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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1055,"lon":-70.7912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6853,"lon":-75.0694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

5

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources (Redirected from Wave) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

6

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Jump to: navigation, search Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Using the Database (1) Map illustrates marine & hydrokinetic demonstration projects around the

7

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 379 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 4 MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project A MHK Projects/ADM 3 MHK Projects/ADM 4 MHK Projects/ADM 5 MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project MHK Projects/Agucadoura MHK Projects/Alaska 1 MHK Projects/Alaska 13 MHK Projects/Alaska 17 MHK Projects/Alaska 18 MHK Projects/Alaska 24 MHK Projects/Alaska 25

8

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Marine and Hydrokinetic | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is therefore leading efforts to prove functionality; evaluate technical and economic viability; and generate cost, performance, and reliability data for a variety of devices. Marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts

10

Tidal Energy  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030, Energy.gov News Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States, Energy Citations...

11

Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101, learn how the Energy Department is supporting research on a range of innovative marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to capture energy from waves and currents. For more information on marine and hydrokinetic energy from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Water Power Program

12

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy technologies ending with shots of ocean waves. We all know energy can come from the wind and the sun, but there's a plentiful renewable resource covering more than 75% of the planet that you might not have thought about: our water! The movement of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents carries energy that can be harnessed and converted into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. The words "Kinetic Energy" appear onscreen with shots of ocean scientists at sea. The words "Marine & Hydrokinetic" appear onscreen.

13

Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. All coastal areas experience two high tides and two low tides over a period of slightly more than 24 hours. For those tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude.

14

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Technology AS Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address PO Box 399 Place Harstad Zip 9484 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2001 Phone number (+47) 77 06 08 08 Website http://http://www.hydratidal.i Region Norway LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: MORILD Demonstration Plant Morild 2 This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System Morild Power Plant This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydra_Tidal_Energy_Technology_AS&oldid=678333

16

Energy Basics: Tidal Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

17

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Generators Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Address 14 Thislesboon Drive Place Mumbles Zip SA3 4HY Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

19

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

20

Tidal Sails AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sails AS Sails AS Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Sails AS Address Standgaten 130 Place Haugesund Zip 5531 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +32 474 98 06 16 Website http://www.tidalsails.com Region Norway LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Tidal Sails This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tidal_Sails_AS&oldid=678479" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources  

SciTech Connect

The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Add description List of Tidal Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTidalEnergy&oldid267201" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

23

Energy Basics: Tidal Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the cost per kilowatt-hour of tidal power is not competitive with conventional fossil fuel power. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last...

24

Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable efforts have been underway to develop hydrokinetic energy resources in tidal and riverine environments throughout North America. Potential for fish to be injured or killed if they encounter hydrokinetic turbines is an issue of significant interest to resource and regulatory agencies. To address this issue, flume studies were conducted that exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral reactions and avoidance. Also, a theoreti...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

26

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

27

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Hybrid) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

28

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Attenuator) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

29

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

30

MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Barge Power Barge < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hydrokinetic Power Barge.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Onsite Recovered Energy LP Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Vurbine proprietary technology design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest hydrokinetic energy from flowing water in a low impact application Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 36:51.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage

31

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tidal Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Photo of the ocean rising along the beach. Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. All coastal areas experience two high tides and two low tides over a period of slightly more than 24 hours. For those tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude. Currently, there are no tidal power plants in the United States, but conditions are good for tidal power generation in the Pacific Northwest and the Atlantic Northeast regions. Tidal Energy Technologies Tidal energy technologies include barrages or dams, tidal fences, and tidal

33

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology below to add it to the registry. If your technology is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that technology's fields and you may edit. MHK_Technologies/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Technologies/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the Marine and Hydrokinetic Database Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology&oldid=680669"

34

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 282 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER A MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo MHK Technologies/AirWEC MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy MHK Technologies/Aquanator MHK Technologies/Aquantis MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000

35

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

36

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Tests | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Tests Jump to: navigation, search Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test This category currently contains no pages or media. Retrieved from "http:...

37

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project below to add it to the registry. If your project is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that project's fields and you may edit. MHK_Projects/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Projects/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology_Project&oldid=688143"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Image courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company ORPC's TidGen(tm) turbine generator unit. R&D Opportunity Advanced water power technologies include devices capable of extracting...

43

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Construction --Commercial Weatherization --Commercial Heating & Cooling --Commercial Lighting --Solar Decathlon -Manufacturing Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar --Wind...

45

MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.9828,"lon":-91.7994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6224,"lon":-71.2153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

49

MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7883,"lon":-141.198,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage This field indicates the stage of development/deployment that technologies, which are undergoing partial or full-scale device testing, are currently in. Contents 1 TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering 2 TRL 4: Proof of Concept 3 TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration 4 TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing, Demonstration, and Operation 5 TRL 9: Commercial-Scale Production / Application TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering The purpose of this stage is to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to

51

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, standard and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This is the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology template. It is designed for use by MHK Technologies Pages. To define an MHK Technology, please use this form. Parameters Image - Associated image file. (optional) Primary Organization - Field def missing! Project(s) where this technology is utilized - Field def missing! Technology Resource - Field def missing! Technology Type - Field def missing! Technology Readiness Level - Field def missing! Technology Description - Field def missing! Designed to Operate with Shore Connection - Field def missing! Power Transfer Method - Field def missing! Water Column Location - Field def missing! Mooring Configuration - Field def missing! Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions - Field def missing!

53

Tidal Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Generation Ltd Address University Gate East Park Row Place Bristol, United Kingdom Zip BS1 5UB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Tidal Generation is developing a 1MW fully submerged tidal turbine to generate electricity from tidal currents in water depths up to 50m. Phone number 4.41E+11 Website http://www.tidalgeneration.co. Coordinates 42.55678°, -88.050449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.55678,"lon":-88.050449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Natural Currents Energy Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Currents Energy Services Natural Currents Energy Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Natural Currents Energy Services Address 24 Roxanne Blvd Place Highland Zip 12528 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 845-691-4008 Website http://www.naturalcurrents.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Avalon Tidal BW2 Tidal Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project Cape May Tidal Energy Cohansey River Tidal Energy Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant Dorchester Maurice Tidal Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project Gastineau Channel Tidal Highlands Tidal Energy Project Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant

56

The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

57

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the

58

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip CF23 8RS Product Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates 51.48125°, -3.180734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.48125,"lon":-3.180734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Platform Test Platform Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Tidal Energy Test Platform Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Offshore Berth Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Tidal Testing Platform is presently a 10.7m long x 3m wide pontoon barge with a derrick and an opening for deploying tidal energy devices. The platform is intentionally configured to be adaptive for the changing needs of different devices. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None

62

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energyâ??s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Programâ??s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrage Barrage < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description No information provided Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 01:04.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Tidal_Barrage&oldid=681672" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

64

International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamic Modeling and Environmental Analysis of Hydrokinetic Energy Extraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The world is facing an imminent energy supply crisis. Our well-being is linked to the energy supply, and energy is in high demand in both (more)

Miller, Veronica Bree

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than 37 million...

67

Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Electric Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW19 8UY Product Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Glossary Technology Glossary (Redirected from Axial Flow Turbine) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

69

UEK Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UEK Corporation UEK Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name UEK Corporation Place Annapolis, Maryland Zip 21403 Sector Hydro, Ocean Product Annapolis-based developer & manufacturer of hydro-kinetic turbines to harness river, tidal and ocean currents. References UEK Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Chitokoloki Project Coal Creek Project Half Moon Cove Tidal Project Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Luangwa Zambia Project Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration Old River Outflow Channel Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project

70

All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community July 24, 2012 - 2:40pm...

71

MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oceana Energy Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Kennebec *MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal

72

Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida  

SciTech Connect

Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Islands of Martha?¢????s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha?¢????s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha?¢????s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

Bruce, Allan J

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-sca

Bruce, Allan J

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database is currently (2009) being updated to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.[Taken from http://www2.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/hydrokinetic/

79

Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis Earth Tidal Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Earth Tidal Analysis Details Activities (6) Areas (4) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir hydraulic parameters. Thermal: Dictionary.png Earth Tidal Analysis: Earth tidal analysis is the measurement of the impact of tidal and barometric fluctuations on effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

80

Some new conceptions in the approach to harnessing tidal energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines a method of converting the energy of ocean tides into electrical and other forms of industrial energy. The main disadvantage of extracting tidal power arises from the low density of tidal power per unit area of the ocean. This leads to the high cost of required investment for the production of a substantial volume of the energy. 10 refs.

Gorlov, A.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kendall Head Tidal Energy Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

84

MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underwater Electric Kite Turbines Underwater Electric Kite Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Underwater Electric Kite Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization UEK Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II *MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project *MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project *MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project *MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration *MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project *MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/UEK Yukon River Project Technology Resource

85

Challenges and Instrumentation Solutions to Understanding the Nature of Tidal Flows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approach to Characterization of Full-Spectrum Approach to Characterization of Full-Spectrum Turbulence Near Current Tidal Energy Devices Presented by Brett Prairie of Rockland Scientific at the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology and Environmental Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop Broomfield, Colorado July 9 - 11, 2012 ©2012 Rockland Scientific Inc. Presentation Agenda ©2012 Rockland Scientific Inc. 1. Introduction & Background 2. The importance of full-spectrum turbulence characterization for current tidal energy project development 3. How non-acoustic measurements can characterize small-scale turbulence near current tidal energy devices 4. Development of a continuous monitoring system to measure full-spectrum turbulence for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

86

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of eddies at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Oceana Energy Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceana Energy Company Oceana Energy Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Oceana Energy Company Place Washington DC, Washington, DC Zip 20036 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product String representation "Oceana Energy C ... ost and impact." is too long. References Oceana Energy Company[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project Kendall Head Tidal Energy Kennebec Penobscot Tidal Energy Project Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project

88

MHK Technologies/TidalStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TidalStar TidalStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage TidalStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The horizontal axis TidalStar device uses a bidirectional twin rotor turbine to produce approximately 50 kW at peak capacity in both ebb and flood tides Technology Dimensions Length (m) 6 Width (m) 6 Freeboard (m) 1 Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 5 Device Testing Date Submitted 46:38.3 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/TidalStar&oldid=681677

89

Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Foreland Tidal Energy East Foreland Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.2223,"lon":-151.905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7778,"lon":-70.8489,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6324,"lon":-132.936,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Astoria Tidal Energy Astoria Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7172,"lon":-73.9703,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cohansey River Tidal Energy Cohansey River Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3829,"lon":-75.2995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Project Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3432,"lon":-73.9977,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8146,"lon":-69.8697,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

MHK Projects/Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.389,"lon":-70.5134,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1008,"lon":-74.0495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5667,"lon":-73.922,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

MHK Projects/Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3501,"lon":-70.3995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Killisnoo Tidal Energy Killisnoo Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.4724,"lon":-134.56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

102

MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2713,"lon":-73.0883,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Project Portugal Tidal Energy Project Portugal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.702,"lon":-9.13445,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penobscot Tidal Energy Project Penobscot Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.5404,"lon":-68.7838,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

105

MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cape May Tidal Energy Cape May Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9668,"lon":-74.963,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salem Tidal Energy Salem Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5739,"lon":-75.5438,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

107

MHK Projects/Angoon Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Angoon Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.5034,"lon":-134.58,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seaflow Tidal Energy System Seaflow Tidal Energy System < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.2353,"lon":-3.8356,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Cook Inlet Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.6893,"lon":-151.437,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

110

MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.1169,"lon":-122.76,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

HYDROKAL: A module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tool for hydrokinetic energy potential assessment in rivers-HYDROKAL, which stands for a ''hydrokinetic calculator''-is presented. This tool was developed in the Fortran 90 programming language as an external module for the CCHE2D application, ... Keywords: Instantaneous power density, Numerical modeling, Resource assessment, Stream

Paul Duvoy; Horacio Toniolo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

Frid, Chris, E-mail: c.l.j.frid@liv.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Andonegi, Eider, E-mail: eandonegi@azti.es [AZTI-Tecnalia, Txatxarramendi ugartea, z/g E-48395 Sukarrieta (Bizkaia) (Spain); Depestele, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.depestele@ilvo.vlaanderen.be [Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Ankerstraat 1, B-8400 Oostende (Belgium); Judd, Adrian, E-mail: Adrian.Judd@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft NR33 0HT United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Rihan, Dominic, E-mail: Dominic.RIHAN@ec.europa.eu [Irish Sea Fisheries Board, P.O. Box 12 Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); Rogers, Stuart I., E-mail: stuart.rogers@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft NR33 0HT United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Kenchington, Ellen, E-mail: Ellen.Kenchington@dfo-mpo.gc.ca [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth Canada, NS B2Y 4A2 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Lunar Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Lunar Energy St David s Peninsula Pembrokeshire South Wales UK *MHK Projects/Lunar Energy Wando Hoenggan Waterway South Korea Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description he Rotech Tidal Turbine (RTT) is a bi-directional horizontal axis turbine housed in a symmetrical venturi duct. The Venturi duct draws the existing ocean currents into the RTT in order to capture and convert energy into electricity. Use of a gravity foundation will allow the RTT to be deployed quickly with little or no seabed preparation at depths in excess of 40 meters. This gives the RTT a distinct advantage over most of its competitors and opens up a potential energy resource that is five times the size of that available to companies using pile foundations.

114

DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy Point absorbers generate electricity by converting the energy in waves using a float that rides the waves and is attached to a moored conversion device. The Department of Energy's Water Power Program Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030, Energy.gov News Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States, Energy Citations Database Georgia Tech's Tidal Energy Resources Database U.S. Renewable Resources Atlas , NREL Tidal energy research in WorldWideScience.org OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services OSTI Facebook OSTI Twitter OSTI Google+ Bookmark and Share (Link will open in a new window) Go to Videos Loading...

115

MHK Technologies/Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Scotrenewables Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Scotrenewables EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine (SRTT) system is a free-floating rotor-based tidal current energy converter. The concept in its present configuration involves dual counter-rotating horizontal axis rotors driving generators within sub-surface nacelles, each suspended from separate keel and rotor arm sections attached to a single surface-piercing cylindrical buoyancy tube. The device is anchored to the seabed via a yoke arrangement. A separate flexible power and control umbilical line connects the device to a subsea junction box. The rotor arm sections are hinged to allow each two-bladed rotor to be retracted so as to be parallel with the longitudinal axis of the buoyancy tube, giving the system a transport draught of less than 4.5m at full-scale to facilitate towing the device into harbors for maintenance.

116

MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stream Stream < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Stream Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Thames at Chiswick Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The TidalStream SST (Semi-Submersible Turbine) is designed for deep water, typically 60m+ (e.g., Pentland Firth) where it is too deep to mount turbines rigidly to the seabed and too rough for surface floaters to survive. Tidal Stream SST consists of turbines connected to unique semi-submersible spar buoys that are moored to the seabed using anchors through swing-arms. This ensures automatic alignment to the tidal flow to maximize energy capture. By blowing the water ballast, the device will rise, rotate, and float to the surface still tethered to the base to allow for on- or off-site maintenance. By releasing the tether arm the device can be towed to a harbor at the end of its life or for major repair or exchange.

117

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Tidal Streams Resource Map. Tidal Streams Resource Assessment The Assessment of the Energy Production from Tidal Streams in the United States report, created by Georgia Tech,...

119

List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 538 Tidal Energy Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-538) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations Connecticut Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Biomass/Biogas

120

MHK Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Projects MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Click one of the following Marine Hydrokinetic Projects for more information: Loading... 40MW Lewis project ADM 3 ADM 4 ADM 5 AW Energy EMEC AWS II Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Agucadoura Alaska 1 Alaska 13 Alaska 17 Alaska 18 Alaska 24 Alaska 25 Alaska 28 Alaska 31 Alaska 33 Alaska 35 Alaska 36 Alaska 7 Algiers Cutoff Project Algiers Light Project Amity Point Anconia Point Project Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Aquantis Project Ashley Point Project Astoria Tidal Energy Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Avalon Tidal Avondale Bend Project BW2 Tidal Bar Field Bend Barfield Point Bayou Latenache Belair Project Belleville BioSTREAM Pilot Plant Bluemill Sound Bondurant Chute Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources July 7, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology Mike Reed Water Power Program Manager, Water Power Program Tidal energy -- a renewable, predictable resource available up and down America's coastlines -- holds great promise for clean energy generation. And now, a first of its kind database gives researchers deeper insight into the potential of this energy resource for the United States.

122

The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified for small tidal excursion over a near-critical continental slope. A theoretical framework for low-wavenumber energy transfer is derived from flat bottom vertical modes ...

Samuel M. Kelly; Jonathan D. Nash; Kim I. Martini; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KESC Tidal Generator KESC Tidal Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage KESC Tidal Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kinetic Energy Systems Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Newfound Harbor Project Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Generator is based on free flow hydrodynamics for regions that have flood and ebb tides. Strategically attached to bridges, pilings, river, channel, or sea bottoms, this multi-directional generator contains two sets of turbine blades. As the tide flows inward the inward turbine blades opens to maximum rotor diameter while the outward turbine closes into the outward cone-shaped hub to create a hydro dynamically clean surface for water to flow without drag. The center diameter is 75% of the diameter of the turbine blades at full rotor extension for stability.

124

MHK Technologies/Tidal Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aquascientific Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Turbine is positioned by anchoring and cabling Energy extraction from flow that is transverse to the rotation axis Turbines utilize both lift and drag Mooring Configuration Gravity base although other options are currently being explored Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10/8/2010

125

MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delay Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Delay utilizes an existing natural land formation such as a peninsula or isthmus that creates a natural tidal barrier separating moving rising and falling bodies of seawater As the seawater on each side of the natural barrier rises and falls the device captures the energy resulting from the difference in water levels across the barrier using proven hydroelectric technology The device utilizes a standard impulse turbine installed in siphon pipe over under the natural barrier

126

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators THG Generators THG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Ramsey Sound Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system, involving relatively small revolving blades which gather power to a central collector, where electricity is generated. The generator, which is situated under water, is 80 metres square, stands at 15 metres high, and is designed to run for a minimum of ten years without service.

127

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal 6 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy August 29, 2013 - 2:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides and currents. Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the surrounding environment. "Wave and tidal energy represent a large, untapped resource for the United States and responsible development of this clean, renewable energy

129

Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal 6 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies August 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Image of machinery to generate energy using tides. As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides, and currents. Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the surrounding environment. "Wave and tidal energy represent a large, untapped resource for the United

130

Property:Project Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Resource Project Resource Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Resource Property Type Text Pages using the property "Project Resource" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Wave MHK Projects/AWS II + Wave MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Wave MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Alaska 35 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + Current /Tidal

131

MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.4072,"lon":-122.643,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Public Utility District No 1 of Snohomish County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District No 1 of Snohomish County District No 1 of Snohomish County Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Utility District No 1 of Snohomish County Address 2320 California Street PO Box 1107 Place Everett Zip 98206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 425-783-1825 Website http://www.snopud.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from

133

Hydrokinetic Oscillators for Energy Harvesting via Coupling Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) and Electromagnetics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sustainable energy generation has received a great deal of interest recently because the presence of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is at an unprecedented high. (more)

Hudzik II, Alan Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Definition: Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View...

135

Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Georgia Tech Savannah Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.tidalstreampower.gatech.edu/ Country: United States Web Application Link: www.tidalstreampower.gatech.edu/ Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 32.167482°, -81.212405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.167482,"lon":-81.212405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project July 24, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Today, Energy Secretary Steven Chu recognized the nation's first commercial, grid-connected tidal energy project off the coast of Eastport, Maine. Leveraging a $10 million investment from the Energy Department, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) will deploy its first commercial tidal energy device into Cobscook Bay this summer. The project, which injected $14 million into the local economy and has supported more than 100 local and supply chain jobs, represents the first tidal energy project in the United States with long-term contracts to sell electricity

137

Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

Nelson, E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine) Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine) Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection State regulation of tidal and wave energy projects is covered under the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA), and complements

143

NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and...

144

MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep Gen Tidal Turbines Deep Gen Tidal Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Gen Tidal Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The DEEP Gen 1 MW fully submerged tidal turbine best exploits resources in depths 30m The horizontal axis turbine is inexpensive to construct and easy to install due to the lightweight 80 tons MW support structure allows rapid removal and replacement of powertrains enabling safe maintenance in a dry environment and is located out of the wave zone for improved survivability

145

MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Korea East West Power Co LTD Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description The tidal current power plant uses current energy that can be differentiated from a typical tidal power plant using marine energy The latter confines water in a dam and when released it gets processed in a turbine to produce electric power The tidal current power plant on the other hand does not need a dam thus concerns of social dislocations and degradation of ecosystems primarily endangering marine life can be avoided

146

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

147

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment May 4, 2012 - 12:11pm Addthis Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? ORPC will deploy cross flow turbine devices in Cobscook Bay, at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. These devices are designed to generate electricity over a range of

148

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment May 4, 2012 - 12:11pm Addthis Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? ORPC will deploy cross flow turbine devices in Cobscook Bay, at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. These devices are designed to generate electricity over a range of

149

MHK Technologies/Tidal Sails | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sails Sails < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Sails.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Sails AS Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Sails device is a series of underwater sails affixed to wires strung across the tidal stream at an angle The sails are driven back and forth by the tidal flow between two stations at one of which the generator is installed Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 26:04.6 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Tidal_Sails&oldid=681675

150

MHK Technologies/Tidal Lagoons | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Lagoons Tidal Lagoons < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Lagoons.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Electric Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Dandong City *MHK Projects/Swansea Bay Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description idal Lagoons are situated a mile or more offshore in high tidal range areas, and use a rubble mound impoundment structure and low-head hydroelectric bulb turbines. Shallow tidal flats provide the most economical sites. Multi-cell Tidal Lagoons provide higher load factors (about 62%) and have the flexibility to shape the output curve in order to dispatch power in response to demand price signals. The impoundment structure is a conventional rubble mound breakwater (loose rock, concrete, and marine sheetpiles are among the types of appropriate materials for the impoundment structure), with ordinary performance specifications and is built from the most economical materials. The barrage is much shorter than an impoundment structure with the same output capacity, but the barrage is a much larger structure. The offshore tidal generator uses conventional low-head hydroelectric generation equipment and control systems. The equipment consists of a mixed-flow reversible bulb turbine, a generator, and the control system. Manufacturers/suppliers include Alstom, GE, Kvaerner, Siemens, Voith, Sulzer, and others.

151

Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial ... raw materials suggests the need for elimination of these materials from electric motors ...

152

Tidal Energy Dissipation at the Sill of Sechelt Inlet, British Columbia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy budget of a tidally active, shallow silled fjord is discussed. Constriction of the flow over the shallow sill causes a reduction in tidal amplitude and a phase lag across the sill. A generalized expression for the total power extracted ...

Scott W. Tinis; Stephen Pond

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reynolds Stress and Turbulent Energy Production in a Tidal Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-frequency (1.2 MHz) acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) moored on the seabed has been used to observe the mean and turbulent flow components in a narrow tidally energetic channel over six tidal cycles at neap and spring tides. The ...

Tom P. Rippeth; Eirwen Williams; John H. Simpson

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

MHK Technologies/MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Morild 2 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description Hydra Tidal´s Morild II tidal power plant technology at-a-glance: - A unique and patented floating tidal power plant - Prototype has an installed effect of 1,5 MW - Turbine diameter of 23 meters - Each turbine is pitchable - 4 turbines with a total of 8 turbine blades - Unique wooden turbine blades - The MORILD II can be anchored at different depths, thus it can be positioned in spots with ideal tidal stream conditions - The plant carries a sea vessel verification, and is both towable and dockable - The floating installation enables maintenance in surface position, and on site - The MORILD II will be remotely operated, and has on-shore surveillance systems - Technology patented for all relevant territories The Morild power plant is a floating, moored construction based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents. The 4 turbines transmit power via hydraulic transmission to 2 synchronous generators. Can be pitched 180 degrees to utilize energy in both directions. A cable from the transformer on the prototype to shore transfers energy.

156

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. Risk has two components: (1) The likelihood, or probability, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential consequence if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, consequence, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

548: Categorical Exclusion Determination 548: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal Marine Hydrokinetic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Davis, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of California, Davis (UCD) is proposing to use Department of Energy funding for computer modeling to improve the design of the bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT) for tidal marine hydrokinetic applications. The BRTT design, an already established and commercially applied technology, has disadvantages. Although the simpler design reduces energy costs, without pitch-adjustment and optimally cambered blades, the BRTT rotor is relatively inefficient. UCD is proposing to recapture some of

158

MHK Technologies/Jiangxia Tidal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiangxia Tidal Power Station Jiangxia Tidal Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Jiangxia Tidal Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization China Guodian Corporation Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description There are 6 bulb turbine generator units operating in both ebb and flood tides with a total installed capacity up to 3 9 MW Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 3 9 Device Testing Date Submitted 14:15.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Jiangxia_Tidal_Power_Station&oldid=681601

159

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to tidal and barometric effects to tidal and barometric effects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River,

160

MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsea tidal turbine subsea tidal turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description It is characterised by a turbine configuration on the seafloor, without impinging on the surface. These turbines are stabilised by gravity and/or are anchored according to the nature of the seafloor. They are pre-orientated in the direction of the tidal currents, and the profile of their symmetrical blades helps to capture the ebb and flow. The rotor activated, at slow speeds (10 to 15 rpm), by the tides powers a generator, which exports the electricity produced to the coast via a submarine cable anchored and embedded at its landfall.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stream Turbine Stream Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization StatoilHydro co owned by Hammerfest Strong Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A fully operational 300kW prototype tidal turbine has been running in Norway since 2003 and has achieved good results It s the world s first tidal turbine to supply electricity directly to the onshore grid In the autumn of 2008 Hammerfest Str�m signed an intention agreement with Scottish Power to further develop tidal technology in the UK A 1 MW turbine is currently under development

162

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University?¢????s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay 16: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 19, 2012 EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot

164

A Study of Tidal Energy Dissipation and Bottom Stress in an Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Method for inferring an area-averaged bottom stress and energy dissipation rate in a tidal estuarine channel is presented. The one-dimensional continuity and momentum relations are developed using simplifying assumptions appropriate for a well-...

Wendell S. Brown; Richard P. Trask

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Abyssal Penetration and Bottom Reflection of Internal Tidal Energy in the Bay of Biscay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes field observations in the Bay of Biscay, and presents convincing evidence for the existence of a broad beam of internal tidal energy propagating downward from a source region on the upper continental slopes, which, after ...

R. D. Pingree; A. L. New

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay 1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 19, 2012 EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot

167

CX-002145: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

145: Categorical Exclusion Determination 145: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, A9 Date: 04/29/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) is proposing to use Department of Energy and cost-share funding to study of the acoustic effects of hydrokinetic tidal turbines at the site of the District's Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Activities would include the purchase and configuration of instrumentation, the deployment and retrieval of the instrumentation packages on the seabed, the simulation and measurement of sound propagation by a tidal turbine, and experimentation (conducted at

168

CX-006029: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6029: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6029: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006029: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.3, B3.6 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) is proposing to use Department of Energy and cost-share funding to study of the acoustic effects of hydrokinetic tidal turbines at the site of the District's Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Activities would include the purchase and configuration of instrumentation, the deployment and retrieval of the instrumentation packages on the seabed, the simulation and measurement of sound propagation by a tidal turbine, and experimentation (conducted at

169

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Energy generated by the worlds oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal stream energy is one of the alternative energy sources that are renewable and clean. With the constantly increasing effort in promoting alternative energy, tidal streams have become one of the more promising energy sources due to their continuous, predictable and spatially-concentrated characteristics. However, the present lack of a full spatial-temporal assessment of tidal currents for the U.S. coastline down to the scale of individual devices is a barrier to the comprehensive development of tidal current energy technology. This project created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speed and water level surface. The performance of the model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed with an independent validation. The geodatabase is published at a public domain via a spatial database engine and interactive tools to select, query and download the data are provided. Regions with the maximum of the average kinetic power density larger than 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth larger than 5 m are defined as hotspots and list of hotspots along the USA coast is documented. The results of the regional assessment show that the state of Alaska (AK) contains the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, and is followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL). The average tidal stream power density at some of these locations can be larger than 8 kW/m2 with surface areas on the order of few hundred kilometers squared, and depths larger than 100 meters. The Cook Inlet in AK is found to have a substantially large tidal stream power density sustained over a very large area.

Haas, Kevin A.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

MHK Projects/Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.5343,"lon":-123.017,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.4133,"lon":-135.737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7639,"lon":-73.9466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

MHK Projects/Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Narrows Tidal Energy Project Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.2591,"lon":-122.445,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Islands Tidal Energy Project Islands Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4833,"lon":-70.7578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Project Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.3378,"lon":-151.875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1081,"lon":-70.7776,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

MHK Projects/San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.5896,"lon":-123.012,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2379,"lon":-72.0599,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

MHK Projects/Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.5341,"lon":-123.013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.3378,"lon":-151.875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3638,"lon":-70.2766,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.691,"lon":-122.311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

184

MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7686,"lon":-70.5651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0453,"lon":-72.3748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

186

MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1674,"lon":-72.218,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

187

Effects of Localized Energy Extraction in an Idealized, Energetically Complete Numerical Model of an Ocean-Estuary Tidal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

localized energy extraction in an localized energy extraction in an idealized, energetically complete numerical model of an ocean-estuary tidal system MHK Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop, Broomfield CO, July 10 2012 Mitsuhiro Kawase and Marisa Gedney Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center / School of Oceanography University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 United States * Far-field (Estuary-wide) - Changes in the tidal range - Changes in tidal currents  Near-field (Vicinity of the Device)  Flow redirection  Interaction with marine life  Impact on bottom sediments and benthos Environmental Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction * Reduction in tidal range can permanently expose/submerge tidal flats, altering nearshore habitats * Reduction in kinetic energy of

188

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Margate Tidal Margate Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3793,"lon":-74.4384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dorchester Maurice Tidal Dorchester Maurice Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3262,"lon":-74.938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Orient Point Tidal Orient Point Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0748,"lon":-72.9461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gastineau Channel Tidal Gastineau Channel Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.295,"lon":-134.407,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

MHK Projects/Paimpol Brehat tidal farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paimpol Brehat tidal farm Paimpol Brehat tidal farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.869,"lon":-2.98546,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

194

MHK Projects/Turnagain Arm Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turnagain Arm Tidal Turnagain Arm Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.3378,"lon":-151.875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lubec Narrows Tidal Lubec Narrows Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8652,"lon":-66.9828,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treat Island Tidal Treat Island Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maurice River Tidal Maurice River Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3261,"lon":-74.9379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

198

MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BW2 Tidal BW2 Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3264,"lon":-74.9336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avalon Tidal Avalon Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1068,"lon":-74.7463,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community July 24, 2012 - 2:40pm Addthis Captain Gerald "Gerry" Morrison, Vice President of Perry Marine & Consctruction. | Photo Courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Captain Gerald "Gerry" Morrison, Vice President of Perry Marine & Consctruction. | Photo Courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Today in Eastport, Maine, people are gathering to celebrate a project that will harness the power of the massive tides of Cobscook Bay to generate clean electricity. At a public dedication event this afternoon, Portland-based Ocean Renewable

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201

Area Solar energy production BACKGROUND -All renewable energies, except for geothermal and tidal, derive their energy from the sun. By harnessing the power of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Area Solar energy production ­ BACKGROUND - All renewable energies installations. Advantages: · A renewable form of energy - "Locks up" carbon, except for geothermal and tidal, derive their energy from the sun

Keinan, Alon

202

Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

204

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-57605 February 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WA09.3406

205

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

Kropp, Roy K.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

207

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Tidal Stream Energy Conversion Devices * Ocean Energy - HydroKinetic Energy - Marine Energy Terminology 4 Terminology: HydroKinetic * Hydro Greek word for water (hydor) *...

208

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Comparison of Tidal Conversion Parameterizations for Tidal Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conversion of barotropic to baroclinic tidal energy in the global abyssal ocean is calculated using three different formulations. The calculations are done both offline, that is, using externally given tidal currents to estimate the energy ...

J. A. Mattias Green; Jonas Nycander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 22020 of 29,416 results. 11 - 22020 of 29,416 results. Download CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal Marine Hydrokinetic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Davis, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004548-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004529: Categorical Exclusion Determination Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/29/2010 Location(s): Anchorage, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004529-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

211

NREL Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uses Computing Power to Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have applied their knowledge of wind flow and turbulence to simulations of underwater tidal turbines. Inspired by similar simulations of wind turbine arrays, NREL researchers used their wind expertise, a supercomputer, and large-eddy simulation to study how the placement of turbines affects the power production of an underwater tidal turbine array. As tides ebb and flow, they create water currents that carry a significant amount of kinetic energy. To capture this energy, several companies are developing and deploying devices known as horizontal-axis tidal turbines, which resemble small wind turbines. These devices can be arranged in an array of multiple turbines to maximize the energy extracted in tidal

212

Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 ?Pa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 ?Pa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

213

MHK Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Click one of the following Marine Hydrokinetic Technologies for more information: Loading... 14 MW OTECPOWER Aegir Dynamo AirWEC Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine AquaBuoy Aquanator Aquantis Archimedes Wave Swing Atlantis AN 150 Atlantis AR 1000 Atlantis AS 400 Atlantisstrom BOLT Lifesaver Benkatina Turbine Blue Motion Energy marine turbine Bluetec Brandl Generator C Plane C Wave C5 CETO Wave Energy Technology Centipod Closed Cycle OTEC CoRMaT Cross Flow Turbine Current Catcher Current Electric Generator Current Power CurrentStar DEXA Wave Converter Davidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Deep Gen Tidal Turbines Deep Green Deep Ocean Water Application Facility DOWAF Deep Water Pipelines Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine

214

Verdant Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdant Power Verdant Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Verdant Power Place New York, New York Zip 10044 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product A systems integrator and a developer of free-flow turbine systems that generates utility and village scale electric power from natural underwater currents. References Verdant Power[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Cornwall Ontario River Energy CORE Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Kinetic Hydropower System KHPS This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Verdant Power is a company located in New York, New York .

215

Market Acceleration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Photo of several men on a floating platform that is lowering monitoring tools into the ocean. The Water Power Program works to foster a commercial market for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices in order to achieve its goal of the nation obtaining 15% of its electricity needs from all types of water power by 2030. Though marine and hydrokinetic energy is still in its infancy, the program is developing a robust portfolio of projects to accelerate wave, tidal and current project deployments and development of the MHK market in general. These projects include project siting activities, market assessments, environmental impact analyses, and research supporting technology commercialization. Learn more about the Water Power Program's work in the following areas of

216

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area(1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Notes Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters. References Hanson, J. M. (29 May 1980) Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects

217

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5561: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5561: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Support for Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Projects CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/06/2011 Location(s): New Hampshire Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Scientific Solutions, Incorporated (SSI) is proposing to use Department of Energy and cost-share funding to further advance its existing Swimmer Detection Sonar Network (SDSN) system in a joint effort with Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) to fully develop, Integrate, test, and operate a full-scale active acoustic monitoring system for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) and other offshore renewable energy projects; specifically for monitoring the region surrounding a tidal turbine. The

219

Novel approach to the exploitation of tidal energy. Volume I. Summary and discussion, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program is the development of the hydropneumatic concept in the approach to harnessing low-head tidal hydropower. The approach is based on converting the energy of water flow into the energy of an air jet by means of a specialized air chamber which is placed on the ocean floor across a flowing watercourse. Water passes through the chamber where it works as a natural piston compressing air in the upper part of the closure. Then, compressed air is used as a new working plenum to drive air turbines. The kinetic energy of an air jet provided by the air chamber is sufficient for stable operation of industrial air turbines. Also, because of the absence of the power turbogenerators in the dam body and because of decreased water pressure (two-meter head, or even less) it becomes possible to use light plastic barriers instead of conventional rigid dams (the water sail concept). Figures presented confirmed that the proposed concept can result in a less expensive and more effective tidal power plant project than the conventional hydroturbine approach. The scale of the power installation actually does not affect the economic characteristics.

Gorlov, A.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Maine Maritime Academy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Academy Academy Jump to: navigation, search Name Maine Maritime Academy Address Engineering Department Pleasant Street Place Castine Zip 4420 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 207-326-2365 Website http://http://www.mainemaritim Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Castine Harbor Badaduce Narrows Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Maine_Maritime_Academy&oldid=678366" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Modeling the Limits and Effects of Energy?Extraction from Tidal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agree well with analytical solution by Garrett & Cummins (2004, 2005) Extractable Max Power Function of (tidal amplitude, volume flux) P model 2,154 MW; P analytical ...

225

Earth Tidal Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80) 80) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Notes Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

226

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Data Marine & Hydrokinetic Data This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge,

227

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To estimate subsurface fracture orientation based on an analysis of solid earth tidal strains. Notes A new practical method has been developed. The tidal strain fracture orientation technique is a passive method which has no depth limitation. The orientation of either natural or hydraulically stimulated fractures can be measured using either new or old static observation wells. Estimates for total compressibility and areal interconnected porosity can also be developed for reservoirs with matrix permeability using a combination of

228

Maryland | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic,...

229

EA-1916: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1916: Draft Environmental Assessment Hydropower Project Pilot License, Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project-FERC Project No. 12711-005 On September 1, 2011, Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC (ORPC Maine) filed an application for an 8-year pilot license to construct and operate its proposed Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project (Cobscook Bay Project or project). The 300-kilowatt (kW) hydrokinetic project would be located in Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine. The project would not be located on federal lands. The proposed Cobscook Bay Project would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture

230

Green Energy Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Industries Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.gecorpusa.co Region United States...

231

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

232

Spectral Estimates of Gravity Wave Energy and Momentum Fluxes. Part III: Gravity Wave-Tidal Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An application of the gravity wave parameterization scheme developed in the companion papers by Fritts and VanZandt and Fritts and Lu to the mutual interaction of gravity waves and tidal motions is presented. The results suggest that interaction ...

Wentong Lu; David C. Fritts

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

MHK Technologies/Sihwa tidal barrage power plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sihwa tidal barrage power plant Sihwa tidal barrage power plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sihwa tidal barrage power plant.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description Sihwa TBPP operates only on flood tide generation which produces electrical power during the flood tide the water is discharged back from basin to sea during ebb tide Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 254 Device Testing Date Submitted 59:41.3 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sihwa_tidal_barrage_power_plant&oldid=681654

234

Overland Tidal Power Generation Using Modular Tidal Prism  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring sites with sufficient kinetic energy suitable for tidal power generation with sustained currents > 1 to 2 m/s are relatively rare. Yet sites with greater than 3 to 4 m of tidal range are relatively common around the U.S. coastline. Tidal potential does exist along the shoreline but is mostly distributed, and requires an approach which allows trapping and collection to also be conducted in a distributed manner. In this paper we examine the feasibility of generating sustainable tidal power using multiple nearshore tidal energy collection units and present the Modular Tidal Prism (MTP) basin concept. The proposed approach utilizes available tidal potential by conversion into tidal kinetic energy through cyclic expansion and drainage from shallow modular manufactured overland tidal prisms. A preliminary design and configuration of the modular tidal prism basin including inlet channel configuration and basin dimensions was developed. The unique design was shown to sustain momentum in the penstocks during flooding as well as ebbing tidal cycles. The unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to subject the proposed design to a number of sensitivity tests and to optimize the size, shape and configuration of MTP basin for peak power generation capacity. The results show that an artificial modular basin with a reasonable footprint (? 300 acres) has the potential to generate 10 to 20 kw average energy through the operation of a small turbine located near the basin outlet. The potential of generating a total of 500 kw to 1 MW of power through a 20 to 40 MTP basin tidal power farms distributed along the coastline of Puget Sound, Washington, is explored.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Maryland | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit (Personal) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid...

237

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

238

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New hydrokinetic energy technologies that generate electricity by harnessing the energy from ocean waves, tides, and river currents are advancing toward commercial ...

239

CFC Photo Gallery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power Science Lecture: Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101:...

240

MHK Technologies/NAREC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAREC NAREC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage NAREC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization NaRec New and Renewable Energy Centre Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The in house engineering and prototype testing capabilities of Narec are assisting wave and tidal stream marine developers move their innovative design concepts towards commercialisation Where the Evopod was tested Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 04:07.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/NAREC&oldid=681614" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from

244

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a...

245

Hydro Alternative Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Energy Alternative Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydro Alternative Energy Place Boca Raton, Florida Zip 33486 Sector Ocean Product Marine project developer focusing on ocean current and tidal power development using underwater turbines. References Hydro Alternative Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Oceanus This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hydro Alternative Energy is a company located in Boca Raton, Florida . References ↑ "Hydro Alternative Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydro_Alternative_Energy&oldid=678899

246

Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:greenwaveenergyc Region United States...

247

Renewable Portfolio Standard (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or waste from agricultural crops, food or vegetative material, energy crops, algae, biogas, liquid biofuels;** marine or hydrokinetic energy; and geothermal energy....

248

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

250

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2010 30, 2010 CX-004631: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Turlock CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Turlock, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004630: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Tulare CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Tulare, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal Marine Hydrokinetic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Davis, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 29, 2010 CX-004555: Categorical Exclusion Determination

251

Earth Tidal Analysis At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is

252

MHK Projects/Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8028,"lon":-69.7833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4468,"lon":-69.6933,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

MHK Projects/Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.3781,"lon":-3.43597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ward s Island Tidal Power Project Ward s Island Tidal Power Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7818,"lon":-73.9316,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.7161,"lon":-124.038,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project Half Moon Cove Tidal Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9062,"lon":-66.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit (Corporate) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid...

260

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

262

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

263

Category:Sectors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biomass Buildings C Carbon E Efficiency G Geothermal energy H Hydro Hydrogen M Marine and Hydrokinetic O Ocean R Renewable Energy S Services Solar V Vehicles W...

264

Alison Labonte | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alison Labonte About Us Alison Labonte - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22...

265

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies Available for ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portalto someone ...

267

User:GregZiebold/Sector test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

types for Companies: Bioenergy Biofuels Biomass Buildings Carbon Efficiency Geothermal energy Hydro Hydrogen Marine and Hydrokinetic Ocean Renewable Energy Services Vehicles...

268

Measurement of the Rates of Production and Dissipation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Energetic Tidal Flow: Red Wharf Bay Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of the rates of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation (?) and production (P) have been made over a period of 24 h at a tidally energetic site in the northern Irish Sea in water of 25-m depth. Some ? profiles from 5 ...

Tom P. Rippeth; John H. Simpson; Eirwen Williams; Mark E. Inall

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 16860 of 26,764 results. 51 - 16860 of 26,764 results. Download CX-006240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006240-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003541: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Wind Turbine CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Rutland, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003541-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Energy Exploration Study CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7

270

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02042013...

271

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Support for Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Projects CX(s)...

272

FEMP Renewable Energy Project Assistance Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considered (select all that apply) Solar PV Solar (other) Wind Biomass Incremental Hydro Hydrokinetic Ocean Geothermal Waste-to-energy Other: ...

273

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2011 25, 2011 CX-006029: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.3, B3.6 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 25, 2011 CX-006015: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - Iowa-City-Cedar Rapids CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Cedar Rapids, Iowa Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 25, 2011 CX-006006: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): The Dalles, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

274

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 21530 of 29,416 results. 21 - 21530 of 29,416 results. Download CX-000900: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Cost for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power in the United States over Time CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/25/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000900-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000904: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydropower from Wastewater CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 02/25/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000904-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

275

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization By: Jacques Beaudry-Losique, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy

277

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 20350 of 28,560 results. 41 - 20350 of 28,560 results. Download CX-000280: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smoking Shelters CX(s) Applied: B1.5 Date: 11/09/2009 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000280-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oregon - Tribe - Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/26/2010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006355-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, A9 Date: 04/29/2010

278

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 CX-006240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 15, 2011 CX-006238: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Post-Installation Monitoring Capabilities CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 15, 2011 CX-006228: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Dufur and Hanna-Cantrell CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Dufur, Oregon

279

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2011 15, 2011 CX-006240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 15, 2011 CX-006238: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Post-Installation Monitoring Capabilities CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 14, 2011 Team Massachusetts' Project Manager Spencer Culhane puts the finishing touches on the team's design model. | Courtesy of the Team Massachusetts Flickr photostream Team Massachusetts Brings a Fourth Dimension to the Solar Decathlon Team Massachusetts is bringing a unique perspective to the Solar Decathlon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects  

SciTech Connect

To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DoE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights next steps to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major show-stopper, largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations - A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations. - A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research

Sharon Kramer, Mirko Previsic, Peter Nelson, Sheri Woo

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2010 30, 2010 CX-004632: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Visalia CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Visalia, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004630: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Tulare CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Tulare, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal Marine Hydrokinetic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Davis, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 30, 2010 CX-004582: Categorical Exclusion Determination

283

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2010 30, 2010 CX-004630: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Tulare CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Tulare, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada- Tribe- Walker River Paiute Tribe CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004548: Categorical Exclusion Determination Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal Marine Hydrokinetic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Davis, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 30, 2010 CX-004582: Categorical Exclusion Determination

284

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5021 5021 August 2009 Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors D. Sale University of Tennessee J. Jonkman and W. Musial National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the ASME 28 th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Honolulu, Hawaii May 31-June 5, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

285

MHK Technologies/Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Ocean < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydro Green Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Alaska 35 *MHK Projects/Maine 1 Project *MHK Projects/Mississippi 6 *MHK Projects/Mississippi 7 *MHK Projects/New York 1 *MHK Projects/New York 2 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description Hydro Green Energy's HydroKinetic Turbine Arrays operate differently than a traditional hydropower plant. Like a traditional hydropower station, the electricity that we produce is clean and renewable, however, there are significant differences. Hydro Green Energy's Krouse Turbines are kinetic turbines. This means that the renewable power that is generated comes from the energy in the "motion" of the moving water, i.e. the velocity of the moving water be it river, tidal or ocean current to generate river, tidal energy or ocean energy, respectively.

286

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The projects scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industrys development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

CX-004532: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

532: Categorical Exclusion Determination 532: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2010 Location(s): Piscataway, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Sunlight Photonics is proposing to use Department of Energy funding to design, build and test a proof-of-concepts (Technology Readiness Level 4) model-scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) on-shore power generation system with no high-ratio gears or submerged electronics. Funding would also be used to collect and report the data to be used toward full-scale implementation of the MHK system. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004532.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001727: Categorical Exclusion Determination

290

FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

Driscoll, F.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

292

Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Wave Energy Centre Address Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place Lisboa Zip 1000-201 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number (+351) 21...

293

Tidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative flux of internal wave energy (the tidal conversion) powered by the oscillating flow of a uniformly stratified fluid over a two-dimensional submarine ridge is computed using an integral-equation method. The problem is characterized ...

Franois Ptrlis; Stefan Llewellyn Smith; W. R. Young

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM PROGRAM � 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report March 1, 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

296

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brown University - Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems Program or Field Office:Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy (ARPA-E) Location(s) (City/County/State): Providence, Rl Proposed Action Description: Funding will support efforts to develop a cyber-physical hydrofoil, an oscillating, underwater wing coupled with adaptive control software to capture energy from flowing water in rivers and tidal basins. Project tasks will be conducted in dedicated university laboratory, testing, and office facilities at Brown University in accordance with university materials/waste management protocols and pursuant to applicable Federal, State, and local regulatory requirements. No outdoor field testing will occur in this project.

298

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tidal heating and tidal evolution in the solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we examine the effects of tidal dissipation on solid bodies in application and in theory. First, we study the effects of tidal heating and tidal evolution in the Saturnian satellite system. We constrain the ...

Meyer, Jennifer Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Property:ProjectTechnology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectTechnology ProjectTechnology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ProjectTechnology Property Type Page Has Default form Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Pages using the property "ProjectTechnology" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + MHK Technologies/Oyster + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + MHK Technologies/Wavebob + MHK Projects/ADM 4 + MHK Technologies/Wavebob + MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + MHK Technologies/Wave Roller + MHK Projects/Alaska 35 + MHK Technologies/Ocean +, MHK Technologies/Kensington + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + MHK Technologies/RED HAWK + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + MHK Technologies/bioSTREAM + MHK Projects/Bluemill Sound + MHK Technologies/Exim + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + MHK Technologies/SmarTurbine +

302

Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company LLC Address 505 Fifth Ave 800 Place Des Moines Zip 50309-2426 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2011 Phone number (515) 246-1500 Region United States...

303

Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Ltd Address 3 Casement Square Place Cobh Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 00353-21-4816779 Website http:www.oceanenergy.ie Region Ireland LinkedIn...

304

Renewable Energy Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Research Address 2113 C Boulevard St Regis Place Dollard des Ormeaux Zip H9B 2M9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

305

Wave Energy Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Energy Technologies Inc Address 270 Sandy Cove Rd Place Ketch Harbour Zip B3V 1K9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:...

306

EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine Based on the Final Environmental Assessment, DOE has determined that authorizing the expenditirure of federal funding to ORPC Maine to build, install, operate, and monitor a commercial-scale arry of five grid-connected TidGenTM hydrokinetic energy conversion devices on the sea floor in Cobscook Bay does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the context of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1916-FONSI-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1916: Final Environmental Assessment

307

EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine Based on the Final Environmental Assessment, DOE has determined that authorizing the expenditirure of federal funding to ORPC Maine to build, install, operate, and monitor a commercial-scale arry of five grid-connected TidGenTM hydrokinetic energy conversion devices on the sea floor in Cobscook Bay does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the context of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1916-FONSI-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1916: Notice of Availability of a Finding of No Significant Impact

308

Tidal Response in Estuaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new general theory has been developed to determine both the tidal response of estuaries and the effects of cross-channel tidal barriers on this response. The theory is shown to be widely applicable and provides a connecting framework against ...

D. Prandle; M. Rahman

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.owwe.net Region Norway LinkedIn Connections...

310

Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.ocees.com Region United States LinkedIn...

311

NREL Developing Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. (2012). "A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines." Accepted by Proceedings of the...

312

Bourne Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bourne Energy Bourne Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bourne Energy Name Bourne Energy Address Box 2761 Place Malibu, California Zip 90265 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product River, tidal, wave and ocean current power systems Year founded 2005 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 310-456-8112 Website http://www.bourneenergy.com/ Coordinates 34.0050079°, -118.8100893° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0050079,"lon":-118.8100893,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

US DEPARl'lIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARl'lIIENT OF ENERGY DEPARl'lIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT: Snohomish County PUD PROJECf TITLE: Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines Page 1 on STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000069 DE-EEOOO2654 GFQ-0002654-OO2 0 Based on my review orlhe Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authori1.ed under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX ANO NUMBER: Description: B3.3 Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly related to the conservation of fish or wildlife resources and that involve only negligible habitat destruction or population reduction

314

IEC 61400-25 protocol based monitoring and control protocol for tidal current power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy and tidal current power have a common operation principle. Tidal current power converts kinetic energy of fluid to electric power. The communication infrastructure is very important to control the system and to monitor the working conditions ... Keywords: IEC 61400-25, monitoring, remote control, tidal current power

Jung Woo Kim; Hong Hee Lee

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w

Kropp, Roy K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hawaii Ocean Current Resources and Tidal Turbine Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in converting the kinetic energy of ocean current and tidal flow into electrical power has increased in recent years. This report focuses on the ocean current resource in Hawaii, which includes tidal flows as well as uni-directional oceanic current flows around the main Hawaiian Islands, with the exception of Kauai, from the shoreline to approximately the 2000-m depth contour.

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Property:Project(s) where this technology is utilized | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project(s) where this technology is utilized Project(s) where this technology is utilized Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project(s) where this technology is utilized Property Type Page Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Pages using the property "Project(s) where this technology is utilized" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/AirWEC + MHK Projects/Ocean Trials Ver 2 + MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy + MHK Projects/Figueira da Foz Portugal +, MHK Projects/Humboldt County Wave Project +, MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project +, ... MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing + MHK Projects/AWS II +, MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + MHK Projects/Gujarat + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + MHK Projects/Castine Harbor Badaduce Narrows +, MHK Projects/Gujarat +, MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC +

319

Implementation of control system for hydrokinetic energy converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Uppsala University, a research group is investigating a system for converting the power in freely flowing water using a verticalaxis turbine directly connected to a permanent magnet generator. An experimental setup comprising a turbine, a generator, ...

Katarina Yuen, Senad Apelfrjd, Mats Leijon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Turbulence Characteristics in a Tidal Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A broadband ADCP and a moored microstructure instrument (TAMI) were deployed in a tidal channel of 30-m depth and with peak speeds of 1 m s?1. The measurements enable us to derive profiles of stress, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), the rate of ...

Youyu Lu; Rolf G. Lueck; Daiyan Huang

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tidal Venuses: Triggering a Climate Catastrophe via Tidal Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally stellar radiation has been the only heat source considered capable of determining global climate on long timescales. Here we show that terrestrial exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars may be tidally heated at high enough levels to induce a runaway greenhouse for a long enough duration for all the hydrogen to escape. Without hydrogen, the planet no longer has water and cannot support life. We call these planets "Tidal Venuses," and the phenomenon a "tidal greenhouse." Tidal effects also circularize the orbit, which decreases tidal heating. Hence, some planets may form with large eccentricity, with its accompanying large tidal heating, and lose their water, but eventually settle into nearly circular orbits in the habitable zone (HZ). However, these planets are not habitable as past tidal heating desiccated them, and hence should not be ranked highly for detailed follow-up observations aimed at detecting biosignatures. We simulate the evolution of hypothetical planetary systems in a quasi-continuous ...

Barnes, Rory; Goldblatt, Colin; Meadows, Victoria S; Kasting, James F; Heller, Rene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

324

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5 Megawatt Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

325

Estimating Open-Ocean Barotropic Tidal Dissipation: The Hawaiian Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized inverse of a regional model is used to estimate barotropic tidal dissipation along the Hawaiian Ridge. The model, based on the linear shallow-water equations, incorporates parameterizations for the dissipation of energy via ...

Edward D. Zaron; Gary D. Egbert

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

327

Georgia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 7, 2011 A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology New Interactive...

328

MHK Technologies/RED HAWK | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RED HAWK RED HAWK < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage RED HAWK.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal *MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal *MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal *MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal *MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Margate Tidal *MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal *MHK Projects/Mohawk MHK Project *MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal *MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant

329

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Influence of Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code D.C. Maniaci Pennsylvania State University Y. Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the Oceans 11 Conference Kona, Hawaii September 19-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-52306 October 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

330

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

331

Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects- Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Marine wave and tidal energy technology could interact with marine resources in ways that are not well understood. As wave and tidal energy conversion projects are planned, tested, and deployed, a wide range of stakeholders will be engaged; these include developers, state and federal regulatory agencies, environmental groups, tribal governments, recreational and commercial fishermen, and local communities. Identifying stakeholders environmental concerns in the early stages of the industrys development will help developers address and minimize potential environmental effects. Identifying important concerns will also assist with streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles by the industry in the U.S. today. In September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to conduct a scenario-based evaluation of emerging hydrokinetic technologies. The purpose of this evaluation is to identify and characterize environmental impacts that are likely to occur, demonstrate a process for analyzing these impacts, identify the key environmental concerns for each scenario, identify areas of uncertainty, and describe studies that could address that uncertainty. This process is intended to provide an objective and transparent tool to assist in decision-making for siting and selection of technology for wave and tidal energy development. RE Vision worked with H. T. Harvey & Associates, to develop a framework for identifying key environmental concerns with marine renewable technology. This report describes the results of this study. This framework was applied to varying wave and tidal power conversion technologies, scales, and locations. The following wave and tidal energy scenarios were considered: ? 4 wave energy generation technologies ? 3 tidal energy generation technologies ? 3 sites: Humboldt coast, California (wave); Makapuu Point, Oahu, Hawaii (wave); and the Tacoma Narrows, Washington (tidal) ? 3 project sizes: pilot, small commercial, and large commercial The possible combinations total 24 wave technology scenarios and 9 tidal technology scenarios. We evaluated 3 of the 33 scenarios in detail: 1. A small commercial OPT Power Buoy project off the Humboldt County, California coast 2. A small commercial Pelamis Wave Power P-2 project off Makapuu Point, Oahu, Hawaii 3. A pilot MCT SeaGen tidal project, sited in the Tacoma Narrows, Washington This framework document used information available from permitting documents that were written to support actual wave or tidal energy projects, but the results obtained here should not be confused with those of the permitting documents1. The main difference between this framework document and permitting documents of currently proposed pilot projects is that this framework identifies key environmental concerns and describes the next steps in addressing those concerns; permitting documents must identify effects, find or declare thresholds of significance, evaluate the effects against the thresholds, and find mitigation measures that will minimize or avoid the effects so they can be considered less-than-significant. Two methodologies, 1) an environmental effects analysis and 2) Raptools, were developed and tested to identify potential environmental effects associated with wave or tidal energy conversion projects. For the environmental effects analysis, we developed a framework based on standard risk assessment techniques. The framework was applied to the three scenarios listed above. The environmental effects analysis addressed questions such as: ? What is the temporal and spatial exposure of a species at a site? ? What are the specific potential project effects on that species? ? What measures could minimize, mitigate, or eliminate negative effects? ? Are there potential effects of the project, or species response to the effect, that are highly uncertain and warrant additional study? The second methodology, Raptools, is a collaborative approach useful for evaluating multiple characteristi

Sharon Kramer; Mirko Previsic; Peter Nelson; Sheri Woo

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The projects scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industrys development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industrys development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ecological safety of tidal-power projects  

SciTech Connect

The operating regime of tidal power plants requires ecological monitoring of their associated water area.

Fedorov, M. P.; Shilin, M. B. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

335

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE'S ENERGY DATA BASE (EDB) VERSUS OTHER ENERGY-RELATED DATA BASES: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen, other synthetic and natural fuels, hydro energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, tidal power, wind energy; energy storage,

Robinson, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Consequences of Strong Compression in Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is a highly energetic event with consequences dependent on the degree to which the star plunges inside the SMBH's tidal sphere. We introduce a new analytic model for tidal disruption events (TDEs) to analyze the dependence of these events on beta, the ratio of the tidal radius to the orbital pericenter. We find, contrary to most previous work, that the spread in debris energy for a TDE is largely constant for all beta. This result has important consequences for optical transient searches targeting TDEs, which we discuss. We quantify leading-order general relativistic corrections to this spread in energy and find that they are small. We also examine the role of stellar spin, and find that a combination of spin-orbit misalignment, rapid rotation, and high beta may increase the spread in debris energy. Finally, we quantify for the first time the gravitational wave emission due to the strong compression of a star in a high-beta TDE. Although this signal is unlikely to be detectable for disruptions of main sequence stars, the tidal disruption of a white dwarf by an intermediate mass black hole can produce a strong signal visible to Advanced LIGO at tens of megaparsecs.

Nicholas Stone; Re'em Sari; Abraham Loeb

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tidal flow over threedimensional topography generates outofforcingplane harmonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy conversion from the barotropic to the baroclinic tide. The generation of internal waves by tidal, a significant amount of the energy converted from barotropic to baroclinic tides can be generated perpendicular of a sphere, J. Fluid Mech., 183, 439­450. Baines, P. G. (2007), Internal tide generation by seamounts, Deep

Texas at Austin. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Free Flow Power Corporation (generators mounted on poles placed in the river bottom) * Hydro Green Energy (barge mounted generators) * MarMC Enterprises (generators submerged in...

343

Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

Musial, W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Tidal | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Tidal Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

345

Tidal Current Predictions Using Rotary Empirical Orthogonal Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the conventional point tidal analysis approach, a set of tidal harmonic constituents is derived from each time series of currents. These sets of tidal constituents are then used to predict the tidal currents. For a large database of current ...

Betty Ng

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

On Tidal Damping in Laplace's Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laplace's tidal equations are augmented by dissipation in a bottom boundary layer that is intermediate in character between those of Ekman and Stokes. Laplace's tidal equation for a global ocean remains second-order and self-adjoint, but the ...

John W. Miles

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Tidal Diffusivity: A Mechanism for Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that tidal mixing may provide a diffusivity mechanism for frontogenesis. It stems from the fact that tidal diffusivity varies in the opposite sense from the water depth, so the vertically integrated diffusivity may exhibit a ...

Hsien-Wang Ou; Chang-Ming Dong; Dake Chen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tidal Mixing Signatures in the Indonesian Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions of low-frequency tidal periods are found throughout the Indonesian Seas' temperature field, supporting the hypothesis that vertical mixing is enhanced within the Indonesian Seas by the tides. The thermal signatures of tidal mixing ...

Amy Ffield; Arnold L. Gordon

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Wavemill Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemill Energy Wavemill Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wavemill Energy Address 1 Research Dr Place Dartmouth Zip B2Y 4M9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 613-847-5687 Website http://www.wavemill.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Wavemill Energy Cape Breton Island NS CA This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Wavemill This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wavemill_Energy&oldid=678514" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies

350

Tidal Flow Turbulence Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

n still result in some spreading of the corrected , eve case of a unique mean 32. This definition assumes Northwest)Na+onal)Marine) Renewable)Energy)Center)...

351

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

352

Tidal indicators in the spacetime of a rotating deformed mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tidal indicators are commonly associated with the electric and magnetic parts of the Riemann tensor (and its covariant derivatives) with respect to a given family of observers in a given spacetime. Recently, observer-dependent tidal effects have been extensively investigated with respect to a variety of special observers in the equatorial plane of the Kerr spacetime. This analysis is extended here by considering a more general background solution to include the case of matter which is also endowed with an arbitrary mass quadrupole moment. Relation with curvature invariants and Bel-Robinson tensor, i.e., observer-dependent super-energy density and super-Poynting vector, are investigated too.

Donato Bini; Kuantay Boshkayev; Andrea Geralico

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

354

Tunable surface plasmon devices - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial ...

355

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Comparison of Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine and New England Shelf Tidal Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semidiurnal tidal currents associated with the near-resonant response of the Gulf of Maine-Bay of Fundy system are amplified over the relatively shallow depths of Georges Bank, thus leading to enhanced energy dissipation, vertical mixing and ...

Wendell S. Brown

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Power system - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

359

Verdant-Kinetic Hydropower System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island Tidal Energy Technology Resource CurrentTidal Technology Type Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level TRL 78: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration &...

360

Offshore Renewable Energy R&D (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the offshore renewable energy R&D efforts at NREL's NWTC. As the United States increases its efforts to tap the domestic energy sources needed to diversify its energy portfolio and secure its energy supply, more attention is being focused on the rich renewable resources located offshore. Offshore renewable energy sources include offshore wind, waves, tidal currents, ocean and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. According to a report published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2010,1 U.S. offshore wind resources have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater than the nation's present electric capacity, and the Electric Power Research Institute estimates that the nation's ocean energy resources could ultimately supply at least 10% of its electric supply. For more than 30 years, NREL has advanced the science of renewable energy while building the capabilities to guide rapid deployment of commercial applications. Since 1993, NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has been the nation's premier wind energy research facility, specializing in the advancement of wind technologies that range in size from a kilowatt to several megawatts. For more than 8 years, the NWTC has been an international leader in the field of offshore floating wind system analysis. Today, researchers at the NWTC are taking their decades of experience and extensive capabilities and applying them to help industry develop cost-effective hydrokinetic systems that convert the kinetic energy in water to provide power for our nation's heavily populated coastal regions. The center's capabilities and experience cover a wide spectrum of wind and water energy engineering disciplines, including atmospheric and ocean fluid mechanics, aerodynamics; aeroacoustics, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics, control systems, electrical systems, and testing.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Offshore Renewable Energy R&D (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the offshore renewable energy R&D efforts at NREL's NWTC. As the United States increases its efforts to tap the domestic energy sources needed to diversify its energy portfolio and secure its energy supply, more attention is being focused on the rich renewable resources located offshore. Offshore renewable energy sources include offshore wind, waves, tidal currents, ocean and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. According to a report published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2010,1 U.S. offshore wind resources have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater than the nation's present electric capacity, and the Electric Power Research Institute estimates that the nation's ocean energy resources could ultimately supply at least 10% of its electric supply. For more than 30 years, NREL has advanced the science of renewable energy while building the capabilities to guide rapid deployment of commercial applications. Since 1993, NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has been the nation's premier wind energy research facility, specializing in the advancement of wind technologies that range in size from a kilowatt to several megawatts. For more than 8 years, the NWTC has been an international leader in the field of offshore floating wind system analysis. Today, researchers at the NWTC are taking their decades of experience and extensive capabilities and applying them to help industry develop cost-effective hydrokinetic systems that convert the kinetic energy in water to provide power for our nation's heavily populated coastal regions. The center's capabilities and experience cover a wide spectrum of wind and water energy engineering disciplines, including atmospheric and ocean fluid mechanics, aerodynamics; aeroacoustics, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics, control systems, electrical systems, and testing.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks - Energy ...  

Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; ...

364

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Address 1 124 Stirling Highway Place North Fremantle Zip 6159 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1993 Number of employees 25 Website http://www.carnegiewave.com Region Australia LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: CETO La Reunion CETO3 Garden Island Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: CETO Wave Energy Technology This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carnegie_Wave_Energy_Limited&oldid=678263

365

Tidal Transport in the Florida Current and Its Relationship to Tidal Heights and Cable Voltages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear relationship between tidal height (sea level of tidal frequencies) and tidal transport near 27N in the Straits of Florida is confirmed. Transport estimates from this relationship for the O1 and M2 constituents are compared with those ...

Dennis A. Mayer; Jimmy C. Larsen

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CX-002452: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

452: Categorical Exclusion Determination 452: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002452: Categorical Exclusion Determination Assessment of the Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish CX(s) Applied: B3.3 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is proposing to use Department of Energy and cost-share funding to conduct research activities to determine injury and survival rates for fish passing through hydrokinetic turbines. Research would be accomplished by: (1) Conducting a review of existing information on injury mechanisms associated with fish passage through conventional hydro turbines and determine its relevance and applicability to fish passage through hydrokinetic turbines; (2) Developing theoretical

367

Vortex Hydro Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Energy LLC Hydro Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Address 4870 West Clark Rd Suite 108 Place Ypsilanti Zip 48197 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 734.971.4020 Website http://www.vortexhydroenergy.c Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Vortex_Hydro_Energy_LLC&oldid=678497

368

HYDROCAP ENERGY SAS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HYDROCAP ENERGY SAS HYDROCAP ENERGY SAS Jump to: navigation, search Name HYDROCAP ENERGY SAS Address 65 Place Nicolas Copernic Technopole Brest Iroise Place Plozane Zip 29280 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2004 Phone number +33 298451417 Website http://http://www.hydrocap.com Region France LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: SEACAP This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=HYDROCAP_ENERGY_SAS&oldid=678336" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes

369

Spectral Scaling in a Tidal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simple scaling of a tidal bottom boundary layer by the shear velocity, u*, and the wall to the wall describes well the mean Bow field. To test the full extent of this scaling measurements were made of the turbulence spectra in a natural tidal ...

Thomas F. Gross; Arthur R. M. Nowell

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

Zheng Zhang

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snowhomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. DOE is a cooperating agency.

372

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tida...

Jackson, Brian; Barnes, Rory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

374

Torque shudder protection device and method - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

375

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

376

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

377

Resolute Marine Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resolute Marine Energy Inc Resolute Marine Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Resolute Marine Energy Inc Address 3 Post Office Square 3rd floor Place Massachusetts Zip 02109-3905 Country United States Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Resolute is a wave-power technology developer operating in Massachusetts. Year founded 2007 Number of employees 12 Phone number 917-626-6790 Website http://www.resolutemarine.com References Resolute Marine Energy LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Trials Ver 2 SurgeWEC Ocean Testing 1 This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: AirWEC SurgeWEC

378

Green Energy Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Energy Corp Green Energy Corp Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://www.gweconline.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Floating wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Energy_Corp&oldid=678318" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

379

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA 49: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA SUMMARY This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snowhomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. DOE is a cooperating agency. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 9, 2013 EA-1949: FERC Notice of Availability Errata Sheet

380

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

New Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Energy Corp. New Energy Corp. Address Suite 473 3553 31 St NW Place South Bend, Indiana Zip 46613-1010 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product 102mmgy (386.1m litres/y) ethanol producer. Year founded 2003 Phone number (403) 260-5248 Website http://www.newenergycorp.ca Region Canada References New Energy Corp.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 Canoe Pass Galena ABS Alaskan Great River Journey Miette River Pointe du Bois Ruby ABS Alaskan Western Irrigation District This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies:

382

Isolation of Four Diatom Strains from Tidal Mud toward Biofuel Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and utilization of bio-energy is an important way to relieve the pressure of global energy shortage. Biodiesel can be a focus of the bio-energy, because it is a cleaner-burning and renewable fuel. Micro algae have been considered to be an ... Keywords: biodiesel, diatom, isolation, tidal mud

Yu Gao; Yang Yu; Junrong Liang; Yahui Gao; Qiaoqi Luo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Relativistic effects in the tidal interaction between a white dwarf and a massive black hole in Fermi normal coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider tidal encounters between a white dwarf and an intermediate mass black hole. Both weak encounters and those at the threshold of disruption are modeled. The numerical code combines mesh-based hydrodynamics, a spectral method solution of the self-gravity, and a general relativistic Fermi normal coordinate system that follows the star and debris. Fermi normal coordinates provide an expansion of the black hole tidal field that includes quadrupole and higher multipole moments and relativistic corrections. We compute the mass loss from the white dwarf that occurs in weak tidal encounters. Secondly, we compute carefully the energy deposition onto the star, examining the effects of nonradial and radial mode excitation, surface layer heating, mass loss, and relativistic orbital motion. We find evidence of a slight relativistic suppression in tidal energy transfer. Tidal energy deposition is compared to orbital energy loss due to gravitational bremsstrahlung and the combined losses are used to estimate tidal capture orbits. Heating and partial mass stripping will lead to an expansion of the white dwarf, making it easier for the star to be tidally disrupted on the next passage. Finally, we examine angular momentum deposition. By including the octupole tide, we are able for the first time to calculate deflection of the center of mass of the star and debris. With this observed deflection, and taking into account orbital relativistic effects, we compute directly the change in orbital angular momentum and show its balance with computed spin angular momentum deposition.

Roseanne M. Cheng; Charles R. Evans

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Jump to: navigation, search Name Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Address The Innovation Centre 1 Ainslie Road Hillington Business Park Place Glasgow Zip G52 4RU Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +44 141 585 6447 Website http://www.hammerfeststrom.com Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream Kvalsundet This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hammerfest_Strom_UK_co_owned_by_StatoilHydro&oldid=678328"

385

A Coupled Model for Laplace's Tidal Equations in a Fluid with One Horizontal Dimension and Variable Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidetopography interactions dominate the transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales. At present, it is poorly understood how low-mode internal tides reflect and scatter along the continental margins. Here, the coupling equations for ...

Samuel M. Kelly; Nicole L. Jones; Jonathan D. Nash

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

TIDAL INTERACTIONS IN MERGING WHITE DWARF BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

The recently discovered system J0651 is the tightest known detached white dwarf (WD) binary. Since it has not yet initiated Roche-lobe overflow, it provides a relatively clean environment for testing our understanding of tidal interactions. I investigate the tidal heating of each WD, parameterized in terms of its tidal Q parameter. Assuming that the heating can be radiated efficiently, the current luminosities are consistent with Q {sub 1} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 10} and Q {sub 2} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 7}, for the He and C/O WDs, respectively. Conversely, if the observed luminosities are merely from the cooling of the WDs, these estimated values of Q represent the upper limits. A large Q {sub 1} for the He WD means its spin velocity will be slower than that expected if it was tidally locked, which, since the binary is eclipsing, may be measurable via the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. After one year, gravitational wave emission shifts the time of eclipses by 5.5 s, but tidal interactions cause the orbit to shrink more rapidly, changing the time by up to an additional 0.3 s after a year. Future eclipse timing measurements may therefore infer the degree of tidal locking.

Piro, Anthony L., E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

389

Japan - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Coal Report Monthly Energy Review Residential Energy ... testing of methane hydrates ... solar, and tidal power are being actively ...

390

INORGANIC SALT HEAT TRANSFER FLUID - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

391

COMBINED FUEL AND AIR STAGED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

392

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heat, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind, Natural Gas, Unspecified technologies, Electricity Demand Reduction* Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy...

393

Dexawave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dexawave Dexawave Jump to: navigation, search Name Dexawave Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number + 45 8651 8690 Website http://http://www.dexawave.com Region Denmark LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: The DEXAWAVE wave energy converter This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Dexawave&oldid=678285" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

394

Oceanlinx | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanlinx Oceanlinx Jump to: navigation, search Name Oceanlinx Address PO Box 116 Place Botany Zip 1455 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 61 (0) 2 9549 6300 Website http://www.oceanlinx.com Region Australia LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: GPP Namibia Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project Hawaii Oceanlinx Maui Port Kembla Portland This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Denniss Auld Turbine Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oceanlinx&oldid=678407

395

Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbines Ltd Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Marine Current Turbines Ltd (MCT) Place Bristol, United Kingdom Zip BS34 8PD Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in particular. Coordinates 51.454513°, -2.58791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.454513,"lon":-2.58791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Address 595 Burrard Street Suite 3113 Three Bentall Centre PO Box 49071 Place Vancouver Zip V7X 1G4 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 604-288-9051 Website http://www.finavera.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Coos County Offshore Wave Energy Power Plant Figueira da Foz Portugal Humboldt County Wave Project Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project South Africa Ucluelet BC Canada This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: AquaBuoy This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

397

Net Metering (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Aggregate Capacity...

398

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tidal Energy Project Energy Department-Supported Project Diversifies Energy Mix, Tests Promising Technology http:energy.govarticlesmaine-deploys-first-us-commercia...

399

NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Geostrophic Adjustment Model of a Tidal Mixing Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a model of a tidal mixing front as occurring between well mixed and (seasonally) stratified water in tidally energetic areas in continental shelf seas. The model examines the geostrophic adjustment of a stratified two-layer ...

G. J. F. van Heijst

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Blog Water Blog RSS December 10, 2013 The Energy Department has launched a new coding competition to help industry develop new models and tools that improve the design, development, and optimization of marine and hydrokinetic devices. | Graphic courtesy of TopCoder Calling All Coders: Help Advance America's Ocean Power Industry The Energy Department has launched a new coding competition to help industry develop new models and tools that improve the design, development, and optimization of marine and hydrokinetic devices. August 14, 2013 Tacoma Power's Cushman Hydroelectric Project installed a new two-generator powerhouse that increases electric generation capacity by 3.6 megawatts and captures energy from previously untapped water flows. | Photo courtesy of Tacoma Power.

402

Black-Hole Spin Dependence in the Light Curves of Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A star orbiting a supermassive black hole can be tidally disrupted if the black hole's gravitational tidal field exceeds the star's self gravity at pericenter. Some of this stellar tidal debris can become gravitationally bound to the black hole, leading to a bright electromagnetic flare with bolometric luminosity proportional to the rate at which material falls back to pericenter. In the Newtonian limit, this flare will have a light curve that scales as t^-5/3 if the tidal debris has a flat distribution in binding energy. We investigate the time dependence of the black-hole mass accretion rate when tidal disruption occurs close enough the black hole that relativistic effects are significant. We find that for orbits with pericenters comparable to the radius of the marginally bound circular orbit, relativistic effects can double the peak accretion rate and halve the time it takes to reach this peak accretion rate. The accretion rate depends on both the magnitude of the black-hole spin and its orientation with respect to the stellar orbit; for orbits with a given pericenter radius in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates, a maximal black-hole spin anti-aligned with the orbital angular momentum leads to the largest peak accretion rate.

Michael Kesden

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Resonant Tidal Disruption in Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has recently been shown that the rate of angular momentum relaxation in nearly-Keplerian star clusters is greatly increased by a process termed resonant relaxation (Rauch & Tremaine 1996), who also argued that tidal disruption of stars in galactic nuclei containing massive black holes could be noticeably enhanced by this process. We describe here the results of numerical simulations of resonant tidal disruption which quantitatively test the predictions made by Rauch & Tremaine. The simulation method is based on an N-body routine incorporating cloning of stars near the loss cone and a semi-relativistic symplectic integration scheme. We also briefly describe the discovery of chaos in the Wisdom-Holman symplectic integrator applied to highly eccentric orbits and propose a modified integration scheme that remains robust under these conditions. We find that resonant disruption rates exceed their non-resonant counterparts by an amount consistent with the predictions; in particular, we estimate the net tidal disruption rate for a fully resonant cluster to be about twice that of its non-resonant counterpart. No significant enhancement in rates is observed outside the critical radius. Relativistic quenching of the effect is found to occur for hole masses M>8*10^7 solar masses. The numerical results combined with the observed properties of galactic nuclei indicate that for most galaxies the resonant enhancement to tidal disruption rates will be very small.

Kevin P. Rauch; Brian Ingalls

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Tidal Flow through the Straits of Dover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the first long-term deployment of the Mark II OSCR high-frequency radar system. This new system measures surface currents at 700 preselected locations every 20 minutes at a range up to 25 km offshore. Tidal analysis, in ...

D. Prandle; S. G. Loch; R. Player

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results  

SciTech Connect

Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

David Teel

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations are presented of the rate of energy conversion of the barotropic tide into internal gravity waves above topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists of ...

Balmforth, Neil J.

407

Tidal Conversion by Subcritical Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical estimates of the rate at which energy is extracted from the barotropic tide at topography and converted into internal gravity waves are given. The ocean is idealized as an inviscid, vertically unbounded fluid on the f plane. The ...

N. J. Balmforth; G. R. Ierley; W. R. Young

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations are presented of the rate of energy conversion of the barotropic tide into internal gravity waves above topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists of periodic obstructions; a ...

Neil J. Balmforth; Thomas Peacock

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Oceanergia formerly Oceanergia Jump to: navigation, search Name AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Address Redshank House Alness Point Business Park Place Alness Ross shire Zip IV17 0UP Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 44 (0) 1349 88 44 22 Website http://www.awsocean.com Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: AWS II Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Archimedes Wave Swing This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AWS_Ocean_Energy_formerly_Oceanergia&oldid=678253

410

Videos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power Energy 101: Wind Turbines Energy 101: Home Energy Checkup Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Solar PV Energy 101: Daylighting Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers Secretary Moniz Speaks on New Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) at NREL Energy 101: Electric Vehicles Energy 101: Lumens Energy 101: Biofuels Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Wide Bandgap Semiconductors Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More About the Southeastern Power Administration Secretary Moniz Speaks at the Center on Global Energy Policy Update: Solar Powered Classroom Secretary Moniz Speaks at Biomass 2013 Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City

411

Swell Fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Swell Fuel Place Houston, Texas Zip 77072 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Texas-based developer of small-scale wave energy devices. Website http://www.swellfuel.com References Swell Fuel LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Lever Operated Pivoting Float Swell Fuel This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Swell Fuel is a company located in Houston, Texas . References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Swell_Fuel&oldid=680057" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies

412

Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff (California) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas, Municipal Solid Waste, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Solar Thermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing...

413

DOE Science Showcase - Green Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

reports and patent information on different types of renewable energy resources and energy conservation, including solar, wind, bioenergy, hydroelectric, geothermal, tidal...

414

Environmental Assessment (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind energy Active Policy Yes...

415

Connecticut/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Nuclear Photovoltaics Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy StateProvince The EXP Job Creation Incentive Program provides loans towards expenditures related to training,...

416

Virginia/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy StateProvince The Virginia Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant provides cash grants to businesses located in Enterprise zones that...

417

Steven Chalk | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chalk Steven Chalk About Us Steven Chalk - Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy In his role as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Steven Chalk oversees applied research, development, and demonstration for a diverse clean energy portfolio. This portfolio spans wind, solar, geothermal, conventional hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic, biomass, and hydrogen technologies. Prior to his current position, Steve served as EERE's Chief Operating Officer and led EERE's Recovery Act implementation, which included $17 billion of awards, part of the nation's largest-ever investment in clean energy. Steve also supported the Treasury Department

418

Tides turn for tidal power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capricious air currents and passing clouds may thwart wind and solar power, but the tides, governed by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun, might prove a more dependable energy source. In certain spots, the tides have already proved a good ...

J. Calamia

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Feed-in Tariff (Hawaii) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Amount Rates for Tier...

420

Category:MHK Companies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Companies MHK Companies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? The companies below are involved in the Marine and Hydrokinetic energy sector and are considered to be MHK Companies. Pages in category "MHK Companies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 291 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Able Technologies ABS Alaskan Inc AER NY Kinetics LLC AeroVironment Alaska Power Telephone Company AlbaTERN Alternative Energy Engineering Associates LLP Applied Technologies Company Ltd Aqua Magnetics Inc AquaEnergy Aquamarine Power Aquantis Inc Aquaphile sarl Hydro Gen Aquascientific Arlas Invest Arnold Energy Systems Artificial Muscle Inc Atlantis Resources Corporation Atlantisstrom Atmocean Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic tidal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CLIMATE INSTABILITY ON TIDALLY LOCKED EXOPLANETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks that can destabilize the climates of synchronously rotating rocky planets may arise on planets with strong day-night surface temperature contrasts. Earth-like habitable planets maintain stable surface liquid water over geologic time. This requires equilibrium between the temperature-dependent rate of greenhouse-gas consumption by weathering, and greenhouse-gas resupply by other processes. Detected small-radius exoplanets, and anticipated M-dwarf habitable-zone rocky planets, are expected to be in synchronous rotation (tidally locked). In this paper, we investigate two hypothetical feedbacks that can destabilize climate on planets in synchronous rotation. (1) If small changes in pressure alter the temperature distribution across a planet's surface such that the weathering rate goes up when the pressure goes down, a runaway positive feedback occurs involving increasing weathering rate near the substellar point, decreasing pressure, and increasing substellar surface temperature. We call this feedback enhanced substellar weathering instability (ESWI). (2) When decreases in pressure increase the fraction of surface area above the melting point (through reduced advective cooling of the substellar point), and the corresponding increase in volume of liquid causes net dissolution of the atmosphere, a further decrease in pressure will occur. This substellar dissolution feedback can also cause a runaway climate shift. We use an idealized energy balance model to map out the conditions under which these instabilities may occur. In this simplified model, the weathering runaway can shrink the habitable zone and cause geologically rapid 10{sup 3}-fold atmospheric pressure shifts within the habitable zone. Mars may have undergone a weathering runaway in the past. Substellar dissolution is usually a negative feedback or weak positive feedback on changes in atmospheric pressure. It can only cause runaway changes for small, deep oceans and highly soluble atmospheric gases. Both instabilities are suppressed if the atmosphere has a high radiative efficiency. Our results are most relevant for atmospheres that are thin, have low greenhouse-gas radiative efficiency, and have a principal greenhouse gas that is also the main constituent of the atmosphere. ESWI also requires land near the substellar point, and tectonic resurfacing (volcanism, mountain-building) is needed for large jumps in pressure. These results identify a new pathway by which habitable-zone planets can undergo rapid climate shifts and become uninhabitable.

Kite, Edwin S.; Manga, Michael [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gaidos, Eric, E-mail: edwin.kite@gmail.com [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Efficient, Low-cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger - Energy ...  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar ... Renewable energy (concentrated solar power, residential solar h ...

423

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control - Energy Innovation ...  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels;

424

Internal/External Split Field Generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

Wind Energy Vehicles and Fuels Industrial Technologies Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Geothermal Internal/External Split Field Generator Oak Ridge ...

425

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River, Geothermal Field (RRGF), Idaho. Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

Hanson, J.M.

1980-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gas/Star Offsets in Tidal Tails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use numerical simulations to study the development of gas/star offsets in the tidal tails of merging galaxies. These offsets are shown to be a natural consequence of the radially extended HI spatial distribution in disk galaxies, coupled with internal dissipation in the gaseous component driven by the interaction. This mechanism explains the observed gas/star offsets in interacting galaxies without invoking interactions with a hot (unseen) gaseous component.

Mihos, C

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas/Star Offsets in Tidal Tails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use numerical simulations to study the development of gas/star offsets in the tidal tails of merging galaxies. These offsets are shown to be a natural consequence of the radially extended HI spatial distribution in disk galaxies, coupled with internal dissipation in the gaseous component driven by the interaction. This mechanism explains the observed gas/star offsets in interacting galaxies without invoking interactions with a hot (unseen) gaseous component.

Chris Mihos

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Water News and Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water News and Blog Water News and Blog Water News and Blog Blog The Energy Department has launched a new coding competition to help industry develop new models and tools that improve the design, development, and optimization of marine and hydrokinetic devices. | Graphic courtesy of TopCoder Calling All Coders: Help Advance America's Ocean Power Industry December 10, 2013 3:57 PM The Energy Department has launched a new coding competition to help industry develop new models and tools that improve the design, development, and optimization of marine and hydrokinetic devices. Read The Full Story Tacoma Power's Cushman Hydroelectric Project installed a new two-generator powerhouse that increases electric generation capacity by 3.6 megawatts and captures energy from previously untapped water flows. | Photo courtesy of Tacoma Power.

429

CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Distributed Hydrostatic Direct Drive for Large Wind Turbine and Marine Hydro-Kinetic Device Applications CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/16/2011 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to Dehlsen Associates, LLC to develop and refine a high energy Hydrostatic Direct Drivetrain (HOD) for large wind turbine (1.5+ megawatt) and marine hydro-kinetic energy technology application. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006520.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001841: Categorical Exclusion Determination

430

Arlas Invest | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arlas Invest Arlas Invest Jump to: navigation, search Name Arlas Invest Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://www.capricornioct.com Region Spain LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: TUVALU This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Arlas_Invest&oldid=678244" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

431

Seabased AB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seabased AB Seabased AB Jump to: navigation, search Name Seabased AB Address Dag Hammarskjlds vg 52B Place Uppsala Zip S-75183 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 46,705,325,560 Website http://www.seabased.com Region Sweden LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Uppsala University Seabased AB Lysekil Sweden This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Seabased This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Seabased_AB&oldid=678449" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs

432

RDZ Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RDZ Renewables RDZ Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name RDZ Renewables Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number (442) 210 45-85 Website http://www.rdz-r.com/new/engli LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: UFCAP This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=RDZ_Renewables&oldid=678432" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

433

Minesto AB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minesto AB Minesto AB Jump to: navigation, search Name Minesto AB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://http://www.minesto.com/ Region Sweden LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Green This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Minesto_AB&oldid=678379" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

434

Mananook Associates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mananook Associates Mananook Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name Mananook Associates Address PO Box 69 Place Perry Zip 4667 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 207-733-5513 Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Grand Manan Channel Project This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mananook_Associates&oldid=678368" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

435

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

CX-004836: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

836: Categorical Exclusion Determination 836: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Advancement Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Lynnwood, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Sound & Sea Technology, Incorporated (SST), in Lynnwood, Washington, is proposing to use Department of