, and annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, J.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Foley, M.G.; Bierschenk, W.H.; Harrison, R.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); IT Corp., Richland, WA (USA); Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on changes in the state of knowledge on the hydrology and radionuclide migration that have occurred at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1976. In the present study, a literature review was conducted to examine information published since 1976 about the various activities that have occurred at the NTS. Information was collected from the literature on the site's geological, hydrological, geochemical, and geomorphic characteristics related to the impacts on the ground water from weapons testing and the disposal of waste at the NTS. This information was used to identify the state of knowledge about the NTS and the potential impacts of NTS activities on the ground water. More than 250 reports were reviewed, of which about 200 contained information pertinent to the subject of this report. Because the reports have never been collected in a single location, only those that were supplied by the US Department of Energy and other cooperating organizations could be reviewed, and some pertinent documents may have been missed. Appendix A contains an annotated bibliography of the reports reviewed. 149 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  20. aortic dissection combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  1. anesthetics combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  2. acetylcysteine mannitol combination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  3. agrotis ipsilon combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  4. atacama combining bioarchaeology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  5. abdominal hyperthermia combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  6. artemisinin-based antimalarial combination: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  7. arteriovenous malformation combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  8. anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encouraging Combined Heat andgrid to assess the CO 2 mitigate potential of CHP and CCHP and other DER Collected Data Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Stadler, Michael...

  9. Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting ace025rappe2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR...

  10. Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation ace025rappe2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR...

  11. Engine Driven Combined Heat and Power: Arrow Linen Supply, December...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Driven Combined Heat and Power: Arrow Linen Supply, December 2008 Engine Driven Combined Heat and Power: Arrow Linen Supply, December 2008 This paper describes the Arrow...

  12. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and...

  13. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Providing Clean, Low-Cost,...

  14. Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

  15. Optimal combined wind power forecasts using exogeneous variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal combined wind power forecasts using exogeneous variables Fannar ®Orn Thordarson Kongens of the thesis is combined wind power forecasts using informations from meteorological forecasts. Lyngby, January

  16. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2011 Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power...

  17. Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 The models...

  18. AMO Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System AMO Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and...

  19. SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

  20. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  1. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  2. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenton K. Yee

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

  3. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Kenton K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

  4. Combined fluidized bed retort and combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer-Yu (Fairfax, VA); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Zeng, Li-Wen (Morgantown, WV)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a combined fluidized bed retorting and combustion system particularly useful for extracting energy values from oil shale. The oil-shale retort and combustor are disposed side-by-side and in registry with one another through passageways in a partition therebetween. The passageways in the partition are submerged below the top of the respective fluid beds to preclude admixing or the product gases from the two chambers. The solid oil shale or bed material is transported through the chambers by inclining or slanting the fluidizing medium distributor so that the solid bed material, when fluidized, moves in the direction of the downward slope of the distributor.

  5. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Combined Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory Directors LaboratoryPlanning Combined

  6. combined heat power | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2Development ofCombined

  7. Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study 457 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) © EGU Operational hydro forecasting system in the context of the Piemonte Regions hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure

  8. Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion 589 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) © EGU Sustainability of UK forestry entitled Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters by presenting

  9. Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421431 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales 421 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421≠431 (2002) © EGS Assessing environmental impacts on stream water the environmental sciences, there are major management issues over the impact of man on the water quality

  10. The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 8599 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes 85 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 85­99 (2002) © EGS The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) for estimation, The Netherlands Email: B.su@Alterra.wag-ur.nl Abstract A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) is proposed

  11. Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway predicted by the MAGIC model Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(4), 467483 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway predicted by the MAGIC model 467 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(4), 467483 (2003) © EGU Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway.O. Box 173 Kjelsås, N-0411 Oslo, Norway 2 Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia

  12. Nitrogen dynamics in runoff from two small heathland catchments in Norway Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 351362 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrogen dynamics in runoff from two small heathland catchments in Norway 351 Hydrology and Earth catchments representing opposite extremes with respect to climate and N deposition in Norway √?yvind Kaste1 Grimstad, Norway 2 Norwegian Institute for Water Research, P.O. Box 173 Kjels√•s, N-0411 Oslo, Norway Email

  13. Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, Norway and Sweden 19901999 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 327337 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, Norway and Sweden 1990­1999 327 Hydrology, Norway and Sweden 1990­1999 B.L. Skjelkvåle1 , J. Mannio2 , A. Wilander3 and T. Andersen1 1 Norwegian Institute for Water Research, PB 173 Kjelsås, N-0411 Oslo, Norway 2 Finnish Environment Institute, PB.140

  14. Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks 313 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) © EGU Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide a quick and flexible means of developing flood flow simulation

  15. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  16. The hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Stefan Hagemann and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    substance across the globe, but they also carry along thermal energy in the process ­ albeit hidden into liquid water or freezes to form ice. Conversely, energy input is necessary for ice to melt or sublimeThe hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere

  17. 1198 Hydrological Sciences Journal Journal des Sciences Hydrologiques, 58 (6) 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2013.803183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1SS, UK 14 Water Problems Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 15 Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, The Netherlands 20 Agrocampus Ouest, INRA, UMR1069, Soil Agro and hydroSystem, F-35000 Rennes, France Chair

  18. Climate change impacts on nutrient loads in theYorkshire Ouse catchment (UK) Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(2), 197209 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Climate change impacts on nutrient loads in theYorkshire Ouse catchment (UK) 197 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(2), 197­209 (2002) © EGS Climate change impacts on nutrient loads for corresponding author: faycal.bouraoui@jrc.it Abstract This study assessed the impact of potential climate change

  19. Flood forecasting using a fully distributed model: application of the TOPKAPI model to the Upper Xixian Catchment Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 347364 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the lumping of a kinematic wave assumption in the soil, on the surface and in the drainage network, and leads Liu1 , Mario L.V. Martina2 and Ezio Todini2 1 Bureau of Hydrology, Ministry of Water Resources, 2 Lane, snowmelt, soil water, surface water and channel water, respectively. Percolation to deep soil layers

  20. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of peat soils 23 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 23≠32 (2003) © EGU An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils.Schwaerzel@TU-Berlin.de Abstract A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which

  1. Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927937 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rainfall. Keywords: Chalk, modelling, groundwater recharge Introduction The Chalk is the main aquiferSimplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments 927 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927­937 (2002) © EGS Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater

  2. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  3. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  4. Nonlinear interaction of compressional waves in a 2D dusty plasma crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    sound waves is dispersionless [4,9,10], with a speed CL = /k given in Ref. [9]. Here, 2 0 = Q2 /4 0ma3 monolayers [1], electrons on the surface of liquid helium [2], rare gas atoms ab- sorbed on graphite [3 a screened Coulomb repulsion or Yukawa potential. Sound waves, or phonons, in a 2D Yukawa lattice are well

  5. Theory of compressional and transverse wave propagation in consolidated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    sediments. The consolidated material is treated as an elastic medium which exhibits a specific form waves, from which expressions for the wave speeds and attenuations are established. In both cases of attenuation in sandstones, limestones, and shales; the wave speeds show weak logarithmic dispersion

  6. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 38 (2001) 765776 Compressional waves guided between parallel fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    , contami- nants or other fluids in active or depleted oil or gas reservoirs, or man-made underground

  7. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of drift-compressional modes in dipole geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    be determined by considering whether the source of the wave energy is an external drive (e.g., the solar wind (Received 14 January 2011; accepted 2 June 2011; published online 21 July 2011) Gyrokinetic particle) or an internal excitation via phase space or configuration space nonuniformities and whether the energy

  8. Pore-scale study of dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of rocks with binary minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Viswanathan, Hari S; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pore-scale numerical model for reactive transport processes based on the Lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of a fractured medium and a porous medium. The solid phase of both media consists of two minerals, and a structure reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set is employed to generate the distributions of both minerals. Emphasis is put on the effects of undissolved minerals on the changes of permeability and porosity under different Peclet and Damkohler numbers. The simulation results show porous layers formed by the undissolved mineral remain behind the dissolution reaction front. Due to the large flow resistance in these porous layers, the permeability increases very slowly or even remains at a small value although the porosity increases by a large amount. Besides, due to the heterogeneous characteristic of the dissolution, the chemical, mechanical and hydraulic apertures are very different from each other. Further, sim...

  9. Tevatron Top-Quark Combinations and World Top-Quark Mass Combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhild Yvonne Peters; on behalf of the ATLAS; CDF; CMS; D0 collaborations

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost 20 years after its discovery, the top quark is still an interesting particle, undergoing precise investigation of its properties. For many years, the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab was the only place to study top quarks in detail, while with the recent start of the LHC proton proton collider a top quark factory has opened. An important ingredient for the full understanding of the top quark is the combination of measurements from the individual experiments. In particular, the Tevaton combinations of single top-quark cross sections, the ttbar production cross section, the W helicity in top-quark decays as well as the Tevatron and the world combination of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  10. Combining attosecond XUV pulses with coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbar, M., E-mail: msabbar@phys.ethz.ch; Heuser, S.; Boge, R.; Lucchini, M.; Cirelli, C.; Keller, U. [Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gallmann, L. [Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a successful combination of an attosecond beamline with a COLTRIMS apparatus, which we refer to as AttoCOLTRIMS. The setup provides either single attosecond pulses or attosecond pulse trains for extreme ultraviolet-infrared pump-probe experiments. We achieve full attosecond stability by using an active interferometer stabilization. The capability of the setup is demonstrated by means of two measurements, which lie at the heart of the COLTRIMS detector: firstly, we resolve the rotating electric field vector of an elliptically polarized few-cycle infrared laser field by attosecond streaking exploiting the access to the 3D momentum space of the charged particles. Secondly, we show streaking measurements on different atomic species obtained simultaneously in a single measurement making use of the advantage of measuring ions and electrons in coincidence. Both of these studies demonstrate the potential of the AttoCOLTRIMS for attosecond science.

  11. Combining Modeling and Gaming for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of our most significant challenges involve people. While human behavior has long been studied, there are recent advances in computational modeling of human behavior. With advances in computational capabilities come increases in the volume and complexity of data that humans must understand in order to make sense of and capitalize on these modeling advances. Ultimately, models represent an encapsulation of human knowledge. One inherent challenge in modeling is efficient and accurate transfer of knowledge from humans to models, and subsequent retrieval. The simulated real-world environment of games presents one avenue for these knowledge transfers. In this paper we describe our approach of combining modeling and gaming disciplines to develop predictive capabilities, using formal models to inform game development, and using games to provide data for modeling.

  12. Combined Experiment Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT)? The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  13. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataperumal, Rama R. (Troy, MI); Mericle, Gerald E. (Mount Clemens, MI)

    1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  14. Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; Steve Piet; Timothy Trickel; Joe Carter; John Vienna; Bill Ebert; Gretchen Matthern

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE.

  15. A Holocene record of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)-related hydrologic variability in Southern California (Lake Elsinore, CA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    details in Sect. ĎĎResultsíí). Core sedimentology and grainsize Core 3 sedimentology is based on a combination ofs interpretations. Core sedimentology and grain size Results

  16. A combination air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.L.; Beavers, W.M.; Niederhofer, J.D.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the drilling of coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior Basin, the possibility of penetrating a highly permeable fault or fracture zone is likely. These fracture zones, and occasionally the faults, are the source of large quantities of water. When air is being used as the drilling medium, problems may arise with producing and disposing of the formation water. When rotary drilling with fluid, loss of returns may also become a problem. The use of conventional lost circulation materials have been demonstrated-in this situation--to be both ineffective and expensive. Also, lost circulation materials substantially reduce the effective secondary permeability of the coal seams, severely limiting the ultimate methane production potential of the well. If the wellbore is generally competent, one inexpensive solution to the problem is to drill with air to a point where surface recovery tanks are full of produced formation water. Drilling can continue by switching to conventional fluid drilling until the surface storage tanks are pumped dry. This process of alternating fluid and air drilling can be continued until reaching total depth. Structural geologic information, available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior Basin, documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air and fluid drilling technique may prove to be advantageous to coalbed methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. Recently, this technique was successfully utilized on TRW, Inc., coalbed methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

  17. National CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity in the United States by 2010, March 2001 National CHP Roadmap: Doubling Combined Heat and Power Capacity in the United States...

  18. Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace025rappe2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR...

  19. Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power Alaska Gateway School District Adopts Combined Heat and Power May 7, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In Tok, Alaska, the...

  20. FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , distributed generation #12;iv #12;v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Acknowledgements FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning. Neff , Bryan. A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning for 2030. 2012. California

  1. agent combination therapy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASP and Planning, Jul-Aug 2003, Sydney, NICTA Third week (Chapter 4) The second part Zachmann, Gabriel 3 Combination therapy for manic phases Combination therapy for manic phases:...

  2. The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control A Dissertation Presented Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control Approved by: Dr. William Singhose, Advisor School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 PID Feedback Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.5 Comparison

  3. approach combining genetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    genetic algo- rithms combine genetic algorithm search with a case-based memory of past problem solving attempts Louis, Sushil J. 27 Combining Case-Based Memory with Genetic...

  4. Singular and combined effects of beef tenderization methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jambers, Tim Gerard

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Depa ment) August 1977 (singular or combined) nor secondary treatments (singular or combined) had significant (P&. 05) effects on cooking losses, flavor ratings or juiciness ratings of loin steaks. Electrical stimulation of the carcass combined... with blade tenderization of the loin greatly enhanced (P&. 05) the ten- derness of loin steaks. Initial treatment combinations of obturator foramen suspension and high temperature conditioning, electrical stimulation and obturator foramen suspension...

  5. Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

  6. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  7. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Lynnwood, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  8. Combination process for upgrading residual oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, L.E.; Walters, P.W.; Zandona, O.

    1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for upgrading high boiling residual portions of crude oils comprising metal contaminants, porphyrins, asphaltenes and high molecular weight multi-ring hydrocarbon material. It comprises: charging a high boiling residual portion of crude oil admixed with diluent in contact with suspended upflowing substantially inert fluidizable solids particulate material at an elevated thermal visbreaking temperature in a riser contact zone for a time sufficient to recover therefrom a vaporous hydrocarbon product higher boiling than gasoline partially decarbonized and demetallized to a lower contaminating metals level, quenching the vaporous product of thermal visbreaking below its dew point after separation from solids, charging quenched thermally modified high boiling hydrocarbon product with a crystalline zeolite cracking catalyst under cracking conditions for a hydrocarbon residence time in a riser cracking zone; recovering a hydrocarbon conversion product; separating a combined C{sub 4} minus wet gas product stream of the visbreaking and zeolite catalyst cracking operating to recover a C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} rich fraction separately from a C{sub 2} minus dry gas product fraction, and regenerating the crystalline zeolite contcontaining catalyst.

  9. Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film Are you looking in Digital Journalism (DJ) and Communication, Media, and Film (CMF) is for you. That's because our DJ for a career combining your interests in media with a practical skill-set? If so, the Combined Honours program

  10. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin: 1. A 6 year record of energy balance, radiation, andorganic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850Ėcarbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over

  11. Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated With Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 WMA T Tank Farm Pump-and-Treat System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump-and-treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 T Tank Farm pump-and-treat system monitor wells during a recent shutdown (May 1, 2008) and restart activity (June 4, 2008) involving extraction well 299-W11-46. Specifically, this report 1) applies to recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses to determine large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) assesses characteristics and conditions that influence hydrologic responses (both laterally and vertically) associated with pump-and-treat systems. The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  12. Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

  13. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  14. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. A Modeling Study Evaluating the Thermal-Hydrological Conditions In and Near Waste Emplacement Tunnels At Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Birkholzer; N. Halecky; S.W> Webb; P.F. Peterson; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacement of radioactive waste at the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, temperature gradients cause natural convection processes that may significantly influence the moisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock. Large-scale convection cells in the heated tunnels would provide an effective mechanism for turbulent mixing and axial transport of vapor generated from evaporation of pore water in the nearby formation. As a result, vapor would be transported from the elevated-temperature sections of the tunnels into cool end sections (where no waste is emplaced), would condense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. To study these processes, we have developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools for simulating thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in the fractured formation with a module that approximates turbulent natural convection in heated emplacement drifts. The new method simultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in the fractured rock, (2) the flow and energy transport processes in the cavity, and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface. An application is presented studying the future TH conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensation along the emplacement section, a possible result of heat output differences between individual waste packages.

  16. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23į ◊ 0.31į resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D ? PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more†ĽWe show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.ę†less

  17. An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

  18. Comparison of waste emplacement configurations for a nuclear waste respository in tuff. IV. Thermo-hydrological analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondy, L.A.; Wilson, R.K.; Bixler, N.E.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a hydrological analysis of two emplacement schemes being considered for the storage of commercial high-level nuclear waste at the Nevada Test Site. The analysis is two-dimensional, considers the flow of water in partially saturated tuff (the Topopah Springs member of the Paintbrush tuff in Yucca Mountain) and includes the effects of the heat source (waste canisters) on that flow. The results include measures of the heat flux entering the access and emplacement drifts, measures of the flow rates near the canisters and a comparison of the temperature fields. It was necessary in the analysis to approximate the boundary conditions at the walls of the access and emplacement drifts in order to simulate the ventilation process. As a result the analysis was done for several cases which were expected to bracket the actual situation. A discussion of this problem is also included in the report. It should be noted that these results are intended as a means of comparing emplacement schemes, not as a performance assessment. 72 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Disaggregation of spatial rainfall fields for hydroloigcal modelling Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(2), 165173 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate the evolution of the climate (DOE, 1996) while at the regional scale, mesoscale models are weather. In the case of rainfall forecasting, some combination of the mesoscale forecast and a finer scale advection

  20. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    goals chpaccomplishmentsbooklet.pdf More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Fact Sheet, 2014 Combined Heat and Power - A Decade...