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Sample records for hydrokinetic technology projects

  1. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    :MarineandHydrokineticTechnologyProjectMilestone&oldid675523" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other...

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office’s marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015.

  3. Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LiVecchi, Al; Jepsen, Richard Alan

    2010-06-01

    The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

  4. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOEs Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects, Fiscal Years 2008-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-24

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects from 2008 to 2014.

  8. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsMicroturbine River In Stream MHK ProjectsMiette River MHK ProjectsMiller Bend Project MHK ProjectsMilliken Bend Project MHK ProjectsMinas Basin Bay of Fundy...

  9. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to...

  10. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - No field def provided Project Resource - No field def provided Project Nearest Body of Water - No field def provided Coordinates - No field def provided Project Footprint - No...

  11. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Form Edit History Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop ...

  13. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program efforts to develop advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. PDF icon mhk_factsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  15. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  16. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  17. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  18. MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computer Modeling Workshop | Department of Energy Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be

  20. MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc...

  1. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Water Power Program: ...

  2. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Stefanie Damiani Stavrakas, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Douglas Hall, Idaho ... USFWS United States Fish and Wildlife Service HYDROKINETIC & WAVE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES ...

  3. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Aquatic Environments | Department of Energy Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments. PDF icon

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses 2014 Water Power Program

  5. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Market Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on aquatic organisms, with early emphasis on the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise from currenttidal, wave and riverine hydrokinetic generators, toxicity...

  6. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the NREL in Broomfield, Colorado from July 9 - 10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and to collect

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Technology Development and Testing Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing The Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. In order to meet its generation goals, the program supports the design, development, testing, and demonstration of technologies that can capture

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bureau of Shipping ALARA as low as reasonably achievable API ... of Knowledge PMI Project Management Institute PTO power ... TPL technology performance level TRL technology readiness ...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, David; Weber, Jochem

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, the global marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry has suffered a number of serious technological and commercial setbacks. To help reduce the risks of industry failures and advance the development of new technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK Risk Management Framework. By addressing uncertainties, the MHK Risk Management Framework increases the likelihood of successful development of an MHK technology. It covers projects of any technical readiness level (TRL) or technical performance level (TPL) and all risk types (e.g. technological risk, regulatory risk, commercial risk) over the development cycle. This framework is intended for the development and deployment of a single MHK technology—not for multiple device deployments within a plant. This risk framework is intended to meet DOE’s risk management expectations for the MHK technology research and development efforts of the Water Power Program (see Appendix A). It also provides an overview of other relevant risk management tools and documentation.1 This framework emphasizes design and risk reviews as formal gates to ensure risks are managed throughout the technology development cycle. Section 1 presents the recommended technology development cycle, Sections 2 and 3 present tools to assess the TRL and TPL of the project, respectively. Section 4 presents a risk management process with design and risk reviews for actively managing risk within the project, and Section 5 presents a detailed description of a risk registry to collect the risk management information into one living document. Section 6 presents recommendations for collecting and using lessons learned throughout the development process.

  11. Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pamphlet that describes the Office of EERE's Water Power Program in fiscal year 2009, including the fiscal year 2009 funding opportunities, the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, the U.S. hydrodynamic testing facilities, and the fiscal year 2008 Advanced Water Projects awards.

  12. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  13. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report that provides an overview of the federal and state regulatory framework for hydrokinetic projects.

  14. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power

  15. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy...

  17. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-01

    Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of non-polluting alternatives to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. Two emerging categories of renewable energy technologies, hydrokinetic and wave energy conversion devices, offer ways to tap the energy of moving water without impoundment (dams) or diversion required by many conventional hydroelectric facilities. These technologies include devices designed for deployment in natural streams, tidal estuaries, ocean currents, and constructed waterways, as well as devices designed to capture the energy of ocean waves. On October 26-28, 2005, 54 representatives from government, non-governmental organizations, and private business met to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave technology devices, their stages of development, and the projected cost to bring each to market; (2) identify where these technologies can best operate; (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures; (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. These workshop proceedings include detailed summaries of the 24 presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  18. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources.

  19. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative DE-EE0003636 TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION Final Technical Report: June 26, 2012 Awardee: SUNLIGHT PHOTONICS INC. 600 Corporate Court South Plainfield, NJ 07080 Sub Awardee: NASA - JET PROPULSION LAB. 4800 Oak Grove Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91109 Principal Investigator: Dr. Allan J. Bruce, Sunlight Photonics Inc.

  20. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs

  1. MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization UEK Corporation Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Report that provides an overview of the federal and state regulatory framework for hydrokinetic projects. PDF icon sitinghandbook2009.pdf ...

  3. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles

    2011-09-26

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progess to Investigate areas offshore southeast Florida that appeared most suitable for siting of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of southeast Florida.

  4. MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island Energy Group LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13092 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  5. SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

    2012-07-15

    Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

  6. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centipod MHK TechnologiesCETO Wave Energy Technology MHK TechnologiesClosed Cycle OTEC MHK TechnologiesCoRMaT MHK TechnologiesCross Flow Turbine MHK TechnologiesCurrent...

  7. MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing...

  8. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources. The report does not address impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and organisms that are common to other electricity-generating technologies (e.g., construction and maintenance of transmission lines) or possible effects on the human environment, including: human use conflicts, aesthetics, viewsheds, noise in the terrestrial environment, light, recreation, transportation, navigation, cultural resources, socioeconomic impacts.

  9. Quadrennial Technology Review 2015: Technology Assessments--Marine and Hydrokinetic Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Baldwin, Gilbert Bindewald, Austin Brown, Charles Chen, Kerry Cheung, Corrie Clark, Joe Cresko,

    2015-10-07

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. With more than 50% of the U.S. population living within 50 miles of the nation’s coasts, MHK technologies hold significant potential to supply renewable electricity to consumers in coastal load centers, particularly in the near term in areas with high costs of electricity and longer term in high resource areas in close proximity to major coastal load centers. MHK resource assessments identify a total U.S. technical resource potential of approximately 1250–1850 terawatt-hours (TWh) of generation per year from ocean wave, ocean current, ocean tidal, and river current energy. Of this, the U.S. continental technical resource potential is approximately 500–750 TWh/year. For context, roughly 90,000 homes can be powered by 1 TWh of electricity generation each year. A cost-effective MHK industry could provide a substantial amount of electricity for the nation owing in large part to its unique advantages as a source of energy, including its vast resource potential, its close proximity to major coastal load centers, and its long-term predictability and near-term forecastability.

  10. In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment Office presentation icon 46_instream_hydrokinetic_resource_assessment_epri_jacobson.ppt More Documents & Publications Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in

  11. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patents - Field def missing Was This Project DOE Funded? - Field def missing Collaborators - Field def missing Usage It should be invoked using the corresponding form....

  12. MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest...

  13. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary layer of water flowing over the blade surface. The study quantified both immediate and delayed mortalities (observed immediately, 3 hours, and 24 hours after encountering the blade) among freshwater YOY fish resulting from contact with the blade or turbulent flows in the wake of the blade.

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses Categorizing and Evaluating

  15. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exponential Growth for Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy Commercial Success for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Spells Exponential Growth for Geothermal Energy First Commercial Success for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Spells Exponential Growth for Geothermal Energy April 15, 2013 - 1:50pm Addthis Nevada-based industry partner Ormat Technologies leveraged DOE funds to deploy the nation's first commercial EGS at Desert Peak, Nevada. photo courtesy of Ormat Nevada-based industry

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Hydrokinetic » Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization With more than 50% of the population living within 50 miles of coastlines, there is vast potential to provide clean, renewable electricity to communities and cities across the United States using marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. In order to understand the full potential for future electricity production that

  18. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  1. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Čada, Glenn F.

    2007-04-01

    A new generation of hydropower technologies, the kinetic hydro and wave energy conversion devices, offers the possibility of generating electricity from the movements of water, without the need for dams and diversions. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 encouraged the development of these sources of renewable energy in the United States, and there is growing interest in deploying them globally. The technologies that would extract electricity from free-flowing streams, estuaries, and oceans have not been widely tested. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy convened a workshop to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave energy conversion devices and their stages of development, (2) identify where these technologies can best operate, (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures, and (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments.

  2. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Description See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Topic Water Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy

  3. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  4. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-29

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  5. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  6. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2009 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Navigating the Regulatory Framework Prepared by Pacific Energy Ventures, LLC on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy December 2009 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics: Navigating the Regulatory Framework 2009 December 2009 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Intentionally Left Blank Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics: Navigating the Regulatory Framework 2009 December 2009 Siting Methodologies

  7. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  8. Hydrokinetic Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrokinetic Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydrokinetic Laboratory Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hklabllc.com This company is...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  10. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Form Edit History...

  11. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Form Edit History...

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research &...

  13. Impacts of electromagnetic fields associated with marine and hydrokinetic surrogate technologies on fish movements and behaviors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claisse, Jeremy T.; Pondella, Daniel J.; Williams, Chelsea M.; Zahn, Laurel A.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2015-09-30

    Marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) and offshore wind devices are being developed and deployed in U.S. and international waters. Electric current flowing through subsea transmission cables associated with these devices will generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), which may interact with, and potentially impact, marine fishes. Some marine fishes can detect electric and/or magnetic fields and use them to navigate, orientate, and sense prey, mates and predators. Over the past five years there have been multiple comprehensive reviews and studies evaluating the potential vulnerability of marine fishes to EMF produced by MHK devices. Most documented effects involve sub-lethal behavioral responses of individual fish when in close proximity to EMF (e.g., fish being repelled by or attracted to fields). These reviews reach conclusions that the current state of research on this topic is still in its infancy and evaluations of potential impacts are associated with great uncertainty. A variety of MHK technologies are likely to be considered for deployment offshore of the Hawaiian Islands, and there is a need to be able to better predict and assess potential associated environmental impacts. The goal of this study was to provide a complementary piece to these previous reviews (e.g., Normandeau et al. 2011) by focusing on marine fish species in the Hawaii region. We compiled the relevant available information, then prioritized fish species as candidates for various paths of future research. To address this, we first developed a list of Hawaii Region Focal Species, which included fishes that are more likely to be sensitive to EMF. We then compiled species-specific information available in the literature on their sensitivity to EMF, as well as life history, movement and habitat use information that could inform an analysis of their likelihood of encountering EMF from subsea cables associated with MHK devices. Studies have only documented EMF sensitivity in 11 of the marine fish species in this region. There was also relatively little detailed information on fish movement and habitat use patterns for most of the focal species. Our last objective was to develop recommendations for research needs to close the important knowledge gaps. We describe species-independent baseline research that primarily consists of in situ quantification of EMF generated by MHK devices and undersea cables that can occur as pilot and commercial scale MHK devices are deployed in Hawaii. Then we propose a simple approach for prioritizing Hawaii Region Focal Species (ranked relative to each other) as candidates in multiple related research paths. The prioritization approach incorporates EMF sensitivity information with the likelihood of interacting with EMF generated undersea transmission cables associated with MHK devices. Finally, we discuss the types of research needed to help fill gaps in the scientific knowledge base for this region. These involve studies to better define species-specific EMF sensitivity thresholds under various environmental conditions, studies of life history, movement and habitat use patterns to improve our understanding of the likelihood and frequency fishes may be in the vicinity of EMF generated by subsea transmission cables, and studies of the potential for related population, community or ecosystem impacts. Many of these studies can and should occur opportunistically as pilot and commercial scale MHK devices are deployed in Hawaii.

  14. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Spain

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University’s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

  15. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities | Department of Energy Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities June 22, 2015 - 12:13pm Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research

  16. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters

  17. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)." ... development, prepared to build and test technology at close to full-scale in the ...

  18. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on ...

  19. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF icon Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development 2016 Agenda More Documents & Publications Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Agenda CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011388: Categorical

  20. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101,

  1. DOE’s Deep Capabilities and Wide Possibilities Highlighted at Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When it comes to marine and hydrokinetic technology development, the Department of Energy (DOE) offers deep capabilities and wide possibilities.

  2. DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management, and More

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are...

  3. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This workshop focused on information about the technologies and identified potential environmental issues associated with deploying them, and outlined a list of research needs and possible approaches to addressing those issues.

  4. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development | Department of Energy 37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to

  5. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  6. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  7. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower Conference, 10 June 2010, rev 1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrokinetic Projects on the Mississippi River Mississippi River Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference 10 June 2010 Jeff Artman, P.E. MVD Hydropower Business Line Manager Line Manager BUILDING STRONG ® 1 What are Hydrokinetic Projects? Hydrokinetic hydropower projects convert the kinetic energy of flowing water into electrical energy. Applications are where adequate velocity of flowing water to generate electricity exists. This can be from tidal currents, wave energy, or in our case...the

  9. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROGRAM C L E A N C I T I E S WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM * April 2011 * Page 2 C L E A N C I T I E S DOEGO-102011-3299 * April 2011

  10. Gulfstream Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Gulfstream Technologies Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  11. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects The NREL geothermal team is involved in various projects to help accelerate the development and deployment of clean, renewable geothermal technologies, including low-temperature resources; enhanced geothermal systems; strategic planning, analysis, and modeling; and project assessment. Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources NREL supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) through various collaborations that evaluate the levelized cost of electricity

  12. Muroran Institute of Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 81 143 46 5200 Website: www.muroran-it.ac.jpenglish This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This...

  13. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: • Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. • Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. • Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. • Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. • Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. • Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. • Completed final reporting and deliverables

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrokinetic Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMarineandHydrokinetic&oldid619739" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  16. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Office presentation icon ...

  17. Ecomerit Technologies LLC see Dehlsen Associates LLC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 805.684.2495 X 450 Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  18. Dehlsen Associates see Ecomerit Technologies LLC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 805.684.2495 X 450 Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  19. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  20. Information Technology Project Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-12

    This Guide provides Department of Energy recommended guidelines to ensure that the acquisition of information technology capital assets is performed in compliance with DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE N 251.105.

  1. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28

    DBS Energy Inc. (DBS) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  2. Economic Impact of Large-Scale Deployment of Offshore Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology in Oregon Coastal Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, T.; Tegen, S.; Beiter, P.

    2015-03-01

    To begin understanding the potential economic impacts of large-scale WEC technology, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct an economic impact analysis of largescale WEC deployment for Oregon coastal counties. This report follows a previously published report by BOEM and NREL on the jobs and economic impacts of WEC technology for the entire state (Jimenez and Tegen 2015). As in Jimenez and Tegen (2015), this analysis examined two deployment scenarios in the 2026-2045 timeframe: the first scenario assumed 13,000 megawatts (MW) of WEC technology deployed during the analysis period, and the second assumed 18,000 MW of WEC technology deployed by 2045. Both scenarios require major technology and cost improvements in the WEC devices. The study is on very large-scale deployment so readers can examine and discuss the potential of a successful and very large WEC industry. The 13,000-MW is used as the basis for the county analysis as it is the smaller of the two scenarios. Sensitivity studies examined the effects of a robust in-state WEC supply chain. The region of analysis is comprised of the seven coastal counties in Oregon—Clatsop, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Lane, Lincoln, and Tillamook—so estimates of jobs and other economic impacts are specific to this coastal county area.

  3. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  4. Project Information by Key Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Research Project Information Project Information by Key Technology Jump to: High Performance Materials Innovative Energy Concepts Sensors and Controls Simulation-Based Engineering Water Management R&D View Project Information by Program Area HIGH PERFORMANCE MATERIALS Agreement Number Project Title Performer Name Program Area FE0024076 Advanced Ultrasupercritical (AUSC) Tube Membrane Panel Development Alstom Power Inc. Plant Optimization Technologies FWP-AL-10-450-007 Design of

  5. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Development By employing our project development models, NREL offers a broad range of advisory services that are based off commercial practices and support the entire project development process to help reduce the risks associated with energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. This includes policy and regulatory analysis, financing alternatives, project management, proposal reviews, and project risk and technology assessments. Policy and Regulatory Analysis NREL analyzes federal

  6. MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chitokoloki Project *MHK ProjectsCoal Creek Project *MHK ProjectsHalf Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK ProjectsIndian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects...

  7. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

  8. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Admin Chg 1, dated 1-16-2013, supersedes DOE O 415.1.

  9. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1 approved 1-16-2013.

  10. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur during passage through a Welka UPG turbine at ambient current velocities less than about 2.5 m/s. Survival and Behavior of Juvenile Atlantic Salmon and Adult American Shad on Exposure to a Hydrokinetic Turbine This report describes a series of experiments designed to measure the effect of exposure to a full-scale, vertical axis hydrokinetic turbine on downstream migrating juvenile Atlantic salmon and upstream migrating adult American shad. Studies were performed in a large-scale, open-channel flume, and all individuals approached the turbine under volitional control. No injuries were observed, and there was no measurable increase in mortality associated with turbine passage. Exposure to the turbine elicited behavioral responses from both species, however, with salmon passing primarily over the downrunning blades. Shad movement was impeded in the presence of the device, as indicated by fewer attempts of shorter duration and reduced distance of ascent up the flume. More work should be performed in both laboratory and field conditions to determine the extent to which observed effects are likely to influence fish in riverine environments. Analysis is needed to assess the potential for multiple units to lead to greater mortality rates or impacts on fish movements and migrations. Additionally, future research should focus on expanding the existing data by developing better estimates of encounter and avoidance probabilities.

  11. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume ...

  12. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August ...

  13. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel marine hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  14. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF ...

  15. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United ...

  16. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States ...

  17. MHK Technologies/HyPEG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profile Primary Organization Hydrokinetic Laboratory Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description Their Hydro kinetically Powered Electrical Generators...

  18. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-05-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline, bottom/midwater/surface of channel) to ascertain potential interactions. In addition, we are collaborating and communicating with scientists at other national laboratories and industry who are also developing information useful to this task. For example, other studies being funded by DOE include evaluations of different in-current (hydrokinetic) turbine designs for their effects on rates and severity of blade strike and likelihood of cavitation. This report summarizes activities completed during the first year of a three-year study.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more...

  20. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dress":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Screenshot References: EPRI1 River Atlas2 The...

  1. Information Technology Project Management - DOE Directives, Delegation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5.1 Admin Chg 1, Information Technology Project Management by Denise Hill Functional areas: Administrative Change, Information Technology, Project Management, The Order provides...

  2. Offshore Wind Technology Development Projects | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development Projects Offshore Wind Technology Development Projects The Wind ... more robustly (i.e., requiring less maintenance) than land-based turbines due to the ...

  3. Identification and Prioritization of Analysis Cases for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Risk Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-06-16

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of marine and hydrokinetic energy generation projects. The development process consists of two main phases of analysis. In the first phase, preliminary risk analyses will take the form of screening studies in which key environmental impacts and the uncertainties that create risk are identified, leading to a better-focused characterization of the relevant environmental effects. Existence of critical data gaps will suggest areas in which specific modeling and/or data collection activities should take place. In the second phase, more detailed quantitative risk analyses will be conducted, with residual uncertainties providing the basis for recommending risk mitigation and monitoring activities. We also describe the process used for selecting three cases for fiscal year 2010 risk screening analysis using the ERES. A case is defined as a specific technology deployed in a particular location involving certain environmental receptors specific to that location. The three cases selected satisfy a number of desirable criteria: 1) they correspond to real projects whose deployment is likely to take place in the foreseeable future; 2) the technology developers are willing to share technology and project-related data; 3) the projects represent a diversity of technology-site-receptor characteristics; 4) the projects are of national interest, and 5) environmental effects data may be available for the projects.

  4. Property:ProjectTechnology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean +, MHK TechnologiesKensington + MHK ProjectsBW2 Tidal + MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK + MHK ProjectsBioSTREAM Pilot Plant + MHK TechnologiesbioSTREAM + MHK Projects...

  5. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  6. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressorreceptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.

  7. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic General Engineer | Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer April 7, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is seeking applicants for a new position available within the office. See below for more information. Job title: General Engineer-Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

  8. Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessment | Department of Energy Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment PDF icon Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries EA-1574: Final Environmental

  9. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Technology Developmen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and currenttidal power devices. Areas of focus will be on coatings, composites, and molding processes. System Reliability and Survivability Similar to other early stage...

  10. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 TECHNICAL REPORT Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Energy Resource in the Continental United States 1026880 Final Report, December 2012 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT

  11. Portfolio Projects by Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects by Technology Portfolio Projects by Technology For printable PDF files of LPO's portfolio projects and LPO's illustrated poster series highlighting clean energy and advanced vehicles manufacturing technologies from its portfolio, please see the LPO Publications page. ADVANCED VEHICLES MANUFACTURING PROJECT LOAN PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY OWNER(S) LOCATION(S) LOAN TYPE LOAN AMOUNT 1 ISSUANCE DATE FORD ATVM Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Ford Motor Company Illinois (Chicago), Kentucky

  12. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. PDF icon Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic

  13. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Technology Development Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Development Projects NREL works on several distributed energy integration technology development projects, including the following: High Penetration Photovoltaics Hydrogen Systems Research Metering Solutions Mobile Electric Power Printable Version Distributed Grid Integration Home Capabilities Projects Codes & Standards Data Collection & Visualization Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Microgrids Power Systems Modeling Solar Distributed Grid Integration Technology Development High

  14. Building Technologies Office Projects Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Projects Map Building Technologies Office Projects Map Welcome to the Building Technologies Office Projects Map. Here you will find listings for our ...

  15. Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oceanic Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hioceanictech.com This...

  16. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triton Sea Wave Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triton Sea Wave Technologies Address: 22 A Thrakis Zip: 15669 Region: Greece Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

  17. Teamwork Technology See Tocardo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Jump to: navigation, search Name: Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is...

  18. DOE Technology Validation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects » DOE Technology Validation Projects DOE Technology Validation Projects Stationary fuel cells can be used for backup power, power for remote locations, stand-alone power plants for towns and cities, distributed generation for buildings, and co-generation of heat and power. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office has a number of demonstrations underway to develop and evaluate the performance of fuel cells for stationary applications. The status of DOE's

  19. Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides resources and tools that help federal agencies implement renewable energy projects and technologies to meet federal laws and requirements.

  20. The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conversion Technology Demonstration Project Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website...

  1. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake

    2013-05-01

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  2. Smart Gun Technology project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

  3. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Flume Studies | Department of Energy Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river

  4. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    University Consortium | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium March 21, 2014 - 4:05am Addthis On March 21, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and Development University Consortium." The goal of this funding opportunity is to leverage

  5. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the

  6. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and ...

  7. Power Projects Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Power Projects Limited Address: PO Box 25456 Panama Street Place: Wellington Zip: 6146 Region: New Zealand Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  8. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Falls Laboratory, College of Science & Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414. ABSTRACT Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic ...

  9. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic...

  10. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrokinetic (MHK) Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel MHK coatings at Pacific...

  11. Sandia Energy - Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design Model, CACTUS Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation Sandia Releases...

  12. University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, ... effects of hydrokinetic turbines on erosion of riverbeds ...

  13. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume ... 3 U.S.G.S. S.O. Conte Anadromous Fish Research Laboratory Executive Summary ...

  14. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to evaluate and optimize the technical and environmental performance and cost factors of its hydrokinetic SmarTurbines(tm)-turbines that generate energy from free-flowing rivers. ...

  15. Sandia Energy - Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the Roza Canal, Yakima Washington Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Computational Modeling & Simulation Numerical Simulations of...

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding in the United States: Conventional Hydropower Projects, FY 2008 … FY 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS Fiscal Years 2008 - 2015 WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2 WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 1 Introduction Wind and Water Power Technologies Office The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), supports the development, deployment, and commercialization of wind and water power

  17. Woodshed Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Ltd Address: Level 50 101 Collins St Place: Melbourne Zip: 3000 Region: Australia Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +613 96539264 Website:...

  18. Chevron Technology Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Address: 3901 Briarpark Drive Place: Houston Zip: 77042 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  19. Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that play a neutral broker role with the private sector. The final marine energy case study proposes a similar approach to accelerate hydrokinetic marine energy technology...

  20. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Success Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Success Stories NREL's technology deployment best practices, project support, and technical assistance, and technology acceleration activities are resulting in successful renewable energy and energy efficiency implementation in numerous locations. Photo of a man with a blue hard hat on installing instrumentation on an 80 meter meteorological tower used to measure the wind resource in Bangladesh. Success Stories from Developing Countries Demonstrate Impacts of Low Emission Development

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tethys Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System The U.S. Department of Energy partnered with the International Energy Agency's Ocean Energy Systems initiative to create ...

  2. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Capabilities FAQ Request for Testing Safety Technical Staff Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Resilient Electric Infrastructures Military...

  3. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and longevity of larger commercial tidal machine design. ... were addressed during the first plenary session. * How do ... what models are useful o Through failure comes learning. ...

  4. biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  5. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, P.

    2012-12-12

    This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account for all technical constraints on energy capture and conversion.

  6. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component)- Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

  7. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  8. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal...

  9. Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CURRENT DOE G 415.1-1, Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide by Denise Hill Functional areas: Information Technology, Project Management The guide was developed in...

  10. U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public Meeting Transcript for Offshore Wind Demonstrations U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public Meeting ...

  11. Experimental Design of Hydrokinetic Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual September 2011 Prepared by Vincent S. Neary, Ph.D., P.E. 1 Budi Gunawan, Ph.D. 1 Marshall C. Richmond, Ph.D. P.E. 2 Vibhav Durgesh, Ph.D. 2 Brian Polagye, Ph.D. 3 Jim Thomson, Ph.D. 3 Marian Muste, Ph.D. 4 Arnie Fontaine, Ph.D. 5 1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-01

    The online information resources included in this fact sheet were developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, and are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research.

  13. Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

  14. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  15. Property:Project(s) where this technology is utilized | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC + MHK TechnologiesDeep Water Pipelines + MHK ProjectsOTEC + MHK TechnologiesDeltaStream + MHK ProjectsDeltaStream +, MHK ProjectsDeltaStream...

  16. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Water Power Program is standing up a Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) Data Repository to manage the receipt, protection, and dissemination of scientific and technical data generated by DOE funded awards.

  17. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry regarding the verification and validation of advanced open source MHK design tools and models.

  18. National Security Technology Incubation Project Continuation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-30

    This document contains a project continuation plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This continuation plan describes the current status of NSTI (staffing and clients), long-term goals, strategies, and long-term financial solvency goals.The Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University (NMSU) is the operator and manager of the NSTI. To realize the NSTI, Arrowhead Center must meet several performance objectives related to planning, development, execution, evaluation, and sustainability. This continuation plan is critical to the success of NSTI in its mission of incubating businesses with security technology products and services.

  19. SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment PDF icon Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project More Documents & Publications Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H

  20. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, Christopher R.; McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-12-30

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric Company on January 1, 2013 for up to 5 megawatts at a price of $215/MWh, escalating at 2.0% per year.

  1. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration...

  2. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Lehigh logo Lehigh ...

  3. El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal ...

  4. Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electricity to millions of homes and businesses throughout the country. To boost deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies that capture wave and tidal energy, the ...

  5. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines.

  6. Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization By: Jacques Beaudry-Losique, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy

  7. SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment Harry ... Energy Aiken, South Carolina SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project SPD-07-195 Technology ...

  8. DOE Integrated Technology Validation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Validation » Integrated Projects » DOE Integrated Technology Validation Projects DOE Integrated Technology Validation Projects Integrated hydrogen and fuel cell systems will maximize overall system efficiencies, reduce costs, and optimize component development. DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has a number of demonstrations underway to develop, evaluate, and validate the performance of integrated systems such as Power Parks. The status of DOE's integrated technology validation

  9. Small Hydropower Research and Development Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackmore, Mo

    2013-12-06

    The objective of this work was to investigate, develop, and validate the next generation of small hydroturbine generator designs that maximize the energy transfer from flowing water to electrical power generation. What resulted from this effort was the design of a new technology hydroturbine that Near Space Systems (NSS) has named the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine. Using a design that eliminates nearly all of the shortfalls of conventional hydroturbines, the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine employs a new mechanical-to-electrical energy transfer hydro design that operates without lubrication of any kind, and does not introduce foreign chemicals or particulate matter from oil or drive shaft seal degradation into the hydro ecology. In its unique configuration, the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine is nearly environmentally inert, without the negative aspects caused by interrupting the ecological continuity, i.e., disruptions to sedimentation, water quality, habitat changes, human displacement, fish migration, etc., - while it ensures dramatically reduced timeframes to project completion. While a remarkable reduction in LCOE resulting from application of the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine technology has been the core achievement of the this effort, there have been numerous technological breakthroughs from the development effort.

  10. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  11. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  12. 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology 16 Projects To Advance Hydropower Technology September 6, 2011 - 11:24am Addthis U.S. Department Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced nearly $17 million in funding over the next three years for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology. The list of 16 projects in 11 different states can be found here. Applicant Location Award Amount; Funding is from DOE unless otherwise

  13. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi; Ryou, Albert S

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Development Model NREL developed the Project Development Model to evaluate the risks and investment decisions required for successful renewable energy project development. The two-phase iterative model includes elements in project fundamentals and project development based off commercial project development practices supported by tools such as pro formas and checklists. Project Fundamentals or BEPTC(tm) State & Local Energy Data Enter a city and state or zip code in the State and

  15. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  16. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  17. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tribe pre-proposal sites in Western Passage, Passamaquoddy Bay to help determine the feasibility of electrical power generation. UEK will conduct these tests from September 2008...

  18. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  19. Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide for Small and Medium Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-07-07

    The Guide was developed to provide project management principles and guidelines to small and medium projects that fall outside the scope of DOE O 415.1, Information Technology Project Management, dated 12-3-12.

  20. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development and Finance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyze project economics, and identify effective project funding alternatives. ... Education: M.B.A University of Michigan; M.S. Economics, University of Virginia Back to ...

  1. NREL: Technology Deployment - Renewable Energy Project Helps...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Project Helps Tribe Reduce Carbon Footprint by 20,000 Tons News DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community ...

  2. Three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase 2 Funding | Department of Energy Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive Phase 2 Funding Three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive Phase 2 Funding September 11, 2014 - 3:16pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded additional funding to three of the seven projects from the Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Funding Opportunity. Dominion Virginia Power, Fishermen's Energy of New Jersey, and Principle Power

  3. DOE Selects Gasification Technology Research Projects for Funding |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Gasification Technology Research Projects for Funding DOE Selects Gasification Technology Research Projects for Funding July 14, 2015 - 11:15am Addthis The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected seven projects to receive funding through NETL's Gasification System Program. This program supports a wide range of research and development activities aimed at improving fuel and product versatility, efficiency, and economics of

  4. Renewable Energy Technologies for Federal Projects | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable energy technologies (from left to right): geothermal, hydropower, wind, concentrating solar power, and biomass. Renewable energy technologies (from left to right): ...

  5. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-11-30

    The New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG) demonstrated a combination of technologies at its Milliken Station in Lansing, New York, designed to: (1) achieve high sulfur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency, (2) bring nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions into compliance with Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), (3) maintain high station efficiency, and (4) eliminate waste water discharge. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advance coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of nine selected in January 1991 from 33 proposals submitted in response to the program?s fourth solicitation.

  6. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles ... (OCS EISEA BOEM 2014-1000 and DOEEA-1985). http:www.boem.govVOWTAP PUBLIC ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project: Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  8. DOE Selects Twelve Projects for Crosscutting Technology Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected 12 projects to receive funding through its Crosscutting Research Program's Transitional...

  9. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight March 1, 2011 - 1:49pm Addthis William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last night, we had the chance to visit with a few of the researchers and scientists behind

  10. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects With roughly 80% of the U.S. electricity demand originating from coastal states, offshore wind is a crucial renewable resource to be incorporated in the country's clean energy mix. Designed to reduce the cost of offshore wind energy through the development and deployment of innovative technologies, the Department of Energy has selected three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology

  11. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review Logistics, Costs, and GHG of Co-firing with 20% Biomass May 23, 2013 Technology Area Review: Heat and Power Principal Investigators: J.L. Male, R.D. Boardman Organization: PNNL, INL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Goal Statement & Project Overview History:

  12. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Before the House Science and Technology ...

  13. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  14. Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-04-16

    The guide was developed in support of DOE O 415.1 to assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT.

  15. Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-17

    The guide was developed in support of DOE O 415.1 to assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  16. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  17. EERE Success Story-Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbine Performance and Cost | Department of Energy Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and Cost EERE Success Story-Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and Cost April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis During 2011, EERE worked with Free Flow Power to evaluate and optimize the technical and environmental performance and cost factors of its hydrokinetic SmarTurbines(tm)-turbines that generate energy from free-flowing rivers. Free Flow

  18. EERE Success Story-New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish | Department of Energy Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish EERE Success Story-New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August 22, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines. This report-completed by the Electric Power Research Institute in conjunction with

  19. Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies Contacts For more information about federal renewable energy projects, contact: Contact Organization Specialty Rachel Shepherd 202-586-9209 Federal Energy Management Program Renewable energy program lead Tracy Logan 202-341-7601 Federal Energy Management Program Renewable energy procurement lead Gerald Robinson 510-486-5769 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Renewable energy procurement Doug Dahle

  20. Federal Renewable Energy Project Potential by Technology | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Potential by Technology Federal Renewable Energy Project Potential by Technology Federal renewable energy projects vary by technology and region and align with key market drivers, including renewable energy resource strength, utility rates, and local incentives. One way a federal agency can approach its 30% by 2025 renewable energy target is by examining its inventory of real property, calculating energy use and cost at each site, and obtaining and interpreting local renewable energy

  1. Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technologies (FAST) project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the product for use in HPC environments. The FAST project involves establishing long-term development collaboration agreements to develop the following opportunities: File...

  2. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2007-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

  3. Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the last decade, digitized records have become widely available that can be used to quantify and model the processes underlying technological evolution. These "innovation ...

  4. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Stephen W; Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Ward, Christina D; Smith, Barton; Grubb, Kimberly R; Lee, Russell

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  5. Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Table B-13 Technology: Low Level Waste ... Table C-5 TRL 3: Off-gas Treatment (Radon Decay ... For temperature-sensitive feedstocks, WFEs frequently are ...

  6. MHK Projects/Muroran Institute of Technology Pilot Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    started. In between the second phase start date and December 1998, device efficiency (motor outputincident wave power) was 40-60% of the rated power (5 kW). Project Installed...

  7. Information Technology Program/Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-20

    To close this policy gap the Office of the CIO (OCIO) proposes to develop a new order with departmental guidance on essential processes, documentation, and critical decision-points for IT projects.

  8. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCPOA NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the threat

    JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide Marshall Goldberg MRG &

  9. Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power &

  10. Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technologies (FAST) project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy From the Lab to the Showroom: How the Electric Car Came to Life From the Lab to the Showroom: How the Electric Car Came to Life October 17, 2011 - 11:02am Addthis An illustration of the 2011 Chevy Volt, whose lithium-ion battery is based on technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory. | Image courtesy of General Motors. An illustration of the 2011 Chevy Volt, whose lithium-ion battery is based on technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory. | Image

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $2,000,000 This project aims to demonstrate potentially disruptive, novel photovoltaic (PV) absorbers by developing proof-of-concept PV device prototypes composed of defect-tolerant inorganic thin film

  12. Concentrating Solar Power Projects by Technology | Concentrating Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power | NREL Technology In this section, you can select a concentrating solar power (CSP) technology from the list below. You can then select a specific project and review a profile covering project basics, participating organizations, and power plant configuration data for the solar field, power block, and thermal energy storage. Parabolic Trough Systems-line-focus systems that use curved mirrors to focus sunlight on a receiver Linear Fresnel Reflector Systems-line-focus systems that use

  13. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2013-06-01

    A primary issue of concern of regulatory and resource agencies is how the operation of hydrokinetic turbines will affect local and migratory fish populations. This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments.

  14. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    Fact sheet describing the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth.

  15. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth.

  16. NREL to Advance Technologies for Microgrid Projects - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Advance Technologies for Microgrid Projects Industry partnerships leverage capabilities of Energy Systems Integration Facility December 10, 2014 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is providing critical support to two new microgrid projects coordinated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and General Electric Company (GE). The Energy Department recently announced its award of more than $8 million for seven microgrid projects-including $1.2 million

  17. Technology Transfer and Outreach for SNL/Rochester ALPHA Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinars, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the next stage goals and resource needs for the joint Sandia and University of Rochester ARPA-E project. A key portion of this project is Technology Transfer and Outreach, with the goal being to help ensure that this project develops a credible method or tool that the magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) research community can use to broaden the advocacy base, to pursue a viable path to commercial fusion energy, and to develop other commercial opportunities for the associated technology. This report describes an analysis of next stage goals and resource needs as requested by Milestone 5.1.1.

  18. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  19. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  20. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, ...

  3. Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2011-05-01

    The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

  4. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  5. Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies By 2025, 30% of the electricity consumed by the federal government is to come from renewable energy sources. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, federal renewable electricity consumption was 8.76% of its total electricity consumption. <a href="/node/1040501">Learn more about FY 2014 progress toward the 30% by 2025 target.</a> By 2025, 30% of the electricity consumed by the federal government

  6. Department of Energy Announces 12 New Projects to Accelerate Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that Improve the Efficiency and Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid | Department of Energy 12 New Projects to Accelerate Technologies that Improve the Efficiency and Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid Department of Energy Announces 12 New Projects to Accelerate Technologies that Improve the Efficiency and Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid December 11, 2015 - 1:33pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON- The Energy Department's Advanced Research

  7. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to have commercial potential. * TRL 12: Scientific research...

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0-800-81350 SOUTH AFRICA 080-09-82158 SOUTH KOREA 82-2-6744-1091 00798-14800-7797 SPAIN 34-91-414-21-70 800-300-907 SWEDEN 46-8-503-34-825 0200-899-946 SWITZERLAND...

  11. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example...

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from...

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    64-9-970-4606 0800-456-270 NORWAY 47-21-590-025 800-18093 PANAMA 011-001-800-5072372 PERU 0800-53731 PHILIPPINES 63-2-858-3760 1800-111-42436 POLAND 00-800-1213476 PORTUGAL...

  14. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. ...

  15. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies, Wind and Water Power Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These centers, one run by Oregon State University and the University of Washington and one by the University of Hawaii, are planned with open-water test berths as well as ...

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.comwimagesdd2Red-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"","text":"

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy Oscillating Water Column OscillatingWaterColumn.jpg...

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... a horizontal shaft to form a rotor; the kinetic motion of the water current creates lift ... a vertical shaft to form a rotor; the kinetic motion of the water current creates lift ...

  19. Projects that Employ Innovative Technologies in Support of the Advanced Energy Initiative (2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Loan Guarantees For Projects That Employ Innovative Technologies In Support Of The Advanced Energy Initiative

  20. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  1. DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects for Funding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected 16 projects to receive funding through NETL’s Carbon Capture Program. The program funds development and testing of transformational carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for new and existing coal-based power plants.

  2. Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology Project bibliography, 1984--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology [for Advanced Heat Engines] Project was begun in 1983 to meet the ceramic materials needs of the companion DOE automotive engine program, the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) project, and the Heavy Duty Transport (low-heat-rejection, heavy-duty diesel) project. Goal is to develop an industry technology base for reliable and cost effective ceramics for applications in advanced automotive gas turbine and diesel engines. Research areas were identified following extensive input from industry and academia. Majority of research is done by industry (60%); work is also done at colleges and universities, in-house, and at other national laboratories and government agencies. In the beginning, reliability of ceramic components was the key issue. The reliability issues have largely been met and, at the present time, cost is the driving issue, especially in light of the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. Emphasis of the program has now been shifted toward developing cost-effective ceramic components for high-performance engines in the near-term. This bibliography is a compilation of publications done in conjunction with the Ceramic Technology Project since its beginning. Citations were obtained from reports done by participants in the project. We have tried to limit citations to those published and easily located. The end date of 1992 was selected.

  3. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  4. Demonstration Project 111, ITS/CVO Technology Truck, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambrell, KP

    2002-01-11

    In 1995, the planning and building processes began to design and develop a mobile demonstration unit that could travel across the nation and be used as an effective outreach tool. In 1997, the unit was completed; and from June 1997 until December 2000, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) mobilized the Technology Truck, also known as Demonstration Project No. 111, ''Advanced Motor Carrier Operations and Safety Technologies.'' The project featured the latest available state-of-the-practice intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies designed to improve both the efficiency and safety of commercial vehicle operations (CVO). The Technology Truck was designed to inform and educate the motor carrier community and other stakeholders regarding ITS technologies, thus gaining support and buy-in for participation in the ITS program. The primary objective of the project was to demonstrate new and emerging ITS/CVO technologies and programs, showing their impact on motor carrier safety and productivity. In order to meet the objectives of the Technology Truck project, the FHWA/FMCSA formed public/private partnerships with industry and with Oak Ridge National Laboratory to demonstrate and display available ITS/CVO technologies in a cooperative effort. The mobile demonstration unit was showcased at national and regional conferences, symposiums, universities, truck shows and other venues, in an effort to reach as many potential users and decision makers as possible. By the end of the touring phase, the ITS/CVO Technology Truck had been demonstrated in 38 states, 4 Canadian provinces, 88 cities, and 114 events; been toured by 18,099 people; and traveled 115,233 miles. The market penetration for the Technology Truck exceeded 4,000,000, and the website received more than 25,000 hits. In addition to the Truck's visits, the portable ITS/CVO kiosk was demonstrated at 31 events in 23 cites in 15 states.

  5. Draft - DOE G 415.1-2, Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide for Small and Medium Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Guide was developed to provide project management principles and guidelines to small and medium projects that fall outside the scope of DOE O 415.1, Information Technology Project Management, dated 12-3-12.

  6. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  7. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced $4 million to engage America’s research universities in the effort to accelerate the development of the emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry in the United States.

  8. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report briefly describes recent progress in eight projects. The projects are entitled Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Spray Casting Project; and Watervliet Arsenal Project.

  9. Launch of fast reactor cycle technology development project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2007-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA launched a new Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development f (FaCT) Project in cooperation with the Japanese electric utilities. The FaCT project is based on the conclusion of the previous project, namely the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (FS) which carried out in last seven years. In the FS, the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication was selected as the main concept which should be developed principally because it was the most promising concept for commercialization. A conceptual design study of the main concept and research and development of innovative technologies adopted in the main concept are implemented toward an important milestone at 2015. The development targets, which were set up at the beginning stage of FS, were revised for the FaCT project based on the results of FS and change in Japanese society environment and in the world situation. International collaboration is promoted to pursue fast reactor cycle technology which deserves the global standard and its efficient development. (author)

  10. Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process. Project Performance Summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advanced coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of sixteen selected from 55 proposals submitted in 1988 and 1989 in response to the CCTDP second solicitation.

  11. The Hyperion Project: Partnership for an Advaned Technology Cluster Testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M; Leininger, M

    2008-04-28

    The Hyperion project offers a unique opportunity to participate in a community-driven testing and development resource at a scale beyond what can be accomplished by one entity alone. Hyperion is a new strategic technology partnership intended to support the member-driven development and testing at scale. This partnership will allow commodity clusters to scale up to meet the growing demands of customers multi-core petascale simulation environments. Hyperion will tightly couple together the outstanding research and development capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with leading technology companies, including Cisco, Data Direct Networks, Dell, Intel, LSI, Mellanox, Qlogic, RedHat, SuperMicro and Sun. The end goal of this project is to revolutionize cluster computing in fundamental ways by providing the critical software and hardware components for a highly scalable simulation environment. This environment will include support for high performance networking, parallel file systems, operating system, and cluster management. This goal will be achieved by building a scalable technology cluster testbed that will be fully dedicated to the partners and provide: (1) A scalable development testing and benchmarking environment for critical enabling Linux cluster technologies; (2) An evaluation testbed for new hardware and software technologies; and (3) A vehicle for forming long term collaborations.

  12. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharon; Previsic, Mirko; Nelson, Peter; Woo, Sheri

    2010-06-17

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DOE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major show-stoppers, largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts. Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts.Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns. This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research.

  13. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  15. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. 1990 DOE/SANDIA crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruby, D.S.

    1990-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Cell Research Division and Photovoltaic Technology Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held August 7 through 9, 1990 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, concentrator 3-5 cell research, and concentrating collector development.

  17. El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Peer Exchange Call Series: Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes Smarter (301), call slides and discussion summary. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications The Future is Here - Smart Home Technology Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201) Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home Performance Opportunities (201) to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss |

  18. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  19. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Niedermuller, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are “harvestable,” meaning they result in an actual reduction in headcount and/or cost. The report describes the specific activities conducted with a partner utility to examine the various work activities associated with mobile work packages to determine what time savings and error rate reductions are available. The report summarizes these findings in the form of a business case for the technology.

  20. Fuel Cell Project Selected for First Ever Technology-to-Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Selected for First Ever Technology-to-Market SBIR Award Fuel Cell Project Selected ... electrolyte membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cell and electrolysis applications. ...

  1. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  2. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  4. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  5. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  6. Technology Base Research Project for electrochemical energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Kim

    1991-06-01

    The US DOE's Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an electrochemical energy storage program, which includes R D on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The general R D areas addressed by the project include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced batteries, determination of technical feasibility of the new couples, improvements in battery components and materials, establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion, and the development of air-system (fuel cell, metal/air) technology for transportation applications. Major emphasis is given to applied research which will lead to superior performance and lower life-cycle costs. The TBR Project is divided into three major project elements: Exploratory Research, Applied Science Research, and Air Systems Research. Highlights of each project element are summarized according to the appropriate battery system or electrochemical research area. 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  8. Ceramic Technology Project data base: September 1992 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1993-06-01

    Data presented in this report represent an intense effort to improve processing methods, testing methods, and general mechanical properties (rupture modulus, tensile, creep, stress-rupture, dynamic and cyclic fatigue, fracture toughness) of candidate ceramics for use in advanced heat engines. This work was performed by many facilities and represents only a small part of the data generated by the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) since 1986. Materials discussed include GTE PY6, GN-10, NT-154, NT-164, SN-260, SN-251, SN-252, AY6, silicon nitride combined with rare-earth oxides, Y-TZP, ZTA, NC-433, NT-230, Hexoloy SA, MgO-PSZ-to-MgO-PSZ joints, MgO-PSZ-to-cast iron, and a few whisker/fiber-reinforced ceramics. Information in this report was taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and from final reports summarizing the results of individual studies. Test results are presented in tabular form and in graphs. All data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP data base and are available to all project participants on request. The objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies but not to draw conclusions from those data.

  9. 1992 DOE/Sandia crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maish, A.

    1992-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia National Laboratories` Photovoltaic Technology and Photovoltaic Evaluation Departments. It contains information supplied by organizations making presentations at the meeting, which was held July 14--15, 1992 at the Sheraton Old Town Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Overview sessions covered the Department of Energy (DOE) program, including those at Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and non-DOE programs, including the EPRI concentrator collector program, The Japanese crystalline silicon program, and some concentrating photovoltaic activities in Europe. Additional sessions included papers on Sandia`s Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory`s collaborative research, cell processing research, the activities of the participants in the Concentrator Initiative Program, and photovoltaic technology evaluation at Sandia and NREL.

  10. AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09

  11. DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy’s University Turbine Systems Research Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy for additional development. Developing gas turbines that run with greater cleanness and efficiency than current models is of great benefit both to the environment and the power industry, but development of such advanced turbine systems requires significant advances in high-temperature materials science, an understanding of combustion phenomena, and development of innovative cooling techniques to maintain integrity of turbine components.

  12. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

  13. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site beryllium characterization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.M.; Miller, J.R.; Allen, D.F.

    1999-06-01

    A site beryllium characterization project was completed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in 1997. Information from historical reviews, previous sampling surveys, and a new sampling survey were used to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the locations and levels of beryllium contamination in 35 buildings. A feature of the sampling strategy was to test if process knowledge was a good predictor of where beryllium contamination could be found. Results revealed that this technique was effective at identifying where surface contamination levels might exceed the RFETS smear control level but that it was not effective in identifying where low concentrations of beryllium might be found.

  14. Parallel optics technology assessment for the versatile link project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Rivera, R.; Prosser, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes the assessment of commercially available and prototype parallel optics modules for possible use as back end components for the Versatile Link common project. The assessment covers SNAP12 transmitter and receiver modules as well as optical engine technologies in dense packaging options. Tests were performed using vendor evaluation boards (SNAP12) as well as custom evaluation boards (optical engines). The measurements obtained were used to compare the performance of these components with single channel SFP+ components operating at a transmission wavelength of 850 nm over multimode fibers.

  15. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This fact sheet describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth. Participating fuel cell developers share price information about their fuel cell products and/or raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, and safety with NREL via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC). The limited-access, off-network HSDC houses the data and analysis tools to protect proprietary information. NREL shares individualized data analysis results as detailed data products (DDPs) with the partners who supplied the data. Aggregated results are published as composite data products (CDPs), which show the technology status without identifying individual companies. The CDPs are a primary benchmarking tool for the U.S. Department of Energy and other stakeholders interested in tracking the status of fuel cell technologies. They highlight durability advancements, identify areas for continued development, and help set realistic price expectations at small-volume production.

  16. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 -€“ 09/12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meggitt, Dallas J.

    2012-11-09

    It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

  17. Synchrophasor Technology Advancement in ARRA Projects: Final Report from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advancement of Synchrophasor Technology in ARRA Projects │ ii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This report was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) and prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The effort was directed and supported by DOE Senior Advisor Joseph Paladino and DOE Program Managers Philip N. Overholt and Deborah Haught. The authors of this report were Jose R. Gracia (ORNL), Marcus A. Young, II, Ph.D. (ORNL), D. Tom

  18. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  19. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2011-05-09

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

  20. DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step ... longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. ...

  1. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

  2. Big Data Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion: Kickoff Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SEEDS program, seven projects are investigating strategies to accelerate the pace of change for solar energy technologies using cutting-edge analytical and computational tools, real...

  3. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map......

  4. DOE Selects Research Projects to Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected for funding 16 solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology research projects. Fuel cells are a modular, efficient, and virtually pollution-free power generation technology. In Fiscal Year 2015, NETL issued two funding opportunities announcements (FOAs) to support programs that enable the development and deployment of this energy technology.

  5. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  6. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J.

    1993-03-01

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  7. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Technical Assistance and Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Technical Assistance and Support NREL provides technical assistance and support for projects around the globe by assessing resources, analyzing designs, and guiding project implementation to help identify clean energy solutions. Learn more about NREL's work in the following areas: Federal Agencies Federal Agencies International International Islands Islands Research Campuses Research Campuses State and Local Governments State and Local Governments Tribes Tribes Utilities Utilities

  8. DOE-Backed Project Will Demonstrate Innovative Geothermal Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of DOE's Geothermal Technologies Program, two geothermal companies, AltaRock Energy and Davenport Newberry, announced plans on June 8 to conduct a demonstration of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology at a site located near Bend, Oregon.

  9. DOE Selects Nine R&D Projects to Advance SSL Technology | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Selects Nine R&D Projects to Advance SSL Technology DOE Selects Nine R&D Projects to Advance SSL Technology May 4, 2015 - 9:56am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of nine solid-state lighting projects to receive funding, in response to the funding opportunity announcement DE-FOA-0001171. These one- to two-year projects will focus on all three existing DOE SSL R&D program areas: Core Technology Research (the application of

  10. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  11. NREL: National Wind Technology Center Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL: National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. The NWTC advances the development of innovative land-based and offshore wind energy technologies through its research and testing facilities. Researchers draw on years of experience and their wealth of expertise in fluid dynamics and structural testing to also advance marine and hydrokinetic water power

  12. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merrimack River Amesbury MA US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  13. Big Data Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Graphic showing a web of people with energy bolts connecting them. Through the SEEDS program, seven projects are investigating strategies to accelerate the pace of change for solar ...

  14. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Amazon River Brazil | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amazon River Brazil < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP...

  15. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-08-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was conducted using three different baseline models for estimation peak load reductions. One was three-in-ten baseline, which is based on the site electricity consumption from 7 am to 10 am for the three days with the highest consumption of the previous ten business days. The second model, the LBNL outside air temperature (OAT) regression baseline model, is based on OAT data and site electricity consumption from the previous ten days, adjusted using weather regressions from the fifteen-minute electric load data during each DR test event for each site. A third baseline that simply averages the available load data was used for sites less with less than 10 days of historical meter data. The evaluation also included surveying sites regarding any problems or issues that arose during the DR test events. Question covered occupant comfort, control issues and other potential problems.

  16. Locomotive Emission and Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Archer

    2005-03-14

    In response to a United States Department of Energy (DOE) solicitation, the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), in partnership with CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT), submitted a proposal to DOE to support the demonstration of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) technology on fifty-six CSXT locomotives. The project purpose was to demonstrate the idle fuel savings, the Nitrous Oxide (NOX) emissions reduction and the noise reduction capabilities of the APU. Fifty-six CSXT Baltimore Division locomotives were equipped with APUs, Engine Run Managers (ERM) and communications equipment to permit GPS tracking and data collection from the locomotives. Throughout the report there is mention of the percent time spent in the State of Maryland. The fifty-six locomotives spent most of their time inside the borders of Maryland and some spent all their time inside the state borders. Usually when a locomotive traveled beyond the Maryland State border it was into an adjoining state. They were divided into four groups according to assignment: (1) Power Unit/Switcher Mate units, (2) Remote Control units, (3) SD50 Pusher units and (4) Other units. The primary data of interest were idle data plus the status of the locomotive--stationary or moving. Also collected were main engine off, idling or working. Idle data were collected by county location, by locomotive status (stationary or moving) and type of idle (Idle 1, main engine idling, APU off; Idle 2, main engine off, APU on; Idle 3, main engine off, APU off; Idle 4, main engine idle, APU on). Desirable main engine idle states are main engine off and APU off or main engine off and APU on. Measuring the time the main engine spends in these desirable states versus the total time it could spend in an engine idling state allows the calculation of Percent Idle Management Effectiveness (%IME). IME is the result of the operation of the APU plus the implementation of CSXT's Warm Weather Shutdown Policy. It is difficult to separate the two. The units demonstrated an IME of 64% at stationary idle for the test period. The data collected during calendar year 2004 demonstrated that 707,600 gallons of fuel were saved and 285 tons of NOX were not emitted as a result of idle management in stationary idle, which translates to 12,636 gallons and 5.1 tons of NOx per unit respectively. The noise reduction capabilities of the APU demonstrated that at 150 feet from the locomotive the loaded APU with the main engine shut down generated noise that was only marginally above ambient noise level.

  17. Emerging Technology Retrofit Demonstration Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy An overview of BTO's Emerging Technologies program as presented at the 2013 Peer Review. PDF icon et_overview_phelan_040213.pdf More Documents & Publications Prioritization Tool - 2013 BTO Peer Review Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013 Peer Review Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump - 2013 of Energy

    4 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Emerging Technologies Program. Through robust

  18. Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

    1998-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

  19. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feedstock Supply Chain Analysis WBS :1.1.1.2 March 25, 2015 Jake Jacobson Idaho National ... Technologies Office 2 - Approach (Management) SUCCESS FACTORS * Collaboration across ...

  20. Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings of the 2 nd Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2014 April 15-18, 2014, Seattle, WA FIELD MEASUREMENT TEST PLAN TO DETERMINE EFFECTS OF HYDROKINETIC TURBINE DEPLOYMENT ON CANAL TEST SITE IN YAKIMA, WA, USA Budi Gunawan 1 , Jesse Roberts, Ann Dallman, Vincent Neary Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, U.S. Shane Grovue Instream Energy Systems Vancouver, BC, CA Josh Mortensen, Bryan Heiner US Bureau of Reclamation Denver, CO, U.S. 1 Corresponding author:

  1. Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

  2. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Uldolmok Strait South Korea | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    when it installed a 15ft. GHT in the Strait. During this phase, project partners hope to produce up to 1 MW of power that will be delivered to Jindo Island, with a...

  3. The Geothermal Technologies Office Invests $18 Million for Innovative Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In support of a low carbon future, the United States Department of Energy today announced up to $18 million for 32 projects that will advance geothermal energy development in the United States. The...

  4. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. There is significant opportunity for water power to provide large amounts of clean and renewable power. The Water Power Program is invested significantly in comprehensive analysis of ocean energy potential for future

  5. Sandia Labs participates in DOE Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Development DOE Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  6. Upgrades to SNL-EFDC: A Tool to Balance Marine Hydrokinetic Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation Efficiency with Environmental Response Upgrades to SNL-EFDC: A Tool to Balance Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Generation Efficiency with Environmental Response - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Performance Models and Standards for Bifacial PV Module Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bifacial PV modules absorb sunlight and produce electricity from both the front and back sides of the module and can take advantage of light reflected from a surface (albedo). Analysis and field data indicate that this technology has the potential to increase system outputs by 10%-20%. Because current bifacial PV technology has complex light collecting dynamics, its performance advantages have not been fully exploited and no commonly-available tools allow it to be considered for major PV projects beyond current niche applications. The project will provide the data, standard test methods, and validated models to allow developers to fairly evaluate the potential benefits bifacial PV technologies for specific projects.

  8. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers and Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At its Annual Merit Review in Arlington, VA, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office recently recognized some of its most outstanding performers involved in research,...

  10. Project Profile: CSP Energy Storage Solutions — Multiple Technologies Compared

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Solar Holdings, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is aiming to demonstrate commercial, utility-scale thermal energy storage technologies and provide a path to cost-effective energy storage for CSP plants >50 MW.

  11. Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide for Small and Medium Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-12-21

    The guide supports consistent and effective implementation of DOE O 415.1 and assists IT Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT projects of small and medium size. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  12. Federal Loan Guarantees for Projects that Manufacture Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Systems and Components: August 10, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Loan Guarantees for Projects that Manufacture Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Systems and Components: August 10, 2010

  13. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAY TH

    2008-08-12

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the EV project:...

  15. Redesigned CCS Website Offers Wealth of Information on Worldwide Technology, Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wealth of information about worldwide carbon capture and storage technologies and projects is available on the newly launched, updated and redesigned National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) website.

  16. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  17. Webinar: Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project," originally presented on November 18, 2014.

  18. Webinar: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project Data & Analytic Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about EV project data ...

  20. Los Alamos among new DOE projects to create new technology pathways...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ARPA-E) on May 14, 2015 announced 30 million in funding for 9 groundbreaking new projects aimed at developing prototype technologies to explore new pathways for fusion power. ...

  1. DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: PEV-EVSE Interoperability Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about PEV-EVSE interoperability project.

  3. "Advancement of Synchrophasor Technology in Projects Funded by the American

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009" Report | Department of Energy "Advancement of Synchrophasor Technology in Projects Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009" Report "Advancement of Synchrophasor Technology in Projects Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009" Report The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided $4.5 billion to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability to modernize the U.S.

  4. ATTAP: Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project. Annual report, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Purpose of ATTAP is to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a technology state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing.

  5. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet describes opportunities for leading fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible fuel cell technology performance and durability analysis by sharing their raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, safety, and cost with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center.

  6. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  7. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  8. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  9. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  10. Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Launched in Ohio | Department of Energy Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful

  11. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu ... to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans ... The project will advance ORPC's cross-flow turbine tidal ...

  12. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpe, John; Hampson, Steve; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-09-01

    The work and results described in this final report pertain to the demonstration of real-time characterization technologies applied to potentially contaminated surface soils in and around Area of Concern (AOC) 492 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The work was conducted under the auspices of Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment (KRCEE). KRCEE was created to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to complete the expeditious and economically viable environmental restoration of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), and surrounding areas.

  13. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  14. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION PROJECT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (BETO) Project Peer Review BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION PROJECT 5/23/2013 Heat and Power Ed Olthoff Cedar Falls Utilities STREETER STATION Unit #6 - 1963 Stoker 16.5 MW Coal/Natural Gas Unit #7 - 1973 Pulverized 35.0 MW Coal/Natural Gas Goal Statement & Project Overview 3 * Densification process to mimic stoker coal - ¾" to 1 ¼" chunks of coal - Suitable for corn stover and other energy crops - Compatible with the existing fuel handling equipment and boiler - Validity determined by

  15. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

    2010-03-17

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

  16. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

  17. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  18. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Gunawan 1 , V.S. Neary 1 C. Hill 2 and L.P. Chamorro 2 1 Energy-Water-Ecosystems Engineering, Wind and Water Power Technologies, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge...

  19. Final Technical Report: The Water-to-Wire (W2W) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissner, Daniel N.; Edward, Lovelace C.

    2013-12-24

    The purpose of the Free Flow Power (FFP) Water-to-Wire Project (Project) was to evaluate and optimize the performance, environmental compatibility, and cost factors of FFP hydrokinetic turbines through design analyses and deployments in test flumes and riverine locations.

  20. ORNL/TM-2012/221 Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL/TM-2012/221 Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait June 2012 Prepared by Vincent S. Neary, Ph.D., P.E., Budi Gunawan, Ph.D., Albert Ryou DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source.

  1. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  2. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  3. Applications of EOR (enhanced oil recovery) technology in field projects--1990 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, J.F.; Thomas, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Trends in the type and number of US enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects are analyzed for the period from 1980 through 1989. The analysis is based on current literature and news media and the Department of Energy (DOE) EOR Project Data Base, which contains information on over 1,348 projects. The characteristics of the EOR projects are grouped by starting date and process type to identify trends in reservoir statistics and applications of process technologies. Twenty-two EOR projects starts were identified for 1989 and ten project starts for 1988. An obvious trend over recent years has been the decline in the number of project starts since 1981 until 1988 which corresponds to the oil price decline during that period. There was a modest recovery in 1989 of project starts, which lags the modest recovery of oil prices in 1987 that was reconfirmed in 1989. During the time frame of 1980 to 1989, there has been a gradual improvement in costs of operation for EOR technology. The perceived average cost of EOR has gone down from a $30/bbl range to low $20/bbl. These costs of operation seems to stay just at the price of oil or slightly above to result in marginal profitability. The use of polymer flooding has drastically decreased both in actual and relative numbers of project starts since the oil price drop in 1986. Production from polymer flooding is down more than 50%. Long-term plans for large, high-cost projects such as CO{sub 2} flooding in West Texas, steamflooding in California, and hydrocarbon flooding on the North Slope have continued to be implemented. EOR process technologies have been refined to be more cost effective as shown by the continued application and rising production attributable to EOR. 8 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. EERE Success Story-NREL to Advance Technologies for Microgrid Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to Advance Technologies for Microgrid Projects EERE Success Story-NREL to Advance Technologies for Microgrid Projects October 15, 2015 - 3:51pm Addthis NREL will test microgrid controllers developed by EPRI and GE using its megawatt-scale power hardware-in-the-loop capability, which is part of the Energy System Integration Facility. NREL will test microgrid controllers developed by EPRI and GE using its megawatt-scale power hardware-in-the-loop capability, which is part

  5. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review Development of Biofuels Using Ionic Transfer Membranes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (BETO) Project Peer Review Development of Biofuels Using Ionic Transfer Membranes Phase III May 20-23, 2013 Technology Area Review: Biofuels Principal Investigator: Dr. Kris Lipinska, University of Nevada Las Vegas Investigators: S. Balagopal, Ceramatec Inc. Dr. O. Hemmers, UNLV Dr. C. Bae, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement & Project Overview - 1 * Sodium methoxide (SMO) is an

  6. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  7. Residential Energy Efficiency Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.; Rutter, A.; Briggs, D.

    2014-03-01

    In order to meet its energy goals, the Department of Defense (DOD) has partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy-efficiency technologies. The scope of this project was to demonstrate tools and technologies to reduce energy use in military housing, with particular emphasis on measuring and reducing loads related to consumer electronics (commonly referred to as 'plug loads'), hot water, and whole-house cooling.

  8. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, e.g., hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering and design and analysis (D&A) of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high-performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  9. Los Alamos among new DOE projects to create new technology pathways for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-cost fusion energy development New DOE projects for low-cost fusion energy development Los Alamos among new DOE projects to create new technology pathways for low-cost fusion energy development Three of the projects involve Los Alamos National Laboratory science staff and partners. July 20, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  10. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  11. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  12. Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

  13. Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project development-friendly greenhouse gas reduction, May 1999 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.

    1999-05-11

    The Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project (TCAPP) was launched by several U.S. Government agencies (USAID, EPA and DOE) in August 1997 to establish a model for climate change technology cooperation with developing and transition countries. TCAPP is currently facilitating voluntary partnerships between the governments of Brazil, China, Kazakhstan, Korea, Mexico, and the Philippines, the private sector, and the donor community on a common set of actions that will advance implementation of clean energy technologies. The six participating countries have been actively engaged in shaping this initiative along with international donors and the private sector. This program helps fulfill the US obligation to support technology transfer to developing countries under Article 4.5 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. TCAPP also provides a mechanism to focus resources across international donor programs on the technology cooperation needs of developing and transition countries.

  14. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy’s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program’s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  15. Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Metzger, I.; Cutler, D.; Holland, G.; Hanada, A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This project was one of several demonstrations of new or underutilized commercial energy technologies. The common goal was to demonstrate and measure the performance and economic benefit of the system while monitoring any ancillary impacts to related standards of service and operation and maintenance (O&M) practices. In short, demonstrations at naval facilities simultaneously evaluate the benefits and compatibility of the technology with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) mission, and with NAVFAC's design, construction, operations, and maintenance practices, in particular. This project demonstrated the performance of commercially available advanced power strips (APSs) for plug load energy reductions in building A4 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii.

  16. Progress of the PV Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; Von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment total nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  17. Progress of the Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment totals nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  18. Sandia Energy - Bernadette Hernandez-Sanchez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Hernandez-Sanchez is the project lead for the Advanced Materials Program and DOE's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database (MHTDB). The Advanced Materials Program focuses...

  19. Alison LaBonte | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alison LaBonte About Us Alison LaBonte - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22

  20. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  1. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide and Storage Value-Added Options Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Storage Value-Added Options Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle

  2. EIS-0282: McIntosh Unit 4 TCFB Demonstration Project, Clean Coal Technology Program, Lakeland, Florida (also see EIS-0304)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The proposed project, selected under DOE’s Clean Coal Technology Program, would demonstrate both Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) and Topped PCFB technologies. The proposed project would involve the construction and operation of a nominal 238 MWe (megawatts of electric power) combined-cycle power plant designed to burn a range of low- to high-sulfur coals.

  3. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization Projects The objective of NREL's resource characterization work is to characterize U.S. marine and hydrokinetic energy resources and quantify the amounts of energy that could feasibly be extracted. This information will allow both DOE and various stakeholders to prioritize the level of investment and research by resource type and assess the potential contribution to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio. Examples of NREL's resource characterization activities include: Work with

  4. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30

    The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  5. Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

    2012-09-21

    A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

  6. DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Projects | Department of Energy Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to $7.3 million to 14 research teams, with a cost-shared value of over $18 million, under the DOE's competitive solicitation for Advanced

  7. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  8. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Waste-to-Energy Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project J. Davis, R. Gelman, G. Tomberlin, and R. Bain National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-60868 March 2014 Produced under direction of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement 11-01829 and

  9. Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project M. Sheppy, I. Metzger, D. Cutler, and G. Holland National Renewable Energy Laboratory A. Hanada Naval Facilities Engineering Command Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-60382 January

  10. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Hydropower Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Hydropower Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  11. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Environmental monitoring report, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) has installed and is presently operating a high-efficiency flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system to demonstrate innovative emissions control technology and comply with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The host facility for this demonstration project is NYSEG`s Milliken Station, in the Town of Lansing, New York. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate a retrofit of energy-efficient SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control systems with minimal impact on overall plant efficiency. The demonstration project has added a forced oxidation, formic acid-enhanced wet limestone FGD system, which is expected to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions by at least 90 percent. NYSEG also made combustion modifications to each boiler and plans to demonstrate selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology on unit 1, which will reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Goals of the proposed demonstration include up to 98 percent SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high-sulfur coal, 30 percent NO{sub x} reductions through combustion modifications, additional NO{sub x} reductions using SNCR technology, production of marketable commercial-grade gypsum and calcium chloride by-products to minimize solid waste disposal, and zero wastewater discharge.

  12. Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

    2013-07-01

    The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

  13. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in its role as a key component in the U.S. and world energy markets. The CCT Program also has global importance in providing clean, efficient coal-based technology to a burgeoning energy market in developing countries largely dependent on coal. Based on 1997 data, world energy consumption is expected to increase 60 percent by 2020, with almost half of the energy increment occurring in developing Asia (including China and India). By 2020, energy consumption in developing Asia is projected to surpass consumption in North America. The energy form contributing most to the growth is electricity, as developing Asia establishes its energy infrastructure. Coal, the predominant indigenous fuel, in that region will be the fuel of choice in electricity production. The CCTs offer a means to mitigate potential environmental problems associated with unprecedented energy growth, and to enhance the U.S. economy through foreign equipment sales and engineering services.

  14. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Yousry; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  15. Water Power Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Technologies Office leads efforts in developing innovative water power technologies to help the United States meet its growing energy demand. The Office is pioneering research and development efforts in marine and hydrokinetic and hydropower technologies, which hold the promise of clean, affordable electricity, and will move our nation toward energy independence. What We Do The Water Power Technologies Office supports a cutting- edge research portfolio aimed at producing the next

  16. ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F.

    1992-06-01

    This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

  17. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  18. Webinar November 18: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00 to 1:00 Eastern Standard Time (EST).

  19. DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle power plants.

  20. Development of an Improved Process for Installation Projects of High Technology Manufacturing Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Sarah V.

    2014-04-30

    High technology manufacturing equipment is utilized at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to support nuclear missions. This is undertaken from concept initiation where equipment is designed and then taken through several review phases, working closely with system engineers (SEs) responsible for each of the affected systems or involved disciplines (from gasses to HVAC to structural, etc.). After the design is finalized it moves to procurement and custom fabrication of the equipment and equipment installation, including all of the paperwork involved. Not only are the engineering and manufacturing aspects important, but also the scheduling, financial forecasting, and planning portions that take place initially and are sometimes modified as the project progresses should requirements, changes or additions become necessary. The process required to complete a project of this type, including equipment installation, is unique and involves numerous steps to complete. These processes can be improved and recent work on the Direct Current Arc (DC Arc) Glovebox Design, Fabrication and Installation Project provides an opportunity to identify some important lessons learned (LL) that can be implemented in the future for continued project improvement and success.

  1. U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public Meeting Transcript for Offshore Wind Demonstrations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM + + + + + U.S. OFFSHORE WIND: ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS + + + + + PUBLIC MEETING + + + + + TUESDAY FEBRUARY 7, 2012 + + + + + The Public Meeting Convened in Ballroom C & D of the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel, 480 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:30 a.m., Jose Zayas, Program Manager, presiding. PRESENT : JOSE ZAYAS, Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program, Office

  2. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  3. Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

  4. Technology maturation project on optimization of sheet metal forming of aluminum for use in transportation systems: Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.I.; Smith, M.T.; Lavender, C.A.; Khalell, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Using aluminum instead of steel in transportation systems could dramatically reduce the weight of vehicles--an effective way of decreasing energy consumption and emissions. The current cost of SMF aluminum alloys (about $4 per pound) and the relatively long forming times of current materials are serious drawbacks to the widespread use of SMF in industry. The interdependence of materials testing and model development is critical to optimizing SMF since the current process is conducted in a heated, pressurized die where direct measurement of critical SMF parameters is extremely difficult. Numerical models provide a means of tracking the forming process, allowing the applied gas pressure to be adjusted to maintain the optimum SMF behavior throughout the forming process. Thus, models can help produce the optimum SMF component in the least amount of time. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is integrating SMF model development with research in improved aluminum alloys for SMF. The objectives of this research are: develop and characterize competitively priced aluminum alloys for SMF applications in industry; improve numerical models to accurately predict the optimum forming cycle for reduced forming time and improved quality; verify alloy performance and model accuracy with forming tests conducted in PNL`s Superplastic Forming User Facility. The activities performed in this technology maturation project represent a critical first step in achieving these objectives through cooperative research among industry, PNL, and universities.

  5. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

  6. (DOE Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology Program: NBS Measurement Technology Project): Quarterly progress report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semerjian, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Proper understanding of sooting processes will aid in assessing the impact of alternative fuels on hardware durability, combustion and heat transfer efficiency, and the environment. These efforts are in direct support of ECUT projects dealing with open cycle/engine combustion technology, direct heating and conversion, physical processes, and chemical processes. Soot formation entails a number of complex processes that occur within and about the combustion zone. These include hydrocarbon cracking, nucleation, growth, agglomeration and burnout. The importance of free radical processes, the involvement of aromatic and acetylenic intermediates, and the effect of inorganic components on the soot formation processes will be investigated. The effect of physical properties (such as boiling point and viscosity) on the droplet formation, evaporation, combustion and subsequent soot formation processes will also be examined. The effect of flow field parameters on the chemical, as well as physical processes will be studied. Initial studies toward investigation of chemical effects on soot formation are being carried out in laboratory-scale diffusion flames of various configurations. Investigations of physical effects on soot formation are carried out in the NBS experimental furnace. A combination of optical diagnostic techniques are used. 8 refs.

  7. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  8. Report to Congress: Expressions of interest in commercial clean coal technology projects in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report was prepared in response to the guidance provided by the Congress in the course of the Fiscal Year 1995 appropriations process for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). As described in detail below, DOE was directed to make the international dissemination of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) an integral part of its policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries. Congress directed DOE to solicit ``Statements of Interest`` in commercial projects employing CCTs in countries projected to have significant growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, DOE was asked to submit to the Congress a report that analyzes the information contained in the Statements of Interest, and that identifies the extent to which various types of Federal incentives would accelerate the commercial availability of these technologies in an international context. In response to DOE`s solicitation of 18 November 1994, 77 Statements of Interest were received from 33 companies, as well as five additional materials. The contents of these submittals, including the requested Federal incentives, the CCTs proposed, the possible host countries, and the environmental aspects of the Statements of Interest, are described and analyzed in the chapters that follow.

  9. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Field investigation of effectiveness of soil vapor extraction technology (September 1994). Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    A research project was undertaken to study the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction (SVE), an emerging technology for remediation of soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). As part of the project, two soil vapor extraction systems, Site D and Site G at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, New Brighton, Minnesota were selected for evaluation. The approach of the project was to gather and compare site information regarding residual soil concentrations before and after treatment, and obtain operational data to evaluate the performance of the systems. The residual levels of volatile organics before and after treatment are compared for magnitude and distribution. Operational data are analyzed to present the performance of the systems and the progression of treatment with time. Capital, operating and maintenance costs are presented. Results of the evaluation indicate that SVE has been effective in reducing the residual concentrations, generally by several orders of magnitude. In most cases, residual concentrations were nondetectable. Samples taken in silty clays and waste materials showed the hightest residual concentrations.

  11. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

  13. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  14. New - DOE G 415.1-2, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECT EXECUTION MODEL GUIDE FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM PROJECTS

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The guide supports consistent and effective implementation of DOE O 415.1 and assists IT Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT projects of small and medium size. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  15. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  16. EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ormat Technologies, Inc. (Ormat) proposes to use DOE and cost share funding to study the Brady Hot Springs geothermal Field 15-12RD well. This is an EGS Demonstration project divided into three phases. During Phase 1, Ormat characterized the target well to prepare for stimulation activities in Phase 2, Phase 2: Well Stimulation and Collection/Analysis of Stimulation Monitoring Data and Phase 3: Long-term testing of the system. Phase 2 and 3 activities would occur at Ormat's Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Churchill County, NV on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). Since Phases 2 and 3 have the potential to impact subsurface resources, DOE must analyze the impacts associated with Phases 2 and 3. The BLM will be the lead agency for completion of the EA with BOR and DOE as cooperating agencies.

  17. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy Preprint M. Beam, B. Kline, B. Elbing, W. Straka, and A. Fontaine Pennsylvania State University M. Lawson, Y. Li, and R. Thresher National Renewable Energy Laboratory M. Previsic Re Vision Consulting, LLC To be presented at the 32 nd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering (OMAE 2013) Nantes, France June 9-14, 2013 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-58092 February 2013 NOTICE

  18. Bear Creek Valley characterization area mixed wastes passive in situ treatment technology demonstration project - status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.; Leavitt, M.; Moss, D.

    1997-03-01

    Historical waste disposal activities within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, have contaminated groundwater and surface water above human health risk levels and impacted the ecology of Bear Creek. Contaminates include nitrate, radioisotopes, metals, volatile organic chemicals (VOCS), and common ions. This paper provides a status report on a technology demonstration project that is investigating the feasibility of using passive in situ treatment systems to remove these contaminants. Although this technology may be applicable to many locations at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the project focuses on collecting the information needed to take CERCLA removal actions in 1998 at the S-3 Disposal Ponds site. Phase 1 has been completed and included site characterization, laboratory screening of treatment media (sorbents; and iron), and limited field testing of biological treatment systems. Batch tests using different Y-12 Plant waters were conducted to evaluate the removal efficiencies of most of the media. Phase 1 results suggest that the most promising treatment media are Dowex 21 k resin, peat moss, zero-valent iron, and iron oxides. Phase 2 will include in-field column testing of these media to assess loading rates, and concerns with clogging, by-products, and long-term treatment efficiency and media stability. Continued testing of wetlands and algal mats (MATs) will be conducted to determine if they can be used for in-stream polishing of surface water. Hydraulic testing of a shallow trench and horizontal well will also be completed during Phase 2. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  20. Current status and perspective of advanced loop type fast reactor in fast reactor cycle technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Hajime; Aoto, Kazumi; Morishita, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    After selecting the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication as the most promising concept of FR cycle system, 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems' was finalized in 2006. Instead, a new project, Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project) was launched in Japan focusing on development of the selected concepts. This paper describes the current status and perspective of the advanced loop type SFR system in the FaCT Project, especially on the design requirements, current design as well as the related innovative technologies together with the development road-map. Some considerations on advantages of the advanced loop type design are also described. (authors)

  1. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750800C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750800C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  3. BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Waters | Department of Energy BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters June 23, 2014 - 2:30pm Addthis On June 3rd, 2014 the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) issued the first ever lease to test marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices in federal waters to Florida Atlantic University (FAU). Harnessing the power of ocean currents, FAU's Southeast

  4. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

  5. Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

  6. Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computing. The PRIMA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malony, Allen D.; Wolf, Felix G.

    2014-01-31

    The growing number of cores provided by todays high-end computing systems present substantial challenges to application developers in their pursuit of parallel efficiency. To find the most effective optimization strategy, application developers need insight into the runtime behavior of their code. The University of Oregon (UO) and the Juelich Supercomputing Centre of Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) develop the performance analysis tools TAU and Scalasca, respectively, which allow high-performance computing (HPC) users to collect and analyze relevant performance data even at very large scales. TAU and Scalasca are considered among the most advanced parallel performance systems available, and are used extensively across HPC centers in the U.S., Germany, and around the world. The TAU and Scalasca groups share a heritage of parallel performance tool research and partnership throughout the past fifteen years. Indeed, the close interactions of the two groups resulted in a cross-fertilization of tool ideas and technologies that pushed TAU and Scalasca to what they are today. It also produced two performance systems with an increasing degree of functional overlap. While each tool has its specific analysis focus, the tools were implementing measurement infrastructures that were substantially similar. Because each tool provides complementary performance analysis, sharing of measurement results is valuable to provide the user with more facets to understand performance behavior. However, each measurement system was producing performance data in different formats, requiring data interoperability tools to be created. A common measurement and instrumentation system was needed to more closely integrate TAU and Scalasca and to avoid the duplication of development and maintenance effort. The PRIMA (Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis) project was proposed over three years ago as a joint international effort between UO and FZJ to accomplish these objectives: (1) refactor TAU and Scalasca performance system components for core code sharing and (2) integrate TAU and Scalasca functionality through data interfaces, formats, and utilities. As presented in this report, the project has completed these goals. In addition to shared technical advances, the groups have worked to engage with users through application performance engineering and tools training. In this regard, the project benefits from the close interactions the teams have with national laboratories in the United States and Germany. We have also sought to enhance our interactions through joint tutorials and outreach. UO has become a member of the Virtual Institute of High-Productivity Supercomputing (VI-HPS) established by the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres as a center of excellence, focusing on HPC tools for diagnosing programming errors and optimizing performance. UO and FZJ have conducted several VI-HPS training activities together within the past three years.

  7. Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computing: the PRIMA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malony, Allen D.; Wolf, Felix G.

    2014-01-31

    The growing number of cores provided by todays high-end computing systems present substantial challenges to application developers in their pursuit of parallel efficiency. To find the most effective optimization strategy, application developers need insight into the runtime behavior of their code. The University of Oregon (UO) and the Juelich Supercomputing Centre of Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) develop the performance analysis tools TAU and Scalasca, respectively, which allow high-performance computing (HPC) users to collect and analyze relevant performance data even at very large scales. TAU and Scalasca are considered among the most advanced parallel performance systems available, and are used extensively across HPC centers in the U.S., Germany, and around the world. The TAU and Scalasca groups share a heritage of parallel performance tool research and partnership throughout the past fifteen years. Indeed, the close interactions of the two groups resulted in a cross-fertilization of tool ideas and technologies that pushed TAU and Scalasca to what they are today. It also produced two performance systems with an increasing degree of functional overlap. While each tool has its specific analysis focus, the tools were implementing measurement infrastructures that were substantially similar. Because each tool provides complementary performance analysis, sharing of measurement results is valuable to provide the user with more facets to understand performance behavior. However, each measurement system was producing performance data in different formats, requiring data interoperability tools to be created. A common measurement and instrumentation system was needed to more closely integrate TAU and Scalasca and to avoid the duplication of development and maintenance effort. The PRIMA (Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis) project was proposed over three years ago as a joint international effort between UO and FZJ to accomplish these objectives: (1) refactor TAU and Scalasca performance system components for core code sharing and (2) integrate TAU and Scalasca functionality through data interfaces, formats, and utilities. As presented in this report, the project has completed these goals. In addition to shared technical advances, the groups have worked to engage with users through application performance engineering and tools training. In this regard, the project benefits from the close interactions the teams have with national laboratories in the United States and Germany. We have also sought to enhance our interactions through joint tutorials and outreach. UO has become a member of the Virtual Institute of High-Productivity Supercomputing (VI-HPS) established by the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres as a center of excellence, focusing on HPC tools for diagnosing programming errors and optimizing performance. UO and FZJ have conducted several VI-HPS training activities together within the past three years.

  8. Final Project Report. Scalable fault tolerance runtime technology for petascale computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Sadayappan, P

    2015-06-16

    With the massive number of components comprising the forthcoming petascale computer systems, hardware failures will be routinely encountered during execution of large-scale applications. Due to the multidisciplinary, multiresolution, and multiscale nature of scientific problems that drive the demand for high end systems, applications place increasingly differing demands on the system resources: disk, network, memory, and CPU. In addition to MPI, future applications are expected to use advanced programming models such as those developed under the DARPA HPCS program as well as existing global address space programming models such as Global Arrays, UPC, and Co-Array Fortran. While there has been a considerable amount of work in fault tolerant MPI with a number of strategies and extensions for fault tolerance proposed, virtually none of advanced models proposed for emerging petascale systems is currently fault aware. To achieve fault tolerance, development of underlying runtime and OS technologies able to scale to petascale level is needed. This project has evaluated range of runtime techniques for fault tolerance for advanced programming models.

  9. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  10. Roberson Letter - June 25, 2003

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  11. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  12. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HK turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.

  13. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

  14. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  15. DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to 7.3...

  16. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Technologies Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate-affect, detect, and neutralize & mitigate all types of explosive threats. v Technologies Since its inception in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a driving force in explosives science. Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate, detect, and mitigate all types of explosive threats. ANDE:

  17. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  18. EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply.

  19. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  20. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  1. Clean-coal technology by-products used in a highway embankment stabilization demonstration project. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nodjomian, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Clean-coal technology by-products are used in a highway embankment demonstration project. This research chronicles the procedures used in the process and analyzes the stability of a repaired highway embankment. The reconstructed slope is analyzed using an Intelligent Discussion Support System that was developed from a slope stability program. Water quality studies are performed and an instrumentation plan is suggested. The calculated factors of safety and the observed embankment performance give indications that the field demonstration project was a success. Long-term monitoring will be the best barometer for determining embankment gross movement and the future of FGD by-products as a stabilizing material.

  2. RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project I. Doebber, J. Dean, J. Dominick, and G. Holland Produced under direction of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement 11-01829 Technical Report

  3. We're Looking for Innovative Ideas in Building Technology! | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Power for a Clean Energy Future Water Power for a Clean Energy Future This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. PDF icon Accomplishments Report: Water Power for a Clean Energy Future More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on

  4. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  5. DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, Ga.)--Georgia Tech will team with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., to obtain experimental reactor data and ...

  6. Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating: 2014 State of Technology R&D and Projections to 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Zacher, Alan H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Drennan, Corinne

    2015-03-20

    This report documents the technical targets and modeled costs associated with the Bioenergy Technologies Office 2014 fiscal year research related to pyrolysis oil upgrading to hydrocarbons.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Catalyst Characterization (Agreement ID:9130) Project ID:18519

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cummins at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about catalyst characterization.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Aluminum Alloys (Agreement ID:24034) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lessons Learned about Workplace Charging in The EV Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about lessons learned...

  10. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linville, B.

    1983-07-01

    Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

  11. Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds a wide variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in an effort to assist tribes in realizing their energy visions.

  12. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laboratory testing of new hydrokinetic energy device to harness energy in slow-moving water currents.

  13. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

  14. Understanding differences in the diffusion of environmentally beneficial technology. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackman, A.; Boyd, J.; Simpson, R.D.; Toman, M.

    1996-12-31

    The factors affecting the diffusion of technical discoveries among firms and nations remain one of the most interesting and important but least understood elements of economic behavior. Recently, interest in technology diffusion has been heightened by a recognition that the spread of technologies could have important implications for environmental quality as well as for market goods and services. A specific motivation for this study was the question of how rapidly technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions might diffuse. Technologies in this category include technologies that improve the efficiency of fossil energy use or promote substitution of renewable energy resources. The speed with which these technologies spread could have a significant effect on the rate of accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere. From a modeling perspective, the rate of innovation and diffusion of carbon-reducing technology is known to be a crucial parameter in integrated assessments of climate change risks and policy responses. Thus, a better understanding of factors that might influence the spread of carbon-reducing technologies could be valuable in studies on long-term global change and policy assessment.

  15. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  16. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  17. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. Health Space Computing Energy Earth Materials Science Technology The Lab All Glen Wurden in the stellarator's vacuum vessel during camera installation in 2014. Innovative imaging systems on the Wendelstein 7-X bring steady-state fusion energy closer to reality Innovative new imaging systems designed at Los Alamos are helping physicists

  18. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  19. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

    2014-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

  20. The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project: Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstadt, W.A.; Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E.; Overholt, P.N.; Sobajic, D.J.; Hauer, J.F.; Rizy, D.T.

    1996-07-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands, in an environment where increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins all contribute to increased system efficiencies and capacity. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment--the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The WAMS project also brings added focus and resources to the evolving Western System Dynamic Information Network, or WesDINet. This is a collective response of the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) member utilities to their shared needs for direct information about power system characteristics, model fidelity, and operational performance. The WAMS project is a key source of the technology and backbone communications needed to make WesDINet a well integrated, cost effective enterprise network demonstrating the role of dynamic information technology in the emerging utility environment.

  1. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  2. Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating 2013 State of Technology R&D and Projections to 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Zacher, Alan H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Drennan, Corinne

    2014-04-16

    This report documents the FY13 modeled costs and experimental basis for those costs for fast pyrolyis and hydrotreating to liquid fuels. The report also documents the projected costs to 2013.

  3. Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel Discussion on Building Technology Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn more about the DOE's Buildings of the Future Project. Buildings will no longer be passive objects that consume resources, but rather active participants engaged in the energy system and our community.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Detroit Diesel Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about SuperTruck Program...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Zero Emission Cargo Transport Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Houston-Galvelston Area Council at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about zero emission...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Central Texas Fuel Independence Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by City of Austin at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Central Texas Fuel...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Detroit Diesel at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about SuperTruck program: engine...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: California Fleets and Workplace Alternative Fuels Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Bay Area Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Daimler Truck North America LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Class 8 Truck...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by DTNA at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about class 8 truck freight efficiency...

  11. Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.; Young, J.K.; Berkowitz, J.B.; DeVine, Jr.J.C.; Sutter, H.G.

    2008-07-01

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F and H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Desk-book. The TRA consists of three parts: - Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. - Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. - Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy. (authors)

  12. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-10-25

    ABSTRACT One of U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRCs ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  13. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-03-18

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: (1) Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. (2) Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. (3) Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  14. Hydropower Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

  15. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. It is important to understand that the purpose of this study was to establish baseline scenarios based on basic device data that was provided to use by the manufacturer for illustrative purposes only.

  16. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sill, A.E.; Warren, S.; Dillinger, J.D.; Cloer, B.K.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. This study was conducted by implementing both top-down and bottom-up strategies. The top-down approach used prosperity gaming methodology to identify future health care delivery needs. This effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements. The bottom-up approach identified and ranked interventional therapies employed in existing care delivery systems for a host of health-related conditions. Economic analysis formed the basis for development of care pathway interaction models for two of the most pervasive, chronic disease/disability conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Societal cost-benefit relationships based on these analyses were used to evaluate the effect of emerging technology in these treatment areas. 17 figs., 48 tabs.

  17. Projecting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Projecting the scale of the pipeline network for CO2-EOR and its implications for CCS infrastructure development Matthew Tanner Office of Petroleum, Gas, & Biofuels Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration October 25, 2010 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions ex- pressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Author: Matthew Tanner, matthew.tanner@eia.gov

  18. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  19. Staff exchange with Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute (SIRTI), final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in U.S. industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms.

  20. Able Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: 330 Audubon Road Place: Englewood Zip: 7631 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 201-569-2842 Website: www.abletechnologiesllc.com This...

  1. Fuel Cell Project Selected for First Ever Technology-to-Market SBIR Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE recently announced the selection of 40 small businesses for new Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards that total nearly $6.3 million, including a first-of-its-kind award under a new EERE SBIR technology-to-market topic.

  2. Award-Winning DOE Technology Scores Success in Carbon Storage Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ability to detect and track the movement of carbon dioxide in underground geologic storage reservoirs -- an important component of carbon capture and storage technology -- has been successfully demonstrated at a U.S. Department of Energy New Mexico test site.

  3. DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge, Tenn. – As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC.

  4. Energy Department Announces $7.25 Million for Projects to Advance America’s Emerging Marine & Hydrokinetic Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced today $7.25 million for six organizations that will continue to advance water power as a viable resource for America’s clean energy portfolio.

  5. PNL vitrification technology development project glass formulation strategy for LLW vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Hrma, P.R.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This Glass Formulation Strategy describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions for Hanford`s low-level waste vitrification between now and the projected low-level waste facility start-up in 2005. The objectives of the glass formulation task are to develop optimized glass compositions with satisfactory long-term durability, acceptable processing characteristics, adequate flexibility to handle waste variations, maximize waste loading to practical limits, and to develop methodology to respond to further waste variations.

  6. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matter and Technologies R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI Winfried Barth Matter and Technologies Super Heavy Nuclei International Symposium, Texas A & M University, College Station TX, USA, March 31 - April 02, 2015 W. Barth, R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 2 R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 1. Introduction 2. Status of the Unilac High Current Performance 3. Cavity Development 4. General linac layout 5. R&D approach 6. Status of

  7. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-08

    The objective of this project was to determine why diamond-based films are unusually efficient electron emitters (field emission cathodes) at room temperature. Efficient cathodes based on diamond are being developed by SI Diamond Technology (SIDT) as components for bright, sunlight-readable, flat panel displays. When the project started, it was known that only a small fraction (<1%) of the cathode area is active in electron emission and that the emission sites themselves are sub-micron in size. The critical challenge of this project was to develop new microcharacterization methods capable of examining known emission sites. The research team used a combination of cathode emission imaging (developed at SIDT), micro-Raman spectroscopy (LBNL), and electron microscopy and spectroscopy (National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBNL) to examine the properties of known emission sites. The most significant accomplishment of the project was the development at LBNL of a very high resolution scanning probe that, for the first time, measured simultaneously the topography and electrical characteristics of single emission sites. The increased understanding of the emission mechanism helped SIDT to develop a new cathode material,''nano-diamond,'' which they have incorporated into their Field Emission Picture Element (FEPix) product. SIDT is developing large-format flat panel displays based on these picture elements that will be brighter and more efficient than existing outdoor displays such as Jumbotrons. The energy saving that will be realized if field emission displays are introduced commercially is in line with the energy conservation mission of DOE. The unique characterization tools developed in this project (particularly the new scanning microscopy method) are being used in ongoing BES-funded basic research.

  8. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

  9. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  10. Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands This report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. PDF icon waste-to-energy_eval_usvi_nrel_52308_final.pdf More Documents & Publications U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Road Map: Analysis Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands U.S. Virgin Islands

  11. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FUEL CELL FUEL CELL FUEL CELL Fourth Edition November 1998 Fuel Cell Handbook Fuel Cell Handbook Fourth Edition November 1998 DOE/FETC-99/1076 by J.H. Hirschenhofer, D.B. Stauffer, R.R. Engleman, and M.G. Klett Parsons Corporation Reading, PA 19607 Under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31166 for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition Contents Disclaimer List of

  12. Oak Ridge D and D Plan 3515 Project - Technology Review (2007) and GammaCam Technology Demonstration for Characterizing Building 3515 at Oak Ridge (2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne-Kelly, D.; Hart, A.; Brown, Ch.; Jordan, D.; Phillips, E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the results from the Characterization, Decontamination and Decommissioning (CD and D) Study performed by MSE Technology Application, Inc. (MSE) to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the preparation of a Project Execution Plan and Remediation Plan for Building 3515 at ORNL. Primary objectives of this study were to identify innovative CD and D technologies and methodologies and recommend alternatives applicable to the CD and D of Building 3515. Building 3515 is a small heavily shielded concrete and cement block structure centrally located in the Bethel Valley portion of the ORNL. The building's interior is extensively contaminated with Cesium 137 (Cs-137), the primary contaminant of concern. A previous attempt to characterize the building was limited to general interior area radiation exposure level measurements and a few surface smears gathered by inserting monitoring equipment into the building on long poles. Consequently, the spatial distribution of the gamma radiation source inside the building was not determined. A subsequent plan for D and D of the building presented a high risk of worker radiation dose in excess of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) because the source of the interior gamma radiation field is not completely understood and conventional practices required workers to be in close proximity of the building. As part of an initial literature search, MSE reviewed new generation gamma source characterization technologies and identified the GammaCam{sup TM} portable gamma ray imaging system as an innovative technology applicable to locating the dominant gamma ray sources within the building. The GammaCam{sup TM} gamma-ray imaging system is a commercially available technology marketed by the EDO Corporation. This system consists of a sensor head with a co-aligned camera and a portable computer. The system is designed to provide two-dimensional spatial mappings of gamma ray emitting nuclides in real time. The gamma radiation sensor and camera can be set up within or outside of the radiation field while the system operator and PC can be located 30 to 60 m (100 to 200 ft) from the sensor head. The system has been used successfully at numerous DOE and commercial nuclear facilities to precisely locate gamma radiation sources. However, literature attesting to the ability of this technology to detect radiation sources within heavily shielded structures was not available. Consequently, MSE was not certain if this technology would be capable of locating gamma ray sources within the heavily shielded Building 3515. To overcome this uncertainty, MSE sent two individuals to the EDO Corporation for training. At completion of the training, MSE leased the GammaCam{sup TM} portable system and brought it to ORNL to evaluate the capability of the system. An overview from this evaluation is summarized in this paper. (authors)

  13. Development of ceramic matrix composites for application in the ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, H.; Solidum, E.; Karasek, K.; Stranford, G.; Yuhas, D.; Schienle, J.; Bradley, S. . Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this effort (Phase II of a multi-phase program) was to maximize the toughness of a high-temperature Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GN-10) by the near-net-shape fabrication technology established previously (Phase I). Acid-etched American Matrix SiC whiskers were selected as the reinforcement. Extensive green forming and densification process optimizations were conducted. The results showed that whisker addition increased the toughness slightly, but decreased the strength of the material. It has been recommended to discontinue the whisker reinforcement approach, and to instead pursue the in-situ grown-whisker reinforcement approach. To address future needs for the composite technology, two supplemental efforts were conducted using monolithic GN-10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These were nanometer deposition of sintering aids and ultrasonic characterization of drying. Spray drying, polymerization, basic precipitation, and evaporation yielded more uniform sintering aid distributions than conventional ball milling. Spray drying was selected for scale-up study. Improved mechanical properties were demonstrated. The results of the ultrasonic study showed that variations in ultrasonic compressional velocity in slip-cast components are more complex than anticipated. Specifically, it was found that the sonic velocity, as a function of moisture content, was double-valued. This behavior, together with the problems associated with maintaining uniform couplant, precludes the use of ultrasonics as a routine means of monitoring moisture content.

  14. The Lakeland McIntosh Unit 4 demonstration project utilizing Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClung, J.D.; Provol, S.J.; Morehead, H.T.; Dodd, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The City of Lakeland, Florida, Foster Wheeler and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation have embarked on the demonstration of a Clean Coal Technology at the City of Lakeland`s McIntosh Power Station in lakeland, Polk County, Florida. The project will demonstrate the Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFB) technology developed by Foster Wheeler and Westinghouse. The Lakeland McIntosh Unit 4 Project is a nominal 170 MW power plant designed to burn a range of low- to high-sulfur coals. The combined cycle plant employs a Westinghouse 251B12 gas turbine engine in conjunction with a steam turbine operating in a 2400/1000/1000 steam cycle. The plant will demonstrate both the PCFB and topped PCFB combustion technologies. This paper provides a process description of the Foster Wheeler PCFB and Topped PCFB technologies and their application to the Lakeland McIntosh Unit 4 Project.

  15. MHK Projects/Maine 1 Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Griffin Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Power Technologies Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesPowerBuoy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstration Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Synchrophasor measurements are a...

  18. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  19. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  20. Project Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Information Slider award map The REE Program funds projects focused on developing economically feasible and environmentally benign technologies for recovering REEs from coal and/or coal by-products. Project Information The listed projects represent the current REE program portfolio. Agreement Number Project Title Performer Name FWP-RIC REE FY2016-2020 Rare Earth Elements (REE) from Coal and Coal By-Products National Energy Technology Laboratory FE0027167 High Yield and Economical