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Sample records for hydrologic sciences desert

  1. Hydrologic Science and Engineering Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrologic Science and Engineering Graduate Program Handbook Academic Year 2013-2014 Colorado. We offer programs of study in fundamental hydrologic science and applied hydrology with engineering are starting a journey through one of the best Hydrologic Science and Engineering Programs in the world

  2. Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Figure 1. Hydrologic Information System Overarching Vision. Data Interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System David G Tarboton1 , David Maidment2 , Ilya Zaslavsky3 Sciences. Hydrologic Information Systems (HIS) are part of this infrastructure. Hydrologic information

  3. 10th Annual Hydrologic Sciences Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    . Andrew Fahlund will address issues at the forefront of hydrology. Talks and posters from students, and the politics that have shaped our past and dictate the future of hydrology. Join us as we celebrate hydrologic is an interdepartmental endeavor, with participating departments that include Civil, Environmental, and Architectural

  4. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  5. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  6. Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion until 1 June 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Hydrological Sciences­Journal­des Sciences Hydrologiques, 44(6) December 1999 Open for discussion Engineering (IHE), PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands e-mail: sol@ihe.nl N. KUKURIC The Netherlands (optimisation globale, OG). L'application de divers algorithmes de recherche aléatoire (recherche aléatoire

  7. Hydrological Sciences--Journal--des Sciences Hydrologiques, 43(1) February 1998143 Regional scale hydrology: II. Application of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    of the two- layer Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC-2L) macroscale hydrological model. The VIC-2L model'application du schéma de surface VIC-2L (Variable Infiltration Capacity). Le schéma de surface VIC-2L est, mensuelle, et annuelle. Une analyse de sensibilité a été faite. INTRODUCTION This study focuses

  8. 1198 Hydrological Sciences Journal Journal des Sciences Hydrologiques, 58 (6) 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2013.803183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1SS, UK 14 Water Problems Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 15 Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, The Netherlands 20 Agrocampus Ouest, INRA, UMR1069, Soil Agro and hydroSystem, F-35000 Rennes, France Chair

  9. Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnas, George W.

    Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation Susanne Jul Computer Science +1 734-763-0076 furnas@umich.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we introduce the problem of "desert fog desert fog in multiscale electronic worlds. Prototypes of these aids have been implemented

  10. Identifying hydrologically sensitive areas: Bridging the gap between science and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    ); Water quality; Nonpoint Source (NPS) pollution; Variable source area (VSA) hydrology; Topographic index those in 1987, increasingly emphasized nonpoint source (NPS) pollution as a critical cause of water., 2000). Many current attempts to reduce NPS pollution of surface water bodies primarily utilized

  11. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2004-01-01

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  12. The Geometry of Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Shelly

    2005-01-01

    , better appreciate the com­ plex nature of desert if we approach it graphically. 5 Well-being Figure l. Desert Graph axes with a sample poinl In Figure 1, the X axis represents possible levels of well-being. Points to the right of the origin represent... of well-being. 10 One possible way of capturing a view like this is shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Some desert lines with negative peaks. Now Figure 5 only displays desert lines for people who deserve to suffer. For each such person there is a...

  13. WATERCHARRETTE food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERCHARRETTE food deserts University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning 3 summary introduction context To provide a more local society that is less dependent upon large-scale food dialogues will be held to engage students in the concepts of sustainable water management, food deserts

  14. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  15. Ecohydrological Analysis of the Transport of Nitrate and Ammonium in Sandy Desert Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, Julie Marie

    2012-01-01

    of nitrate beneath desert soils. Science 302:1021-1024. DOI:deposition on vegetation and soils in Joshua Tree NationalAndraski B.J. (1997) Soil-water movement under natural-site

  16. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  17. Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones -- Yucca Mountain paleohydrogeology paleoclimate U-series dating secondary ion mass spectrometry Yucca Mountain Understanding to Pleistocene climate change within a deep vadose zone in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  18. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  19. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department of Correctiveof Deliverables UDACSmart GridUNLV DESERT

  20. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  1. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie M; Zender, C. S.; Luo, C.; Savoie, D.; Torres, O.; del Corral, J.

    2002-01-01

    UNDERSTANDING THE 30-YEAR BARBADOS DESERT DUST Moulin, C. ,on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds, Nature, 320,Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.

  2. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  3. H33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    water Bare dunes, instead, experienced deep drainage & local recharge. quicktour Site A bare interduneH33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts: groundwater-fed oases in a sandy landscape Water subsidies from

  4. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  5. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    in the past 30 years, the basic concepts have changed only slightly. More detailed process representations after the last such USA-Japan hydrology seminar (see details in McDonnell et al., this issue is grounded in engineering and now motivated by explaining Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 2053 #12;J

  6. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    and James B. Greenberg. "Fight for the West: A PoliticalEvery Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert AEvery Square Inch: A Fight for the California Desert by

  7. Desert Sunlight | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen GeothermalDesert

  8. Wetland Hydrology Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . #12;2 Hydrologic Influence Model Starting Points ·Wet, Cool ·Flat, Steep ·Rivers, Tides Hydro, sediment trapping, transpiration) and animals (physical modifications) Feedbacks: Nutrients 1 2 Feedbacks

  9. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  10. Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2009-05-15

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major Subject: Water Management and Hydrologic Sciences EVALUATING AND DEVELOPING PARAMETER OPTIMIZATION AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS... OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Raghavan Srinivasan Committee Members, Faming Liang Patricia K. Smith Francisco Olivera Head of Department, Ronald Kaiser August 2008 Major Subject: Water Management and Hydrologic Sciences iii...

  11. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  12. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plancenters as a clean and renewable energy resource. Whether

  13. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies CaliforniaProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

  14. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop Daniel Rosenfeld of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. Satellite

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  16. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  17. Boundary processes between a desert sand dune community and an encroaching suburban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrows, Cameron W.; Allen, M F; Rotenberry, J T

    2006-01-01

    biology of the Namib dune lizard, Aporosaura anchietae,energetics of a Namib Desert dune ecosystem. Journal of Aridbetween a desert sand dune community and an encroaching

  18. Division of Hydrologic Sciences Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parameters impacting mercury transport into/through Lahontan Reservoir as well as quantify uncertainty been divided into two distinct phases based on site location. First, a detailed uncertainty analysis hydrodynamic modeling of the reservoir established, it is proposed to observe and model a temporally varying

  19. Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  1. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal Area

  2. Age constraints on the formation and emplacement of Neoproterozoic ophiolites along the AllaqiHeiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ­Heiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt K.A. Ali a,d, , M.K. Azer b , H.A. Gahlan c , S.A. Wilde d , M., Richardson, TX 75080, USA b Geology Department, National Research Centre, Dokki-Cairo, Egypt c Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt d Department of Applied Geology

  3. The simulation of natural soil pipes and their influence on catchment hydrology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelo, Mark David

    1982-01-01

    THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE SIMULATION OF NATURAL SOIL PIPES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CATCHMENT HYDROLOGY A Thesis by MARK DAVID BARCELO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Mem er...

  4. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15

    29 30 41 42 44 47 48 50 51 52 ix FIGURE 20 Grain size distribution of Study Area 2 sediments, BBNP???. 21 Soil profile cross-sections (10 cm), Study Area 2??????... 22 Grain size distribution of Study Area 3... et al., (2002). Plan view photos show desert pavement from the Cima Volcanic Field in the eastern Mojave Desert, with a 50cm field of view (Wood, 2002). 18 The above study in the Mojave Desert concluded that DP1 has successively more ground...

  5. Snow Accumulation in a Distributed Hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    Snow Accumulation in a Distributed Hydrological Model by Bruce Davison A thesis presented of snow processes in the coupled land-surface-hydrological model WATCLASS. The processes under consideration were mixed precipitation, variable fresh snow density, maximum snowpack density, canopy

  6. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library. Many recent studies quantify historical trends in streamflow and usually attribute these trends to structure studies of streamflow responses to climate change. A wide variety of trends in streamflow have

  7. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    . Simultaneous time series for electrical conductivity, water temperature, and DO over the four-week study period. The main driver of the observed variations in DO is likely to be periodic melt-freeze cycles. We conclude perturbations have large impacts on hydrological and biological processes, via changes in rates of ice and snow

  8. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript of History, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia. MARGARET So PETERSEN WATER civilian and military engineers studied the behavior of rivers and the motion of water. They investigated

  9. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jeff

    2015-06-09

    Engel Presents his book, "Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War," a reevaluation of the Gulf War's origins, the war itself, and its regional and long term impact on international relations.

  11. Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, William Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

  12. Thyroid function in the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohel, Kathryn Anne

    1994-01-01

    stimulate nutrient absorption across the intestine (Higgs et al. , 1982; Collie and Ferraris, 1994). However, there is a lack of information on the influence of food intake in most ectotherms, especially reptiles. 1f the desert tortoise resembles fish...

  13. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  14. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (EIA) forecasted in 2008 that just 140 MW of total utility-scale PV solar capacity would be installed by 2015. Now we're in 2015 and Desert Sunlight itself represents...

  15. Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of Illinois. at Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA. 2 Department of Mathematics, Purdue ...

  16. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  17. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    shrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: theshrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: the

  18. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  19. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    architecture in the deserts of the Near East, and for that matter among mobile pastoralists in Eurasia and North Africa

  1. Research news: UC Desert Research and Extension Center celebrates 100 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Robin

    2012-01-01

    for low desert biofuel production. Leafy greens and climateyield crops for biofuel production in the Imperial Valley

  2. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  3. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113­140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd Natural Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Z .PII: S0169-7722 99 00098-4 #12;( )T.P. Clement et al.rJournal

  4. Hydrological control of stream water chemistry in a glacial catchment (Damma Glacier, Switzerland)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Hydrological control of stream water chemistry in a glacial catchment (Damma Glacier, Switzerland a Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland b, Switzerland c Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ

  5. HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    being proposed for low-level and high-level radioactive waste disposal [Montazer and Wilson, 1984HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT Bridget R Science University of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. Analysis of unsaturated flow and transport in arid regions

  6. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Contact Information David Tarboton Utah State University of Utah 135 South 1460 East Rm 719 Salt Lake City, Utah (801) 581-5033 wjohnson. The Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory development team is highly committed to this concept

  7. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 32333236 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    into different pathways on the land surface are altered due to wildfires, beetle infestations, urbanization; Weiskel et al., 2007). Such changes to water pathways, storage and subsequent release (the blue and green hydrologic responses of natural systems? Mathematical models of the terrestrial hydrological cycle

  8. Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures in EGS reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior of single fractures...

  9. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC)...

  10. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning scenes · Conclusions and Outlook #12;where Rayleigh R340 Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% Absorbing aerosols

  11. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% #12;Reflectance at TOA with absorbing aerosols Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30

  12. Desert Island Contribution --ASE Journal Software Engineering --A Human Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Desert Island Contribution -- ASE Journal Software Engineering -- A Human Activity Gerhard Fischer of software engineering? Without a doubt, different people will have very different answers to this question their ideas and visions. Software engineering (especially its upstream activities) is a human-oriented field

  13. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRDUniversitySchedules Print Current Science

  14. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign In AboutBiologicalScience

  15. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With p

  16. 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Charles

    Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

  17. Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal

  18. Desert View Highlands, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen

  19. Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan

    2004-10-04

    This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

  20. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  1. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01

    of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky Region) S.S. Sheble* M. H. Khalil M. A. Helal Prof. M. El- Demirdash3 Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & head... of Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & Chairman of HBRC Housing & Building National Research Center (HBRC) Cairo, Egypt * Author ABSTRACT Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east of Egyptian western desert...

  2. Brief summary of LADHS: Los Alamos distributed hydrologic modeling system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R. E. (Regan E.); Winter, C. L. (C. Larrabee); Springer, E. P.; Costigan, K. R. (Keeley R.); Tseng, P. H. (Peng-Hsiang)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the current state of the fourth Thrust Area of the NSF Science and Technology Center for the Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA). Sustainability of semi-arid regions has become a serious political and scientific concern. Increasing population has added stress to the water supply and other natural resources, notably, underground aquifers. Recent controversies in the Rio Grande Basin involving the competing interests of endangered species and humans for water have highlighted the delicate balance of biologically diverse southwestern riparian areas. Potentially, the warming climate may intensify summer storms and affect the amount and timing of snow melt, the largest renewable source of water in the southwest. It is, therefore, of great political, social and scientific interest to determine ways in which human activities can coexist with healthy riparian areas and a plentiful, clean water supply over the long run. An understanding of how all of these processes interrelate would allow regional decision-makers to consider a wide range of options and thereby develop useful plans for meeting societal needs. To make the best use of limited fresh water resources, decision makers must be able to make predictions about the entire hydrologic cycle, which is a complex combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Only then could they explore the potential effects of increased water use and of changes in the regional climate. The important processes in the hydrologic cycle include rainfall, snowmelt, storms, runoff, and flow in ephemeral streams, rivers, and underground aquifers. Riparian communities and evaporation play key roles in reducing the available water.

  3. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  4. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record Natalie M. Mahowald,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    (such as new sources due to desertification or land use) may be difficult to distinguish from: Aerosols (0305); KEYWORDS: mineral aerosols, desert dust, North Africa, desertification Citation: Mahowald

  5. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  6. Preprint Downscaling Climate Change Salath 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salathé Jr., Eric P.

    statistics to streamflow computed from the observed data. Downscaled climate-change scenarios fromPreprint Downscaling Climate Change ­ Salathé 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic Modeling Eric P. Salathé Jr. Center for Science in the Earth System

  7. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  8. Deserts are water-controlled ecosystems characterized by high ambient temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    , it can be argued that rates of energy flow through desert ecosystems are controlled by available water dominated by, the availability of water in desert ecosystems. Animals that occupy arid climes face the challenge of meeting their daily energy and water requirements in an environment that, on average, provides

  9. Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyse,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Reports Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy bacteria support a microbial originfor manganese-) films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. Desert varnish is a natural coating dominatedby

  10. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  11. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  12. Desert Shores, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal AreaShores,

  13. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and Wind JumpEnergy|Desert

  14. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-DesertSunlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED ADOPTION REPORT LED8-14 LMBLUE MOUNTAINTo boostDESERT

  15. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  16. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  17. Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology and supergene alunite-group minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology 2010 Available online 18 October 2010 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: Atacama Desert Andes uplift Atacama Desert had been uplifted as early as the late Eocene and, thus, significantly prior

  18. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  20. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  1. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  2. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  4. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  5. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  6. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  8. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2004-09-13

    This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

  9. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  10. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  11. When dunes move together, structure of deserts emerges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Génois, Mathieu; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Crescent shaped barchan dunes are highly mobile dunes that are usually presented as a prototypical model of sand dunes. Although they have been theoretically shown to be unstable when considered separately, it is well known that they form large assemblies in desert. Collisions of dunes have been proposed as a mechanism to redistribute sand between dunes and prevent the formation of heavily large dunes, resulting in a stabilizing effect in the context of a dense barchan field. Yet, no models are able to explain the spatial structures of dunes observed in deserts. Here, we use an agent-based model with elementary rules of sand redistribution during collisions to access the full dynamics of very large barchan dune fields. Consequently, stationnary, out of equilibrium states emerge. Trigging the dune field density by a sand load/lost ratio, we show that large dune fields exhibit two assymtotic regimes: a dilute regime, where sand dune nucleation is needed to maintain a dune field, and a dense regime, where dune c...

  12. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 24092414 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    2009-01-01

    (Sustainability of semi-arid hydrology and riparian areas), University of Arizona, USA 5 Department of Geography hydroclimatic variables and land- scape features in a changing environment (Milly et al., 2008). Water balance models (Schaake, 1990; Dooge, 1992) usually consider the land- scape to be invariant

  13. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 11061114 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    2007-01-01

    . The study identified significant variables for estimating soil steady-state infiltration at a micro- site (0 of animal treading effects on soil infiltration Y. Q. Tian,1 * R. McDowell,2 Q. Yu,3 G. W. Sheath,4 W. T is an important factor in hydrological modelling. We investigated the impacts of animal treading on infiltration

  14. Downscaling Extended Weather Forecasts for Hydrologic Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-03-01

    Weather and climate forecasts are critical inputs to hydrologic forecasting systems. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) issues 8-15 days outlook daily for the U.S. based on the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model, which is a global model applied at about 2? spatial resolution. Because of the relatively coarse spatial resolution, weather forecasts produced by the MRF model cannot be applied directly to hydrologic forecasting models that require high spatial resolution to represent land surface hydrology. A mesoscale atmospheric model was used to dynamically downscale the 1-8 day extended global weather forecasts to test the feasibility of hydrologic forecasting through this model nesting approach. Atmospheric conditions of each 8-day forecast during the period 1990-2000 were used to provide initial and boundary conditions for the mesoscale model to produce an 8-day atmospheric forecast for the western U.S. at 30 km spatial resolution. To examine the impact of initialization of the land surface state on forecast skill, two sets of simulations were performed with the land surface state initialized based on the global forecasts versus land surface conditions from a continuous mesoscale simulation driven by the NCEP reanalysis. Comparison of the skill of the global and downscaled precipitation forecasts in the western U.S. showed higher skill for the downscaled forecasts at all precipitation thresholds and increasingly larger differences at the larger thresholds. Analyses of the surface temperature forecasts show that the mesoscale forecasts generally reduced the root-mean-square error by about 1.5 C compared to the global forecasts, because of the much better resolved topography at 30 km spatial resolution. In addition, initialization of the land surface states has large impacts on the temperature forecasts, but not the precipitation forecasts. The improvements in forecast skill using downscaling could be potentially significant for improving hydrologic forecasts for managing river basins.

  15. DST-NRF INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME 2012/13 The National Research Foundation (NRF) is responsible for the management of the DST-NRF Internship Programme in which unemployed Science, Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    for the management of the DST-NRF Internship Programme in which unemployed Science, Engineering and Technology (SET Science; Chemistry; Physics; Textile Technology; Analytical Chemistry; Textile Design; Zoology Engineering; Metallurgical Engineering; Chemical Engineering; Polymer Science; GIS; Geography; Hydrology

  16. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  17. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  18. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  19. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  20. From Industrial Garden to Food Desert: Unearthing the Root Structure of Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    A Theory of Agro-Industrial Development. New York: BasilSERIES 2007-2008.32 From Industrial Garden to Food Desert:I demonstrate how flows of industrial capital and racialized

  1. Food deserts and access to fresh food in low-income San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puhl, Emily Theresa

    2011-01-01

    R. Kaufman (2003) “Exploring Food Purchase Behavior of Low-Do the Poor Still Pay More? Food Price Variations in Largeand Pavan Yadav. 2008. “Beyond Food Deserts: Measuring and

  2. Observed 20th century desert dust variability: impact on climate and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.tration data observed at Barbados (Prospero and Lamb, 2003)on the shorter in situ Barbados concentration data (1968 to

  3. MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse effect observed over greenhouse effect observed over the Sahara during July 2003 revealed by GERB/UM intercomparisons? Jim M

  4. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  5. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  6. Long-term insights into the influence of precipitation on community dynamics in desert rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    for ecosystem dynamics. DOI: 10.1644/09-MAMM-S-142.1. Key words: consumer dynamics, desertification, desert ecosystems (Easterling et al. 2000), and desertification (Van Auken 2000). The dynamics of small mammals

  7. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir...

  8. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englert, A.

    2009-01-01

    Water Resources Research 2008, 44, W10412, doi:10.1029/2007WR006425. Supporting Information Feedbacks Between Hydrological Heterogeneity and Bioremediation

  9. Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre 11 Innovation Boulevard Modelling The Global Institute for Water Security (GIWS) and the School for Environment and Sustainability

  10. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the Newberry Volcano...

  11. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22,...

  12. Observed 20th Century Desert Dust Variability: Impact on Climate and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Kloster, Silvia; Engelstaedter, S.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McConnell, J. R.; Albani, S.; Doney, Scott C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Curran, M. A. J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Mayewski, P. A.; Neff, Jason; Rothenberg, D.; Thomas, E.; Thornton, Peter E; Zender, Charlie S.

    2010-01-01

    Desert dust perturbs climate by directly and indirectly interacting with incoming solar and outgoing long wave radiation, thereby changing precipitation and temperature, in addition to modifying ocean and land biogeochemistry. While we know that desert dust is sensitive to perturbations in climate and human land use, previous studies have been unable to determine whether humans were increasing or decreasing desert dust in the global average. Here we present observational estimates of desert dust based on paleodata proxies showing a doubling of desert dust during the 20th century over much, but not all the globe. Large uncertainties remain in estimates of desert dust variability over 20th century due to limited data. Using these observational estimates of desert dust change in combination with ocean, atmosphere and land models, we calculate the net radiative effect of these observed changes (top of atmosphere) over the 20th century to be -0.14 {+-} 0.11 W/m{sup 2} (1990-1999 vs. 1905-1914). The estimated radiative change due to dust is especially strong between the heavily loaded 1980-1989 and the less heavily loaded 1955-1964 time periods (-0.57 {+-} 0.46 W/m{sup 2}), which model simulations suggest may have reduced the rate of temperature increase between these time periods by 0.11 C. Model simulations also indicate strong regional shifts in precipitation and temperature from desert dust changes, causing 6 ppm (12 PgC) reduction in model carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere over the 20th century. Desert dust carries iron, an important micronutrient for ocean biogeochemistry that can modulate ocean carbon storage; here we show that dust deposition trends increase ocean productivity by an estimated 6% over the 20th century, drawing down an additional 4 ppm (8 PgC) of carbon dioxide into the oceans. Thus, perturbations to desert dust over the 20th century inferred from observations are potentially important for climate and biogeochemistry, and our understanding of these changes and their impacts should continue to be refined.

  13. Conservation Planning for Offsetting the Impacts of Development: A Case Study of Biodiversity and Renewable Energy in the Mojave Desert.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitler, J; Schloss, CA; Soong, O; Hannah, L; Davis, FW

    2015-01-01

    environmental impacts of renewable energy sources. Appliedbiological impacts. Renewable Energy. 2013; 57: 289–98. doi:of biodiversity and renewable energy in the Mojave Desert.

  14. Effects of Averaging and Separating Soil Moisture and Temperature in the Presence of Snow Cover in a SVAT and Hydrological Model for a Southern Ontario,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    in a SVAT and Hydrological Model for a Southern Ontario, Canada, Watershed S. R. FASSNACHT Watershed Science, Canada E. D. SOULIS AND N. KOUWEN Civil Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada was tested for the 1993 snowmelt period on the Upper Grand River in Southern Ontario, Canada. The results

  15. Ground-water sapping processes, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W.; Arvidson, R.E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Crombie, M.K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Sturchio, N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alfy, Z.E. [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)] [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-01-01

    Depressions of the Western Desert of Egypt (specifically, Kharga, Farafra, and Kurkur regions) are mainly occupied by shales that are impermeable, but easily erodible by rainfall and runoff, whereas the surrounding plateaus are composed of limestones that are permeable and more resistant to fluvial erosion under semiarid to arid conditions. A computer simulation model was developed to quantify the ground-water sapping processes, using a cellular automata algorithm with coupled surface runoff and ground-water flow for a permeable, resistant layer over an impermeable, friable unit. Erosion, deposition, slumping, and generation of spring-derived tufas were parametrically modeled. Simulations using geologically reasonable parameters demonstrate that relatively rapid erosion of the shales by surface runoff, ground-water sapping, and slumping of the limestones, and detailed control by hydraulic conductivity inhomogeneities associated with structures explain the depressions, escarpments, and associated landforms and deposits. Using episodic wet pulses, keyed by {delta}{sup 18}O deep-sea core record, the model produced tufa ages that are statistically consistent with the observed U/Th tufa ages. This result supports the hypothesis that northeastern African wet periods occurred during interglacial maxima. This {delta}{sup 18}O-forced model also replicates the decrease in fluvial and sapping activity over the past million years. 65 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Science Park Science Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Kruislaan Kruislaan Science Park SURFsara NLeSC Polder Anna Hoeve Telecity Matrix Innovation Center AUC AMOLF ARCNL UvA Faculty of Science Equinix Universum CWI UvA Oerknal Meet & Eat Maslow Spar ACE Venture Lab IXA ILCA NS Amsterdam Science

  17. Hydrological Forecasting Improvements Primary Investigator: Thomas Croley -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    multiple data streams in a near-real-time manner and incorporate them into the AHPS data base, run for matching weather forecasts with historical data, and prepare extensive forecasts of hydrology probabilities maximum use of all available information and be based on efficient and true hydrological process models

  18. Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas Vic Engel,1 Esteban G of Eucalyptus camaldulensis in the Pampas grasslands of Argentina were explored for 2 years using a novel. B. Jackson (2005), Hydrological consequences of Eucalyptus afforestation in the Argentine Pampas

  19. SNOW DISTRIBUTION OVER AN ELEVATION GRADIENT AND FOREST SNOW HYDROLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Operational bright-band snow level detection using DopplerG. 1999. Scaling issues in snow hydrology. Hydrological2149- CDEC. 2007. Historic snow sensor data. California Data

  20. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  1. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  2. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  3. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  4. Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal, Venezuelan Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: oxygen isotopes; biogenic opal; hydrologic balance; Holocene; Venezuela

  5. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B.; Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M.

    1992-05-01

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  6. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of sola

  7. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  8. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  9. Eco-Hydro-Climate Science/Engineering in SESE Definition: An emerging frontier in Earth system science is the interaction of ecological,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Eco-Hydro-Climate Science/Engineering in SESE Definition: An emerging frontier in Earth system that are `retooled' to treat the coupled eco-hydro-climate system. Arid and semiarid regions (deserts) are a fruitful Southwest is thus an ideal laboratory for eco-hydro-climate studies and provides several case studies

  10. Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown DIVERSITY OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 Abstract.The seed-eatingrodent faunas were sampled on 18 dunes

  11. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  12. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  13. Science Outreach Science Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Science Outreach Science Outreach AT SFU'S FACULTY OF SCIENCE OUR PASSION IS SCIENCE EDUCATION At SFU's Faculty of Science our passion is science education #12;coming sooncoming soon The Trottier 2015. The Trottier Observatory will be an anchor for a science plaza located in front of Strand Hall

  14. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01

    , was resuspended in Tris-EDTA, and the concentration of DNA in yg/ml was determined (Skow et al. 1988). 18 Table 1. Species identification. No. 1 2 3 4 6 7 DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX Heparinized Blood.... Rambo. Calif. Rambo. Calif. Rambo. DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form UCB UCB UCB UCB UCB DBHS NV/TX: Desert Bighorn Sheep Nevada/Texas cross DBHS AZ/AZ: Desert Bighorn Sheep...

  15. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  16. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 20, 25272547 (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Trent

    2006-01-01

    of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA 3 Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil Abstract: A conceptual model of water and solute transport

  17. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  18. AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII M.A. Scholl, S.E. Ingebritsen, C.J. Janik, and J.P. Kauahikaua

  19. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    1988-01-01

    traditionally have been used in water supply planning and management are firm yield and, to a lesser extent, reliability. Firm yield is the estimated maximum release or withdrawal rate which can be maintained continuously during a repetition of the hydrologic...

  20. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  1. Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Building a Texas Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Cycle Building a Texas Hydrologic Information System TX-HIS #12;Q to couple streamflow models to GCMs · We need to break the hydro-illogical cycle and plan for the delivery

  2. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Spring characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge ---soil moisture, unsaturated flow, infiltration, evapotranspiration and recharge 5. Principles of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head

  3. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  4. Plant Science Bulletin 55(2) 2009 The Biology of Deserts. Ward, David. 2008. ISBN-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorelick, Root

    on human influences, desertification, and conservation. While this book usually describes things that many to 2650 rpm and 1.5 m/sec. The author's discussion of desertification has some conventionally bad aspects

  5. Plant Science Bulletin 53(4) 2007 Structure and Function of a Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorelick, Root

    happen to be former Jornada LTER PIs, repeatedly in one chapter talk about "desertification, primarily of beef cattle. Desertification is a problem if you graze cattle, but should not necessarily

  6. MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the watershed respectively (Pan and Tien 2001). While glacial/snow melt in the Qilianshan Mountain contribute1 MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE WATERSHED inland river in arid Northwestern China, with a drainage area of 128,000 km2) for understanding glacial

  7. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  8. Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Felisa A.

    Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert woodrat temperature influences the ecology and life history of animals. In habitats near the thermal range boundary temperature might influence both the timing and the duration of activity. To test this idea, we attached i

  9. Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes of price and weather on wa- ter demand is important for Arizona. If the effect of weather is not well. In part, this is because few other studies use household data, and instead use data aggregated

  10. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  11. Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss ssp.): Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    413 Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Ucrit) and oxygen consumption in the field at 12 and 24 C; (2) biochemical indices of energy metabolism gradient. Fur- ther, we also examined genetic and morphological character- istics of fish from these two

  12. Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carretero, Ricardo

    Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa, *, HIROSHI MOMIJIb is developed to model the dynamics of sand dunes. The physical processes display strong non-linearity that has features we monitor morphology, dune growth, dune migration and spatial patterns within a dune field

  13. Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    of incident solar energy reflected by the land surface in all directions. They determine the surface radiation map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 in climate model deserts such as the Sahara. However, solar short- wave diffuse albedos vary by a factor

  14. Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess M and weathered loess sections from the Chinese Loess Plateau. We found an apparent decreasing grain size trend it is located more than 2000 km west of the central Loess Plateau. Key words: Chinese loess, magnetic

  15. Expansion of the world's deserts due to vegetation-albedo feedback under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    -ocean-land model with a dynamic vegetation component that predicts surface albedo change, here we simulate, the model simulated an increase in the world's `warm desert' area of 2.5 million km2 or 10% at the end Coupled- Carbon-Cycle-Climate Model Intercomparison Project [Friedlingstein et al., 2006] (C4MIP) has

  16. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic spar- rows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response

  17. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  18. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  19. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  20. Soil microbial activity and N availability with elevated CO2 in Mojave Desert soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.; Schaeffer, Sean M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Mojave Desert by measuring plant N isotope composition (?15N), soil microbial biomass N, soil respiration, resin-available N, and C and N dynamics during soil incubations...

  1. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have reported sizes of less than one hectare. Additional refinement of remote sensing methods is necessary

  2. Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process We used cosmogenic 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process rates We used. Comparison of the different data sets allows us to see similarities in piedmont behavior over time. Nuclide of sediment as it is transported down each piedmont. Nuclide activities in sediment samples from two soil pits

  3. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  4. Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities to as keystones. However, little is known about the interactive effects of these species where they co keystone species of grassland ecosystems, creating a mosaic of unique habitats on the landscape through

  5. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 22, 17131724 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/hyp.6739 Peat porewater chloride concentration and Peter S. Rawlik, Jr.4 1 US Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, PO Box 25046, Denver, CO 80225 Collins, CO 80523, US 3 US Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder

  6. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 16391650 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wemple, Beverley

    2007-01-01

    of Geography, University of Vermont, 202 Old Mill, Burlington, VT 05405, USA 2 US Geological Survey, Montpelier, Vermont, USA 3 Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 202 Old Mill, Burlington, VT 05405, USA *Correspondence to: Beverley Wemple, Department of Geography, University of Vermont, 202 Old

  7. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

  8. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2010-03-25

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  9. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  10. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    turbines, jet engines, nuclear power plants and space crafts, have placed severe demands on highSCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  11. Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science: Evaluating the Use Stojanovicd , Femke Reitsmae , Lukasz Korczynskif and Boyan Brodaricg a Centre for Geospatial Science of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; e Department of Geography, University

  12. Ecological energetics of the desert tortoise (Gopherus Agassizii): Effects of rainfall and drought

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate ecological effects of variation in the temporal distribution of a limiting resource (water in the Mojave Desert), energetics of two free-living populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus [=Xerobates] agassizii) were studied concurrently over 18 mo with use of doubly-labeled water. Field metabolic rates (FMR) and feeding rates were highly variable. This variability was manifested at several levels, including seasonal changes within populations, year-to-year differences within populations, and differences between populations. Underlying observed patterns and contrasts was considerable variation among individuals. Much of the variation in energetic variables was associated with a single climatic variable, rainfall. Seasonal, annual, and interpopulation differences in FMR and foraging rates corresponded to differences in availability of free-standing water from rainstorms. Some differences among individuals were apparently due to differences in proclivity or ability to drink. Tortoises had very low FMRs relative to other reptiles, allowed them to tolerate long periods of chronic energy shortage during a drought. Calculations suggested that tortoises experienced a net loss of energy shortage during a drought and tortoises experienced a net loss of energy on their spring diet of succulent annual plants. If so, tortoises require drier forage to accrue an energy profit, emphasizing reliance on drinking rainwater. Further, it suggests that growth (as protein deposition) and net acquisition of energy may be temporally decoupled in desert tortoises, with potential consequences for geographic variation in life history. Energy acquisition and expenditure in desert tortoises are strongly constrained by the contingencies of rainfall, both indirectly through effects on availability and quality of food, and directly through reliance on free-standing water for drinking, which is apparently necessary for achieving a net annual energy profit. 61 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

  14. The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomblies, Arne

    2009-01-01

    A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

  15. Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011) (IAHS Publ. 351, 2011).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011) (IAHS Publ hydrology; drop distribution; multifractals INTRODUCTION Weather radars remain the only measuring devices

  16. A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkez, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

  17. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod and Small Mammal Responses to Anthropogenic Disturbances Within Southern California Deserts: From Plant Invasions to Altered Fire Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulton VanTassel, Heather Lynn

    2015-01-01

    selected California sand dunes. Bureau of Land Management,Coachella Valley sand dunes, Coleoptera: (Tenebrionidae).schemes within a desert sand dune landscape. Journal of Arid

  18. Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first, modeling, and sensing the mountain environment that will improve understanding and prediction of hydrologic

  19. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

  20. HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Osage County, Oklahoma. Salt and crude oil from oil well waste pits and accidental releases from oil DESCRIPTION As shown in the site map (figure 1), at Site "B" there is an oil tank battery and a waste pitHYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD BRINE AT THE OSAGE-SKIATOOK PETROLEUM

  1. Field Test of the Superconducting Gravimeter as a Hydrologic Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    Field Test of the Superconducting Gravimeter as a Hydrologic Sensor by Clark R. Wilson1 , Bridget of a transportable version of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) intended for groundwater storage monitoring. The test of a transportable superconducting gravimeter (SG) designed to monitor sur- face gravity and provide a direct measure

  2. Catchment hydrological responses to forest harvest amount and spatial pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    ] by decreasing evapotranspiration [Bosch and Hewlett, 1982]; (2) regrowth after harvest decreases water yield a large variability in the relationship between harvest amount and annual water yield within eachCatchment hydrological responses to forest harvest amount and spatial pattern Alex Abdelnour,1 Marc

  3. Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating monthly water storage from grace (M/t) #12;Datasets for assimilation: Geodesy 7 Power-law of the time-variable gravity field [mm/month] #12;Datasets for assimilation: Hydro-meteorology 9 Evapotranspiration (ETa) from era

  4. Hydrologic Variability of Small, Northern Michigan Lakes Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    different forms and units, they all require some measure of the input of water from the watershed. The hydraulic residence time is difficult to mea- sure directly and is usually inferred from other measurementsHydrologic Variability of Small, Northern Michigan Lakes Measured by the Addition of Tracers

  5. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Spring and potentiometric surface maps, aquifer characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

  6. GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography Fall surface maps, aquifer characteristics, homogeneity and isotropy 4. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

  7. FULLYDISCRETE FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    FULLY­DISCRETE FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen element method for a nonlinear differential system for describing an air­water system in groundwater experiments using the present approach for modeling groundwater flow in porous media are reported. Key words

  8. Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a case study for fracture aperture reconstruction. The rst one is a correlation technique that estimates the normal aper techniques are applied to discontinuities extracted from a core drilled down to 20 m in a fractured marl

  9. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater NERC EQUIP;protected spring in Kampala (Uganda) · groundwater supplies 50% of world's drinking water Kundzewicz and Döll (2009) #12;maize plantation irrigated by a groundwater-fed pivot, Katwe (Zambia) · and 42

  10. Groundwater and global hydrological change current challenges and new insight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater and global hydrological change ­ current challenges and new insight R. TAYLOR1 , L Groundwater Resources Assessment Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands 11 Federal Institute for Geosciences, groundwater plays a critical role in enabling communities to adapt to freshwater shortages derived from low

  11. Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koka, Srikanth

    2004-09-30

    ....................................................................................45 4.9 Rank Attribute .....................................................................................................51 4.10 Outlet Segments...- dimensional diffusion wave model. Though this model offers a strong physical base for hydrologic modeling, can be applied only to areas where runoff production mainly assumes Hortonian patterns. A model which is based on 1 dimensional kinematic...

  12. Center for the Study of Environment and Society Double major in Environmental Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    of the following three courses CEVE 401 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry CEVE 412 Hydrology and WatershedCSES Center for the Study of Environment and Society Double major in Environmental Science Director Karoline Mortensen Donald Ostdiek Lisa Slappey Degrees Offered: BA in Environmental Science The BA

  13. Faculty of Science: Updates 243-14 4.9M 09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    the physical geography fields of resource and environmental assessment, soil science, climatology, hydrology in Geography with concentration in Physical Geography has been changed to Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Physical Geography. The name of the minor in Geography: Physical Geography has been changed to minor

  14. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  15. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  16. Education:1 FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    and working in our service region of Southeast Florida. The College is organized into 6 academic departments-information science, space-time physics, hydrology and much more. Partnerships with research organizations to study carbon cycling and climate change in the Greater Everglades. Dr. Dale Gavlik received a $460

  17. DONALD A. GRAETZ Department of Soil and Water Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    quality (mainly animal-related problems) and land application of solid wastes. Most of my research is interdisciplinary and is done in cooperation with colleagues in such disciplines as animal science, hydrology of Soil Capacity to Assimilate or Release P Applied as Manure, Fertilizer, Compost, or Biosolids. W. G

  18. Hydrologic impacts of mechanical shearing of Ashe juniper in Coryell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Courtney Hale

    2006-10-30

    creates soil depressions allowing for increased water storage and percolation to groundwater (Richardson et al. 1979). A similar study was conducted in the desert shrublands of southeastern Arizona (Tromble 1976). During one hour rainfall simulations...

  19. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    86 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society of London

  20. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    94 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

  1. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg HU HongChang, TIAN FuQiang* & HU HePing Department of Hydraulic Engineering, State Key Laboratory as a key soil physical parameter and has been widely used to predict soil hydraulic and other related

  2. Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown and Gerald A. Lieberman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author UTILIZATION AND COEXISTENCE OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department how these differences affect the utilization of seeds. Our estimates of total overlap in resource

  3. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  4. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  5. High-Tech Energy "Oasis" to Bloom in the Desert?1 by Christine Dell'Amore for www.nationalgeographic.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    technologies designed to bring green4 living to the desert. The planned research center is part of the Sahara to build in deserts around the globe. Experts are now examining arid sites in Australia, the U and seawater make fresh water for growing crops, solar energy would be collected to generate power, and algae

  6. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    We have designed and tested a portable instrument consisting of a small infrared camera coupled with an array of piezoresistive microcantilever sensors that is used to provide real-time, non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical “signature” of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  7. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris Inc formerly1-2003)Emidio Desert Area (DOE

  8. Active layer dynamics and arctic hydrology and meteorology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Man`s impact on the environment is increasing with time. To be able to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on an ecosystems, it is necessary first to understand all facets of how the ecosystems works: what the main processes (physical, biological, chemical) are, at what rates they proceed, and how they can be manipulated. Arctic ecosystems are dominated by physical processes of energy exchange. This project has concentrated on a strong program of hydrologic and meteorologic data collection, to better understand dominant physical processes. Field research focused on determining the natural annual and diurnal variability of meteorologic and hydrologic variables, especially those which may indicate trends in climatic change. Comprehensive compute models are being developed to simulate physical processes occurring under the present conditions and to simulate processes under the influence of climatic change.

  9. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-05-15

    This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  10. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-01-19

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  11. Hydrologic Impacts of Saltcedar Control Along a Regulated Dryland River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Alyson Kay

    2012-02-14

    hydrology is an under-developed discipline (Tooth, 2000). At present, much of our understanding of river systems comes from studies in humid regions (Nanson et al., 2002). Transferring these concepts to arid regions is complicated at best, primarily... and prevalence of drought in arid regions has led to damming of some rivers to provide a consistent supply of water for municipalities and irrigation. Flow regulation has a variety of downstream effects such as disconnection of channels from floodplains...

  12. Improving primary science great science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving primary science Developing great science subject leadershipGreat ideas for primary science leaders from schools that value science. #12;2 | Primary science Where science has a good profile, investigative science with access to high-quality expertise, children are likely to enjoy learning the subject

  13. Vesicular Horizon Distribution, Properties, and Pedogenic Processes in Deserts of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Judith Katherine

    2012-01-01

    feedbacks in global desertification. Science 247:1043-1048.feedbacks in global desertification. Science 247:1043-1048.feedback that promotes desertification in semi-arid lands by

  14. Science and Science Fiction

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Robert [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

  15. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  16. Science Mathematics Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Richard

    Science Mathematics Engineering . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', Mathematics, . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', Mathematics, and Software Development

  17. Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius; Schoenherr and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44°C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon with a Q10 of 2 or greater (see Bennett, 1985), it has traditionally been assumed that the thermal show a significant thermal dependence in ectotherms. For example, goldfish fast muscle myofibrillar

  18. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  19. HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN,ANDMARK C. WALLACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB .. .. LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN use by 12-18 mountain sheep(Ovis canadensis nelsom)in a 320-ha enclosure betweenJune 1990and June 1991-collared mountain sheep. Mountain sheepusedmidslopes and drawassociationson the westside of the enclosure

  20. The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    ABSTRACT The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus significant spectral variations that indicate potential mineralogic heterogeneities within the active dunes-member minerals that showed marked variations within the dunes. In addition, standard petrographic techniques re

  1. &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in-duced cavitation in the evergreen desert shrub Larrea tri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pockman, William T.

    &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in- duced cavitation in the evergreen, freezing exotherms occurred at temperatures between ­6.5 and ­9°C and as long as temperatures were held · Prosopis velutina · Cavitation · Freezing tolerance · Deserts&bdy: Introduction Freezing tolerance

  2. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse with different pulse sizes based on the changes in the hydrogen isotope ratios (dD) of their stem water 7 days

  3. Ecophysiological responses of Chihuahuan desert grasses to fire B.W. Allred , K.A. Snyder 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    Nitrogen Photosynthesis a b s t r a c t To better understand the effects of fire in the Chihuahuan desert, gas exchange characteristics of two dominant grass species, Bouteloua eriopoda and Aristida purpurea, and soil nitrogen availability were studied in response to prescribed fire at the Jornada Experimental

  4. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water sources derived from small (rain events, A. ordosia took advantage of deeper soil waterSummer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse

  5. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    on trace metals in soils, sewage sludges, and sludge-treatedproducts from soil and sewage sludge. Science (Washington,

  6. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  7. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    precipitation regime on vernal pool hydrology. FreshwaterColburn, E.A. (2004). Vernal pools: Natural history andof California’s Puddles, Pools, and Playas. Eureka: Mad

  8. Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use: Predicting the Impact of an Emerging Aquatic Pathogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use:with infection, are the pond morphology and the topographyis that differences in the pond morphology and topography of

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  10. Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science Thomas Henick-Kling Professor of Enology Director of Viticulture & Enology Program #12;Wine Science Wine Science Growth of Washington Wine Industry #12;Wine Science Wine Science Wine Grapes utilized 2007 2008 2009 2010 WA 127,000 145,000 156,000 160,000 NY 24,000 26,000 30

  11. Faculty of Science General Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Science General Science The General Science program gives you maximum flexibility to explore the sciences, plus the core requirements you need for on-going, specialized studies. www.uwindsor.ca/science Rigorous, Enriching Programs The BSc General Science program is a great way to explore your many interests

  12. 1 Biomedical Sciences BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Biomedical Sciences BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES The interdisciplinary doctoral programs in the biomedical sciences are organized within the Institute for Biomedical Sciences. The first full year of study toward are admitted directly into the Institute for Biomedical Sciences through Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

  13. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  14. Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awwad, Haitham Munir

    1991-01-01

    Farland (Member) J esTR ao (Head of Department) May 1991 ABSTRACT Streamflow Forecasting for Large-Scale Hydrologic Systems. (May 1991) Haitham Munir Awwad, B. S. , University of Jordan Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Juan B. Valdes An on-line streamflow... thankful to Dr. Ralph A. Wurbs and Dr. Marshall J. McFarland for their assistance on my advisory committee. Support for this thesis by the Department of Civil Engineering through the Engineering Excellence Fund, and by the U, S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  15. Computer Science Computer Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    -M Programming, U-M Solar Car, Hybrid Racing, and the Mars Rover Team. Other groups that advance societal good. Michigan Hackers: Experimenting with technology gEECS: Girls in electrical engineering and computer science

  16. Is sustainability science really a science?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively...

  17. Materials Science & Engineering | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering SHARE Materials Science and Engineering ORNL's core capability in applied materials...

  18. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  19. Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. F., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

  20. Reconstructing the duty of water: a study of emergent norms in socio-hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    This paper assesses the changing norms of water use known as the duty of water. It is a case study in historical socio-hydrology, or more precisely the history of socio-hydrologic ideas, a line of research that is useful ...

  1. Hydrological Connectivity of the Landscape of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    , and lakes) are dependent upon daily, seasonal, and annual surface energy balance. For example, glacier melt, the hydrologic cycle of the MDV is strongly driven by climate; however, in the MDV, surface energy balance has provide a unique real-world laboratory in which to study fundamental hydrologic processes (with

  2. Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright © 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro Arc Hydro: GIS in Water Resources Seminar/Workshop Gainesville, Florida ­ November 15, 2007 Christine Dartiguenave, ESRI inc. cdartiguenave@esri.com #12;Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 2 2Arc Hydro

  3. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  4. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

    2012-12-12

    [1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

  5. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13

    Detrital apatite and zircon (U-TH)/He analysis across a recently discovered unconformity in the Western Desert of Egypt provides new insight into the tectonic evolution of northeastern Africa. The unconformity juxtaposes ...

  6. Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record. J.on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds. Nature, 320,late 1960s to 1980s over Barbados (13°N, 60°W; Prospero and

  7. 1 Political Science POLITICAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Political Science POLITICAL SCIENCE With Capitol Hill nearby and the White House just blocks away, GW is the ideal place to study political science. Students in the program benefit from rigorous study and behavioral sciences discipline in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the program examines politics

  8. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations in chemistry, physics, materials, engineering, and computer science IEEE Xplore Full text...

  10. Statistical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LeeAnn Martinez (505) 667-3308 Email Find Expertise header Search our employee skills database Statistical Sciences Statistical Sciences provides statistical reasoning and...

  11. Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear...

  12. Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies...

  13. Nuclear Science | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science SHARE Nuclear Science In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and...

  14. PREPUBLICATION COPY Hydrologic Effects of a Changing Forest Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Impacts of Forest Management Water Science and Technology Board Division on Earth and Life Studies of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given

  15. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. B l, PAGES 557-569, JANUARY 10, 1990 Large-Magnitude Miocene Extension in the Central Mojave Desert' Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary Paleogeography and Tectonics J. DOUGLAS WALKER Department... of Geology, University of Kansas, La}rwence JOHN M. BARTLEY Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City ALLEN F. GLAZNER Department of Geology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill The main Cenozoic extensional structure...

  16. Hydrologic test system for fracture flow studies in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E; Lord, D.; Burklund, P.

    1982-05-05

    A hydrologic test system has been designed to measure the intrinsic permeabilities of individual fractures in crystalline rock. This system is used to conduct constant pressure-declining flow rate and pressure pulse hydraulic tests. The system is composed of four distinct units: (1) the Packer System, (2) Injection system, (3) Collection System, and (4) Electronic Data Acquisition System. The apparatus is built in modules so it can be easily transported and re-assembled. It is also designed to operate over a wide range of pressures (0 to 300 psig) and flow rates (0.2 to 1.0 gal/min). This system has proved extremely effective and versatile in its use at the Climax Facility, Nevada Test Site.

  17. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  18. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Hydrologic calibration of paired watersheds using a MOSUM approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ssegane, H.; Amatya, D. M.; Muwamba, A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Appelboom, T.; Tollner, E. W.; Nettles, J. E.; Youssef, M. A.; Birgand, F.; Skaggs, R. W.

    2015-01-09

    Paired watershed studies have historically been used to quantify hydrologic effects of land use and management practices by concurrently monitoring two neighboring watersheds (a control and a treatment) during the calibration (pre-treatment) and post-treatment periods. This study characterizes seasonal water table and flow response to rainfall during the calibration period and tests a change detection technique of moving sums of recursive residuals (MOSUM) to select calibration periods for each control-treatment watershed pair when the regression coefficients for daily water table elevation (WTE) were most stable to reduce regression model uncertainty. The control and treatment watersheds included 1–3 year intensively managedmore »loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with natural understory, same age loblolly pine intercropped with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), 14–15 year thinned loblolly pine with natural understory (control), and switchgrass only. Although monitoring during the calibration period spanned 2009 to 2012, silvicultural operational practices that occurred during this period such as harvesting of existing stand and site preparation for pine and switchgrass establishment may have acted as external factors, potentially shifting hydrologic calibration relationships between control and treatment watersheds. Results indicated that MOSUM was able to detect significant changes in regression parameters for WTE due to silvicultural operations. This approach also minimized uncertainty of calibration relationships which could otherwise mask marginal treatment effects. All calibration relationships developed using this MOSUM method were quantifiable, strong, and consistent with Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) greater than 0.97 for WTE and NSE greater than 0.92 for daily flow, indicating its applicability for choosing calibration periods of paired watershed studies.« less

  20. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  1. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

  2. Baldassare Bacchi and Roberto Ranzi Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 785798 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    -SOP conducted in autumn 1999 for the Mesoscale Alpine Programme MAP. The investigations were based on both field to investigate and test in an operational context the potential of both mesoscale meteorological and distributed

  3. Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science for the Anthropocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivapalan, M.

    Water is at the core of the most difficult sustainability challenges facing humans in the modern era, involving feedbacks across multiple scales, sectors, and agents. We suggest that a transformative new discipline is ...

  4. Statistical representation of mountain shading Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10451050 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2004-01-01

    self-shaded or shaded by remote topography as functions of solar elevation and time of day. These expressions are in good agreement with results from a terrain shading model. Keywords: solar radiation, topography, surface energy balance, statistical parameterisation Introduction Solar radiation is a major

  5. Hydrology and Larval Fish Dynamics in Texas Rivers: Science to Evaluate Environmental Flow Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodger, Anthony

    2015-07-17

    Brazos and middle Trinity rivers in Texas and the littoral fish assemblage in the lower Brazos River. From March 2013 to March 2014, abiotic environmental data were collected along with data on fish abundance, reproduction, and recruitment. Larval fish...

  6. Toward a unified science of the Earth's surface: Opportunities for synthesis among hydrology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Mary Eleanor

    . This paper discusses challenges, opportunities, and a few example problems that can serve as pathways toward of terrestrial surface and groundwater in creating surface morphology. A quantitative style is deeply ingrained). These spatial patterns are not restricted to the terrestrial landscape but, with remarkable similarity of form

  7. Wetlandnutrientremoval:areviewoftheevidence Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 673685 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    . By reviewing studies of natural wetlands it is hoped to identify the key processes which govern nitrogen (N, nitrogen, phosphorus, riparian, swamps, marshes, eutrophication Introduction The conservation, restoration denitrification may release the greenhouse and ozone depleting gas, nitrous oxide (Machefert et al., 2002

  8. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    University, Lanzhou 730000, China; 3 School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute on the piezoelectric semiconductor materials, such as ZnO, ZnS, CdS and GaN. With the usage of these piezoelectric.37 eV and large free-exciton binding energy of 60 meV at room temperature. Furthermore, splendid one

  9. Faculty of Science Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Science Computer Science Computer software engineering, network and system analysis.uwindsor.ca/computerscience The University of Windsor offers a variety of computer science programs to prepare students for a career in the technology industry or in research and academia. A computer science degree provides an in-depth understanding

  10. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    84 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

  11. Faculty of Science Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Science Computer Science Software engineering, network and system analysis continue a variety of computer science programs to prepare students for a career in the technology industry or in research and academia. A computer science degree provides an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals

  12. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  13. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  14. Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 54(4) August 2009 Special issue: Groundwater and Climate in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    : Groundwater and Climate in Africa 655 Groundwater and climate in Africa--a review RICHARD G. TAYLOR1 , ANTONIS on water resources commonly exclude groundwater. This omission is of particular concern in Africa, where. The Groundwater and Climate in Africa Conference (http://www.gwclim.org/), held in Kampala, Uganda on 24­28 June

  15. Evaluation of hydrologic indices for forecasting Western U.S. seasonal water supply Edwin P. Maurer1 and Andrew W. Wood2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    anomaly event (e.g., El Nino), however, creates uncertainty in the event's future hydrologic impacts

  16. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    International University Karst hydrology, carbon sequestration, environmental hydrogeology, groundwater

  17. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geotechnics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    PHD Florida International University Karst hydrology, carbon sequestration, environmental hydrogeology

  18. Science Education Programs | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Tutorials Kids' Corner NScD Careers Supporting Organizations Neutron Science Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Science and Education SHARE Inspiring...

  19. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Biology SHARE...

  20. NERSC Science Gateways

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users Science Gateways Science Gateways About Science Gateways A science gateway is a web based interface to access HPC computers and storage systems. Gateways allow science...

  1. Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

  2. Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Chan Yong

    2011-08-08

    maps extracted from remote sensing images; 2) examining the effect of urbanization on hydrologic regime; and 3) investigating a relationship between watershed urbanization and ecosystem invasibility of a riparian forest. I studied twelve riparian...

  3. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18

    flood peaks. Meanwhile, climate change has led to more frequent extreme events. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the hydrological processes under urbanization and climate change is indispensable for sustainable water management...

  4. Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of a floodplain ecosystem, Everglades,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of former wetlands converted to agriculture. Interactions between groundwater and sur- face water have also groundwater's changing role, from a fresh- water storage reservoir that sustained the Everglades ecosystem

  5. 36 Minimising the hydrological impact of forest harvesting in Malaysia's rainforests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    36 Minimising the hydrological impact of forest harvesting in Malaysia's rainforests H. C. Thang lorries, such extraction is slow and costly,andwouldnotgivethestateornationtherevenuetodevelop schools water sup- plies (Mohamed, 1987) and enhanced flood risk from increased channel sedimentation (Sheffield

  6. Operation of water supply reservoirs for flood mitigation : hydrologic and institutional considerations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craney, Patrick Wayne

    1996-01-01

    of water supply storage for flood control purposes. Lake Limestone in Central Texas serves as the case study. The highly variable conditions of the watershed commonly exhibit both hydrologic extremes, floods and droughts. The agency responsible...

  7. Big Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2010-01-08

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  8. Inversion of Hydrological Tracer Test Data Using TomogrpahicConstraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Niklas; Finsterle, Stefan; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-11-11

    A reasonable description of the hydraulic conductivity structure is a prerequisite for modeling contaminant transport. However, formulations of hydrogeological inverse problems utilizing hydrogeological data only often fail to reliably resolve features at a resolution required for accurately predicting transport. Incorporation of geophysical data into the inverse problem offers the potential to increase this resolution. In this study, we invert hydrological tracer test data using the shape and relative magnitude variations derived from geophysical tomographic data to regionalize a hydrogeological inverse problem in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivity structure. Our approach does not require that the petrophysical relationship be known a-priori, but that it is linear and stationary within each geophysical anomaly. However, tomograms are imperfect models of geophysical properties and geophysical properties are not necessarily strongly linked to hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, we focus on synthetic examples where the correlation between radar velocity and hydraulic conductivity, as well as the geophysical data acquisition errors, are varied in order to assess what aspects of the hydraulic conductivity structure we can expect to resolve under different conditions. The results indicate that regularization of the tracer inversion procedure using geophysical data improves estimates of hydraulic conductivity. We find that even under conditions of corrupted geophysical data, we can accurately estimate the effective hydraulic conductivity and areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity. However, given imperfect geophysical data, our results suggest that we cannot expect accurate estimates of the variability of the hydraulic conductivity structure.

  9. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  10. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  11. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science...

  12. STOKED ABOUT SCIENCE? Science Summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    ) · Sunscreen & Bug Spray · www.science.ualberta.ca/summercamps Proper footwear (no flip flops) #12;Half Day

  13. The spatial and temporal variability of aerosol optical depths in the Mojave Desert of southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    California Thomas D. Frank a,, Larry Di Girolamo b,1 , Shannon Geegan a a Department of Geography, University of Illinois, 220 Davenport Hall, 607 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, USA b Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

  14. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  15. The Science of Science Dr. Katy Brner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    1 The Science of Science Dr. Katy Börner Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, Director Information Visualization Laboratory, Director School of Library and Information Science Indiana University February 20th, 2008 Computational Scientometrics: Studying Science by Scientific Means Börner, Katy, Chen

  16. 1 Geological Sciences GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Geological Sciences GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES Geological sciences' faculty members are engaged in research on the geology and paleontology of the Appalachian and Rocky mountains, Asia and elsewhere. They collaborate with scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and other international organizations. Research

  17. Simulation of flood reduction by natural river rehabilitation using a distributed hydrological model Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11291140 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2004-01-01

    and by assessing the response of the stream channels to the resistance or obstruction of flows. Based frequency and enhance flood peaks downstream. Moreover, urbanisation in the basin increased by 30% between. Urbanisation enhances runoff because of impervious areas, reduced vegetation cover, depression storage

  18. Final Report for the ZERT Project: Basic Science of Retention Issues, Risk Assessment & Measurement, Monitoring and Verification for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Lageson, David; Melick, Jesse; Gardner, Mike; Dobeck, Laura; Repasky, Kevin; Shaw, Joseph; Bajura, Richard; McGrail, B Peter; Oldenburg, Curtis M; Wagoner, Jeff; Pawar, Rajesh

    2011-03-31

    ZERT has made major contributions to five main areas of sequestration science: improvement of computational tools; measurement and monitoring techniques to verify storage and track migration of CO{sub 2}; development of a comprehensive performance and risk assessment framework; fundamental geophysical, geochemical and hydrological investigations of CO{sub 2} storage; and investigate innovative, bio-based mitigation strategies.

  19. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  20. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1991. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Restoration of aquatic ecosystems - science, technologies and public policy; Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment; Opportunities in the hydrologic sciences; and Ground water models - scientific and regulatory applications. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  1. Regionalization of hydrologic response in the Great Lakes basin: Considerations of temporal and spatial scales of analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to water resource management objectives; and Assess the potential for regression tree models for hydrologic scales for recreation, commerce, ecosystems, hydropower, transportation, and consumptive supply

  2. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  3. DESERT PAVEMENTS AND SOILS ON BASALTIC PYROCLASTIC DEPOSITS AT LATHROP WELLS AND RED CONE VOLCANOES, SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Valentine; C.D. Harrington

    2005-08-10

    Formation of desert pavement and accretionary soils are intimately linked in arid environments such as the Mojave Desert. Well-sorted fallout scoria lapilli at Lathrop Wells (75-80 ky) and Red Cone ({approx}1 Ma) volcanoes (southern Nevada) formed an excellent starting material for pavement, allowing infiltration of eolian silt and fine sand that first clogs the pore space of underlying tephra and then aggrades and develops vesicular A (Av) horizons. Variations in original pyroclast sizes provide insight into minimum and maximum clast sizes that promote pavement and soil formation: pavement becomes ineffective when clasts can saltate under the strongest winds, while clasts larger than coarse lapilli are unable to form an interlocking pavement that promotes silt accumulation (necessary for Av development). Contrary to predictions that all pavements above altitudes of {approx}400 m would have been ''reset'' in their development after late Pleistocene vegetation advances (about 15 ka), the soils and pavements show clear differences in maturity between the two volcanoes. This indicates that either the pavement soils develop slowly over many 10,000's of years and then are very stable, or that, if they are disrupted by vegetation advances, subsequent pavements are reestablished with successively more mature characteristics.

  4. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

  5. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Terminating combinator parsers in Agda and Computing Sciences Utrecht University June 12, 2008 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Information and Computing Sciences] 3 Totality #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 4

  6. Academy of Integrated Science College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    FALL 2015 Academy of Integrated Science College of Science Virginia Tech Integrated Science SCIENCE CURRICULUM COMPILED BY NORA SULLIVAN PROGRAM ACADEMIC ADVISOR ACADEMY OF INTEGRATED SCIENCE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE VIRGINIA TECH NORA84@VT.EDU 540-231-2442 WWW.SCIENCE.VT.EDU/AIS/ISC #12

  7. Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reports News and Awards Supporting Organizations Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science Nuclear Science | Nuclear Science SHARE In World War II's Manhattan Project,...

  8. Information Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) American Society for Indexing (ASI) Digital Library Federation (DLF) National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Special...

  9. What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website...

  10. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2011-01-01

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  11. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2013-05-29

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  12. NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaic Program and DOE Basic Energy Sciences Program. Materials Science. The Materials Science Group's research...

  13. Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  15. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A OU Behavioral Neuroscience Works Cited. Brownell, P.H. & R.D. Farley. 1979 Arachnological Society. Burnham Beeches, Bucks. Stephens, A.V. 1999. Honors Thesis. University of Oklahoma

  16. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P R, Hooke, R L, Persico, L, Caffee, M, Finkel, R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r$^{2}$ = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed

  17. Trace-element evidence for the origin of desert varnish by direct aqueous atmospheric deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    , Ni, Pb and the rare-earth elements (REEs). In particular, they have anomalously high Ce/La and low Y Nivedita Thiagarajan, Cin-Ty Aeolus Lee* Department of Earth Science, MS-126, Rice University, Houston, TX elemental fractionations. One remaining possibility is that the Fe, Mn and trace metals in varnish

  18. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to representmore »the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics in northern peatlands, and provides a useful foundation for investigation of northern peatland carbon exchange.« less

  19. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  20. Modeling of earthquake-induced hydrological changes and possible permeability enhancement due to the 17 January 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to the 17 January 1995 Kobe Earthquake, Japan T. Tokunaga Department of Geosystem Engineering, University Abstract Hydrologic changes associated with the 17 January 1995 Kobe Earthquake occurred in Awajishima and King, 1993; Rojstaczer et al., 1995). It has been reported that similar hydrologic fluctuations were

  1. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

  2. B. Decharme H. Douville Introduction of a sub-grid hydrology in the ISBA land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Decharme Æ H. Douville Introduction of a sub-grid hydrology in the ISBA land surface model spa- tial scales. This paper focuses on the parameterization of sub-grid hydrological processes within the ISBA land surface model. Five off-line simulations are performed over the French Rho^ ne river basin

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  4. Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology) SpecialiSationS Environmental Microbiology environment. This specialisation can be attached to the Environmental Sciences major. Environmental Modelling Sciences major. Land and Freshwater Environments This specialisation is for students interested

  5. Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

  6. Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Treaty Verification Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

  7. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling...

  8. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty Dr. Tim Dunnagan, Dean #12;Health Sciences Connection 2 College News College of Health Sciences

  9. Web of Science Web of ScienceWeb of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yayu

    Web of Science 2015-3-25 #12;Web of ScienceWeb of Science 93 2 22 7 Web of Science #12; 3.com/WOS_GeneralSearch_input.do?product=WOS&search_ mode=GeneralSearch&SID=4CLD1VklEapSgBPAiM8&preferencesSaved= Web of Science Web of Science core; #12; IDS IDS IDS #12; 50 "" #12; #12; 1. 2. 3. #12;4. 5. #12;6. Web of ScienceSCI 2

  10. Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    447 Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The Department of Computer Science provides undergraduate instruction leading to the bachelor's degree in computer science. This program in computer science is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting body recognized

  11. Department of Materials Science &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Materials Science & Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, students in materials science, engineering physics and engineering science choose to tackle compelling issues in materials science and engineering or engineering science

  12. COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

  13. Toward hydro-social modeling: Merging human variables and the social sciences with climate-glacier runoff models (Santa River, Peru)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Toward hydro-social modeling: Merging human variables and the social sciences with climate mountain range, this paper provides a holistic hydro-social framework that identifies five major human of watershed dynamics. This hydro-social framework has wide- spread implications for hydrological modeling

  14. Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Engineering Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations SHARE Supporting...

  15. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 1999 / 371 PARKING LOT STORAGE MODELING USING DIFFUSION WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 1999 / 371 PARKING LOT STORAGE MODELING USING DIFFUSION holding storm water in parking lots is examined by using a diffusion wave model of catchment dynamics. Four extreme storm types are applied to four typical parking lot sizes to assess the sensitivity

  16. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROLOGICAL CONTROLS ON GULLY FORMATION NEAR LAKE TANA, NORTHERN HIGHLANDS OF ETHIOPIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the millennium goal of Ethiopia by preparing seedlings and planting indigenous trees for the rehabilitation Management and Environmental Protection (LaRMEP) in 2006 from Mekelle University located in the Tigray Region and Hydrology. Tigist prepared for her Master's research that was to be conducted in the Debre-Mewi watershed

  17. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the Palaeocene The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum represents a period of rapid, extreme global warming ,55 million years ago global warming6 . The terrestrial-plant carbon isotope excursion (about 24.5 to 26 per mil

  18. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models Accepted 13 March 2013 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Snow Energy-balance Temperature that both the Isnobal energy-balance and calibrated temperature-index methods adequately reproduce snow

  19. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 31 1998 315335 Rapid fluid content measurement method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with potential for controlling the huge costs and extended times required to clean up these sites. However contents in rapidly changing flow fields. High intensity X-rays were used at the Cornell High Z .Energy it aids in the understanding of hydrologic control which is an essential component of cost-effective in

  20. Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Determination of hydrologic pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain Abstract. Alpine/subalpine ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park may be sensitive to atmospherically with soil and vegetation. Because of this, waters draining granitic terrains, such as Rocky Mountain

  1. Strip mining: Hydrology. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the hydrologic impacts of strip mining. The potential impacts of strip mining on surface and ground water are examined, and techniques for control and monitoring of water pollution are discussed. Site rehabilitation is also considered. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Redwood Trees, Fog Water Subsidies, and the Hydrology of Redwood Forests1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwood Trees, Fog Water Subsidies, and the Hydrology of Redwood Forests1 Todd Dawson,2 Stephen Burgess,3 Kevin Simonin,2 Emily Limm,2 and Anthony Ambrose2 Fog is a defining feature of the coastal California redwood forest and fog inputs via canopy drip in summer can constitute between 10 to 45 percent

  3. Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b , Philippe Naveau c Abstract The statistics of extremes have played an important role in engineering practice for water resources design and management. How recent developments in the statistical theory of extreme values can

  4. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Abstract: Sediment rating curves are commonly used to estimate the suspended sediment load in rivers and streams under the assumption

  5. Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California contamination in California's Sacramento River watershed where 8500 km2 of agricultural land influences water components were assessed for the Sacramento River watershed. To represent flood conveyance in the area

  6. Mountain-Block Hydrology and Mountain-Front Recharge* John L. Wilson and Huade Guan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    " (MFR), this process has been treated by modelers of basins as a boundary condi- tion. In general of a basin groundwater model. These methods avoid altogether the complexities of the hydrologic sys- tem include the partitioning of rainfall and snowmelt into vegetation-controlled evapotranspiration, surface

  7. Hydrologic assessment of an urban variable source watershed in the northeast United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologic assessment of an urban variable source watershed in the northeast United States Zachary by considering the impact of impervious surfaces, hydraulic control structures (detention basins), and land use and interflows increased accordingly. Both modeled and measured distributed results indicated that the more

  8. Hydrology, Salinity, and Salinity Control Possibilities of the Middle Pecos River: A Reconnaissance Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.; Anand, Shilpa; Hatler, Will

    2008-01-01

    , and upwards of 12,000 mg L-1 at Girvin. These high levels of streamflow salinity not only reduce the economic uses of the water, but also limit the biodiversity of aquatic and riparian species along the river. This report outlines the hydrology, geochemistry...

  9. Global validation of the ISBA sub-grid hydrology B. Decharme H. Douville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global validation of the ISBA sub-grid hydrology B. Decharme Æ H. Douville Received: 16 January scale is therefore a crucial task, which requires off-line simu- lations driven by realistic atmospheric and consistent set of sub-grid parametrizations in order to account for spatial heter- ogeneities of topography

  10. Scaling of hydrologic flows in polygonal ground within an Arctic ecosystem Gautam Bisht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4 as high-latitude temperatures warm. Polygonal ground, with a characteristic length Moderate Old D Low center High Moderately wet High Young BOUNDARY CONDITIONS & SOIL PROPERTIES Boundary structures, with high or low centers, dominate the local hydrologic environment, thereby impacting the energy

  11. Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood-pulsed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood;Microalgae, base of aquatic food webs Ecosystem services. Provisioning: food, fiber and fuel. Regulating estimate of algal biodiversity in the Okavango Delta A2)Explain biomass and diversity patterns in relation

  12. Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic availability is indispensable for water resources management at regional or national level. This information processes. The currently available estimates of freshwater availability by a few large international

  13. A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part I: Implementation and Synthetic Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    structure in signals and a filtering procedure, and thus is an efficient way to solve the optimal estimation in a hydrologic data assimilation system, which runs a land surface model. Assimilation experiments are carried out over the Arkansas­Red River basin, located in the central United States (;645 000 km2 ), using

  14. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies-sensor/multi-platform approach to water and energy cycle prediction is demonstrated in an effort to understand the variability to an improved understanding of water and energy cycles within the NAME region and providing a novel framework

  15. Precipitation Change Effects Evaluated For Seven Ecosystems With Distinctive Vegetation and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Precipitation Change Effects Evaluated For Seven Ecosystems With Distinctive Vegetation and Hydrology Contact: Paul J. Hanson hansonpj@ornl.gov 865-574-5361 Doubled Precipitation Contact: Paul JCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), were used to explored effects of potential precipitation changes (P) on water limitation

  16. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & ANALYSIS www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 339 8 FEBRUARY 2013 635 Steven Chu, the fi rst Nobel-winning scien- tist to lead the sprawling U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has rarely...

  17. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum July 22, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury...

  18. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1992. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Managing wastewater in coastal urban areas; Ground water vulnerability assessment; Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment; and Opportunities in the hydrologic sciences. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  19. Faculty of Science Environmental Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for career success. An Environmental Science degree is also appropriate background training for professions Resources A new and integrated set of state-of-the-art laboratory and field equipment has been designed

  20. Neutron Science | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL's long history of neutron science began in the 1940s with the pioneering neutron scattering studies of Ernest Wollan and Clifford Shull. Shull was co-recipient of...

  1. The Science of Team Science: Origins and Themes The Science of Team Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    The Science of Team Science: Origins and Themes The Science of Team Science Overview of the Field, PhD Abstract: The science of team science encompasses an amalgam of conceptual and methodologic about the cost effectiveness of public- and private-sector investments in team-based science

  2. Statistics and Actuarial Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    SCIENCE SFU.CA/ SCIENCE Statistics and Actuarial Science #12;Further Information Student info, academic calendar, registration students.sfu.ca Science advising sfu.ca/science/undergrad/advising Statistics and Actuarial Science The Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science offers the degree

  3. Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @...

  4. Information science is neither

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furner, J

    2015-01-01

    of library and information sciences, 3rd ed. , edited byAmerican Society for Information Science and Technology 63,Annual Review of Information Science and Technology 41, no.

  5. Physics | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics ORNL Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Physics SHARE Physics Bottom view of the 25 million volt tandem...

  6. Science & Discovery | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Clean Energy National Security Neutron Science Nuclear Science Supercomputing and Computation More Science Hubs, Centers and Institutes US ITER Mars 'Curiosity'...

  7. ORISE: Forensic Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forensic Science Forensic Science The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides direct forensic analytical support, consulting and training services to United...

  8. Computational Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Computational Science and Engineering Research Profile The Computational Science and Engineering and Process Engineering Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory Prof. Dr. Petros Koumoutsakos petros

  9. Earth & Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science1354608000000Earth & Environmental ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.No...

  10. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01

    of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientificthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced5 Simulation Data Key Remote Science Drivers Instruments and

  11. Neural Social Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2013-01-01

    interpersonal warmth . ” Science, 322, 2008, 606–607 . Atcold? ” Psychological Science , 19, 2008, 838–842. Subjectsand physical cleansing. Science, 313, 1451–1452. Students

  12. Citizen science in archaeology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, ML

    2014-01-01

    Melinda A. Zeder Smith] CITIZEN SCIENCE IN ARCHAEOLOGY 2014and Application of Citizen Science. Biological ConservationHilchey 2011 A Review of Citizen Science and Community-Based

  13. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  14. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 1 Types in Functional Programming Languages Andres L¨oh Department of Information and Computing Sciences Utrecht University UU General Math Colloquium ­ May 8, 2008 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 2 Overview What

  15. History of Science 157 Sociology of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapin, Steven

    1 History of Science 157 Sociology of Science Fall 2009 Steven Shapin Science Center 469 Tuesdays to thinking about science, its historical development, its relations to society and other forms of culture: Science Center 451 Office hours: Mondays 8:30 -> 10.15, or by arrangement #12;2 E-mail: shapin

  16. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection Back to School edition September 2010 Volume IX (1) Dr. Tim Dunnagan, Dean of the College of Health Sciences (COHS) at Boise State University (BSU). It is truly an honor to have

  17. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRDUniversitySchedules PrintNIF AboutScienceScience

  18. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatricNOAA ScienceScience Highlights Print

  19. Science &Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science &Technology Facilities Council Science &Technology Facilities Council Science and Technology Facilities Council Annual Report and Accounts 2011-2012 Science and Technology Facilities Council Laboratory, Cheshire; UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Edinburgh; Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire; Isaac

  20. Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

    2005-01-01

    Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

  1. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  2. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  3. Spatial and hydrologic variation of Bacteroidales, adenovirus and enterovirus in a semi-arid, wastewater effluent-impacted watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambic, Dustin G.; Kildare-Hann, Beverly J.; Rajal, Veronica B.; Sturm, Belinda; Minton, Chris B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Wuertz, Stefan

    2015-05-15

    receiving waters (rather than municipal wastewater, which is the case during dry weather). As such, the approach to data segregation was dependent on hydrology/storm conditions. Storm events led to significant increases in ruminant- and dog...

  4. Hydrologic variation during the last 170,000 years in the southern hemisphere tropics of South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigsby, Catherine A.

    or tectonic processes that affected basin hydrology, or some combination of both. The dominance of salt of the penultimate glacial period. Alternating mud and salt units in a core from Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia reflect

  5. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  6. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of ...

  7. Redirecting science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaserud, F.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters. Science policy and fund-raising up to 1934; The Copenhagen spirit at work, late 1920's to mid-1930s; The refugee problem, 1933 to 1935; Experimental biology, late 1920s to 1935; and Consolidation of the transition, 1935 to 1940.

  8. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  9. Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology...

  10. Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2008-08-22

    This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

  11. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  12. Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1986-12-01

    A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

  13. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01

    . Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... to account for the entire increase in the coastal erosion rates in the study area since at least 1937 Future sand losses brought about by the construction oi' new reservoirs downstream of those presently on the Brazos River, or one of its major tribu...

  14. Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Carrie J.

    2009-05-15

    )????????????????.. 4 2 Aerial photographs of Boat Ramp (BR), Pump Canal (PC) and Sundown Bay (SB) sites at site-appropriate scales???......... 5 3 Left-hand column indicates correlation between pond water level and tidal creek water level...????????????????. 13 4 Hydrologic timeline (bay water level and local precipitation) for Guadalupe estuary, February 2005 through May 2006?????.. 17 5 Tidal creek salinity (A) and average salinity by site (B)...????. 18 6 Water column algal...

  15. Science &Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science &Technology Facilities Council Accelerator Science and Technology Centre Daresbury Science)1235 445808 www.stfc.ac.uk/astec Head office, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Polaris House, North Newton Group, La Palma: Joint Astronomy Centre, Hawaii. ASTeC Science Highlights 2009 - 2010 Science

  16. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  17. CO$_2$ dissolution controlled by buoyancy driven shear dispersion in a background hydrological flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unwin, H Juliette T; Woods, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the long-time flow which controls the dissolution of a plume of CO$_2$ following injection into an anticline structure in a deep saline aquifer of finite vertical extent. Over times of tens to thousands of years, some of the CO$_2$ will dissolve into the underlying groundwater to produce a region of relatively dense, CO$_2$ saturated water directly below the plume of CO$_2$. Continued dissolution then requires the supply of CO$_2$ unsaturated aquifer water. This may be provided by a background hydrological flow or buoyancy driven flow caused by the density contrast between the CO$_2$ saturated and unsaturated water in the aquifer. At long times, the interaction of the cross-layer diffusive mixing with the buoyancy, leads to buoyancy driven shear dispersion of the CO$_2$. With a background hydrological flow, the upstream transport of dissolved CO$_2$ by this dispersion becomes balanced by the oncoming hydrological flow so that CO$_2$ rich water can only spread a ...

  18. Hydrology and ecology of pinyon-juniper woodlands: Conceptual framework and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Breshears, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands represent an important ecosystem in the semiarid western United States. Concern over the sustainability of, and management approaches for, these woodlands is increasing. As in other semiarid environments, water dynamics and vegetation patterns in pinyon-juniper woodlands are highly interrelated. An understanding of these relationships can aid in evaluating various management strategies. In this paper we describe a conceptual framework designed to increase our understanding of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands. The framework comprises five different scales, at each of which the landscape is divided into {open_quotes}functional units{close_quotes} on the basis of hydrologic characteristics. The hydrologic behavior of each unit and the connections between units are being evaluated using an extensive network of hydrological and ecological field studies on the Pajarito Plateau in northern New Mexico. Data from these studies, coupled with application of the conceptual model, have led to the development of a number of hypotheses concerning the interrelationships of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands.

  19. Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

  20. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests—Fiscal and Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2008-02-27

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within selected Hanford Site wells during fiscal and calendar year 2005. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, in-well vertical groundwater-flow assessments, and a single-well tracer and constant-rate pumping test. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral and vertical groundwater-flow velocity, aquifer groundwater-flow velocity, and depth-distribution profiles of hydraulic conductivity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for a site where detailed well testing was performed. Results obtained from these tests provide hydrologic information that supports the needs of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act waste management area characterization as well as sitewide groundwater monitoring and modeling programs. These results also reduce the uncertainty of groundwater-flow conditions at selected locations on the Hanford Site.

  1. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  2. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  3. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatricNOAA Science

  4. Computer Science Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Computer Science Department of Computer Science Stuart Building 10 W. 31st St. Chicago, IL 60616: Bogdan Korel The study of computer science is the inquiry into the nature of computation and its use in solving problems in an information-based society. Computer science is an evolving discipline, but it has

  5. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Indexed fixed points Andres Löh Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center GP meeting, 21 November 2008 #12;[Faculty of Science Information

  6. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Types, Universes and Everything Andres L¨oh Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center May 26, 2010 #12;[Faculty of Science Information

  7. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic diff Andres Löh joint work with Eelco Lempsink and Sean Leather Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University IFIP WG 2.1 meeting #64, Weltenburg, April 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

  8. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with the multirec. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center May 15, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

  9. [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löh, Andres

    [Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with fixed points Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center September 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information

  10. NSF WORKSHOP ON SCIENCE JOURNALISM Science Journalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    NSF WORKSHOP ON SCIENCE JOURNALISM Science Journalism: From 'Little Story on the Prairie retaining factual accuracy -- the key to good sci- ence communication and science journalism. Science journalism aims to transmute scientific concepts and re- sults from jargon-based language often understand

  11. POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study of governments, public policies, and political behavior. Political science uses both humanistic perspectives and scientific skills to examine the United States and all countries and regions of the world. Students enrolled in Political Science courses explore

  12. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection November 2010 Volume IX (2) Rationale The faculty, staff and students within the sweeping changes associated with health care reform. Health care reform represents the most significant

  13. Web of Science Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    Web of Science #12; Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2 Web of Science.................................................................................................................. 4 ISI Web of Knowledge

  14. Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science ENCYCLOPEDIA OF COGNITIVE SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilber, David

    the physical, biological, #12;Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science and behavioural sciences to place seriousEncyclopedia of Cognitive Science 173 ENCYCLOPEDIA OF COGNITIVE SCIENCE 2000 ©Macmillan Reference

  15. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair:...

  16. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    varying little from year to year. For hydroelectricity production, the water management therefore rather

  17. Assela Pathirana, Srikantha Herath andTadashiYamada Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 668679 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    based on the log-Lèvy generator, synthetic hourly rainfall series were generated from the multifractal a scaling relationship between daily and hourly rainfall intensities. Using a discrete cascade algorithm of agreement between the synthetic hourly series and observed hourly rainfall. Keywords: rainfall modelling

  18. Disaggregation of spatial rainfall fields for hydroloigcal modelling Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(2), 165173 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01

    to investigate the evolution of the climate (DOE, 1996) while at the regional scale, mesoscale models are weather. In the case of rainfall forecasting, some combination of the mesoscale forecast and a finer scale advection

  19. ESRM315/CFR521 Old Growth and Forest Policy April 9. 2014 RIPARIAN, AQUATIC, AND HYDROLOGIC SCIENCE & ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    /rivers floats and rearranges large woody debris (LWD) 4. Large streams/rivers actively interact with forests in recruiting LWD through bank cutting 5. LWD creates much of the complexity in larger streams and rivers a. Off

  20. Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2005-01-01

    multi-model ensembles of Global Circulation Model output for reference baseline and typical enhanced CO2 realisations capture the stochastic properties of the forecast precipitation and temperature fields increase in the frequency of high floods in the 20th century for basins greater than 2 × 105 km2

  1. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  2. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  3. Behavioral Sciences | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Computational Engineering Computer Science Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems...

  4. Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation...

  5. Chemical Engineering | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical and Engineering Materials Clean Energy Nuclear Sciences Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment...

  6. Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research Assessment of environmental models anf software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monte, L; Hofman, Dimitry

    2005-01-01

    Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research

  7. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  8. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRDUniversitySchedules PrintNIF &Science Briefs

  9. Science Cafe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRDUniversitySchedules PrintNIF &Science

  10. Science Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRDUniversitySchedulesScience Highlights

  11. Energy Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 Thanks forEnergy Science Print Our current

  12. Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 Thanks forEnergy Science Print Our

  13. Explosives Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan-5 Beamline 1-5ComputingExplosives Science

  14. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatricNOAA MAY 2013 VOL 340 SCIENCE

  15. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat PumpsTechnologiesTechnologiesScienceStudents | Center

  16. Science Council

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign56Science Careers202-000

  17. Science Digests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign56ScienceOpens

  18. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScience Goal25, 2008

  19. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScience Goal25,

  20. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScience Goal25,Chang

  1. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScience

  2. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScienceHasan Research

  3. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScienceHasan

  4. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-ContestHighlightsScienceHasan6, 2009

  5. Innovation in Computer Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    power- up Innovation in Computer Sciences Department of Computer Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin #12;#12;Computer science is the enabling science of our age. It is the engine. In the Department of Computer Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the top ten departments

  6. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  7. A, Science Service Feature Released w o n receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheelm nh gig- you a r e standing near your nerorJlane i n the desert and a l w g e Any- "If dust devil

  8. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  9. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  10. Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

  11. Review: Who’s asking? Native Science, Western Science and Science Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Western Science and Science Education By Douglas L. MedinScience and Science Education. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press,previously the director of education at the American Indian

  12. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  13. Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

  14. The Computational Sciences. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    The Computational Sciences. Research activities range from the theoretical foundations. The teaching mission of the computational sciences includes almost every student in the University for computational hardware and software. The computational sciences are undergoing explosive growth worldwide

  15. Sandia Energy - Fire Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire Science Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Fire Science Fire ScienceTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T17:01:52+0...

  16. OPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    OPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERINGOPTICAL as waveguiding mechanism in optical fibers. We have shown, both experimentally and numerically, that for a moderate amount of disorder in optical fibers

  17. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  18. Computer Science Induction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Ulrich

    Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Supervision Regulations Progression Regulations Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Department of Computer Science Swansea

  19. E-Science Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abad, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    on December 6, 2011, E-Science Day was a day-long event,regional librarians in e-science, and to expose regionalthe initiation of e-science support projects within their

  20. Communicating Evolution as Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thanukos, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):1451–5. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

  1. Introduction Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    32 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems population, changing lifestyle habit, and the coming of globalization age. The role health sciences play, the former Department of Health Sciences of the Graduate School of Medicine, was reorganized

  2. Sandia Energy - Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Science Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Computational Science Computational Sciencecwdd2015-03-26T13:35:2...

  3. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01

    21 Neutron Scattering Science User Facilities atlight source facilities, neutron scattering facilities, andup to 40Gbps 7 Neutron Scattering Science User Facilities at

  4. Science and Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faces of Science The people behind our science Radical Supercomputing Extreme speeds, big data, powerful simulations 70 Years of Innovation Addressing the nation's most complex...

  5. Information science is neither

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furner, J

    2015-01-01

    Information science is neither Jonathan Furner University ofIt would appear that we neither use nor need the conceptabout information, neither is data science primarily about

  6. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences Expanding the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperatures and densities and to build the scientific foundation...

  7. Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Science & Technology Border Security Comprehensive Vulnerability and Threat Analysis Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools Export...

  8. Fuel Cycle Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiochemical Separation & Processing Recycle & Waste Management Uranium Enrichment Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope...

  9. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Computer Science The Computational Science credential only available to students currently enrolled in the Computer Science undergraduate degree program that are distinct from already-required coursework. To receive a certificate in "Computational Science

  10. 146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science ESCI 101 The Earth or ESCI 102 Evolution of the Earth or ESCI 107 Oceans and Global Change or ESCI 108 Crises of the Earth ESCI 105 Introductory Lab for Earth Geophysics I ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II or ESCI 446 Solid Earth Geophysics Math and Other Sciences

  11. College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY VIRIGINIA TECH AY2015 Training 24 B. Clinical Science Area Committee 25 C. Graduate Student Representatives 25 D. Advisor 26 E for Continuation on to the Preliminary Examination 49 F. Plan of Study: Doctoral Degree 51 G. The Preliminary

  12. Explicitly integrating parameter, input, and structure uncertainties into Bayesian Neural Networks for probabilistic hydrologic forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Liang, Faming; Yu, Beibei; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-11-09

    Estimating uncertainty of hydrologic forecasting is valuable to water resources and other relevant decision making processes. Recently, Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been proved powerful tools for quantifying uncertainty of streamflow forecasting. In this study, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to incorporate the uncertainties associated with input, model structure, and parameter into BNNs. This framework allows the structure of the neural networks to change by removing or adding connections between neurons and enables scaling of input data by using rainfall multipliers. The results show that the new BNNs outperform the BNNs that only consider uncertainties associated with parameter and model structure. Critical evaluation of posterior distribution of neural network weights, number of effective connections, rainfall multipliers, and hyper-parameters show that the assumptions held in our BNNs are not well supported. Further understanding of characteristics of different uncertainty sources and including output error into the MCMC framework are expected to enhance the application of neural networks for uncertainty analysis of hydrologic forecasting.

  13. Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

  14. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  15. CHRISTINE DOUGHTY Earth Sciences Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , Berkeley. Hydrologic characterization of heterogeneous geologic media using inverse methods based, Berkeley, CA, Mathematical modeling of the hydrothermal behavior of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs, aquifer and soil thermal energy storage systems, geologic sequestration of nuclear waste and carbon

  16. Published in Journal of Hydrology, 2002, v. 264, no 1-4, p. 170-184 The influence of microclimates and fog on stable isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of microclimates and fog on stable isotope signatures used in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui., Ste. 415, Honolulu, HI 96813 Key words: d18 O, dD, fog, isotope hydrology, Hawaii, ground water consideration of the influence of fog, as fog samples had isotopic signatures enriched by as much as 3 in d18 O

  17. Forms of Soil Phosphorus in Selected Hydrologic Units of the Florida Everglades K. R. Reddy,* Y. Wang, W. F. DeBusk, M. M. Fisher, and S. Newman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Forms of Soil Phosphorus in Selected Hydrologic Units of the Florida Everglades K. R. Reddy,* Y is subject to changes in hydroperiod and nutrient loading, resulting in soil P enrichment and changes P in soils from four hydrologic units of the Everglades, and (ii) develop empirical relationships

  18. EAS 44600/B4600 GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Instructor: Dr. Pengfei Zhang, MR-932, 212-650-5609, pzhang@sci.ccny.cuny.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    1 EAS 44600/B4600 GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Fall 2014 Instructor: Dr. Pengfei Zhang, MR-932, 212 a working knowledge of groundwater. Course material will cover hydrologic cycle, fundamental physics of porous media flow, aquifer evaluation, chemical properties of groundwater, and contaminant transport

  19. L a n d s c a p e H y d r o l o g y Page 1 SWS 6932 Landscape Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of research tools to analyze coupled hydrologic and environmental changes. The course will center around two cover change o Predicting water availability under variable climate 3. Roderick and Farquhar, 2011 and variability in both time and space. Observed statistical properties of hydrologic data will be related

  20. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.