Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 379 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 4 MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project A MHK Projects/ADM 3 MHK Projects/ADM 4 MHK Projects/ADM 5 MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project MHK Projects/Agucadoura MHK Projects/Alaska 1 MHK Projects/Alaska 13 MHK Projects/Alaska 17 MHK Projects/Alaska 18 MHK Projects/Alaska 24 MHK Projects/Alaska 25

2

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project below to add it to the registry. If your project is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that project's fields and you may edit. MHK_Projects/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Projects/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology_Project&oldid=688143"

3

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database is currently (2009) being updated to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.[Taken from http://www2.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/hydrokinetic/

5

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology below to add it to the registry. If your technology is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that technology's fields and you may edit. MHK_Technologies/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Technologies/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the Marine and Hydrokinetic Database Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology&oldid=680669"

6

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Jump to: navigation, search Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Using the Database (1) Map illustrates marine & hydrokinetic demonstration projects around the

7

NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and...

8

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This is the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology template. It is designed for use by MHK Technologies Pages. To define an MHK Technology, please use this form. Parameters Image - Associated image file. (optional) Primary Organization - Field def missing! Project(s) where this technology is utilized - Field def missing! Technology Resource - Field def missing! Technology Type - Field def missing! Technology Readiness Level - Field def missing! Technology Description - Field def missing! Designed to Operate with Shore Connection - Field def missing! Power Transfer Method - Field def missing! Water Column Location - Field def missing! Mooring Configuration - Field def missing! Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions - Field def missing!

10

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 282 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER A MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo MHK Technologies/AirWEC MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy MHK Technologies/Aquanator MHK Technologies/Aquantis MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000

11

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

12

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Tests | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Tests Jump to: navigation, search Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test This category currently contains no pages or media. Retrieved from "http:...

13

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

14

MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1055,"lon":-70.7912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.9828,"lon":-91.7994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6224,"lon":-71.2153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7883,"lon":-141.198,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Barge Power Barge < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hydrokinetic Power Barge.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Onsite Recovered Energy LP Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Vurbine proprietary technology design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest hydrokinetic energy from flowing water in a low impact application Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 36:51.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage

20

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, standard and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

22

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage This field indicates the stage of development/deployment that technologies, which are undergoing partial or full-scale device testing, are currently in. Contents 1 TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering 2 TRL 4: Proof of Concept 3 TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration 4 TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing, Demonstration, and Operation 5 TRL 9: Commercial-Scale Production / Application TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering The purpose of this stage is to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to

23

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Hybrid) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

24

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Attenuator) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

25

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

26

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

27

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6853,"lon":-75.0694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-57605 February 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WA09.3406

29

SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Property:ProjectTechnology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectTechnology ProjectTechnology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ProjectTechnology Property Type Page Has Default form Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Pages using the property "ProjectTechnology" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + MHK Technologies/Oyster + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + MHK Technologies/Wavebob + MHK Projects/ADM 4 + MHK Technologies/Wavebob + MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + MHK Technologies/Wave Roller + MHK Projects/Alaska 35 + MHK Technologies/Ocean +, MHK Technologies/Kensington + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + MHK Technologies/RED HAWK + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + MHK Technologies/bioSTREAM + MHK Projects/Bluemill Sound + MHK Technologies/Exim + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + MHK Technologies/SmarTurbine +

31

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

32

First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Image courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company ORPC's TidGen(tm) turbine generator unit. R&D Opportunity Advanced water power technologies include devices capable of extracting...

33

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

34

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

35

Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Glossary Technology Glossary (Redirected from Axial Flow Turbine) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

37

Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida  

SciTech Connect

Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Marine and Hydrokinetic | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is therefore leading efforts to prove functionality; evaluate technical and economic viability; and generate cost, performance, and reliability data for a variety of devices. Marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts

39

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Property:Project(s) where this technology is utilized | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project(s) where this technology is utilized Project(s) where this technology is utilized Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project(s) where this technology is utilized Property Type Page Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Pages using the property "Project(s) where this technology is utilized" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/AirWEC + MHK Projects/Ocean Trials Ver 2 + MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy + MHK Projects/Figueira da Foz Portugal +, MHK Projects/Humboldt County Wave Project +, MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project +, ... MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing + MHK Projects/AWS II +, MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + MHK Projects/Gujarat + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + MHK Projects/Castine Harbor Badaduce Narrows +, MHK Projects/Gujarat +, MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC +

44

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University?¢????s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underwater Electric Kite Turbines Underwater Electric Kite Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Underwater Electric Kite Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization UEK Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II *MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project *MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project *MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project *MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration *MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project *MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/UEK Yukon River Project Technology Resource

47

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects The NREL...

48

Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101, learn how the Energy Department is supporting research on a range of innovative marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to capture energy from waves and currents. For more information on marine and hydrokinetic energy from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Water Power Program

49

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy technologies ending with shots of ocean waves. We all know energy can come from the wind and the sun, but there's a plentiful renewable resource covering more than 75% of the planet that you might not have thought about: our water! The movement of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents carries energy that can be harnessed and converted into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. The words "Kinetic Energy" appear onscreen with shots of ocean scientists at sea. The words "Marine & Hydrokinetic" appear onscreen.

50

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

INL - Hydrokinetic & Wave Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Center Turbine (790KB PDF) Hydromatrix - Innovative Solution For Low Impact Hydropower at Existing Engineered Structures (2.2MB PDF) Hydraulic Cross-Flow Turbines (3.5MB...

53

FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on...

54

FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Projects to Integrated Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects Integrated Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Integrated Projects To maximize overall system efficiencies, reduce costs, and optimize

55

NETL: Deepwater Technology Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture | Safety & Environmental | Other UDW Technology | Completed DW Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10121-4306-01 All Electric Subsea Autonomous High Integrity Pressure Protection System (HIPPS) Architecture GE Global Research 10121-4401-02 Ultra-Deepwater Riser Concepts for High Motion Vessels Stress Engineering Services, Inc. 10121-4405-02 Ultra-deepwater Dry Tree System for Drilling and Production in the Gulf of Mexico Det Norske Veritas 10121-4505-01 Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel Nautilus International, LLC 09121-3500-01 Intelligent Production System for Ultra-Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer for Lateral Production Control and Optimization

56

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cryogenic Technologies Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... processes and products involving cryogenic technologies. ... Develop mathematical models for cryogenic ... Assist in development of bibliographic ...

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Basic Performance Measures for Technology Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measures for Technology Projects Basic Performance Measures for Technology Projects A white paper to provide guidance for project teams in the identification of performance...

63

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Demonstration Project 111 ITS/CVO Technology Truck Final Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1277 Demonstration Project 111 ITSCVO Technology Truck Final Project Report December 2001 Prepared by G. J. Capps, ORNL Project Manager K. P. Gambrell, Technical Associate K. L....

65

Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanolubricants Research Nanolubricants Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

66

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

67

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources (Redirected from Wave) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

68

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

69

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

GCK Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GCK Technology Inc Place San Antonio, Texas Zip 78205 Sector Hydro, Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Designer and manufacturer of marine turbine technology. Has patented the Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT), designed for hydroelectric applications in free flowing low head water courses. References GCK Technology Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: GCK Technology Amazon River Brazil GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US GCK Technology Uldolmok Strait South Korea GCK Technology Vinalhaven ME US

72

Projects selected in todays announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants. The projects selected for negotiation of awards include: Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will further develop and validate the Aquantis Current Plane ocean current turbine technology. The project will validate analytical design tools and develop the technology's direct drive component. DOE share: up to $750,000; Duration: up to 2 years Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will first develop a bottom habitat survey methodology and siting study approach in accordance with all relevant regulatory agencies in the southeast Florida region; then they will determine the most suitable areas for mooring marine and hydrokinetic facilities based on the

73

Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium...

74

Smart Gun Technology project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

Weiss, D.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

policies and making recommendations on federal fleet mandates, local electric vehicle incentives, solar permitting standards, and more. Project Financing Alternatives We can...

76

Teamwork Technology See Tocardo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Jump to: navigation, search Name Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.tocardo.com Region...

77

Chevron Technology Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Address 3901 Briarpark Drive Place Houston Zip 77042 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic...

78

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

79

Congeneration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Congeneration Technologies Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.cogeneration.net Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

80

Holographic Projection Technology: The World is Changing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research papers examines the new technology of Holographic Projections. It highlights the importance and need of this technology and how it represents the new wave in the future of technology and communications, the different application of the technology, the fields of life it will dramatically affect including business, education, telecommunication and healthcare. The paper also discusses the future of holographic technology and how it will prevail in the coming years highlighting how it will also affect and reshape many other fields of life, technologies and businesses.

Elmorshidy, Ahmed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary/Distributed Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Integrated Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production

82

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

Whisnant, R.A. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable efforts have been underway to develop hydrokinetic energy resources in tidal and riverine environments throughout North America. Potential for fish to be injured or killed if they encounter hydrokinetic turbines is an issue of significant interest to resource and regulatory agencies. To address this issue, flume studies were conducted that exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral reactions and avoidance. Also, a theoreti...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project Agency/Company /Organization: The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.socalconversion.org/resources.html Cost: Free The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project website is focused on a specific conversion technology demonstration project in L. A. County. Overview The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project website is focused on a specific conversion technology demonstration project in L.

89

DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The...

90

Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Technology AS Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address PO Box 399 Place Harstad Zip 9484 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2001 Phone number (+47) 77 06 08 08 Website http://http://www.hydratidal.i Region Norway LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: MORILD Demonstration Plant Morild 2 This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System Morild Power Plant This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydra_Tidal_Energy_Technology_AS&oldid=678333

91

Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Water and Wastewater Technology Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the California Energy Commission (CEC), with project management by SCE. The primary objective was to identify and develop technologies that could help California's water/wastewater industry reduce the cost of water and wastewater treatment and improve the overall operation at treatment facilities. Metropolitan Water District (MWD) and Orange County Water District (OCWD) were commissioned...

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

97

Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

Johnson, D.R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

HYDROKAL: A module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tool for hydrokinetic energy potential assessment in rivers-HYDROKAL, which stands for a ''hydrokinetic calculator''-is presented. This tool was developed in the Fortran 90 programming language as an external module for the CCHE2D application, ... Keywords: Instantaneous power density, Numerical modeling, Resource assessment, Stream

Paul Duvoy; Horacio Toniolo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Photovoltaic concentrator technology development project. Sixth project integration meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-three abstracts and short papers are presented which describe the current status of research, development, and demonstration of concentrator solar cell technology. Solar concentrators discussed include the parabolic trough, linear focus Fresnel lens, point focus Fresnel lens, and the parabolic dish. Solar cells studied include silicon, GaAs, and AlGaAs. Research on multiple junction cells, combined photovoltaic/thermal collectors, back contact solar cells, and beam splitter modules is described. Concentrator solar cell demonstration programs are reported. Contractor status summaries are given for 33 US DOE concentrator solar cell contracts; a description of the project, project status, and key results to date is included. (WHK)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Success Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Success Stories Project Success Stories NREL's technology deployment best practices, project support, and technical assistance, and technology acceleration activities are resulting in successful renewable energy and energy efficiency implementation in numerous locations. View success stories highlighting NREL's work with: Cities and Communities Greensburg, Kansas Greensburg: Photo of wind turbines in a green field. An International Inspiration for Green Disaster Recovery For 3 years after a devastating tornado struck Greensburg, Kansas, NREL technical experts helped the town rebuild as a model green community completely powered by a 12.5 megawatt wind farm and surrounded by the highest per-capita concentration of LEED-certified buildings in the United States-13 of which are saving $200,000 annually. Learn more.

102

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Data Marine & Hydrokinetic Data This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge,

103

RECIPIENT:Dehlsen Associates STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device Funding Opportunity Announcement...

104

Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacuum Insulation Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research

105

Norwegian University of Science and Technology CONWEC AS | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Norwegian University of Science and Technology CONWEC AS Address Department of Physics Realfagbygget Place Trondheim Zip N-7491 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website...

106

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

107

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

108

TidGen Power System Commercialization Project  

SciTech Connect

ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPCs tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric Company on January 1, 2013 for up to 5 megawatts at a price of $215/MWh, escalating at 2.0% per year.

Sauer, Christopher R. [President & CEO; McEntee, Jarlath [VP Engineering & CTO

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to Prichard to improve its decision-making process through Geographic Information System (GIS) as a decision-making tool. The agency has provided GIS training and other technical assistance in Prichard's Brownfields redevelopment effort. Other National Conference of Black Mayors' cities that have received computers for technology centers and technology transfer are Hayti Heights, Missouri; East St. Louis, Illinois; and Glenarden, Maryland. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project (July 1998) More Documents & Publications Environmental Justice and Public Participation Through Technology-

110

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a...

112

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

113

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Fluid Projects to someone by E-mail Working Fluid Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

114

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Research Projects to someone by E-mail HVAC Research Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

115

Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Publications Website: cdm.unfccc.int/Reference/Reports/TTreport/TTrep08.pdf Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects Screenshot References: Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects[1] Overview "Although the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) does not have an explicit technology transfer mandate, it may contribute to technology transfer by financing emission reduction projects using technologies currently not available in the host countries. This report analyzes the claims of

116

Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold Climate Heat Pump Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

117

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Development Model Project Development Model NREL developed the Project Development Model to evaluate the risks and investment decisions required for successful renewable energy project development. The two-phase iterative model includes elements in project fundamentals and project development based off commercial project development practices supported by tools such as pro formas and checklists. Project Fundamentals or BEPTC(tm) Renewable Energy Project Development Tool For help with the BEPTC phase of your project, check out the Renewable Energy Project Development Tool, developed by NREL for U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment effort. The tool helps you quickly establish the key motivators and feasibility of your project. Strong project fundamentals and an understanding of how a project fits

119

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization By: Jacques Beaudry-Losique, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy

120

The Technology Integration Outreach Project: Developing "Best Practices" Curriculum Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Technology Integration Outreach Project (TIOP) is a joint project between the Southeast Interactive Long Distance Learning Consortium (SILDL), and University of South Dakota School of Education's Professional Development Center (PDC) and it's Learning ...

Mary Engstrom; Rosanne Yost; Ray Thompson; Don Versteeg

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Collaborative Project to Develop Technology to Capture and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

900 E. Benson Boulevard Anchorage, AK 99519 A Collaborative Project to Develop Technology to Capture and Store CO 2 from Large Combustion Sources Abstract A major...

122

Williams instructional technology: summer students working on faculty projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Williams Instructional Technology (WIT) is a summer technology intern program hosted by the Office for Information Technology at Williams College. The WIT program started in 1997 as part of an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant. The goals of the program ... Keywords: faculty, instructional technology, program, projects, students, summer, training, williams college, wit

Trevor Murphy

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology September 6, 2011 - 11:24am Addthis U.S. Department Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced nearly $17 million in funding over the next three years for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology. The list of 16 projects in 11 different states can be found here. Applicant Location Award Amount; Funding is from DOE unless otherwise noted Description Sustainable Small Hydro (Topic Areas 1.1. and 1.2) Earth by Design Bend, OR $1,500,000 This project will develop and test a new low-head modular hydropower technology in a canal in Oregon's North Unit Irrigation District to produce cost-competitive electricity.

124

16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology September 6, 2011 - 11:24am Addthis U.S. Department Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced nearly $17 million in funding over the next three years for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology. The list of 16 projects in 11 different states can be found here. Applicant Location Award Amount; Funding is from DOE unless otherwise noted Description Sustainable Small Hydro (Topic Areas 1.1. and 1.2) Earth by Design Bend, OR $1,500,000 This project will develop and test a new low-head modular hydropower technology in a canal in Oregon's North Unit Irrigation District to produce cost-competitive electricity.

125

ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight March 1, 2011 - 1:49pm Addthis William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last night, we had the chance to visit with a few of the researchers and scientists behind the exciting projects on display at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Technology Showcase. The following projects represent a few of the highlights we found: PolyPlus At Berkeley, CA-based PolyPlus Battery Company, researchers are developing a lithium-air battery that could enable an electric car to travel 500 miles

126

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the

127

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Prioritizing a Portfolio of Information Technology Investment Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of real options for valuation of information technology (IT) investments has been documented, little research has been conducted to examine its relevance for valuing and prioritizing a portfolio of projects. Complexities of IT projects ... Keywords: Business Value, Information Technology, Investment Evaluation, Net Present Value, Portfolio Optimization, Real Options Analysis, Sequential Investment

Indranil Bardhan; Ryan Sougstad

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

132

DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology DOE Projects to Advance Environmental Science and Technology August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected nine new projects targeting environmental tools and technology for shale gas and coalbed methane (CBM) production. NETL's goals for these projects are to improve management of water resources, water usage, and water disposal, and to support science that will aid the regulatory and permitting processes required for shale gas development. A primary goal of Fossil Energy's Oil and Natural Gas Program is to enhance the responsible development of domestic natural gas and oil resources that supply the country's energy. A specific objective is to accelerate the

133

MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Devices Deployed 6 Number of Build Out Units Deployed 7 Main Overseeing Organization Ocean Power Technologies Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesPowerBuoy Project Timeline and...

134

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 1 of 4 7 is that portion of the total cost of a research or other externally funded project that is not funded as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Goddard III, William A.

135

Artificial Retina Project Spurs New Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy's (DOE) Artificial Retina Project has led to cutting-edge innovations as well as several unanticipated discoveries and spinoffs that are increasing the value of...

136

Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulated Operational Environment Environment that uses a range of waste simulants for testing of a virtual prototype. iv 233 Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project...

137

MDHA Geothermal Technologies Program Geothermal Project | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website http:www.nashville-mdha.org Partner 1 Siemens Building Technologies Partner 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratories Partner 3 Nashville Electric Service Funding Opportunity...

138

ATP-MEP TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION PILOT PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a hard, amorphous carbon thin film deposited from ... doping and can provide thin, hard, low ... will either adopt the technologies or lose market share. ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections  

SciTech Connect

The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Grubb, Kimberly R [ORNL; Lee, Russell [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Project Management Plan for the INEL technology logic diagrams  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan (PjMP) describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to activities outlined in Technical Task Plan (TTP) ID-121117, ``Technology Logic Diagrams For The INEL.`` The work on this project will be conducted by personnel in EG&G Idaho, Inc.`s Waste Technology Development Program. Technology logic diagrams represent a formal methodology to identify technology gaps or needs within Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Operations, which will focus on Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM-50) research and development, demonstration, test, and evaluation efforts throughout the US Department of Energy complex. This PjMP describes the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, workscope and processes for implementing and managing the technology logic diagram for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory project.

Rudin, M.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Project Management Plan for the INEL technology logic diagrams  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan (PjMP) describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to activities outlined in Technical Task Plan (TTP) ID-121117, Technology Logic Diagrams For The INEL.'' The work on this project will be conducted by personnel in EG G Idaho, Inc.'s Waste Technology Development Program. Technology logic diagrams represent a formal methodology to identify technology gaps or needs within Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Operations, which will focus on Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM-50) research and development, demonstration, test, and evaluation efforts throughout the US Department of Energy complex. This PjMP describes the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, workscope and processes for implementing and managing the technology logic diagram for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory project.

Rudin, M.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration 9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply. Under the proposed action, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability would provide cost shared funding for the project through American Reinvestment and Recovery Act

144

DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama August 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection has begun at the world's first fully integrated coal power and geologic storage project in southwest Alabama, with the goals of assessing integration of the technologies involved and laying the foundation for future use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The "Anthropogenic Test"--conducted by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven partnerships in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program--uses CO2 from a newly constructed post-combustion CO2-capture facility at Alabama Power's 2,657-megawatt Barry Electric Generating Plant (Plant Barry). It will help

145

Three Argonne projects win DOE funding to improve vehicle technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Argonne projects win DOE funding to improve vehicle technologies By Louise Lerner * September 12, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National...

146

DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research August 14, 2013 - 1:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for additional development. Developing gas turbines that run with greater cleanness and efficiency than current models is of great benefit both to the environment and the power industry, but development of such advanced turbine systems requires significant advances in high-temperature materials science, an understanding of combustion phenomena, and development of innovative

147

Stevens Institute of Technology Solar Decathlon 2011 Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dan Tipaldo Schaefer School of Eng. and Science dtipaldo@stevens.edu U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 Stevens Institute of Technology As-Built Project Manual August...

148

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

149

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

150

SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tank 48H Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment Harry D. Harmon Joan B. Berkowitz John C. DeVine, Jr. Herbert G. Sutter Joan K. Young SPD-07-195 July 31, 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Aiken, South Carolina SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project SPD-07-195 Technology Readiness Assessment July 31, 2007 Signature Page 7/31/07 ___________________________ _________________________ John C. DeVine, Jr., Team Member Date SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project SPD-07-195 Technology Readiness Assessment July 31, 2007 Executive Summary The purpose of this assessment was to determine the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's

151

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - "Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets." In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.'' In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, B.E.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT PIPING MTO FOR 1 MW SOLAR THERMAL POWER PROJECT #12;PIPING MTO 1089-202-108 1 2 1 BE,7.1Thk.,Welded To ANSI B-36.10 12" 165 M

Narayanan, H.

154

Foresight and forecasts: participation in a welfare technology innovation project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In predicting areas of growth, public innovation projects may rely on optimistic visions of technology still in development as a way of ensuring novelty for funding. This paper explores what happens when forecasts of robotic technology meets the practice ... Keywords: facilitation, healthcare, participatory innovation, robotics

Kyle Kilbourn; Marie Bay

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

Johnson, D.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1: Technology Demonstration Projects 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

157

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

Driscoll, F.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Wave Energy Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Energy Technologies Inc Address 270 Sandy Cove Rd Place Ketch Harbour Zip B3V 1K9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:...

160

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4982E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Page, Janie, Sila Kiliccote, Junqiao Han Dudley, Mary Ann Piette, Albert K. Chiu, Bashar Kellow, Edward Koch, and Paul Lipkin Date Published 07/2011 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, emerging technologies, market sectors, medium commercial business, openadr, small commercial, small commercial business, technologies Abstract Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Building Technologies Office: R&D Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Projects R&D Projects DOE leadership and support spur advances in the efficacy and performance of light-emitting diode (LED) and organic LED (OLED) technologies-advances that might not otherwise be achieved without DOE funding. (Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.) The three-pronged DOE SSL R&D program addresses: Core Technology Research, focusing on applied research for technology development, with particular emphasis on meeting efficiency, performance, and cost targets. This research fills technology gaps to overcome technical barriers, and is subject to the Exceptional Circumstances Determination regarding intellectual property. Product Development, using the knowledge gained from basic or applied research to develop or improve commercially viable materials, devices, or systems.

163

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

MHK Technologies/Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Ocean < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydro Green Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Alaska 35 *MHK Projects/Maine 1 Project *MHK Projects/Mississippi 6 *MHK Projects/Mississippi 7 *MHK Projects/New York 1 *MHK Projects/New York 2 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description Hydro Green Energy's HydroKinetic Turbine Arrays operate differently than a traditional hydropower plant. Like a traditional hydropower station, the electricity that we produce is clean and renewable, however, there are significant differences. Hydro Green Energy's Krouse Turbines are kinetic turbines. This means that the renewable power that is generated comes from the energy in the "motion" of the moving water, i.e. the velocity of the moving water be it river, tidal or ocean current to generate river, tidal energy or ocean energy, respectively.

165

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project TitJe: Geothermal Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Information Project TitJe: Geothermal Technologies Program Date: 12-11-()9 DOE Code: 6730.020.61041 Contractor Code: Project Lead: Project Overview This NEPA is for the laying of a 2,975 foot, 8" welded plastic water line from Little Teapot Creek near in the 1. What are the environmental impacts? intersection with Teapot Creek to the North Waterflood Facility (NWF) building. The entire project area is within Section 21 T39N R78W (map attached) and will not impact any wet land areas but will cross one 2. What is the legal location? intermittent stream. The stream is presently dry. The project will include the clearing of vegetation from a 12 3. What is the duration of the project? foot wide construction corridor along the route, digging a 5 foot deep trench, welding and placing the plastic

166

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Communications Technology and Urban Governance Reform: Project Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe highlights of a research project funded by the NSF Digital Government program. The study has examined the impacts of advanced communication technologies in the implementation of a system of neighborhood councils in Los Angeles. It employs social network analysis to chart the development of political networks engendered by the reform and the role of email in shaping these networks.

Christopher Weare

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Regulators approve first commercial hydrokinetic projects in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When the tube sections flex, hydraulic arms move in opposite directions and turn a generator that produces power. Sea snakes are being tested in Scotland and Portugal.

169

Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology Project bibliography, 1984--1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology [for Advanced Heat Engines] Project was begun in 1983 to meet the ceramic materials needs of the companion DOE automotive engine program, the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) project, and the Heavy Duty Transport (low-heat-rejection, heavy-duty diesel) project. Goal is to develop an industry technology base for reliable and cost effective ceramics for applications in advanced automotive gas turbine and diesel engines. Research areas were identified following extensive input from industry and academia. Majority of research is done by industry (60%); work is also done at colleges and universities, in-house, and at other national laboratories and government agencies. In the beginning, reliability of ceramic components was the key issue. The reliability issues have largely been met and, at the present time, cost is the driving issue, especially in light of the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. Emphasis of the program has now been shifted toward developing cost-effective ceramic components for high-performance engines in the near-term. This bibliography is a compilation of publications done in conjunction with the Ceramic Technology Project since its beginning. Citations were obtained from reports done by participants in the project. We have tried to limit citations to those published and easily located. The end date of 1992 was selected.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Demonstration Project 111, ITS/CVO Technology Truck, Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995, the planning and building processes began to design and develop a mobile demonstration unit that could travel across the nation and be used as an effective outreach tool. In 1997, the unit was completed; and from June 1997 until December 2000, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) mobilized the Technology Truck, also known as Demonstration Project No. 111, ''Advanced Motor Carrier Operations and Safety Technologies.'' The project featured the latest available state-of-the-practice intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies designed to improve both the efficiency and safety of commercial vehicle operations (CVO). The Technology Truck was designed to inform and educate the motor carrier community and other stakeholders regarding ITS technologies, thus gaining support and buy-in for participation in the ITS program. The primary objective of the project was to demonstrate new and emerging ITS/CVO technologies and programs, showing their impact on motor carrier safety and productivity. In order to meet the objectives of the Technology Truck project, the FHWA/FMCSA formed public/private partnerships with industry and with Oak Ridge National Laboratory to demonstrate and display available ITS/CVO technologies in a cooperative effort. The mobile demonstration unit was showcased at national and regional conferences, symposiums, universities, truck shows and other venues, in an effort to reach as many potential users and decision makers as possible. By the end of the touring phase, the ITS/CVO Technology Truck had been demonstrated in 38 states, 4 Canadian provinces, 88 cities, and 114 events; been toured by 18,099 people; and traveled 115,233 miles. The market penetration for the Technology Truck exceeded 4,000,000, and the website received more than 25,000 hits. In addition to the Truck's visits, the portable ITS/CVO kiosk was demonstrated at 31 events in 23 cites in 15 states.

Gambrell, KP

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

Johnson, D.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NETL Coal Power Systems & Technology: Interactive Project Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal & Power Systems Coal & Power Systems Project Portfolio Web Map Welcome to the Strategic Center for Coal Project Portfolio Web Map assembled by NETL. The web map includes projects across all Coal & Power Systems technologies including Advanced Energy Systems, Carbon Capture, Carbon Storage, Cross-Cutting Research, Futuregen 2.0, Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS), Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI), Geologic Sequestration Training and Research (GSTR), Geologic Sequestration Site Characterization (GSSC), and ICCS (Research). This active web map is updated frequently and provided for informational purposes only. The NETL Strategic Center for Coal Project Portfolio Web Map requires Microsoft Silverlight, a free downloadable browser plug-in. If Silverlight has not been installed previously you will be prompted to do so when the link is clicked to initiate the web map. Microsoft Silverlight is also available at: http://www.microsoft.com/getsilverlight/Get-Started/Install/Default.aspx.

175

Bartlesville Energy Technology Center enhanced oil recovery project data base  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive EOR project data base that is validated, integrated, and continuously maintained and updated is being developed at BETC. The data base, which is not currently available to the public, provides an information resource to accelerate the advancement and applications of EOR technology. The primary sources of data have been specific EOR Projects certified in the Incentives Program, the DOE Cost-Shared Tertiary Program, and a data base of ongoing EOR projects supplied by Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC). Information from these sources has provided an extensive basis for the development of a comprehensive data base relating the key parameters for EOR projects in the United States. The sources and types of data within the data base are organized in a manner which will facilitate information transfer within the petroleum industry. 28 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

French, T.R.; Ray, R.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R&D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R&D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

RAPHAEL: The European Union's (Very) High Temperature Reactor Technology Project  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1990, the European Union (EU) was conducting work on High Temperature Reactors (HTR) confirming their high potential in terms of safety (inherent safety features), environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (high efficiency, potential suitability for various fuel cycles), and economics (simplifications arising from safety features). In April 2005, the EU Commission has started a new 4-year Integrated Project on Very High Temperature Reactors (RAPHAEL: Reactor for Process Heat And Electricity) as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The European Commission and the 33 partners from industry, R and D organizations and academia finance the project together. After the successful performance of earlier HTR-related EU projects which included the recovery of some earlier German experience and the re-establishment of strategically important R and D capabilities in Europe, RAPHAEL focuses now on key technologies required for an industrial VHTR deployment, both specific to very high temperature and generic to all types of modular HTR with emphasis on combined process heat and electricity generation. Advanced technologies are explored in order to meet the performance challenges required for a VHTR (900-1000 deg C, up to 200 GWd/tHM). To facilitate the planned sharing of significant parts of RAPHAEL results with the signatories of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR projects, RAPHAEL is structured in a similar way as the corresponding GIF VHTR projects. (authors)

Fuetterer, Michael A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Besson, D.; Bogusch, E.; Carluec, B.; Hittner, D.; Verrier, D. [AREVA Framatome-ANP (France); Billot, Ph.; Phelip, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (France); Buckthorpe, D. [NNC Ltd, Knutsford (United Kingdom); Casalta, S. [European Commission, DG RTD, Brussels (Belgium); Chauvet, V. [STEP, Paris (France); Van Heek, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Von Lensa, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Pirson, J. [Tractebel Engineering, Brussels (Belgium); Scheuermann, W. [Institut fuer Kernenergetik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM PROGRAM � 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report March 1, 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

MHK Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Projects MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Click one of the following Marine Hydrokinetic Projects for more information: Loading... 40MW Lewis project ADM 3 ADM 4 ADM 5 AW Energy EMEC AWS II Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Agucadoura Alaska 1 Alaska 13 Alaska 17 Alaska 18 Alaska 24 Alaska 25 Alaska 28 Alaska 31 Alaska 33 Alaska 35 Alaska 36 Alaska 7 Algiers Cutoff Project Algiers Light Project Amity Point Anconia Point Project Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Aquantis Project Ashley Point Project Astoria Tidal Energy Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Avalon Tidal Avondale Bend Project BW2 Tidal Bar Field Bend Barfield Point Bayou Latenache Belair Project Belleville BioSTREAM Pilot Plant Bluemill Sound Bondurant Chute Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1

183

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). 1944 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed in development and demonstration of structural ceramics technology for automotive gas turbine engines. At the end of this period, the project name was changed to ``Ceramic Turbine Engine Demonstration Project``, effective Jan. 1995. Objectives are to provide early field experience demonstrating the reliability and durability of ceramic components in a modified, available gas turbine engine application, and to scale up and improve the manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate the application of these processes in the production environment. The 1994 ATTAP activities emphasized demonstration and refinement of the ceramic turbine nozzles in the AlliedSignal/Garrett Model 331-200[CT] engine test bed in preparation for field testing; improvements in understanding the vibration characteristics of the ceramic turbine blades; improvements in critical ceramics technologies; and scaleup of the process used to manufacture ceramic turbine components.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

1990 DOE/SANDIA crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Cell Research Division and Photovoltaic Technology Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held August 7 through 9, 1990 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, concentrator 3-5 cell research, and concentrating collector development.

Ruby, D.S. (ed.)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Digg

186

Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies  

SciTech Connect

The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects  

SciTech Connect

To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DoE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights next steps to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major show-stopper, largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations - A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations. - A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research

Sharon Kramer, Mirko Previsic, Peter Nelson, Sheri Woo

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

MHK Projects/Muroran Institute of Technology Pilot Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Pilot Project Technology Pilot Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.5197,"lon":136.319,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bartlesville Energy Technology Center enhanced oil recovery project data base  

SciTech Connect

The BETC Enhanced Oil Recovery Data Base is currently being developed to provide an information resource to accelerate the advancement and applications of EOR technology. The primary initial sources of data have been the Incentive and Cost-Shared Programs. The data base presently contains information on 607 EOR projects. This includes 410 of the approximately 423 projects which operators originally applied for certification with the Incentive Program; 20 EOR projects under the Cost-Shared Program; and a data base relating to 177 projects developed by Gulf Universities Research Consortium. In addition, relevant data from all previous DOE-funded contractor EOR data bases will be integrated into the BETC data base. Data collection activities from publicly available information sources is continuing on an on-going basis to insure the accuracy and timeliness of the information within the data base. The BETC data base is being developed utilizing a commercial data base management system. The basic structure of the data base is presented as Appendix I. This data base includes information relating to reservoir characteristics, process-specific data, cost information, production data, and contact persons for each project. The preliminary list of data elements and the current density of occurrence is presented as Appendix II. A basic profile of the types of projects contained within the developmental data base is contained in Appendix III. Appendix IV presents a number of system output reports to illustrate potential data base applications. Plans to eventually place the data base in a computer system which would be publicly accessible are currently under active consideration. A list of Incentive projects processed to date by BETC is provided as Appendix V. Appendix VI gives a detailed report by EOR Process for all projects in the BETC's Enhanced Oil Recovery Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Westinghouse Savannah River Company LLC Westinghouse Savannah River Company LLC Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 LWO-SPT-2007-00247 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00247 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

194

Manufacturing Science and Technology: R & D Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Projects R&D Projects This page is included to give visitors to the web site a sample of the R&D work that this Center undertakes. The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center works mainly in the Development-to-Application part of the Research-to-Development-to-Application cycle.Staff in the Center, however, do perform work in the research-to-development area with the aim of providing our customers with more robust, quicker, and/or less expensive processes to meet Sandia's manufacturing needs. We also do R&D to develop processes required for the manufacture of specialized materials and components that can no longer be obtained either in the commercial market or at one of the DOE's production facilities. Within Sandia, most manufacturing R&D is carried out by the Manufacturing

195

Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Overview of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project  

SciTech Connect

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a historic government/industry photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing R&D partnership composed of joint efforts between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US PV industry. The project`s ultimate goal is to ensure that the US industry retains and extends its world leadership role in the manufacture and commercial development of PV components and systems. PVMaT is designed to do this by helping the US PV industry improve manufacturing processes, accelerate manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, improve commercial product performance, and lay the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing capacities. Phase 1 of the project, the problem identification phase, was completed in early 1991. Phase 2, the problem solution phase, which addresses process-specific problems of specific manufacturers, is now underway with an expected duration of 5 years. Phase 3 addresses R&D problems that are relatively common to a number of PV companies or the PV industry as a whole. These ``generic`` problem areas are being addressed through a teamed research approach.

Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Mooney, G.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ceramic Technology Project data base: September 1992 summary report  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in this report represent an intense effort to improve processing methods, testing methods, and general mechanical properties (rupture modulus, tensile, creep, stress-rupture, dynamic and cyclic fatigue, fracture toughness) of candidate ceramics for use in advanced heat engines. This work was performed by many facilities and represents only a small part of the data generated by the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) since 1986. Materials discussed include GTE PY6, GN-10, NT-154, NT-164, SN-260, SN-251, SN-252, AY6, silicon nitride combined with rare-earth oxides, Y-TZP, ZTA, NC-433, NT-230, Hexoloy SA, MgO-PSZ-to-MgO-PSZ joints, MgO-PSZ-to-cast iron, and a few whisker/fiber-reinforced ceramics. Information in this report was taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and from final reports summarizing the results of individual studies. Test results are presented in tabular form and in graphs. All data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP data base and are available to all project participants on request. The objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies but not to draw conclusions from those data.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Technology Base Research Project for electrochemical energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US DOE's Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an electrochemical energy storage program, which includes R D on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The general R D areas addressed by the project include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced batteries, determination of technical feasibility of the new couples, improvements in battery components and materials, establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion, and the development of air-system (fuel cell, metal/air) technology for transportation applications. Major emphasis is given to applied research which will lead to superior performance and lower life-cycle costs. The TBR Project is divided into three major project elements: Exploratory Research, Applied Science Research, and Air Systems Research. Highlights of each project element are summarized according to the appropriate battery system or electrochemical research area. 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Kinoshita, Kim (ed.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technology Base Research Project for electrochemical energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE's Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an electrochemical energy storage program, which includes R D on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The general R D areas addressed by the project include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced batteries, determination of technical feasibility of the new couples, improvements in battery components and materials, establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion, and the development of air-system (fuel cell, metal/air) technology for transportation applications. Major emphasis is given to applied research which will lead to superior performance and lower life-cycle costs. The TBR Project is divided into three major project elements: Exploratory Research, Applied Science Research, and Air Systems Research. Highlights of each project element are summarized according to the appropriate battery system or electrochemical research area. 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Kinoshita, Kim (ed.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

1992 DOE/Sandia crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia National Laboratories` Photovoltaic Technology and Photovoltaic Evaluation Departments. It contains information supplied by organizations making presentations at the meeting, which was held July 14--15, 1992 at the Sheraton Old Town Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Overview sessions covered the Department of Energy (DOE) program, including those at Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and non-DOE programs, including the EPRI concentrator collector program, The Japanese crystalline silicon program, and some concentrating photovoltaic activities in Europe. Additional sessions included papers on Sandia`s Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory`s collaborative research, cell processing research, the activities of the participants in the Concentrator Initiative Program, and photovoltaic technology evaluation at Sandia and NREL.

Maish, A. [ed.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Technology Transfer: Success Stories: Industry-Lab Research Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry-Lab Collaboration Industry-Lab Collaboration Below are some of Berkeley Lab's collaborative research projects performed with industry. Companies Technologies Applied Materials, Inc. Particle -Free Wafer Processing Boeing, StatOil Hydro Techno Economic Model for Commercial Cellulosic Biorefineries Capintec, Inc. Compact Scintillation Camera for Medical Imaging Catalytica, Inc. Optimized Catalysts For The Cracking of Heavier Petroleum Feedstocks Chiron Corporation High Throughput Assay for Screening Novel Anti-Cancer Compounds CVC-Commonwealth Scientific Corp. Advanced Hard Carbon Plasma Deposition System with Application to the Magnetic Storage Industry E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company Catalytic Conversion of Chloro-Fluorocarbons over Palladium-Carbon Catalysts Empire Magnetics, Inc.

204

Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report  

SciTech Connect

Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

Zheng Zhang

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth. Participating fuel cell developers share price information about their fuel cell products and/or raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, and safety with NREL via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC). The limited-access, off-network HSDC houses the data and analysis tools to protect proprietary information. NREL shares individualized data analysis results as detailed data products (DDPs) with the partners who supplied the data. Aggregated results are published as composite data products (CDPs), which show the technology status without identifying individual companies. The CDPs are a primary benchmarking tool for the U.S. Department of Energy and other stakeholders interested in tracking the status of fuel cell technologies. They highlight durability advancements, identify areas for continued development, and help set realistic price expectations at small-volume production.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth. Participating fuel cell developers share price information about their fuel cell products and/or raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, and safety with NREL via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC). The limited-access, off-network HSDC houses the data and analysis tools to protect proprietary information. NREL shares individualized data analysis results as detailed data products (DDPs) with the partners who supplied the data. Aggregated results are published as composite data products (CDPs), which show the technology status without identifying individual companies. The CDPs are a primary benchmarking tool for the U.S. Department of Energy and other stakeholders interested in tracking the status of fuel cell technologies. They highlight durability advancements, identify areas for continued development, and help set realistic price expectations at small-volume production.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTJ!R1,fiNATION RECIPIENT:Sound & Sea Technology. Inc. PROJECT TITLE: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Advancemenlinitiative Page I of2 STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number N[PA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 OE-EEOOO3632 GFO-OOO3632-OO1 GOO Based on my review oflhe informatioD concerning the proposed action,.s NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, bul 1"101 limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

211

Solar central receiver technology: the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two will be the world`s largest operating solar central receiver power plant. It is expected to begin operating in April 1996; it is currently undergoing start-up and checkout. The plant will use sunlight reflected from 1926 sun-tracking mirrors to heat molten nitrate salt flowing in a heat exchanger (receiver) that sits atop a 200 foot tower. The heated salt will be stored in a tank for use, when needed, to generate superheated steam for producing electricity with a conventional Rankine-cycle turbine/generator. The purpose of the project is to validate molten-salt solar central receiver technology and to reduce the perceived risks associated with the first full-scale commercial plants. Already, much has been learned during the project including the effects of trace contaminants in the salt and the large effect of wind on the receiver. There is also much that remains to be learned. This report describes the technical status of the Solar Two project including a summary of lessons learned to date.

Sutherland, J.P. [Southern California Edison Co., Irwindale, CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 -???????? 09/12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

Meggitt, Dallas J.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database  

SciTech Connect

A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst.

Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pearson, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Baseline Revision 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Plan, MWNT Revised Baseline 3.0, replaces and significantly modifies the current baseline. The revised plan will focus efforts specifically on the demonstration of an integrated Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) system. In addition to the MSO primary unit, offgas, and salt recycle subsystems, the demonstrations will include the generation of robust final forms from process mineral residues. A simplified process flow chart for the expedited demonstration is shown. To minimize costs and to accelerate the schedule for deployment, the integrated system will be staged in an existing facility at LLNL equipped to handle hazardous and radioactive materials. The MSO systems will be activated in FY97, followed by the activation of final forms in FY98.

Adamson, M.G.; Densley, P.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

218

AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2013 Early Release AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09 50.49 8,700 7,450 Pulverized Coal with carbon sequestration 2017 650 4 4,662 1.07 1.03 5,138 4.37 65.31 12,000 9,316

219

Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

Navigant Consulting Inc.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

Navigant Consulting Inc.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

SunShot Initiative: Big Data Projects on Solar Technology Evolution...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are focused on optimizing the R&D mix to maximize real-world cost declines for solar technologies. Four "diffusion" project teams are combining big datasets, computational...

223

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

224

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives are listed and technical progress is summarized for contracts for field projects and supporting research on: chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, extraction technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R&D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Basis and objectives of the Los Alamos Accelerator?Driven Transmutation technology project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator?Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) Project carries three approaches for dealing with waste from the defense and commercial nuclear energy enterprise. First

Charles D. Bowman

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

State Technology Extension Assistance Project for the State of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST provides technical assistance to State technology extension programs throughout the United States. The purpose ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda (PDF 83 KB) New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 1.2 MB), P. Davis, DOE New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 609 KB), N. Garland, DOE Membranes Membranes and MEAs for Dry,...

230

Methodological analysis of process technology in Engineering projects implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis will evaluate the utilization of process management tools in the implementation of a major engineering project in a steel plant of Gerdau Group in the city of Charqueadas, Brazil. The project consisted of an ...

Heineck, Fabio L. (Fabio Luis)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NREL: Technology Deployment - Wind for Schools Project Gains...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 29, 2013 Pennsylvania is one area where the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Powering America Wind for Schools project is seeing big impact thanks to several projects...

232

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms Many facilities slated for D&D across the DOE complex pose hazards (radiological, chemical, and structural) which prevent the use of traditional manual techniques. D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms More Documents & Publications Demonstration of Fixatives to Control Contamination and Accelerate D&D Demonstration of DeconGel (TM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building 2026 D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms

235

Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Instrumentation of Current Technology Testing and Replicating Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 2 Project Team o Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) o Jarlath McEntee o Monty Worthington o University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) o Faculty o Thomas Ravens o Todd Petersen o Muhammad Ali o Research Assistants o Tim Kirk o Jacob Clark o Angus Bromaghin 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 3 ORPC Technology o TideGen Power System (TGU) o Designed to generate electricity at water depths of 50 to 100 feet 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 4 ORPC Technology 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 5 TGU Performance Test Results o ORPC field testing on TGU prototype in 2008 showed significant wear on bearings and seals. 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 6

237

Supporting the A Project of Technology Transfer Mission  

Oak Ridge at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A Project of One of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessees family of companies For more information on ...

238

NREL: Technology Transfer - CEMEX Wind Turbine Project Case Study  

The company began negotiations with project developer Foundation Wind Power in July 2010 and subsequently completed a detailed review of various CEMEX ...

239

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was conducted using three different baseline models for estimation peak load reductions. One was three-in-ten baseline, which is based on the site electricity consumption from 7 am to 10 am for the three days with the highest consumption of the previous ten business days. The second model, the LBNL outside air temperature (OAT) regression baseline model, is based on OAT data and site electricity consumption from the previous ten days, adjusted using weather regressions from the fifteen-minute electric load data during each DR test event for each site. A third baseline that simply averages the available load data was used for sites less with less than 10 days of historical meter data. The evaluation also included surveying sites regarding any problems or issues that arose during the DR test events. Question covered occupant comfort, control issues and other potential problems.

Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Locomotive Emission and Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to a United States Department of Energy (DOE) solicitation, the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), in partnership with CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT), submitted a proposal to DOE to support the demonstration of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) technology on fifty-six CSXT locomotives. The project purpose was to demonstrate the idle fuel savings, the Nitrous Oxide (NOX) emissions reduction and the noise reduction capabilities of the APU. Fifty-six CSXT Baltimore Division locomotives were equipped with APUs, Engine Run Managers (ERM) and communications equipment to permit GPS tracking and data collection from the locomotives. Throughout the report there is mention of the percent time spent in the State of Maryland. The fifty-six locomotives spent most of their time inside the borders of Maryland and some spent all their time inside the state borders. Usually when a locomotive traveled beyond the Maryland State border it was into an adjoining state. They were divided into four groups according to assignment: (1) Power Unit/Switcher Mate units, (2) Remote Control units, (3) SD50 Pusher units and (4) Other units. The primary data of interest were idle data plus the status of the locomotive--stationary or moving. Also collected were main engine off, idling or working. Idle data were collected by county location, by locomotive status (stationary or moving) and type of idle (Idle 1, main engine idling, APU off; Idle 2, main engine off, APU on; Idle 3, main engine off, APU off; Idle 4, main engine idle, APU on). Desirable main engine idle states are main engine off and APU off or main engine off and APU on. Measuring the time the main engine spends in these desirable states versus the total time it could spend in an engine idling state allows the calculation of Percent Idle Management Effectiveness (%IME). IME is the result of the operation of the APU plus the implementation of CSXT's Warm Weather Shutdown Policy. It is difficult to separate the two. The units demonstrated an IME of 64% at stationary idle for the test period. The data collected during calendar year 2004 demonstrated that 707,600 gallons of fuel were saved and 285 tons of NOX were not emitted as a result of idle management in stationary idle, which translates to 12,636 gallons and 5.1 tons of NOx per unit respectively. The noise reduction capabilities of the APU demonstrated that at 150 feet from the locomotive the loaded APU with the main engine shut down generated noise that was only marginally above ambient noise level.

John R. Archer

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

242

Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Los Alamos National Laboratory Tritium Technology Deployments Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the organization, planning and initial implementation of a DOE OST program to deploy proven, cost effective technologies into D&D programs throughout the complex. The primary intent is to accelerate closure of the projects thereby saving considerable funds and at the same time being protective of worker health and the environment. Most of the technologies in the ''toolkit'' for this program have been demonstrated at a DOE site as part of a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP). The Mound Tritium D&D LSDDP served as the base program for the technologies being deployed in this project but other LSDDP demonstrated technologies or ready-for-use commercial technologies will also be considered. The project team will evaluate needs provided by site D&D project managers, match technologies against those needs and rank deployments using a criteria listing. After selecting deployments the project will purchase the equipment and provide a deployment engineer to facilitate the technology implementation. Other cost associated with the use of the technology will be borne by the site including operating staff, safety and health reviews etc. A cost and performance report will be prepared following the deployment to document the results.

McFee, J.; Blauvelt, D.; Stallings, E.; Willms, S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

NREL: Technology Deployment - Wind for Schools Project Enters...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Enters 2013 with 124 Turbine Installations March 29, 2013 This past winter, NREL hosted the Sixth Annual Wind for Schools Summit. Forty-six attendees...

246

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

247

Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The projects scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industrys development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

usion Technology for ITER, the ITER Project. Further Development Towards a DEMO Fusion Power Plant (4/4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usion Technology for ITER, the ITER Project. Further Development Towards a DEMO Fusion Power Plant (4/4)

CERN. Geneva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill 944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV SUMMARY Ormat Technologies, Inc. (Ormat) proposes to use DOE and cost share funding to study the Brady Hot Springs geothermal Field 15-12RD well. This is an EGS Demonstration project divided into three phases. During Phase 1, Ormat characterized the target well to prepare for stimulation activities in Phase 2, Phase 2: Well Stimulation and Collection/Analysis of Stimulation Monitoring Data and Phase 3: Long-term testing of the system. Phase 2 and 3 activities would occur at Ormat's Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Churchill County, NV on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). Since Phases 2 and 3

250

Federal assistance program. Geothermal technology transfer. Project status report, May 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress for the month of May, 1986, is described. Projects include evaluation of direct heating of greenhouses and other businesses, technology transfer to consultants, developers and users, and program monitor activities. (ACR)

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill 944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV SUMMARY Ormat Technologies, Inc. (Ormat) proposes to use DOE and cost share funding to study the Brady Hot Springs geothermal Field 15-12RD well. This is an EGS Demonstration project divided into three phases. During Phase 1, Ormat characterized the target well to prepare for stimulation activities in Phase 2, Phase 2: Well Stimulation and Collection/Analysis of Stimulation Monitoring Data and Phase 3: Long-term testing of the system. Phase 2 and 3 activities would occur at Ormat's Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Churchill County, NV on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). Since Phases 2 and 3

252

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting On January 5th and 6th, 2005, the FreedomCAR and Fuels...

253

Energy's Technology Research Project (TRP) Program W(C)-93-015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

made in the course of or under arrangements entered into under the Department of Energy's Technology Research Project (TRP) Program W(C)-93-015 The Department of Energy (DOE) is...

254

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Following the fuel cell funding announcement, DOE funded the fuel cell market transformation projects listed below. These projects focus on fuel cell systems in emergency backup power, material handling, and combined heat and power applications, with the goal of improving the potential of fuel cells to provide power in stationary, portable, and specialty vehicles. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is collecting and analyzing data from these projects to show potential adopters the benefits and real-world performance of fuel cells. These data are aggregated across industries and sites as composite data products to provide relevant technology status results and fuel cell performance data without revealing proprietary information. These publicly available data products build the business case for fuel cells and help fuel cell developers understand the state of technologies while identifying ways to improve them.

255

The Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program/Segmented Gate System Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working to accelerate the acceptance and application of innovative technologies that improve the way the nation manages its environmental remediation problems. The DOE Office of Science and Technology established the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program (ASTD) to help accelerate the acceptance and implementation of new and innovative soil and ground water remediation technologies. Coordinated by the Department of Energy's Idaho Office, the ASTD Program reduces many of the classic barriers to the deployment of new technologies by involving government, industry, and regulatory agencies in the assessment, implementation, and validation of innovative technologies. Funding is provided through the ASTD Program to assist participating site managers in implementing innovative technologies. The program provides technical assistance to the participating DOE sites by coordinating DOE, industry, and regulatory participation in each project; providing finds for optimizing full-scale operating parameters; coordinating technology performance monitoring; and by developing cost and performance reports on the technology applications.

PATTESON,RAYMOND

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

ATTAP: Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project. Annual report, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of ATTAP is to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a technology state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes opportunities for leading fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible fuel cell technology performance and durability analysis by sharing their raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, safety, and cost with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Technology transfer by CDM projects: a comparison of Brazil, China, India and Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biogas recovery in breeding farms and landfills (see table 3). Renewable energy projects mostly consist is biogas recovery. They generally entail technology transfer. In particular, projects in breeding farms mitigating biogas resulting from the decomposition process of animal effluents present interesting channels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

260

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Program on Technology Innovation: Project Prioritization Optimization Under Budget Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common for an industrial management team to carry out annual capital-budgeting exercises by rank-ordering projects using net present value (NPV), benefit-to-investment ratio (BIR), or other means. However, obtaining these results can be labor intensive. Additionally, during the course of the year, emerging events can have a significant impact on the plant budget, resulting in significant revision to the ranked list and requiring the expenditure of considerable resources. To address this issue, it w...

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hydroacoustic Technologies for Environmental Assessment at Hydro Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroacoustic technologies can aid the hydroelectric community in detection, assessment, and monitoring of underwater physical and biological objects and provide the information necessary to manage effectively both hydroelectric resources and aquatic resources. The emphasis of this report is remote sensing and measurement of in-water geophysical and biological features using sound, particularly in rivers and as it relates to hydroelectric applications. Understanding the science of hydroacoustics and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT OF THE CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME ONE Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC February 2011 ii This page intentionally left blank. Review of Calcine Disposition Project Self-Assessment of Technology Maturation iii SIGNATURES ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Anthony F. Kluk, Team Lead Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Hoyt C. Johnson Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Clyde Phillip McGinnis Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________

265

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWO-SPT-2007-00249 LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, or product or process

266

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

267

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

268

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants June 11, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The projects, totaling nearly $14.4 million, will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Pre-combustion processes convert fossil fuels into a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and CO2 prior to combustion. The CO2 is then separated and the

269

MHK Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Click one of the following Marine Hydrokinetic Technologies for more information: Loading... 14 MW OTECPOWER Aegir Dynamo AirWEC Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine AquaBuoy Aquanator Aquantis Archimedes Wave Swing Atlantis AN 150 Atlantis AR 1000 Atlantis AS 400 Atlantisstrom BOLT Lifesaver Benkatina Turbine Blue Motion Energy marine turbine Bluetec Brandl Generator C Plane C Wave C5 CETO Wave Energy Technology Centipod Closed Cycle OTEC CoRMaT Cross Flow Turbine Current Catcher Current Electric Generator Current Power CurrentStar DEXA Wave Converter Davidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Deep Gen Tidal Turbines Deep Green Deep Ocean Water Application Facility DOWAF Deep Water Pipelines Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine

270

Reservoir and injection technology and Heat Extraction Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the Stanford Geothermal Program in the fiscal year 1989, the task areas include predictive modeling of reservoir behavior and tracer test interpretation and testing. Major emphasis is in reservoir technology, reinjection technology, and heat extraction. Predictive modeling of reservoir behavior consists of a multi-pronged approach to well test analysis under a variety of conditions. The efforts have been directed to designing and analyzing well tests in (1) naturally fractured reservoirs; (2) fractured wells; (3) complex reservoir geometries; and, (4) gas reservoirs including inertial and other effects. The analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoirs are determined using fracture size distribution. In the study of fractured wells, an elliptical coordinate system is used to obtain semi-analytical solutions to finite conductivity fractures. Effort has also been directed to the modeling and creation of a user friendly computer program for steam/gas reservoirs including wellbore storage, skin and non-Darcy flow effects. This work has a complementary effort on modeling high flow rate wells including inertial effects in the wellbore and fractures. In addition, work on gravity drainage systems is being continued.

Horne, R.N.; Ramey, H.H. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Clipper Turbine Development Project; Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc. to develop a new turbine design that incorporates advanced elements.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Property:Project Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Resource Project Resource Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Resource Property Type Text Pages using the property "Project Resource" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Wave MHK Projects/AWS II + Wave MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Wave MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Alaska 35 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + Current /Tidal

274

Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY OF THE CALCINE Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy ECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT ALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME TWO Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC SSESSMENT ROJECT 412.09 (06/03/2009 - Rev. 11) CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN Identifier: Revision*: Page: PLN-1482 2 C-1 of C-317 Appendix C Appendix C Checklists for Critical Technology Elements and Technology Readiness Levels This appendix provides the CTE and TRL checklists for the CTEs. For the TRL questions that receive a "Y" (yes) response, the supporting documentation is provided with a complete reference at the

276

Industrial Technology Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Research Institute Technology Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Industrial Technology Research Institute Name Industrial Technology Research Institute Address Rm. 112, Bldg. 24, 195, Sec. 4, Chung Hsing Rd., Place Chutung, Hsinchu Zip 31040 Country Taiwan Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Company Type Non Profit Technology Point absorber Project ITRI WEC Phone number +886-3-5918579 Website http://www.itri.org.tw Coordinates 24.776467696266°, 121.04182720184° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.776467696266,"lon":121.04182720184,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Stationary Power Application Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to: (1) Develop a reliable, cost-effective, and production-friendly technique to apply the power-enhancing layer at the interface of the air electrode and electrolyte of the Siemens SOFC; (2) Design, build, install, and operate in the field two 5 kWe SOFC systems fabricated with the state-of-the-art cylindrical, tubular cell and bundle technology and incorporating advanced module design features. Siemens successfully demonstrated, first in a number of single cell tests and subsequently in a 48-cell bundle test, a significant power enhancement by employing a power-enhancing composite interlayer at the interface between the air electrode and electrolyte. While successful from a cell power enhancement perspective, the interlayer application process was not suitable for mass manufacturing. The application process was of inconsistent quality, labor intensive, and did not have an acceptable yield. This program evaluated the technical feasibility of four interlayer application techniques. The candidate techniques were selected based on their potential to achieve the technical requirements of the interlayer, to minimize costs (both labor and material), and suitably for large-scale manufacturing. Preliminary screening, utilizing lessons learned in manufacturing tubular cells, narrowed the candidate processes to two, ink-roller coating (IRC) and dip coating (DC). Prototype fixtures were successfully built and utilized to further evaluate the two candidate processes for applying the interlayer to the high power density Delta8 cell geometry. The electrical performance of interlayer cells manufactured via the candidate processes was validated. Dip coating was eventually selected as the application technique of choice for applying the interlayer to the high power Delta8 cell. The technical readiness of the DC process and product quality was successfully and repeatedly demonstrated, and its throughput and cost are amenable to large scale manufacturing. Two 5 kWe-class SOFC power systems were built and installed for the purpose of testing and evaluating state-of-the-art tubular cell and bundle technologies, advanced generator and module design features, balance-of-plant components, and cost reduction measures. Installed at the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, a system operated for more than 17,500 hrs, delivering electrical power to the on-site grid and thermal energy in form of hot water for onsite utilization. Operation was typically autonomous, requiring minimal operator intervention, and achieved an overall availability of greater than 85%. Outages were primarily due to an unstable local grid, two weather related outages were experienced, and very few reliability issues were encountered despite harsh operating conditions. No repairs to the stack, module, or balance-of-plant were required. A second system was designed, built, delivered, and installed at a Siemens facility in Charlotte, North Carolina. Operational issues associated with the balance-of-plant were encountered during startup and prevented the system from operating.

Joseph Pierre

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

279

Energy's Technology Research Project (TRP) Program W(C)-93-015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. and Foreign U.S. and Foreign Patent Rights in Inventions made in the course of or under arrangements entered into under the Department of Energy's Technology Research Project (TRP) Program W(C)-93-015 The Department of Energy (DOE) is one of a number of Federal agencies collaborating with the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) in the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). The TRP is a federal effort to develop "dual-use" technologies with both military and commercial applications, and to help small defense firms make the transition to commercial markets. It is anticipated to be a multi-year funding program and has been funded at approximately $472M in FY'93. The TRP is a key part of the President's Defense Reinvestment and Conversion Initiative. The TRP consists of eight statutory programs established under

280

Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects on the Mississippi River Mississippi River Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference 10 June 2010 Jeff Artman, P.E. MVD Hydropower Business Line Manager Line Manager...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

283

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account...

284

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than 37 million...

285

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 JUNE 2012 7 JUNE 2012 Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions and Improve Efficiency 2 Cover Photos: * Top left: Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station * Top right: We Energy's Presque Isle Power Plant * Bottom: Dynegy's Baldwin Energy Complex A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * NeuCo. , Inc. * WeEnergies 3 Executive Summary 4 Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program 5 CCPI Program 6 Demonstration of Integrated Optimization Software at

286

The State of Solar Power: Benchmarking Solar Technology, Market, and Project Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of solar projects throughout the world is accelerating the pace of technical and economic change in the sector. In fact, innovation is occurring across all the major solar technologies, including crystalline and thin-film, flat-plate photovoltaics, concentrating photovoltaics, and concentrating solar thermal power (CSP), and is driving greater commercial and utility interest. As the sector matures, benchmarking solar market developments and pioneering project work is becoming increasing...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The projects scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industrys development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industrys development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

Mirko Previsic

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

Johnson, D.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Supplemental Comprehensive Report to Congress - Clean Coal Technology Program. Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) in February 1987 submitted a Comprehensive Report to Congress for a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project entitled {open_quotes}Tidd PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} In that document, DOE reported to Congress that the Government share of project costs would be $60,200,000 and that the participant agreed to absorb any cost overruns, even though the public law contained provisions which would allow DOE to share in project cost growths up to 25 percent of the original financial assistance. This Supplemental Report is being submitted because DOE now intends to increase its contribution to the project by approximately 11 percent to facilitate extension of the original 3-year operating period by one additional year. DOE`s overall percentage cost share resulting from this extension will not exceed DOE`s overall percentage cost share in the original agreement.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Final Technical Report: The Water-to-Wire (W2W) Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Free Flow Power (FFP) Water-to-Wire Project (Project) was to evaluate and optimize the performance, environmental compatibility, and cost factors of FFP hydrokinetic turbines through design analyses and deployments in test flumes and riverine locations.

Lissner, Daniel N.; Edward, Lovelace C.

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to $7.3 million to 14 research teams, with a cost-shared value of over $18 million, under the DOE's competitive solicitation for Advanced Water Power Projects. The projects will advance commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of new technologies that can harness renewable energy from oceans and rivers. These efforts will further the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, which dramatically increases clean-energy research

297

DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to $7.3 million to 14 research teams, with a cost-shared value of over $18 million, under the DOE's competitive solicitation for Advanced Water Power Projects. The projects will advance commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of new technologies that can harness renewable energy from oceans and rivers. These efforts will further the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, which dramatically increases clean-energy research

298

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energyâ??s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Programâ??s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Progress of the Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment totals nearly $ 1.3 billion.

Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Progress of the PV Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment total nearly $ 1.3 billion.

Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; Von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PTC, ITC, or Cash Grant? An Analysis of the Choice Facing Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydroelectric, and marine and hydrokinetic power, are notmarine and hydrokinetic facilities. For wind, closed-loop biomass, and geothermal power,

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MHK Technologies/Hydroomel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroomel Hydroomel < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Eco cinetic Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Hydroomel r composed of little modules that perfectly fits into natural and urban environments and on existing structures where it could be located Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 59:09.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Hydroomel&oldid=680955" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

303

Mobile biometric device (MBD) technology : summary of selected first responder experiences in pilot projects.  

SciTech Connect

Mobile biometric devices (MBDs) capable of both enrolling individuals in databases and performing identification checks of subjects in the field are seen as an important capability for military, law enforcement, and homeland security operations. The technology is advancing rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate through an Interagency Agreement with Sandia sponsored a series of pilot projects to obtain information for the first responder law enforcement community on further identification of requirements for mobile biometric device technology. Working with 62 different jurisdictions, including components of the Department of Homeland Security, Sandia delivered a series of reports on user operation of state-of-the-art mobile biometric devices. These reports included feedback information on MBD usage in both operational and exercise scenarios. The findings and conclusions of the project address both the limitations and possibilities of MBD technology to improve operations. Evidence of these possibilities can be found in the adoption of this technology by many agencies today and the cooperation of several law enforcement agencies in both participating in the pilot efforts and sharing of information about their own experiences in efforts undertaken separately.

Aldridge, Chris D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Energy generated by the worlds oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Concentrating Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51137 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Prepared under Task No. SM10.2442

306

DOE/Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boeing Sponsored Projects in Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia Lennie Klebanoff and Joe Pratt Sandia National Laboratories Livermore CA 94551 September 30, 2010 "Exceptional Service in the National Interest" DOE-DOD Workshop on Uses of Fuel Cells in Aviation * ~ 8,300 employees * ~ 1,500 PhDs; ~2800 MS/MA * ~ 700 on-site contractors Sandia National Laboratories Sandia is a government-owned/contractor operated (GOCO) facility. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, manages Sandia for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Website: www.sandia.gov Annual Budget ~ $2.2 Billion ($1.3 Billion DOE, $0.9 Billion work for others) 3 Origin: Boeing Interested in Bringing Fuel Cell Technology to Ground Support Equipment (GSE)

307

Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology projects for the US Pacific Islands. Final report, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the status of 18 of the 33 Department of Energy (DOE) Appropriate Energy Technology (AET) Projects on the US Pacific Islands (excluding the Hawaiian Islands) as of August 1, 1982. The projects include: shallow lens water pumping on the Marshall Islands; hydroelectric power systems on Micronesia; hospital solar hot water system on Micronesia; wind and solar equipment for the Aramas Kapw school in Micronesia; sail powered fishing boat in Micronesia; wind electric power project in Micronesia; smokeless cooking stoves in the Marshall Islands; demonstration programs in the Mariana Islands; typhoon-proof greenhouse on Guam; evaporative cooling for buildings in Guam, solar photovoltaic refrigerator in Micronesia; and a solar dryer demonstration in Micronesia.

Case, C.W.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal's sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E's technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

MHK Technologies/NAREC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAREC NAREC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage NAREC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization NaRec New and Renewable Energy Centre Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The in house engineering and prototype testing capabilities of Narec are assisting wave and tidal stream marine developers move their innovative design concepts towards commercialisation Where the Evopod was tested Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 04:07.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/NAREC&oldid=681614" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

312

Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport  

SciTech Connect

The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support (HVTE-TS) project. 1995--1996 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of technical work accomplished on the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine--Technology Support (HVTE-TS) Project during calendar years 1995 and 1996. Work was performed under an initial National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract DEN3-336. As of September 1996 the contract administration was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DoE) Chicago Operations Office, and renumbered as DE-AC02-96EE50553. The purpose of the HVTE-TS program is to develop gas turbine engine technology in support of DoE and automotive industry programs exploring the use of gas turbine generator sets in hybrid-electric automotive propulsion systems. The program focus is directed to the development of four key technologies to be applied to advanced turbogenerators for hybrid vehicles: Structural ceramic materials and processes; Low emissions combustion systems; Regenerators and seals systems; and Insulation systems and processes. 60 figs., 9 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in its role as a key component in the U.S. and world energy markets. The CCT Program also has global importance in providing clean, efficient coal-based technology to a burgeoning energy market in developing countries largely dependent on coal. Based on 1997 data, world energy consumption is expected to increase 60 percent by 2020, with almost half of the energy increment occurring in developing Asia (including China and India). By 2020, energy consumption in developing Asia is projected to surpass consumption in North America. The energy form contributing most to the growth is electricity, as developing Asia establishes its energy infrastructure. Coal, the predominant indigenous fuel, in that region will be the fuel of choice in electricity production. The CCTs offer a means to mitigate potential environmental problems associated with unprecedented energy growth, and to enhance the U.S. economy through foreign equipment sales and engineering services.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 28  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of progress during the quarter ending September 30, 1981 are summarized. Field projects and supporting research in the following areas are reported: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal processes/heavy oil (steam and in-situ combustion); resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. A list of BETC publications with abstracts, published during the quarter is included. (DMC)

Linville, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

Gohar, Yousry; /Argonne; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining. Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop on ``Cost Effective Ceramic Machining`` (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee`s opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

Blau, P.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alison Labonte | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alison Labonte About Us Alison Labonte - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22...

319

Demonstration Development Project - Combustion Turbine Low Power Turndown Technologies: A Review of Current and Emerging Technologies for Combined Cycle Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a Demonstration Development Program that supports projects that evaluate developing technologies which will potentially decrease cost and increase performance of power generating assets. This report provides a review of recent developments in combined cycle technologies that provide improved performance in the areas of response time (start-up and ramp time), power turndown while maintaining low emissions, and fuel flexibility.A review of technologies either ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 37, quarter ending December 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Project reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal methods; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology  

SciTech Connect

This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Recommendation for Supplemental Technologies for Hanford River Protection Project Potential Mission Acceleration (RPP-11838)  

SciTech Connect

In May of 2002, the River Protection Project at Hanford proposed as part of the accelerated cleanup for the entire Hanford Site to ''accelerate waste stabilization by developing and deploying alternative treatment and immobilization solutions that are aligned with the waste characteristics to add assurance that overall waste treatment/immobilization will be completed 20 or more years sooner.'' This paper addresses one of these elements: development of recommendations for the supplemental technologies that have the greatest potential to supplement the River Protection Project's new Waste Treatment Plant throughput and achieve completion of waste processing by 2028. Low-activity waste treatment in the Waste Treatment Plant needs either to be enhanced or supplemented to enable the full amount of low-activity feed in the single-shell and double-shell tanks to be processed by 2028. The supplemental technologies are considered for low-activity waste feed that represents the maximum effectiveness of treatment compared with Waste Treatment Plant processing. During the Spring of 2002, over two dozen candidate technologies were assessed by staff from the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Hanford Office of River Protection, representatives from the Washington State Department of Ecology and Region 10 of the Environmental Protection Agency, staff from many national laboratories, as well as contractor and independent experts.

Allen, D. I.; Raymond, R. E.; CH2M Hill Hanford Group; Brouns, T. M.; Choho, A. F.; Numatec Hanford Corporation; Mauss, B. M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5021 5021 August 2009 Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors D. Sale University of Tennessee J. Jonkman and W. Musial National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the ASME 28 th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Honolulu, Hawaii May 31-June 5, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

327

Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources  

SciTech Connect

The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of changing global markets for natural gas liquids (NGL) with the simultaneous increase in global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has stimulated an interest in the integration of NGL recovery technology with LNG liquefaction technologies. Historically, the removal of heavy or high-freezing-point hydrocarbons from the feed to LNG plants has been characterized as gas conditioning and achieved using one or more distillation columns. While some attempts to provide reflux to the distillation columns marginally enhanced NGL recovery, little emphasis was placed on maximizing NGL recovery as a product from the LNG process. As such, the integration of the two processes was not a priority. Integrating state-of-the art NGL recovery technology within the CoP LNGSM Process1, formerly the Phillips Optimized Cascade LNG Process, results in a significant reduction in the specific power required to produce LNG, while maximizing NGL recovery. This corresponds to a production increase in both LNG and NGL for comparable compression schemes as compared to stand-alone LNG liquefaction and NGL extraction facilities. In addition, there are potential enhancements to the overall facility availability and project economics and environmental impacts using the integrated concept. This integrated concept has been applied to three ongoing international NGL/LNG projects using the CoP LNG Process in Iran LNG project. In this respect, simulation has been performed in THERMOFLEX software. Moreover, thermo economic analysis has been applied for economic and thermodynamic analysis of base and integrated cases through computer code has been provided here. Finally, the base and integrated case have been evaluated and comprised in view of thermodynamics, economics and environmental impacts.

Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Revised projections of fuel economy and technology for highway vehicles. Task 22. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Both the methodology used to forecast fuel economy and the technological and tooling plan data central to the derivation of the forecast for all those vehicle classes are updated here. Forecasts were prepared for a scenario where oil prices stay flat through 1985 (in current real dollars) and increase at the rate of one percent per year in the 1985 to 1995 period. Estimates of the mix of vehicles sold and projections for diesel penetration are documented. Revised forecasts for cars and light duty truck analysis are detailed. Heavy-duty truck fuel economy forecast revisions are described. The DOE automotive R and D programs are examined in the context of the newly revised projections. (MHR)

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

MHK Projects/GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7433,"lon":-70.6093,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

DEPLOYMENT OF THE GUBKA TECHNOLOGY TO STABILIZE RADIOACTIVE STANDARD SOLUTIONS AT THE FERNALD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the deployment of the Gubka technology to stabilize liquid technical standards at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. Gubka, an open-cell glass crystalline porous material, was developed by a joint research program of Russian Institutes at St. Petersburg, Krasnoyarsk, and Zheleznogorsk and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Gubka technology can be applied in an active or a passive method to stabilize a solution. In both methods the result is the same, and the dried components of the solution are sorbed in the pores of the Gubka block while the liquid phase is evaporated. In this deployment Gubka blocks were passively floated in the solutions at ambient conditions. As the solutions evaporated, the non-volatile components were sorbed in the pores of the Gubka blocks. The waste-loaded Gubka blocks have been packaged for transportation and disposal at the Nevada Test site within an existing waste category.

Chipman, N.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Meyer, A.; Aloy, A.; Anshits, A.G.; Tretyakov, A.A.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrage Barrage < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description No information provided Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 01:04.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Tidal_Barrage&oldid=681672" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

336

Rebaselining of the plutonium residue elimination project at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

Systems Engineering and Value Engineering principles were put into practice in rebaselining the Pu Residue Stabilization and Elimination Project at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Tradeoff studies were conducted as to how to best rebaseline the system under the new Safeguards Termination Limits (STSs) issued by the Department of Energy. Through the use of a computerized database, the means by which Stakeholder values and other high-level requirements have been included in the tradeoff studies were documented. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Sailor, W.C.; Catlett, D.S.; Burns, T.P. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 21, quarter ending December 31, 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual report are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, environment, and petroleum technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

VOICE, POWER, TECHNOLOGY: JOINING THE TECHNOLOGY LITERACY CLUB VIA A JOURNEY FROM THE PROJECTS TO A PH.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My autobiography is a critical reflective journey from my discourse of home into the Technology Literacy Club. Through the Technology Literacy Club, I overcame my (more)

Ferguson, Larry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Report to Congress: Expressions of interest in commercial clean coal technology projects in foreign countries  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to the guidance provided by the Congress in the course of the Fiscal Year 1995 appropriations process for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). As described in detail below, DOE was directed to make the international dissemination of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) an integral part of its policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries. Congress directed DOE to solicit ``Statements of Interest`` in commercial projects employing CCTs in countries projected to have significant growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, DOE was asked to submit to the Congress a report that analyzes the information contained in the Statements of Interest, and that identifies the extent to which various types of Federal incentives would accelerate the commercial availability of these technologies in an international context. In response to DOE`s solicitation of 18 November 1994, 77 Statements of Interest were received from 33 companies, as well as five additional materials. The contents of these submittals, including the requested Federal incentives, the CCTs proposed, the possible host countries, and the environmental aspects of the Statements of Interest, are described and analyzed in the chapters that follow.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Recent progress in the photovoltaic manufacturing technology project (PVMaT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project was initiated in 1990 to help the US photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and commercially developing PV modules and systems. It is being conducted in several phases, staggered to support industry progress. The four most recently awarded subcontracts (Phase 2B) are now completing their first year of research. They include two subcontracts on CdTe, one on Spheral Solar[trademark] Cells, and one on cast polysilicon. These subcontracts represent new technology additions to the PVMaT Project. Subcontracts initiated in earlier phases are nearing completion, and their progress is summarized. An additional phase of PVMaT, Phase 4A, is being initiated which will emphasize product-driven manufacturing research and development. The intention of Phase 4A is to emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. The work areas may include, but are not limited to, issues such as improvement of module manufacturing processes; system and system component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements.

Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Thomas, H. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Herwig, L.O. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Ruby, D.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Sellers, R.

1994-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

MHK Technologies/Closed Cycle OTEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Closed Cycle OTEC Closed Cycle OTEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Closed Cycle OTEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Marine Development Associates Inc Technology Resource Click here OTEC Technology Type Click here OTEC - Closed Cycle Technology Description Closed Cycle System Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 02:50.8 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Closed_Cycle_OTEC&oldid=681555" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

344

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 8, 2010 DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The research is aimed at making use of the nation's abundant coal and biomass resources to produce affordable power, fuels and chemicals in a safe and environmentally clean manner. In addition, the production of fuels and chemicals from coal-biomass feedstocks has the added benefit of reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions.

345

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

346

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. Annual subcontract report, 11 March 1991--11 November 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

Whisnant, R.A. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 29, quarter ending December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of progress accomplished during the quarter ending December, 1981, are summarized in this report. Discussion is presented under the following headings: chemical flooding - field projects; chemical flooding - supporting research; carbon dioxide injection - field projects; carbon dioxide injection - supporting research; thermal/heavy oil - field projects and supporting research; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental aspects; petroleum processing technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Environmental Assessment for the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81(E)/020508 81(E)/020508 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT OAK RIDGE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECT AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1575) for the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Project (ORSTP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The proposed action would advance technology transfer and other missions at ORNL by supporting technology commercialization, creating new companies, and stimulating technology-based recruitment. Funding for the ORSTP would primarily be from private, other federal, and state sources. As a part of the ORSTP, DOE would also establish the Oak Ridge Science and

352

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center .IX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - PartOF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II C.

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Alternative Energy Saving Technology Analysis Report for Richland High School Renovation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 8, 2004, L&S Engineering, Inc. submitted a technical assistance request to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to help estimate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of the solar energy and daylighting design alternatives for Richland High School Renovation Project in Richland, WA. L&S Engineering expected PNNL to evaluate the potential energy savings and energy cost savings, the probable installation costs, incentives or grants to reduce the installed costs and simple payback for the following alternative measures: (1) Daylighting in New Gym; (2) Solar Photovoltaics; (3) Solar Domestic Hot Water Pre-Heat; and (4) Solar Outside Air Pre-Heat Following are the findings of the energy savings and cost-effectiveness analysis of above alternative energy saving technologies.

Liu, Bing

2004-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Wabash River Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed project would result in a combined-cycle power plant with lower emissions and higher efficiency than most existing coal-fired power plants of comparable size. The net plant heat rate (energy content of the fuel input per useable electrical generation output; i.e., Btu/kilowatt hour) for the new repowered unit would be a 21% improvement over the existing unit, while reducing SO{sub 2} emissions by greater than 90% and limiting NO{sub x} emissions by greater than 85% over that produced by conventional coal-fired boilers. The technology, which relies on gasified coal, is capable of producing as much as 25% more electricity from a given amount of coal than today`s conventional coal-burning methods. Besides having the positive environmental benefit of producing less pollutants per unit of power generated, the higher overall efficiency of the proposed CGCC project encourages greater utilization to meet base load requirements in order to realize the associated economic benefits. This greater utilization (i.e., increased capacity factor) of a cleaner operating plant has global environmental benefits in that it is likely that such power would replace power currently being produced by less efficient plants emitting a greater volume of pollutants per unit of power generated.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.4164,"lon":-157.784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

The Photovolatic Manufacturing Technology project (PVMaT) after three years  

SciTech Connect

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project (PVMaT) is a government/industry research and development (R&D) partnership involving joint efforts between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. The project`s goal is to assist US industry in retaining and extending its world leadership role in the manufacture and commercial development of PV components and systems. PVMaT is being carried out in three separate phases, each designed to address separate R&D requirements for achieving PVMaT goals. Phase 1 was a problem identification phase of about 3 months duration. In Phase 1, the status and needs of the US PV manufacturing industry were identified, and the development of a Phase 2 procurement responsive to the industry`s needs was begun. Phase 1 was completed in 1991. Problem solution began in 1992, under Phase 2A, when DOE awarded multiyear subcontracts. Technical accomplishments for PVMaT 2A are presented in this paper. Subcontracts were recently awarded for a second, overlapping, and similar process-specific solicitation (PVMaT 2B). The activities of these new subcontracts are also described. Two subcontracts presently comprise the Phase 3 effort. Phase 3 addresses R&D problems that are relatively common to a number of PV companies or the PV industry as a whole. A teamed research approach is being used to improve automated module manufacturing lines and encapsulation materials used in module manufacturing. The first year`s work on these subcontracts is also described in this paper.

Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Thomas, H [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Herwig, L O [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Research projects needed for expediting development of domestic oil and gas resources through arctic, offshore, and drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the research projects which were identified at an industry-government workshop on Arctic, Offshore, and Drilling Technology (AODT) held at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, January 5-7, 1981. The purpose of the workshop was to identify those problem areas where government research could provide technology advancement that would assist industry in accelerating the discovery and development of US oil and gas resouces. The workshop results are to be used to guide an effective research program. The workshop identified and prioritized the tasks that need to be implemented. All of the projects listed in the Arctic and Offshore sections were selected as appropriate for a Department of Energy (DOE) research role. The drilling projects identified as appropriate only for industry research have been separated in the Drilling section of this report.

Canja, S.; Williams, C.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

DOE/EA-1621: Oregon Institute of Technology Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project (September 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Klamath Falls, OR 97601 Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center

363

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750800C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750800C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

John Collins

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

DOE O 415.1 Admin Chg 1, Information Technology Project Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Introduction of grid computing application projects at the NASA earth science technology office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) awarded funding for 20 new investigations in information systems technology development under the Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) Program. Two of the selected proposals specifically ...

Kai-Dee Chu; Liping Di; Peter Thornton

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 26, quarter ending March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Objectives and technical progress are summarized for field projects and supporting research in chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil recovery, resource assessment, extraction technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and improved drilling technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Recommendations for cask features for robotic handling from the Advanced Handling Technology Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent progress in the Advanced Handling Technology Project (AHTP) initiated to explore the use of advanced robotic systems and handling technologies to perform automated cask handling operations at radioactive waste handling facilities, and to provide guidance to cask designers on the impact of robotic handling on cask design. Current AHTP tasks have developed system mock-ups to investigate robotic manipulation of impact limiters and cask tiedowns. In addition, cask uprighting and transport, using computer control of a bridge crane and robot, were performed to demonstrate the high speed cask transport operation possible under computer control. All of the current AHTP tasks involving manipulation of impact limiters and tiedowns require robotic operations using a torque wrench. To perform these operations, a pneumatic torque wrench and control system were integrated into the tool suite and control architecture of the gantry robot. The use of captured fasteners is briefly discussed as an area where alternative cask design preferences have resulted from the influence of guidance for robotic handling vs traditional operations experience. Specific robotic handling experiences with these system mock-ups highlight a number of continually recurring design principles: (1) robotic handling feasibility is improved by mechanical designs which emphasize operation with limited dexterity in constrained workspaces; (2) clearances, tolerances, and chamfers must allow for operations under actual conditions with consideration for misalignment and imprecise fixturing; (3) successful robotic handling is enhanced by including design detail in representations for model-based control; (4) robotic handling and overall quality assurance are improved by designs which eliminate the use of loose, disassembled parts. 8 refs., 15 figs.

Drotning, W.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress Review No. 31, quarter ending June 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental, petroleum technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Progress review No. 24: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending September 30, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection and thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: extraction technology; resource assessment technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Environmental Assessment for the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81(E)/020508 81(E)/020508 DOE/EA-1575 Environmental Assessment for the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee February 2008 U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office 06-281(E)/020508 iii CONTENTS FIGURES.....................................................................................................................................................iv TABLES ......................................................................................................................................................iv ACRONYMS................................................................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION

374

The Infinity Project: building a high school curriculum which emphasizes the engineering, math, and science principles of modern technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bold new plan has been initiated to bring state-of-the-art science-based technology and engineering education to high schools. This effort, called The INFINITY Project, aims to develop a novel and interactive curriculum emphasizing the engineering ...

M. A. Yoder; R. Athale; S. Douglas; D. Munson; G. Orsak; J. Treichler; S. Wood

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

In Situ Mercury Stabilization (ISMS) Treatment: Technology Maturation Project Phase I Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) was used to separate lithium-6 isotope for weapons production at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge in the 1950s and 1960s. As much as two million pounds of elemental mercury was 'lost' or unaccounted for and a large portion of that material is believed to have entered the environment. The DOE site office in Oak Ridge has identified Hg pollution in soils, sediments, and streams as the most significant environmental challenge currently faced. In industry, large amounts of mercury have been used to manufacture products (e.g., fluorescent light bulbs, thermometers) and for chemical processing (e.g., production of chlorine and alkali via mercury electrochemical cells) and many of these industrial sites are now polluted with mercury contaminated soil as a result of previous releases and/or inadvertent leaks. Remediation techniques for Hg contaminated soils are either based on thermal desorption and recovery of the mercury or excavation and shipping of large volumes of material to remote facilities for treatment and disposal. Both of these alternatives are extremely costly. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Environmental Research & Technology Division (ERTD) has demonstrated, in laboratory-scale experiments, the viability of treating mercury contaminated soils by means of sulfide treatment rods inserted into the soil through a process known as In Situ Mercury Stabilization (ISMS). This approach is partly based on BNL's patented and successfully licensed ex situ process for Hg treatment, Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) which converts Hg to the more stable sulfide form. The original experiments showed that Hg homogeneously distributed in soil rapidly migrates to form a high concentration zone of chemically stable mercuric sulfide near the treatment rods while concentrations of Hg in surrounding areas away from the treatment rods are depleted to acceptable levels. BSA has subsequently filed for patent protection on the ISMS technology. If further developed it has the potential for large-scale in-situ treatment of contaminated soils that could substantially reduce the prohibitive cost of thermal desorption and/or excavation and disposal. Licensing and spin-off technology development opportunities would then be viable. Depending on performance and regulatory acceptance, the treated mercury could either be excavated for disposal elsewhere or left in place as a stable alternative. Excavated spent treatment rods could be processed by the SPSS process to reduce the potential for dispersion and lower leachability even further. The Phase I objectives of the In Situ Mercury Stabilization Treatment Process Technology Maturation Project were to: (1) replicate the original bench-scale results that formed the basis for BNL's patent application, i.e., mercury contamination in soil will migrate to and react with 'rods' containing sulfur and/or sulfur compounds, (2) provide enough information to evaluate a decision to conduct further development, and (3) establish some of the critical parameters that require further technology maturation during Phase II. The information contained in this report summarizes the work conducted in Phase I to meet these objectives.

Kalb,P.D.; Milian, L.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

GBRN/DOE Project: Dynamic enhanced recovery technologies. Quarterly technical report, January 1994--March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Basins Research Network will perform a field demonstration of their ``Dynamic Enhanced Recovery Technology`` to test the concept that the growth faults in EI-330 field are conduits through which producing reservoirs are charged and that enhanced production can be developed by producing directly from the fault zone. The site, operated by Penzoil, is located in 250 feet of water the productive depth intervals include 4000 to 9000 feet. Previous work, which incorporated pressure, temperature, fluid flow, heat flow, seismic, production, and well log data, indicated active fluid flow along fault zones. The field demonstration will be accomplished by drilling and production test of growth fault systems associated with the EI-330 field. The project utilizes advanced 3-D seismic analysis, geochemical studies, structural and stratigraphic reservoir characterization, reservoir simulation, and compact visualization systems. The quarterly progress reports contains accomplishments to date for the following tasks: Management start-up; database management; field and demonstration equipment; reservoir characterization, modeling; geochemistry; and data integration.

Anderson, R.N.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermal Power Systems, Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver Technology Project. Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 1978. Volume II. Detailed report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal or electrical power from the sun's radiated energy through Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver technology is the goal of this Project. The energy thus produced must be economically competitive with other sources. This Project supports the industrial development of technology and hardware for extracting energy from solar power to achieve the stated goal. Present studies are working to concentrate the solar energy through mirrors or lenses, to a working fluid or gas, and through a power converter change it to an energy source useful to man. Rankine-cycle and Brayton-cycle engines are currently being developed as the most promising energy converters for our near future needs. Accomplishments on point-focusing technology in FY 1978 are detailed.

Not Available

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

CO2 Capture Project: An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project For CO2 Separation, Capture And Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report (which forms part of the requirements of the Statement of Work Task 0, subtask 0.4) records progress towards defining a detailed Work Plan for the CCP 30 days after contract initiation. It describes the studies planned, workscope development and technology provider bid evaluation status at that time. Business sensitive information is provided separately in Appendix 1. Contract negotiations are on hold pending award of patent waiver status to the CCP.

Helen Kerr

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

380

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for...

382

Self-scrubbing coal{sup TM}: An integrated approach to clean air. A proposed Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared by the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), with compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality (CE) regulations for implementating NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE regulations for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021), to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposed demonstration project to be cost-shared by DOE and Custom Coals International (CCI) under the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. CCI is a Pennsylvania general partnership located in Pittsburgh, PA engaged in the commercialization of advanced coal cleaning technologies. The proposed federal action is for DOE to provide, through a cooperative agreement with CCI, cost-shared funding support for the land acquisition, design, construction and demonstration of an advanced coal cleaning technology project, {open_quotes}Self-Scrubbing Coal: An Integrated Approach to Clean Air.{close_quotes} The proposed demonstration project would take place on the site of the presently inactive Laurel Coal Preparation Plant in Shade Township, Somerset County, PA. A newly constructed, advanced design, coal preparation plant would replace the existing facility. The cleaned coal produced from this new facility would be fired in full-scale test burns at coal-fired electric utilities in Indiana, Ohio and PA as part of this project.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Demonstration D&D Toolbox - FIU Tech Demo FIU Technology Demonstration - Selected technology platform(s) was demonstrated at the hot cell mockup facility at the FIU's Applied Research Center tech demo site in Miami, FL. Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennessee Florida New York D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms Challenge Many facilities slated for D&D across the DOE complex pose hazards (radiological, chemical, and structural) which prevent the use of traditional manual techniques. Efficient and safe D&D of the facilities will require the use of remotely operated technologies. In addition, the D&D of a hot cell facility requires that each of the hot cells be

384

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Pressurized Oxy-Coal Technology for Steam-Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of pressurized oxy-combustion technology to support steamelectric power production has been proposed by several organizations as a potential low-cost way to enable a dramatic reduction in CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The pressurized oxy-coal technology realizes most of the benefits of atmospheric pressure oxy-coal technology and offers the prospect of additional efficiency and cost benefits. The technology is, however, in the early stages of development.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

MHK Technologies/Osprey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osprey Osprey < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Osprey.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Osprey is a vertical axis turbine mounted to the bottom of a 30 aluminium catamaran test rig float Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 57:37.3 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Osprey&oldid=681630" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

386

Financing Projects That Use Clean Energy Technologies: An Overview of Barriers and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project finance is asset-based financing, meaning that the project lenders have recourse only to the underlying assets of a project. It involves both debt and equity, where the debt-to-equity ratio is typically large (e.g., 70% debt to 30% equity). Debt is used when available and when it is the least expensive form of financing, with equity still needed for credit worthiness. Most important, revenue from the project must be able to generate a return to the equity investors, and pay for interest and principal on the debt, transaction costs associated with developing and structuring the project, and operations and maintenance costs. Successful project financing must provide a structure to manage and share risks in an optimal way that benefits all participants, allocating risks to those entities that are able to mitigate each specific risk, and to share information about putting risk management in the proper hands at the proper stage of project development. Contractual agreements are, thus, important in risk mitigation. Today's project financing typically involves the creation of a stand-alone project company that is the legal owner of the project assets, and that has contractual agreements with other parties.

Goldman, D. P.; McKenna, J. J.; Murphy, L. M.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services (BTES) / Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Smart Water Heater Project - Technology Description a nd Installation Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the smart grid evolves through advances in technology, the benefits of deploying and leveraging "smart" systems are becoming more and more significant relative to the costs. EPRI's Smart Grid Demonstration project is conducting research focused on integration of distributed energy resources to help advance widespread deployment of these systems. This report provides a technical description of the hardware, software, and communication infrastructure in one such system. Specifically, it documents an ong...

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

eGovernment Project - Study and Use of some eGovernmental Technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through decades exchanging data between different applications and platforms has been a great problem. The aim of this project is to evaluate some of the (more)

Andersen, Rune

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 33, quarter ending December 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 27, for quarter ending June 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 32, quarter ending September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 30, quarter ending March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 35, quarter ending June 30, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Progress review No. 25: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending December 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improving drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 36 for quarter ending September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports for the quarter ending September 30, 1983, are presented for field projects and supported research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovery by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

UEK Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UEK Corporation UEK Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name UEK Corporation Place Annapolis, Maryland Zip 21403 Sector Hydro, Ocean Product Annapolis-based developer & manufacturer of hydro-kinetic turbines to harness river, tidal and ocean currents. References UEK Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Chitokoloki Project Coal Creek Project Half Moon Cove Tidal Project Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Luangwa Zambia Project Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration Old River Outflow Channel Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project

398

Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration System Analysis project  

SciTech Connect

A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the western Pacific alternative energy development. Thisgrant to provide an alternative energy educational program,and promoting alternative energy technologies in homes and

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Property:Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 100kW built and tested with 45kW 200kW and 1 4MW designs in development + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 5kW + MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Proprietary + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + 0 15 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + 1 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 + 0 4 + MHK Technologies/Bluetec + 1 + MHK Technologies/Current Power + from 10 kW and up + MHK Technologies/CurrentStar + 1 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 500 kW + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 30MW +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic technology projects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

NREL: National Wind Technology Center Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. The NWTC advances the development of innovative land-based and offshore wind energy technologies through its research and testing facilities. Researchers draw on years of experience and their wealth of expertise in fluid dynamics and structural testing to also advance marine and hydrokinetic water power technologies. At the NWTC researchers work side-by-side with industry partners to develop new technologies that can compete in the global market and to increase system reliability and reduce costs. Learn more about the facilities and capabilities at the NWTC by viewing our fact sheet.

403

Understanding differences in the diffusion of environmentally beneficial technology. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

The factors affecting the diffusion of technical discoveries among firms and nations remain one of the most interesting and important but least understood elements of economic behavior. Recently, interest in technology diffusion has been heightened by a recognition that the spread of technologies could have important implications for environmental quality as well as for market goods and services. A specific motivation for this study was the question of how rapidly technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions might diffuse. Technologies in this category include technologies that improve the efficiency of fossil energy use or promote substitution of renewable energy resources. The speed with which these technologies spread could have a significant effect on the rate of accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere. From a modeling perspective, the rate of innovation and diffusion of carbon-reducing technology is known to be a crucial parameter in integrated assessments of climate change risks and policy responses. Thus, a better understanding of factors that might influence the spread of carbon-reducing technologies could be valuable in studies on long-term global change and policy assessment.

Blackman, A.; Boyd, J.; Simpson, R.D.; Toman, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects -- Operating Experience and Risk Assessment Through September 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean coal technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) can meet stringent emission standards and achieve high efficiencies. Commercial and near-commercial sized plants using these technologies have accumulated several years of operational experience and are serious candidates for new coal-based power plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)  

SciTech Connect

The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

408

The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project: Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system  

SciTech Connect

In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands, in an environment where increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins all contribute to increased system efficiencies and capacity. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS)