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1

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

3

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources (Redirected from Wave) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

4

HYDROKAL: A module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tool for hydrokinetic energy potential assessment in rivers-HYDROKAL, which stands for a ''hydrokinetic calculator''-is presented. This tool was developed in the Fortran 90 programming language as an external module for the CCHE2D application, ... Keywords: Instantaneous power density, Numerical modeling, Resource assessment, Stream

Paul Duvoy; Horacio Toniolo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the

6

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account...

8

Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Tidal Streams Resource Map. Tidal Streams Resource Assessment The Assessment of the Energy Production from Tidal Streams in the United States report, created by Georgia Tech,...

9

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Philippines Wind Energy Resource Atlas Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the creation of a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas for the Philippines. The atlas was created to facilitate the rapid identification of good wind resource areas and understanding of the salient wind characteristics. Detailed wind resource maps were generated for the entire country using an advanced wind mapping technique and innovative assessment methods recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Elliott, D.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in the country of Armenia. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. The maps portray the wind resource with high-resolution (1-km2) grids of wind power density at 50-m above ground. The wind maps were created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a computerized wind mapping system that uses Geographic Information System (GIS) software.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Southeast China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in two regions of southeast China. The first region is the coastal area stretching from northern Fujian south to eastern Guangdong and extending approximately 100 km inland. The second region is centered on the Poyang Lake area in northern Jiangxi. This region also includes parts of two other provinces-Anhui and Hubei-and extends from near Anqing in Anhui south to near Nanchang in Jiangxi. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. We created the high-resolution (1-km2) maps in 1998 using a computerized wind resource mapping system developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The mapping system uses software known as a Geographical Information System (GIS).

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources  

SciTech Connect

The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

(The Spanish version of Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.nrel.gov/wind/pdfs/34519.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-atlas-oaxaca,http://cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This wind resource atlas identifies wind characteristics and distribution of wind resources in Oaxaca, Mexico, at a wind power density of 50 meters above ground. The detailed wind resource maps contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation, village power, and off-grid wind energy applications. The wind maps were created using a

19

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elliott, M. Schwartz, G. Scott, S. Haymes, D. Heimiller, R. George Elliott, M. Schwartz, G. Scott, S. Haymes, D. Heimiller, R. George National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia July 2003 * NREL/TP-500-33544 Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia D. Elliott M. Schwartz G. Scott S. Haymes, D. Heimiller R. George Prepared under Task No. WF7C0202 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

20

Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable efforts have been underway to develop hydrokinetic energy resources in tidal and riverine environments throughout North America. Potential for fish to be injured or killed if they encounter hydrokinetic turbines is an issue of significant interest to resource and regulatory agencies. To address this issue, flume studies were conducted that exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral reactions and avoidance. Also, a theoreti...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Sri Lanka and the Maldives. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CD version of the Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy technologies ending with shots of ocean waves. We all know energy can come from the wind and the sun, but there's a plentiful renewable resource covering more than 75% of the planet that you might not have thought about: our water! The movement of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents carries energy that can be harnessed and converted into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. The words "Kinetic Energy" appear onscreen with shots of ocean scientists at sea. The words "Marine & Hydrokinetic" appear onscreen.

25

Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101, learn how the Energy Department is supporting research on a range of innovative marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to capture energy from waves and currents. For more information on marine and hydrokinetic energy from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Water Power Program

26

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

27

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United States  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This atlas, containing more than 72 maps, estimates wind energy resource for the United States and its terrorities. Early wind resource atlases created for the Federal Wind Energy Program were based on date collected before 1979. Since then, hundreds of new sites have been instrumented specifically for wind energy assessment purposes, and many of these have been located in areas thought to have high wind resource but where data were previously not available or were very limited [copied from http://rredc.nrel.gov/wind/pubs/atlas/chp1.html].

28

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia (CD-ROM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Atlas of Armenia (CD-ROM) http:www.nrel.govdocsfy03osti33877CD.zip (ZIP 31.9 MB) NRELCD-500-33877 July 2003 Instructions: The URL above links to a zipped archive...

29

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in the country of Armenia. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. The maps portray the wind resource with high-resolution (1-km2) grids of wind power density at 50-m above ground. The wind maps were created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a computerized wind mapping system that uses Geographic Information System (GIS) software.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic identifies the wind characteristics and the distribution of the wind resource in this country. This major project is the first of its kind undertaken for the Dominican Republic. The information contained in the atlas is necessary to facilitate the use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. A computerized wind mapping system developed by NREL generated detailed wind resource maps for the entire country. This technique uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to produce high-resolution (1-square kilometer) annual average wind resource maps.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Kline, J.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a wind resource analysis and mapping study for the Philippine archipelago. The study's objective was to identify potential wind resource areas and quantify the value of those resources within those areas. The wind resource maps and other wind resource characteristic information will be used to identify prospective areas for wind-energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; McCarthy, E.

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Southeast China (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in two regions of southeast China. The first region is the coastal area stretching from northern Fujian south to eastern Guangdong and extending approximately 100 km inland. The second region is centered on the Poyang Lake area in northern Jiangxi. This region also includes parts of two other provinces-Anhui and Hubei-and extends from near Anqing in Anhui south to near Nanchang in Jiangxi. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. We created the high-resolution (1-km2) maps in 1998 using a computerized wind resource mapping system developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The mapping system uses software known as a Geographical Information System (GIS).

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region  

SciTech Connect

The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and...

42

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2001 * NREL/TP-500-27602 October 2001 * NREL/TP-500-27602 Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic D. Elliott M. Schwartz R. George S. Haymes D. Heimiller G. Scott National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Kline RAM Associates Prepared under Task Nos. WER11050 and DO059999 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

43

Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and wind power planning Niels G. Mortensen Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory MENAREC 3, Cairo, Egypt 12 June 2006 #12;Acknowledgements The "Wind Atlas for Egypt" is the result of a comprehensive team effort! · New

44

Marine and Hydrokinetic | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is therefore leading efforts to prove functionality; evaluate technical and economic viability; and generate cost, performance, and reliability data for a variety of devices. Marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts

45

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University?¢????s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database is currently (2009) being updated to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.[Taken from http://www2.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/hydrokinetic/

47

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

48

MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Barge Power Barge < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hydrokinetic Power Barge.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Onsite Recovered Energy LP Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Vurbine proprietary technology design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest hydrokinetic energy from flowing water in a low impact application Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 36:51.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage

49

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Resource utilization in the ATLAS Data Acquisition System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data taking with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has started. The three-level trigger and data-acquisition system of the experiment is fully functional. In 2009 and 2010 large samples of cosmic ray and collisions data have been and are expected to be collected with it. The smooth operation of the system relies on a tuning made on the basis of test-system measurements and modelling performed prior to installation. It is now possible to compare these predictions with measurements made with the system in active use during data-taking and to extrapolate to performance at higher luminosities. In the system events to be analyzed offline are selected by means of a hardware first-level trigger, receiving input data via dedicated paths, and of two levels of software trigger, implemented on commercially available server computers embedded in the data-acquisition system. Data of events accepted by the first-level trigger are received and buffered in other computers forming together the ReadOut ...

Klous, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This is the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology template. It is designed for use by MHK Technologies Pages. To define an MHK Technology, please use this form. Parameters Image - Associated image file. (optional) Primary Organization - Field def missing! Project(s) where this technology is utilized - Field def missing! Technology Resource - Field def missing! Technology Type - Field def missing! Technology Readiness Level - Field def missing! Technology Description - Field def missing! Designed to Operate with Shore Connection - Field def missing! Power Transfer Method - Field def missing! Water Column Location - Field def missing! Mooring Configuration - Field def missing! Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions - Field def missing!

54

Wind Energy Resource Atlas. Volume 11. Hawaii and Pacific Islands Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, and assessments of the wind resource in each division of the region. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be inerpreted is presented. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource for each division are provided. Assessments for individual divisions are presented as separate chapters. Much of the information in the division chapters is given in graphic or tabular form. The sequences for each chapter are similar, but some presentations used for Hawaii are inappropriate or impractical for presentation with the Pacific Islands. Hawaii chapter figure and tables are cited below and appropriate Pacific Islands figure and table numbers are included in brackets ().

Schroeder, T.A.; Hori, A.M.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 8. The southern Rocky Mountain region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southern Rocky Mountain atlas assimilates five collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the four states that compose the Southern Rocky Mountain region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Andersen, S.R.; Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 12. Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico/US Virgin Island atlas assimilates three collections of wind resource data: one for the region as a whole and one each for both the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. For the two subregions, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in both subregions are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Wegley, H.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Data Marine & Hydrokinetic Data This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge,

58

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, standard and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Jump to: navigation, search Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Using the Database (1) Map illustrates marine & hydrokinetic demonstration projects around the

60

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 379 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 4 MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project A MHK Projects/ADM 3 MHK Projects/ADM 4 MHK Projects/ADM 5 MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project MHK Projects/Agucadoura MHK Projects/Alaska 1 MHK Projects/Alaska 13 MHK Projects/Alaska 17 MHK Projects/Alaska 18 MHK Projects/Alaska 24 MHK Projects/Alaska 25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology below to add it to the registry. If your technology is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that technology's fields and you may edit. MHK_Technologies/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Technologies/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the Marine and Hydrokinetic Database Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology&oldid=680669"

62

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 282 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER A MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo MHK Technologies/AirWEC MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy MHK Technologies/Aquanator MHK Technologies/Aquantis MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000

63

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

64

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Tests | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Tests Jump to: navigation, search Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test This category currently contains no pages or media. Retrieved from "http:...

65

Atlas of coal/minerals and important resource problem areas for fish and wildlife in the conterminous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atlas highlights areas in the conterminous US of potential concern involving coal and minerals development activities and fish and wildlife resources, in particular the Important Resource Problem Areas (IRPs) designated in 1980 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as areas of emphasis in policymaking. The atlas serves as an initial screening tool for national and regional planners and administrators to help define areas that may require additional analysis prior to development in order to minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish and wildlife resources and to protect and enhance these resources where practicable. The publication contains maps of selected mineral resources (coal, copper, geothermal resources, gold, iron, molybdenum, nickel, oil shale/tar sands, peat, phosphate, silver, uranium), IRPs, and Federal Endangered and Threatened Animal Species. An overlay of the IRP map is provided: by placing this on a mineral map, counties containing both mineral and wildlife resources will be highlighted. Background information on IRPs, the mineral commodities, and environmental impacts of mineral mining is provided, as well as appendices which tabulate the data displayed in the maps. The document can also be used with a series of 1:7,500,000-scale reproductions of the maps.

Honig, R.A.; Olson, R.J.; Mason, W.T. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project below to add it to the registry. If your project is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that project's fields and you may edit. MHK_Projects/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Projects/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology_Project&oldid=688143"

67

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a...

68

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

69

Diagnostic Systems and Resources utilization of the ATLAS High Level Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the LHC started colliding protons in December 2009, the ATLAS trigger has operated very successfully with a collision rate which has increased by several orders of magnitude. The trigger monitoring and data quality infrastructure was essential to this success. We describe the software tools used to monitor the trigger system performance and assess the overall quality of the trigger selection during collisions running. ATLAS has broad physics goals which require a large number of different active triggers due to complex event topology, requiring quite sophisticated software structures and concepts. The trigger of the ATLAS experiment is built as a three level system. The first level is realized in hardware while the high level triggers (HLT) are software based and run on large PC farms. The trigger reduces the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz, at design, to an average event rate of about 200 Hz for storage. Since the ATLAS detector is a general purpose detector, the trigger must be sensitive to a large numb...

zur Nedden, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Ospanov, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

Driscoll, F.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

74

MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1055,"lon":-70.7912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.9828,"lon":-91.7994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6224,"lon":-71.2153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Hybrid) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

79

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Attenuator) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

80

MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7883,"lon":-141.198,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage This field indicates the stage of development/deployment that technologies, which are undergoing partial or full-scale device testing, are currently in. Contents 1 TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering 2 TRL 4: Proof of Concept 3 TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration 4 TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing, Demonstration, and Operation 5 TRL 9: Commercial-Scale Production / Application TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering The purpose of this stage is to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to

83

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

84

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

85

2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM PROGRAM � 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report March 1, 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

86

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Atlas Brasileiro de Energia Solar (Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas Brasileiro de Energia Solar (Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy) Atlas Brasileiro de Energia Solar (Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy) Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy is divided into five distinct sections. The first section describes the methodology used to obtain the solar radiation data and to produce the solar maps. The second section contains information on the confidence levels of the methodology employed, obtained by comparing solar estimates provided by BRASIL- SR model with estimates provided by other models and ground data. The third section presents the maps of various solar radiation components (global, direct, diffuse, tilted plane, and PAR). The fourth section analyzes the temporal and spatial variations and trends of solar energy resources and, (Purpose): The Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy is designed to supply for a portion of the demand for information

89

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

90

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

91

ProgramResources Dataset | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Assessments + BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas + Biomass Energy Data Book + Building Component Library + Building Energy Tools Software Directory + Building...

92

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

The New England solar energy atlas  

SciTech Connect

This book offers a convenient source of historical solar radiation data excerpted from the Solar Radiation Energy Resource Atlas of the United States. The collection of regional maps and the graphic summaries of the resource data pertinent to the New England area accomplish the author's goal of providing design data in a more compact format than that of the national atlas.

Cook, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Atlas Tier 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATLAS has built a powerful system for computing activities on top of three major grid infrastructures. As expected, with data finally arriving physicists need dedicated resources for analysis activities. In contrast to the existing grid infrastructure, there is a strong need to provide users with data control and high-performance (quasi) interactive data access. The ATLAS Tier3 solution is targeted to provide efficient and manageable analysis computing at each member institution. For most of sites only a small fraction of a physicist or student can be diverted for computing support. Transformative technologies have been chosen and integrated with the existing ATLAS tools. The result is a site which is substantially simpler to maintain and which is essentially operated by client tools and extensive use of caching technologies. Most promising new technologies we are using are: xroot and Lustre (distributed storage); CVMFS (experiment software distribution and condition files). We believe that this experience ha...

Benjamin, D; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Workshop Reports ATLAS Strategic Plan (2009) CARIBU Proposal Dear ATLAS User, This is the third message regarding the ATLAS...

100

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-57605 February 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WA09.3406

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas (NATCARB). (Acknowledgement to the WESTCARB web site at http://www.westcarb.org/index.htm)

102

TransAtlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TransAtlas TransAtlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: TransAtlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Dataset, Maps User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/transatlas Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: TransAtlas TransAtlas is an interactive map with data sets related to transportation and alternative fuels in the United States How to Use This Tool

103

European Wind Atlas: France | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: France European Wind Atlas: France Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: France Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: 130.226.17.201/extra/web_docs/windmaps/france.jpg Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-france,http://cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This wind resource map shows resources at 50 meters above ground level for four different topographic conditions, including sheltered terrain, open plain, coastal and hills and ridges. The greatest resources appear to be near the Mediterranean Sea coast, and the second greatest resources are near the English Channel and northern Atlantic coast.

104

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics...

106

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Workshop Reports ATLAS Strategic Plan (2009) CARIBU Proposal ATLAS USERS WORKSHOP: AGENDA Saturday, August 8 (Bldg....

107

European Wind Atlas: Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: Offshore European Wind Atlas: Offshore Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: Offshore Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.windatlas.dk/Europe/oceanmap.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-offshore,http://c Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is a European offshore wind resources over open sea map developed by Riso National Laboratory in 1989. The map shows the so-called generalised wind climate over Europe, also sometimes referred to as the regional wind climate or simply the wind atlas. In such a map, the influences of local topography have been removed and only the variations on the large scale are

108

European Wind Atlas: Onshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: Onshore European Wind Atlas: Onshore Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: Onshore Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.windatlas.dk/Europe/landmap.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-onshore,http://cl Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is a European on-shore wind resources at 50 meters of altitude map, developed by Riso National Laboratory in 1989. The map shows the so-called generalised wind climate over Europe, also sometimes referred to as the regional wind climate or simply the wind atlas. In such a map, the influences of local topography have been removed and only the variations on

109

Biofuels Atlas (United States) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Atlas (United States) Biofuels Atlas (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biofuels Atlas (United States) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: maps.nrel.gov/biomass Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/biofuels-atlas-united-states,http://c Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Biofuels Atlas is an interactive map that allows users to compare biomass feedstocks and biofuels by location. Users may select from and apply biomass data layers to a map as well as query and download biofuels and feedstock data. The state zoom function summarizes state energy use and infrastructure for traditional and bioenergy power, fuels, and resources. The tool also calculates the biofuels potential for a given area.

110

The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6853,"lon":-75.0694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

RE Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RE Atlas RE Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: RE Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Solar, Water Power, Wind Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: maps.nrel.gov/re_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/re_atlas Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Atlantis Resources Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Corporation Resources Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantis Resources Corporation Address 1 Martime Square Zip 99253 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2002 Website http://www.atlantisresourcesco Region Singapore LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Gujarat This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aquanator Atlantis AN 150 Atlantis AR 1000 Atlantis AS 400 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Gujarat and the following MHK Technologies: Aquanator Atlantis AN 150 Atlantis AR 1000 Atlantis AS 400

114

MHK Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Atlas MHK Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MHK Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/node/65 Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

The ATLAS Distributed Analysis System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the LHC operations era, analysis of the multi-petabyte ATLAS data sample by globally distributed physicists is a challenging task. To attain the required scale the ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing, realized in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), the largest distributed computational resource existing in the sciences. The ATLAS experiment currently stores over 140 PB of data and runs about 140,000 concurrent jobs continuously at WLCG sites. During the first run of the LHC, the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (DA) service has operated stably and scaled as planned. More than 1600 users submitted jobs in 2012, with 2 million or more analysis jobs per week, peaking at about a million jobs per day. The system dynamically distributes popular data to expedite processing and maximally utilize resources. The reliability of the DA service is high but steadily improving; grid sites are continually validated against a set of standard tests, and a dedicated team of expert shifters ...

Legger, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Pacheco Pages, A; Stradling, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources / Related Web Sites Resources / Related Web Sites Buildings-Related Resources Windows & Glazing Resources Energy-Related Resources International Resources Telephone Directories Buildings-Related Resources California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Center for Building Science (CBS) at LBNL Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Energy Efficiency home page Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse Fact sheets in both HTML for standard web browsers and PDF format using Adobe Acrobat Reader (free). National Fenestration Rating Council home page Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EREN) back to top... Windows & Glazing Resources National Glass Association (NGA) LBNL Building Technologies Fenestration R&D news LBNL Center for Building Science (CBS) Newsletter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Schedule Beam Schedule CARIBU Schedule ATLAS Future CARIBU Future Scheduling Considerations ATLAS Archive CARIBU Archive ATLAS Schedules Beamtime at ATLAS is normally scheduled in two-month blocks. We make every effort to produce an accurate schedule at least two weeks prior to its approval in a scheduling meeting. The scheduling process is continuously ongoing with communication between ATLAS personnel and the Principal Investigator (PI) of each experiment approved by the PAC. Follow the link at the left to learn more about the considerations that go into producing an ATLAS schedule. If you have any comments or concerns regarding this situation, please contact the ATLAS User Liaison Physicist (Shaofei Zhu, zhu@anl.gov), the Scientific Director of ATLAS (Guy Savard, savard@phy.anl.gov), or members

122

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the policy and procedures related to access to the ATLAS Facility. 2.0 POLICY It is Physics Division policy that access to the ATLAS Facility is restricted to persons who are...

123

ATLAS Metadata Task Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stage contain events from that block and trigger chain. This1] ATLAS Raw Event Format in Trigger & DAQ, https://across ATLAS. EF Event Filter (third level trigger): farm of

Costanzo, D.; ATLAS Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Transfer reactions at ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer reactions before, and with, HELIOS Or - "...seems like an awful lot of work just to do (d,p)..." Congratulations ATLAS Happy 25 th Prologue: Long before ATLAS... 11...

125

International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

World Bank eAtlas of Global Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank eAtlas of Global Development World Bank eAtlas of Global Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: World Bank eAtlas of Global Development Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en World Bank eAtlas of Global Development Screenshot References: World Bank eAtlas of Global Development[1] "This eAtlas, a new online companion to Atlas of Global Development, third edition, builds on the Atlas topics, allowing you to visualize and analyze a wider variety of data in greater depth, over a longer time period. You can: Map more than 175 World Bank indicators worldwide

129

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

[Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] [Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] Physics Division Home News Division Information Contact Organization Chart Directory ES&H Scientific Staff Publications Awards & Honors Pictures & Videos New Faces PHY Webmail Meeting Rooms Research Low Energy Medium Energy Theory Accelerator R&D Research Highlights Seminars & Events Colloquium Division Seminar MEP Seminar Theory Seminar Heavy Ion Discussion Student Lunch Talk ATLAS arrowdn Facility Schedules User Info Proposals Targetlab CARIBU FMA Gammasphere GRETINA HELIOS AGFA Search Argonne ... Search ATLAS Facility User Info Proposals Beam Schedule Safety Gammasphere GRETINA FMA CARIBU HELIOS AGFA Targetlab Workshop 2009 25 Years of ATLAS Gretina Workshop ATLAS Gus Savard Guy Savard, Scientific Director of ATLAS Welcome to ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System. ATLAS is the

130

Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index A (1) City & State Atlas A (2) Astronomy Atlas A (3) U.S. Atlas A (8) Geologic Atlases A (9) Environment / Forest & Desert A (10) Historic Atlases A (11) World Atlases A (12) Canada and Russia A (13) Europe and the Middle East A (1) City & State Atlas 1. A (1) ALASKA

Ward, Karen

131

BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/bioenergyatlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/biomass Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Amazon Pollen Manual and Atlas/Manual e Atlas Palinologico da Amozonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Amazon Pollen Manual andAtlas/Manual e Atlas Palinologico da Amozonia By PaulMoreno Patio. Amazon Pollen Manual and Atlas/Manual e Atlas

Renner, Susanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The DOE Information Center's current collection has more than 40,000 documents consisting of technical reports and historical materials that relate to DOE operations....

134

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5021 5021 August 2009 Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors D. Sale University of Tennessee J. Jonkman and W. Musial National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the ASME 28 th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Honolulu, Hawaii May 31-June 5, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

135

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility User Info Proposals Beam Schedule Safety Gammasphere GRETINA FMA CARIBU HELIOS AGFA Targetlab Workshop 2009 25 Years of ATLAS Gretina Workshop ATLAS Gus Savard Guy Savard, Scientific Director of ATLAS Welcome to ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System. ATLAS is the world's first superconducting linear accelerator for heavy ions at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. This is the energy domain best suited to study the properties of the nucleus, the core of matter, the fuel of stars. ATLAS can provide beams of essentially all stable isotopes from proton to uranium, and a variety of light radioactive beams through our in-flight production program and heavier neutron-rich isotopes from the newly commissioned CARIBU upgrade. A one page brochure (pdf format)

138

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Atlas of Brazil Energy Atlas of Brazil Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: 130.226.17.201/extra/web_docs/windmaps/Brazil_wind_map.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-energy-atlas-brazil,http://clean Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The maps provided in this resource result from a surface wind modelling tool called MesoMap that estimates the wind potential over the Brazilian territory by simulating the atmosphere dynamics of the wind regime and the related meteorological variables from validated atmosphere pressure-data samples. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wind_Energy_Atlas_of_Brazil&oldid=514616

140

Transmission/Permitting Atlas/State Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transmission/Permitting Atlas/State Data Transmission/Permitting Atlas/State Data < Transmission‎ | Permitting Atlas Jump to: navigation, search PermittingAtlasHeader.png Roadmap Compare States General Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database State State Siting Act State Preemptive Authority Siting/Permitting Entities Permit Processing Timeframe Arizona None If TLSC finds compliance with local land use unreasonable or unfeasible, then the TLSC may grant a certificate Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC); Transmission Line Siting Committee (TLSC) 210-240 Days California Public Utilities Code Section 1001 Local jurisdictions are preempted from regulating electric power line projects California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) 18 months

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141

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Operations personnel, and to various experimental instrument specialists in the Physics Division. The PAC members will review each proposal for scientific merit and...

142

An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Renewable energy atlas of the United States.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. It is designed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) and other federal land management agencies to evaluate existing and proposed renewable energy projects. Much of the content of the Atlas was compiled at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to support recent and current energy-related Environmental Impact Statements and studies, including the following projects: (1) West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (BLM 2008); (2) Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2010); (3) Supplement to the Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2011); (4) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy PEIS (WAPA/USFWS 2012, in progress); and (5) Energy Transport Corridors: The Potential Role of Federal Lands in States Identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 368(b) (in progress). This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software; describes each of the components of the Atlas; lists the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and provides a brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies.

Kuiper, J.A.; Hlava, K.Greenwood, H.; Carr, A. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission Joint Research Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: eusoils.jrc.ec.europa.eu/library/maps/biodiversity_atlas/Documents/Bio UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

146

DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) publication. This resource could potentially store hundreds of years' worth of industrial greenhouse gas emissions, permanently preventing their release into the atmosphere, says the 2012 edition of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Capturing CO2 emissions from large power and

147

DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) publication. This resource could potentially store hundreds of years' worth of industrial greenhouse gas emissions, permanently preventing their release into the atmosphere, says the 2012 edition of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Capturing CO2 emissions from large power and

148

Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector Tobias GollingUniversity of California. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixelof the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS

Golling, Tobias; ATLAS Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Transmission/Permitting Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas < Transmission Jump to: navigation, search PermittingAtlasHeader.png Roadmap Compare States General Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California...

150

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Floorplan Phone Map Experimental Equipment Control System (internal) The ATLAS Facility ATLAS Operations Group The ATLAS Operations Group. ATLAS (the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) is the world's first superconducting accelerator for projectiles heavier than the electron. This unique system is a DOE National Collaborative Research Facility open to scientists from all over the world. ATLAS consists of a sequence of machines where each accelerates charged atoms and then feeds the beam into the next section for additional energy gain. The beams are provided by one of two 'injector' accelerators, either a 9 million volt (MV) electrostatic tandem Van de Graff, or a new 12-MV low-velocity linac and electron

151

Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida  

SciTech Connect

Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

Independent Natural Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Resources Inc Natural Resources Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Independent Natural Resources Inc Place Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip 55344 Product Designer of a wave converter system. Has patented the SEADOG Pump which uses buoyancy to convert ave energy to mechanical energy. References Independent Natural Resources Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Independent Natural Resources Inc is a company located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota . References ↑ "Independent Natural Resources Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Independent_Natural_Resources_Inc&oldid=678906"

153

Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

Zheng Zhang

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Preparation of northern mid-continent petroleum atlas  

SciTech Connect

Project will develop a prototype for a digital and hard-copy atlas of petroleum fields and reservoirs in the northern Mid-continent region. A limited number of reservoirs in Kansas are to be included in the prototype project, but the goal is to expand beyond the prototype atlas to include significant reservoirs representing the major plays in Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, the Williston basin portion of Montana, the Denver-Julesburg basin of eastern Colorado and southeastern Colorado. Primary products of the prototype atlas will be on-line accessible digital data bases covering two selected petroleum plays in Kansas. `Pages` and data schema for the first field studies of the atlas have been developed and are accessible through the World-Wide-Web. The atlas structure includes access to geologic, geophysical and production information at levels from the regional, to the field to the individual well. Several approaches have been developed that provide efficient and flexible screening and search procedures. The prototype of the digital atlas is accessible through the Kansas Geological Survey Petroleum Research Section (PRS) HomePage (The Universal Resource Locator [URL] is http://www.kgs. ukans.edu/PRS/PRS.html). The DPA HomePage is available directly at http://www.kg.ukans.edu/DPA/dpaHome.html. Technology transfer is underway through the use of monthly electronic updates and the on- line availability of DPA products. Quarterly Progress Reports are posted on the digital Petroleum Atlas HomePage.

Gerhard, L.C.; Carr, T.R.; Watney, W.L.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Atlas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas Atlas Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy is divided into five distinct sections. The first section describes the methodology used to obtain the solar radiation data and to produce the solar maps. The second section contains information on the confidence levels of the methodology employed, obtained by comparing solar estimates provided by BRASIL- SR model with estimates provided by other models and ground data. The third section presents the maps of various solar radiation components (global, direct, diffuse, tilted plane, and PAR). Source INPE - National Institute for Space Research Date Released December 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated November 08th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords América Latina Atlas

159

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are nearing completion. In addition, the role of ATLAS for the low-energy nuclear physics community needs to be revisited in light of the decision to site the Facility for...

160

Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy Agency/Company /Organization: International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy References: IRENA - Global Atlas[1] Overview "The Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy project aims to create a collaborative internet-based Geographic Information System (GIS) of these renewable resources that can direct and enhance cooperation on global scenarios and strategies and support decision-making, especially in areas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reliability Engineering for ATLAS Petascale Data Processing on the Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector is in its third year of continuous LHC running taking data for physics analysis. A starting point for ATLAS physics analysis is reconstruction of the raw data. First-pass processing takes place shortly after data taking, followed later by reprocessing of the raw data with updated software and calibrations to improve the quality of the reconstructed data for physics analysis. Data reprocessing involves a significant commitment of computing resources and is conducted on the Grid. The reconstruction of one petabyte of ATLAS data with 1B collision events from the LHC takes about three million core-hours. Petascale data processing on the Grid involves millions of data processing jobs. At such scales, the reprocessing must handle a continuous stream of failures. Automatic job resubmission recovers transient failures at the cost of CPU time used by the failed jobs. Orchestrating ATLAS data processing applications to ensure efficient usage of tens of thousands of CPU-cores, reliability engineering ...

Golubkov, D V; The ATLAS collaboration; Vaniachine, A V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The ATLAS Trigger Menu: Design and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger is a three-tiered system designed to select events of interest for the diverse ATLAS physics program such as Higgs Boson decays. At the same time the rate of events has to be reduced in order to stay within the limitations of available resources such as the output bandwidth, processing power and recording rate. At design capacity, the LHC has a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz whereas ATLAS detector has an average recording rate of about 300Hz. The decision to record an event is based on physics signatures found in the event such as energetic jets, leptons or large missing energy. The ATLAS trigger menu consists of several hundred trigger chains which are used during data taking. Each chain defines the selection criteria at each of the three trigger levels for a single physics signature. Additionally, the trigger menu specifies, depending on the physics purpose of the trigger, at which given rate the trigger is running. The continuously increasing luminosities together with optimisations of alg...

Bernius, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time-series and stage vs. cross-section area rating relationship.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

Igonkina, O.; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Achenbach, R.; /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys.; Adragna, P.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Aharrouche, M.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Alexandre, G.; /Geneva U.; Andrei, V.; /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys.; Anduaga, X.; /La Plata U.; Aracena, I.; /SLAC; Backlund, S.; /CERN; Baines, J.; /Rutherford; Barnett, B.M.; /Rutherford; Bauss, B.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Bee, C.; /Marseille, CPPM; Behera, P.; /Iowa State U.; Bell, P.; /Manchester U.; Bendel, M.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Benslama, K.; /Regina U.; Berry, T.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Bogaerts, A.; /CERN; Bohm, C.; /Stockholm U.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGISTRATION FORM REGISTRATION FORM Name: First Middle Last Organization: Department: Business Address: Street City State Zip Country Business Phone: Fax: E-mail: Citizenship: Additional information is needed for on-site access for non-US citizens who are not ATLAS Users. To download the form as a word document or pdf file, please go to the ATLAS user website (http://www.phy.anl.gov/atlas/users/visitor_info.html). Please return information to Barbara Weller by July 10, 2009. REGISTRATION Fees (If paying by check, please make check payable to: Argonne National Laboratory) Registration fee of $25 will be mailed? Pay at time of registration? Please state if you have special dietary needs. LODGING: Below are several area lodging facilities with rates and telephone numbers. Please make your reservation directly with the hotel. If you stay at the

167

The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Property:Project Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Resource Project Resource Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Resource Property Type Text Pages using the property "Project Resource" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Wave MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Wave MHK Projects/AWS II + Wave MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Wave MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Alaska 35 + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II + Current /Tidal MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + Current /Tidal

169

Living on the edge with the Oregon coastal atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an educational DVD entitled Living on the Edge: Building and Buying Property on the Oregon Coast, intended to alert homeowners, buyers, developers, realtors to the hazards associated with storms and other natural processes ... Keywords: atlas, coastal GIS, coastal resource management, geospatial data, internet map servers, natural hazards, public education, state government educational DVD, web GIS

Paul Klarin; Tanya Haddad; Joseph Cone; Dawn J. Wright

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solar Atlas for the Mediterranean Carsten Hoyer-Klick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar resource is the "fuel" of solar energy applications and its availability is a key economic on the further development. Keywords: solar radiation, direct normal radiation, atlas, solar energy potentials. 1. Introduction Solar energy has a large potential for renewable energy generation. Solar energy is highly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Agency/Company /Organization: Risoe DTU Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Wind Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.wasp.dk/ Cost: Paid Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Screenshot References: WAsP[1] Background "WAsP is a PC program for predicting wind climates, wind resources and power productions from wind turbines and wind farms. The predictions are based on wind data measured at stations in the same region. The program includes a complex terrain flow model, a roughness change model and a model

172

ATLAS = == Description == This spkg builds ATLAS for Sage. It is ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-download sources to fix timestamps. * Remove backup files (ending with ~). * Uncompress lapack tarball, yielding a smaller spkg. === atlas-3.10.0...

173

FleetAtlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FleetAtlas FleetAtlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FleetAtlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/fleetatlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/fleetatlas Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7405574°, -105.1719904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7405574,"lon":-105.1719904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

The Higgs discovery potential of ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higgs boson production and decay at the LHC is described, together with related ATLAS search channels, in order to provide an overview of the ATLAS Higgs discovery potential.

Christopher Collins-Tooth

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer small wheels Brookhaven National Laboratory led the development of the 32 muon detectors in the inner ring of the ATLAS detector's "small wheels." (A small...

176

IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Home > Groups > Utility Rate Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 11 February, 2013 - 15:18 data Global Atlas IRENA OpenEI Renewable Energy Solar Wind The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) recently launched the Global Atlas project in January, bringing robust tools and maps of renewable energy potential to your fingertips. OpenEI is also involved, serving as a portal to the IRENA global atlas on our platform. The aim of the platform is to give users a comprehensive look at global renewable energy resources so that informed decisions can be made about a cost-effective combination of technologies country-by-country, as well as whether a particular country has the market to make benefit from

177

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Higgs boson search at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the ATLAS Higgs boson search using about 5 fb^-1 of data recorded in 2011 is summarized. Proceedings from Physics at the LHC 2012 (Vancouver).

Scott Snyder; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Higgs boson search at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the ATLAS Higgs boson search using about 5 fb^-1 of data recorded in 2011 is summarized. Proceedings from Physics at the LHC 2012 (Vancouver).

Snyder, Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 22-23, 2011 April 22-23, 2011 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II experiments that cannot be scheduled during the present cycle will have to be resubmitted at the next PAC meeting. It is our intention to try as hard as possible to schedule a full experimental program and to accommodate as many, if not all, of the priority II experiments.

183

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety General Radiation Electrical Experiment Safety at ATLAS The Management and Staff at ATLAS and Argonne National Laboratory are fully dedicated to integrating safety into all aspects of work at our facilities. We believe that it is completely possible, and absolutely essenital, to carry out effective research programs without compromising safety. Indeed, the process of incorporating safety into accelerator operations and experimental research begins at the earliest stages. All experiments, equipment, and procedures are reviewed extensively for safety issues prior to their approval. For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding safety at

184

Highlights from ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment has been taking data efficiently since LHC collisions started, first at the injection energy of 450 GeV/beam and at 1.18 TeV/beam in 2009, then at 3.5 TeV/beam in 2010. Many results have already been obtained based on this data demonstrating the performance of the detector, as well as first physics measurements. Only a selection of highlights will be presented here.

Thorsten Wengler for the ATLAS Collaboration

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Highlights from ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment has been taking data efficiently since LHC collisions started, first at the injection energy of 450 GeV/beam and at 1.18 TeV/beam in 2009, then at 3.5 TeV/beam in 2010. Many results have already been obtained based on this data demonstrating the performance of the detector, as well as first physics measurements. Only a selection of highlights will be presented here.

Wengler, Thorsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how Panda meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase, and plans for ...

Maeno, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Wenaus, T; Nilsson, P; Stewart, G; Walker, R; Stradling, A; Caballero, J; Potekhin, M; Smith, D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase and plans for the future.

Maeno T.; De K.; Wenaus T.; Nilsson P.; Stewart G. A.; Walker R.; Stradling A.; Caballero J.; Potekhin M.; Smith D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Overview of ATLAS PanDA Workload Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS Monte-Carlo simulation and data reprocessing jobs pass through the PanDA system. We will describe how PanDA manages job execution on the grid using dynamic resource estimation and data replication together with intelligent brokerage in order to meet the scaling and automation requirements of ATLAS distributed computing. PanDA is also the primary ATLAS system for processing user and group analysis jobs, bringing further requirements for quick, flexible adaptation to the rapidly evolving analysis use cases of the early datataking phase, in addition to the high reliability, robustness and usability needed to provide efficient and transparent utilization of the grid for analysis users. We will describe how PanDA meets ATLAS requirements, the evolution of the system in light of operational experience, how the system has performed during the first LHC data-taking phase, and plans for ...

Maeno, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Wenaus, T; Nilsson, P; Stewart, G A; Walker, R; Stradling, A; Caballero, J; Potekhin, M; Smith, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mongolia wind resource assessment project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of detailed, regional wind-resource distributions and other pertinent wind resource characteristics (e.g., assessment maps and reliable estimates of seasonal, diurnal, and directional) is an important step in planning and accelerating the deployment of wind energy systems. This paper summarizes the approach and methods being used to conduct a wind energy resource assessment of Mongolia. The primary goals of this project are to develop a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas of Mongolia and to establish a wind measurement program in specific regions of Mongolia to identify prospective sites for wind energy projects and to help validate some of the wind resource estimates. The Mongolian wind resource atlas will include detailed, computerized wind power maps and other valuable wind resource characteristic information for the different regions of Mongolia.

Elliott, D.; Chadraa, B.; Natsagdorj, L.

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Agency/Company /Organization: MINES ParisTech Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.webservice-energy.com/ Country: France Web Application Link: www.webservice-energy.org/viewer/heron/applications/atlas-paca/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): International UN Region: Western Europe Coordinates: 43.615149095322°, 7.0526915788651° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615149095322,"lon":7.0526915788651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of several major components: Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) for precision measurements in the bending plane of the muons, supplemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the high eta region; Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for trigger and second coordinate measurement in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively; an optical alignment system to track the relative positions of all chambers; and, finally, the world's largest air-core magnetic toroid system. We will describe the status and commissioning of the muon system with cosmic rays and plans for commissioning with early beams.

E. Diehl; for the ATLAS muon collaboration

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

The ATLAS jet trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS jet trigger system has a 3-level structure, and was designed based on the concept of Regions Of Interest, where only regions of the detector around interesting Level-1 objects are reconstructed at the higher levels. This philosophy has changed during 2011, and there now exists the possibility to unpacking the full calorimeter at Event Filter. In 2012, full calorimeter unpacking is also available at Level-2, in addition jet energies are now calibrated to jet energy scale, and cleaning cuts are applied to reduce rate spikes. This paper presents the performance of the jet trigger in 2011 and an overview of the new features available for 2012.

Tamsett, M; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ATLAS parameter study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to make an independent assessment on the parameters chosen for the ATLAS capacitor bank at LANL. The contractor will perform a study of the basic pulsed power parameters of the ATLAS device with baseline functional parameters of >25 MA implosion current and <2.5 microsecond current risetime. Nominal circuit parameters held fixed will be the 14 nH from the vacuum interface to the load, and the nominal load impedances of 1 milliohm for slow loads and 10 milliohms for fast loads. Single Ended designs, as opposed to bipolar designs, will be studied in detail. The ATLAS pulsed power design problem is about inductance. The reason that a 36 MJ bank is required is that such a bank has enough individual capacitors so that the parallel inductance is acceptably low. Since about half the inductance is in the bank, and the inductance and time constant of the submodules is fixed, the variation of output with a given parameter will generally be a weak one. In general, the dl/dt calculation demonstrates that for the real system inductances, 700 kV is the optimum voltage for the bank to drive X-ray loads. The optimum is broad, and there is little reduction in performance at voltages as low as 450 kV. The direct drive velocity analysis also shows that the optimum velocity is between 480 and 800 kV for a variety of assumptions, and that there is less than a 10% variation in velocity over this range. Voltages in the 120 kV--600 kV range are desirable for driving heavy liners. A compromise optimum operating point might be 480 kV, at which all X-ray operation scenarios are within 10% of their velocity optimum, and heavy liners can be configured to be near optimum if small enough. Based on very preliminary studies the author believes that the choice of a single operating voltage point (say, 480 kV) is unnecessary, and that a bank engineered for dual operation at 480 and 240 kV will be the best solution to the ATLAS problem.

Adler, R.J. [North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Techniques for assessing the wind energy resource in the North Central region  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has sponsored the development of regional wind energy resource atlases for twelve regions of the United States. The North Central Region, which consists of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa, was one of the regions for which an atlas was assembled. This report is a description of observational and analytical techniques used in the development of the North Central region's wind energy resource atlas.

Freeman, D.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The ATLAS Experiment on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The ATLAS detector is searching for new discoveries in the head-on collisions of protons of extraordinarily high energy. ATLAS will learn about the basic forces that have shaped our Universe since the beginning of time and that will determine its fate. Among the possible unknowns are the origin of mass, extra dimensions of space, unification of fundamental forces, and evidence for dark matter candidates in the Universe [copied from http://atlas.ch/]. Approximately 700 physicists, engineers and graduate students from 44 U.S. institutions, including four DOE laboratories, participate in the ATLAS collaboration. In addition to the Collaboration's home page and numerous ATLAS-related pages at the various research organizations involved, there are two primary ATLAS websites that provide the full range of information about this experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in at CERN, Switzerland. The main ATLAS Experiment page hosted by CERN is found at http://atlas.ch/, while the home page specifically for the U.S. contribution to ATLAS is at http://www.uslhc.us/The_US_and_the_LHC/Experiments/ATLAS. Likewise, videos and multimedia from the inception and construction of ATLAS and continuing on through current operations and scientific discoveries are found everywhere from Brookhaven Lab to YouTube to an official collection at the ATLAS Experiment page at CERN. This DDE record guides you to the ATLAS Experiment Channel on YouTube.

196

BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

Moriarty, K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NETL: Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the U.S. and Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the first and second editions of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas I and Atlas II, respectively) have been removed from the NETL website. Atlas...

198

Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Commissioning ATLAS Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will face the challenge of efficiently selecting interesting candidate events in $pp$ collisions at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy, whilst rejecting the enormous number of background events. Therefore it is equipped with a three level trigger system. The first level is is hardware based and uses coarse granularity calorimeter information and fast readout muon chambers. The second and third level triggers, which are software based, will need to reduce the first level trigger output rate of ~ 75 kHz to ~ 200 Hz written out to mass storage. The progress in commissioning of this system will be reviewed in this paper.

Tomasz Bold; for Atlas Tdaq

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Consumer Energy Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Encoding Probabilistic Brain Atlases Using Bayesian Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency of occurrence of labels in ...

Van Leemput, Koen

202

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GLiPHA Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: kids.fao.org/glipha/ GLiPHA Screenshot References: GLiPHA[1] About "GLiPHA is a highly interactive electronic atlas that provides a scaleable overview of spatial and temporal variation in quantitative information related to animal production and health. Against a back-drop of selected maps of livestock densities, land-use or elevation, sub-national statistics relating to the livestock sector can be mapped, or displayed as tables and

203

ATLAS Maintenance and Operation management system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The maintenance and operation of the ATLAS detector will involve thousands of contributors from 170 physics institutes. Planning and coordinating the action of ATLAS members, ensuring their expertise is properly leveraged and that no parts of the detector are understaffed or overstaffed will be a challenging task. The ATLAS Maintenance and Operation application (referred to as Operation Task Planner inside the ATLAS experiment) offers a fluent web based interface that combines the flexibility and comfort of a desktop application, intuitive data visualization and navigation techniques, with a lightweight service oriented architecture. We will review the application, its usage within the ATLAS experiment, its underlying design and implementation.

Copy, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8MAY98 8MAY98 Exp # Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry Measurements of Natural 236U Concentrations with the ECR-ATLAS System 4 667-2 Janssens Unsafe Coulex of the 238,239Pu Nuclei 4 669-2 Carpenter Excited States Associated with Different Shapes in 178Hg and Neighboring Odd-A Nuclei 4 673-2 Lister A Study of Radiative Decay from High Lying States in 24Mg 5 689-2 Freeman Spectroscopy of Odd Tin Isotopes Approaching 100Sn 5 693-2 Reiter Structure and Formation Mechanism of Heavy Elements - Request for additional beam time for Experiment 693 - 6 706 Kwok Heavy-Ion Lithography on High Temperature Superconductors 2 708 Yu In-Beam Spectroscopy Study of the Proton Emitter 109I with Recoil-Decay Tagging Technique

205

ATLAS Equipment 1 June09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives at ATLAS Initiatives at ATLAS Birger B. Back June 10, 2009. HELIOS Description: The Helical Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS) is a novel spectrometer that will enable us to carry out detailed nuclear structure studies via inverse kinematics reactions using re-accelerated, neutron-rich beams from the new CARIBU injector as well as radioactive beams produced by the in-flight method at ATLAS. The spectrometer design has several advantages over conventional techniques using large-area Si detectors. These are: 1) avoidance of kinematical compression of states, 2) simple particle identification without ∆E measurements and the associated detection thresholds, 3) large acceptance achieved with relatively few Si detector channels. The superior performance of HELIOS

206

Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB) Timothy R., Carr (tcarr@kgs.ukans.edu; 785-864-2135) Scott W. White (whites@kgs.ukans.edu; 785-864-2135) Kansas Geological Survey, University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66047-3726 Lawrence H. Wickstrom (larry.wickstrom@dnr.state.oh.us; 614-265-6598) Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus, OH 43224-1362 James A., Drahovzal (drahovzal@kgs.mm.uky.edu; 859-257-5500) Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0107 Beverly Seyler (seyler@isgs.uiuc.edu; 217-244-2389) Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL 61820 John, A. Rupp (rupp@indiana.edu; 812-855-1323) Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208

207

ATLAS Videos and Multimedia Collection at CERN  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN; its detector searches for new discoveries in the head-on collisions of protons of extraordinarily high energy. Approximately 700 physicists, engineers and graduate students from 44 US institutions participate in the ATLAS collaboration, including four Department of Energy National Laboratories. In addition to the ATLAS Collaboration's home page and numerous ATLAS-related pages at the various research organizations involved, there are two primary ATLAS websites that provide the full range of information about this experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in at CERN, Switzerland. Videos and multimedia from the inception and construction of ATLAS and continuing on through current operations and scientific discoveries are found everywhere from Brookhaven Lab to YouTube to an official collection at the ATLAS Experiment page at CERN. This DDE citation guides you to the ATLAS Experiment page where multimedia offerings are organized into eight categories. They include documentary features and clips, animations of actual events and of simulated events, short video clips of the ATLAS Experiment, construction videos, educational videos, and public talks or presentations. Be sure to view also the ATLAS control room webcams and the live Event displays on the homepage when they are available. Note that the ATLAS Experiment also has a Blog and a Twitter presence.

None

208

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Transmission/Resource Library/Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library/Resources < Transmission‎ | Resource Library(Redirected from Transmission/Resource Library/Public Involvement) Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database Public Participation for Interstate Transmission Public participation is a requirement of any project that must comply with

211

ATLAS Tracking Event Data Model -- 12.0.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkEvent/TrkSegment [14]offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkEvent/TrkSpacePoint [offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkDetDescr/TrkSurface

Akesson, F.; ATLAS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the...

213

ATLAS Inner Detector Event Data Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data model for event reconstruction (EDM) in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment is presented. Different data classes represent evolving stages in the reconstruction data flow, and specific derived classes exist for the sub-detectors. The Inner Detector EDM also extends the data model for common tracking in ATLAS and is integrated into the modular design of the ATLAS high-level trigger and off-line software.

ATLAS; Akesson, F.; Costa, M.J.; Dobos, D.; Elsing, M.; Fleischmann, S.; Gaponenko, A.; Gnanvo, K.; Keener, P.T.; Liebig, W.; Moyse, E.; Salzburger, A.; Siebel, M.; Wildauer, A.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Role Based Access Control System in the ATLAS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of the ATLAS experiment motivated the deployment of an integrated Access Control System in order to guarantee safe and optimal access for a large number of users to the various software and hardware resources. Such an integrated system was foreseen since the design of the infrastructure and is now central to the operations model. In order to cope with the ever growing needs of restricting access to all resources used within the experiment, the Roles Based Access Control (RBAC) previously developed has been extended and improved. The paper starts with a short presentation of the RBAC design, implementation and the changes made to the system to allow the management and usage of roles to control access to the vast and diverse set of resources. The paper continues with a detailed description of the integration across all areas of the system: local Linux and Windows nodes in the ATLAS Control Network (ATCN), the Linux application gateways offering remote access inside ATCN, the Windows Terminal Serv...

Valsan, M L; The ATLAS collaboration; Lehmann Miotto, G; Scannicchio, D A; Schlenker, S; Filimonov, V; Khomoutnikov, V; Dumitru, I; Zaytsev, A S; Korol, A A; Bogdantchikov, A; Avolio, G; Caramarcu, C; Ballestrero, S; Darlea, G L; Twomey, M; Bujor, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Role Based Access Control system in the ATLAS experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of the ATLAS experiment motivated the deployment of an integrated Access Control System in order to guarantee safe and optimal access for a large number of users to the various software and hardware resources. Such an integrated system was foreseen since the design of the infrastructure and is now central to the operations model. In order to cope with the ever growing needs of restricting access to all resources used within the experiment, the Roles Based Access Control (RBAC) previously developed has been extended and improved. The paper starts with a short presentation of the RBAC design, implementation and the changes made to the system to allow the management and usage of roles to control access to the vast and diverse set of resources. The paper continues with a detailed description of the integration across all areas of the system: local Linux and Windows nodes in the ATLAS Control Network (ATCN), the Linux application gateways offering remote access inside ATCN, the Windows Terminal Serv...

Valsan, M L; The ATLAS collaboration; Lehmann Miotto, G; Scannicchio, D A; Schlenker, S; Filimonov, V; Khomoutnikov, V; Dumitru, I; Zaytsev, A S; Korol, A A; Bogdantchikov, A; Caramarcu, C; Ballestrero, S; Darlea, G L; Twomey, M; Bujor, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Commissioning of the ATLAS Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008. It is currently in a commissioning phase using cosmic-ray events. We present the highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system.

J. -F. Arguin; for the ATLAS Pixel Collaboration

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector  

SciTech Connect

The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Influence of Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code D.C. Maniaci Pennsylvania State University Y. Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the Oceans 11 Conference Kona, Hawaii September 19-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-52306 October 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

219

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ATLAS Status and latest results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector located in one of the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. In 2010 LHC has been colliding proton beams at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The last month of operation was dedicated to Pb-ion collisions at centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon. In this talk, a survey of the status of the ATLAS detector in both runs will be presented. The main results in pp collisions, including the study of minimum bias events, jets, W/Z, top and first searches for new physics will be reviewed. First results from heavy Ion collisions will be focussed on charged particle multiplicity, transverse energy, and elliptic flow as a function of collision geometry.

Sbarra, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The ATLAS Missing ET trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last few months, the ATLAS detector collected 900 GeV LHC collision events which allowed for the study the performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system (TDAQ). With the 7 TeV collision data collected recently, the performance studies of the trigger system are critical for a successful physics program. In particular a large spectrum of physics results will rely on the capacity of the ATLAS TDAQ system to collect events based on the estimate of the missing transverse energy (MET) contained in each event. The MET trigger would be, for example, the primary trigger to be used in new physics searches for processes involving new weakly interacting particles, which could account for the astronomically observed dark matter. In addition to discovery perspectives, the MET trigger can also be used in combination with other triggers to control the rate of signatures involving low energy objects. For example, the MET trigger is necessary in order to measure non-boosted W in the tau channel. Finally...

Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Wind Resource Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Information Wind Resource Information Photo of five wind turbines at the Nine Canyon Wind Project. The Nine Canyon Wind Project in Benton County, Washington, includes 37 wind turbines and 48 MW of capacity. Detailed wind resource information can be found on NREL's Wind Research Web site. This site provides access to state and international wind resource maps. Wind Integration Datasets are provided to help energy professionals perform wind integration studies and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. In addition, RReDC offers Meteorological Field Measurements at Potential and Actual Wind Turbine Sites and a Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United States. Wind resource maps are also available from the NREL Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Web site.

224

Diffraction and central exclusive production at ATLAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffractive physics program for the ATLAS experiment with an emphasis on the central exclusive production is discussed. The key point in this discussion is the need for an unambiguous experimental definition of diffractive signature which would be acceptable and reproducible by theorists. Recent ATLAS results from samples enhanced in diffraction contribution underline this need.

Marek Taevsk; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NREL North American Solar Radiation Atlas (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is about NREL's North American Solar Radiation Atlas, which currently includes 48 states (Alaska and Hawaii to be added in the future). It discusses the goals of the Atlas which are to: deliver basic solar performance estimates to general users, deliver a wide variety of additional information to more advanced users, be easy to use, full featured, and extensible.

George, R; Gray-Hann, P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

INL - Hydrokinetic & Wave Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Center Turbine (790KB PDF) Hydromatrix - Innovative Solution For Low Impact Hydropower at Existing Engineered Structures (2.2MB PDF) Hydraulic Cross-Flow Turbines (3.5MB...

227

Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The sub-detector integration in recent milestone weeks is described. Cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6 included simultaneous data-taking and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector, as well as combined analysis of muon detector and muon trigger. The calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The high-level-trigger infrastructure is being installed and algorithms tested in technical runs.

Juergen Thomas; for the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

229

Atlas Material Testing Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas Material Testing Solutions Atlas Material Testing Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlas Material Testing Solutions Place Chicago, IL Zip 60613 Website http://atlas-mts.com/ Coordinates 41.9529209°, -87.6605791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9529209,"lon":-87.6605791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

ATLAS upgrade June09_v3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade Guy Savard and Robert V. F. Janssens June 12, 2009 The ATLAS facility is on a constant quest to improve and increase the capabilities it offers to its Users. ATLAS currently provides beams of essentially all stable isotopes at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. These can be used in conjunction with a suite of state-of-the-art instruments such as Gammasphere, the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer (CPT), the split-pole spectrograph, an in-flight radioactive beam line, and the recently commissioned HELIOS spectrometer. At present, these capabilities are being augmented by (1) the addition of the CARIBU upgrade, which will provide low-intensity, neutron-rich radioactive beams from Californium fission fragments in both low-energy and re-

231

Brookhaven and ATLAS | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven and ATLAS Brookhaven and ATLAS BNL scientists install cathode strip chambers BNL scientists install cathode strip chambers - designed and built at the Laboratory - and monitored drift tubes into the ATLAS small wheel. Image credit: CERN. Brookhaven physicists and engineers are participating in one of the most ambitious scientific projects in the world - constructing, operating, doing physics analysis of the data, and upgrading a machine the size of a seven-story building that will open up new frontiers in the human pursuit of knowledge about elementary particles and their interactions. The machine, dubbed ATLAS, is one of four facilities located at the LHC near Geneva, in Switzerland. The LHC consists of two circular vacuum pipes in which protons travel in opposite directions and collide at nearly the

232

ATLAS Calorimeter | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Calorimeter ATLAS Calorimeter liquid argon calorimeter Brookhaven physicist Denis Damazio controls the front end crate of the barrel liquid argon calorimeter in ATLAS with his laptop. The ATLAS calorimeter measures the energies of charged and neutral particles. It consists of metal plates (absorbers) and sensing elements. Interactions in the absorbers transform the energy into a "shower" of particles that are detected by the sensing elements. In the inner sections of the calorimeter, the sensing element is liquid argon. This piece of the detector, called the liquid argon calorimeter, consists of radial layers of accordion-shaped lead plates separated by thin layers of liquid argon and electrodes. The accordion geometry has the advantage of reducing the time needed for the signals to reach the

233

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

NREL

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Atlas Brasileiro de Energia Solar (Brazilian Atlas of Solar Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plane, and PAR). The fourth section analyzes the temporal and spatial variations and trends of solar energy resources and,

(Purpose):The Brazilian...

235

Distributed analysis functional testing using GangaRobot in the ATLAS experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated distributed analysis tests are necessary to ensure smooth operations of the ATLAS grid resources. In this work we present the recent developments of the ATLAS GangaRobot, a tool designed to perform regular tests of all grid sites by running arbitrary user applications with varied configurations at predifined time intervals. Specifically the GangaRobot creates and submits several real ATLAS user applications to the various grid sites using the distributed analysis framework GANGA, a front end for easy grid job definition and management. Success or failure rates of these test jobs are individually monitored. Test definitions and results are stored in a database and made available to users and site administrators through a web interface, the ATLAS Site Status Board (SSB) and the Service Availability Monitor (SAM). The test results provide on the one hand a fast way to to identify systematic or temporary site problems, and on the other hand allow for an effective distribution of the workload on the avai...

Legger, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Elmsheuser, J; Ubeda Garca, M; Gordon, A W; Jha, M K; Van der Ster, D C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of U.S. Oil and Gas Resources (on CD-ROM) (Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, Structuraland logging conventional oil and gas wells. The ability to

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Full supersymmetry simulation for ATLAS in DC1  

SciTech Connect

This note reports results from a simulation of 100k events for one example of a minimal SUGRA supersymmetry case at the LHC using full simulation of the ATLAS detector. It was carried out as part ATLAS Data Challenge 1.

Biglietti, Michela; Brochu, Frederic; Costanzo, Davide; De, Kaushik; Duchovni, Ehud; Gupta, Ambreesh; Hinchliffe, Ian; Lester, Chris; Lipniacka, Anna; Loch, Peter; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Nielsen, Jakob L.; Paige, Frank; Polesello, Giacomo; Rajagopalan, Srini; Schrager, Dan; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Tovey, Dan; Wielers, Monika

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL-International Wind Resource Maps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Wind Resource Maps International Wind Resource Maps Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: NREL-International Wind Resource Maps Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Topics: Resource assessment Website: www.nrel.gov/wind/international_wind_resources.html NREL-International Wind Resource Maps Screenshot References: International Wind Resource Maps [1] Logo: NREL-International Wind Resource Maps This resource provides access to NREL-developed wind resource maps and atlases for several countries. NREL's wind mapping projects have been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Agency for International Development, and United Nations International Programme. "NREL is helping to develop high-resolution projections of wind resources

239

ATLAS trigger for first physics and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATLAS is a multi-purpose spectrometer built to perform precision measurements of Standard Model parameters and is aiming at discovery of Higgs particle, Super Symmetry and possible other physics channels beyond Standard Model. Operating at 14 TeV center of mass energy ATLAS will see 40 million events per second at nominal luminosity with about 25 overlapping interactions. Most of the events are inelastic proton-proton interactions with only few W, Z bosons or ttbar pairs produced each second, and expectations for Higgs or SUSY production cross-section are much smaller than that. ATLAS trigger has a difficult task to select one out of $10^5$ events online and to ensure that most physics channels of interests are preserved for analysis. In this talk we will review the design of ATLAS trigger system, the trigger menu prepared for initial LHC run as well as for high luminosity run. The expected trigger performance of the base-line ATLAS physics programs will be reviewed and first results from the commissioning pe...

Fonseca-Martin, T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Atlas Solar Innovations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Innovations Solar Innovations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atlas Solar Innovations Name Atlas Solar Innovations Address 2640 NW 15th Court Place Pompano Beach, Florida Zip 33069 Sector Solar Product Solar Photovoltaics Year founded 1984 Phone number 1-877-299-SOLAR Website http://www.atlas-solar.com/ Coordinates 26.24691°, -80.158567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.24691,"lon":-80.158567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ATLAS Trigger Performance and Initial Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient trigger will be crucial to charged Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a rejection factor of about 10^7 against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select signal events. Commissioning of the ATLAS trigger is progressing well, and much has already been done using cosmic rays and by replaying simulated physics events through the system. Detailed plans have been developed for commissioning with single LHC beams and the first collisions. The evolution of the ATLAS trigger towards stable running will be discussed in view of the searches for the charged Higgs boson. In particular, the determination of the trigger efficiency will be discussed, both in the case of the inclusive lepton triggers and the combined triggers needed for charged Higgs boson searches.

Winklmeier, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Trigger System reduces the event rate from the bunch-crossing rate of $40 \\rm \\ MHz$ to an average recording rate of $200 \\rm \\ Hz$ by selecting high-$p_{T}$ physics events. The ATLAS Trigger is composed of three levels. The first level (L1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the two-stage High Level Trigger (HLT) is implemented in software executed on large computing farms. The L1 consists of calorimeter, muon and forward triggers to identify electron, photon, jet and muon candidates, as well as event features such as missing transverse energy. These inputs are used by the L1 Central Trigger to generate an L1 Accept (L1A) decision. L1A and timing information is sent to all sub-detectors and summary information is sent to the subsequent levels of the Trigger System. In this paper the performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010 and 2011 is presented.

Gabaldon, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that reduce air emissions. Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) A tool that provides data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric...

246

Publications & Resources, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Manuals Scientific Staff Manual Supervisors Personnel Manual SBMS Subject Areas Compensation...

247

The ATLAS Trigger System Commissioning and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009 and 2010 LHC running at centre of mass energies of 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV, and 7 TeV. This paper presents the ongoing work to commission the ATLAS trigger with proton collisions, including an overview of the performance of the trigger based on extensive online running. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity and give a brief overview of plans for forthcoming LHC running.

A. Hamilton

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Energy generated by the worlds oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

249

Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A selection of ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter commissioning studies is presented. It includes a coherent noise study, a measurement of the quality of the ionization pulse shape prediction, and energy and time reconstruction analyses with cosmic and single beam signals.

Cooke, Mark S. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Results from ATLAS, Results from CMS  

SciTech Connect

This year CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) commenced data taking with pp collisions at 7 TeV in the center of mass. The accelerator and detectors have performed well. In these two talks, we present the status and highlights of the first several months' running, focusing on the big central detectors ATLAS (talk by Torrence) and CMS (talk by Green).

Torrence, Eric (University of Oregon); Green, Dan (Fermilab(

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Underlying event studies at ATLAS and CDF  

SciTech Connect

Improving our understanding and modeling of the underlying event in high energy collider environment is important for more precise measurements at the LHC. CDF Run II data for the underlying event associated with Drell-Yan lepton pair production and early ATLAS data measuring underlying event activity with respect to the leading transverse momentum track are presented. The data are compared with several QCD Monte Carlo models. It is seen that no current standard Monte Carlo tune adequately describes all the early ATLAS data and CDF data simultaneously. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple parton interaction models. One of the goals of these analyses is to provide data that can be used to test and improve MC models for current and future physics studies at the LHC. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple partonic interaction models, since the plateau heights of the underlying event profiles are highly correlated to multiple parton interaction activity. The data at 7 TeV are crucial for MC tuning, since measurements are needed with at least two energies to constrain the energy evolution of MPI activity. PYTHIA tune A and tune AW do a good job in describing the CDF data on the underlying-event observables for leading jet and Drell-Yan events, respectively, although the agreement between predictions and data is not perfect. The leading-jet data show slightly more activity in the underlying event than PYTHIA Tune A, although they are very similar - which may indicate the universality of underlying event modeling. However, all pre-LHC MC models predict less activity in the transverse region (i.e in the underlying event) than is actually observed in ATLAS leading track data, for both center-of-mass energies. There is therefore no current standard MC tune which adequately describes all the early ATLAS data. However, using diffraction-limited minimum bias distributions and the plateau of the underlying event distributions presented here, ATLAS has developed a new PYTHIA tune AMBT1 (ATLAS Minimum Bias Tune 1) and a new HERWIG+ JIMMY tune AUET1 (ATLAS Underlying Event Tune 1) which model the p{sub T} and charged multiplicity spectra significantly better than the pre-LHC tunes of those generators. It is critical to have sensible underlying event models containing our best physical knowledge and intuition, tuned to all relevant available data.

Kar, D.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Transmission/Resource Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library < Transmission Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database About Transmission Electricity Transmission: A Primer Overview of the grid system and the role of states in overseeing this system. The Design, Construction, and Operation of Long-Distance High-Voltage

253

FOREWORD ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOREWORD FOREWORD ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Foreword The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proud to release the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Production of Atlas IV is the result of collaboration among carbon storage experts from local, State, and Federal agencies, as well as industry and academia. Atlas IV provides a coordinated update of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) potential across the United States and other portions of North America. The primary purpose of Atlas IV is to update the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage potential for the United States and to provide updated information on the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) field

254

Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.lio.ontario.ca/imf-ows/imf.jsp?site=renew_en Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/ontario-renewable-energy-atlas-canada Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation The Renewable Energy Atlas is an interactive tool designed for everyone interested in renewable energy, including government policy makers, decision makers in the renewable energy industry, and educational and community institutions who wish to learn more about renewable energy in the

255

NETL: Carbon Storage - North American Carbon Atlas Partnership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Carbon Atlas Partnership (NACAP) NACAP Logo NACAP Logo The United States, Canada, and Mexico participate in a joint CO2 mapping initiative called the North American...

256

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy`s National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4{degrees} latitude by 1/3{degrees} longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4[degrees] latitude by 1/3[degrees] longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A configuration system for the ATLAS trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz that have to be reduced to the few 100 Hz allowed by the storage systems. A three-level trigger system has been designed to achieve this goal. We describe the configuration system under construction for the ATLAS trigger chain. It provides the trigger system with all the parameters required for decision taking and to record its history. The same system configures the event reconstruction, Monte Carlo simulation and data analysis, and provides tools for accessing and manipulating the configuration data in all contexts. THE ATLAS TRIGGER The LHC proton bunches will cross at a frequency of approximately 40 MHz. The rate of events that can be committed to permanent storage in normal data taking is only

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Search for gluinos with ATLAS at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospects for ATLAS observation of a SUSY-like signal from two gluinos are investigated within a certain region of the mSUGRA parameter space, where the cross section of the two gluinos production via gluon-gluon fusion is estimated at a rather high level of 13 pb. The event selection trigger uses a very clear signature of the process (4 jets + 4 muons + up to 4 secondary vertices topology) when final decay products of each gluino are b-anti-b and muon-anti-muon pairs and the lightest SUSY particle, the neutralino. Rather high transverse missing energy carried away by two neutralinos is an essential signature of the event and also allows the relevant Standard Model background to be reduced significantly. The generation and reconstruction processes are performed by means of the ATLAS common software framework ATHENA.

V. A. Bednyakov; J. A. Budagov; A. V. Gladyshev; D. I. Kazakov; G. D. Khoriauli; D. I. Khubua

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

260

CONSTRUCTING A WISE HIGH RESOLUTION GALAXY ATLAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {mu}m, 4.6 {mu}m, 12 {mu}m, and 22 {mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Fowler, J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, S.; Lake, S.; Wright, E. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cluver, M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benford, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Bridge, C.; Neill, James D. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Donoso, E. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koribalski, B. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Insititution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sheth, K. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow. (United States); Stanford, S., E-mail: jarrett@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Atlas and Catalog of Collisional Ring Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog and imaging atlas of classical (collisional) RING galaxies distilled from the Arp-Madore Atlas of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations and supplemented with other known RING galaxies from the published literature. The catalog lists the original host object, compiles available redshifts and presents newly determined positions for the central (target) galaxy and its nearest companion(s). 127 collisional RING systems are illustrated and their components identified. All of the RINGS have plausible colliders identified; many are radial-velocity confirmed companions. Finally, we make note of the existence of a rare sub-class of RING galaxies exemplified by AM 2136-492, double/concentric RING galaxies. These objects are predicted by numerical simulations, but they appear to be quite rare and/or short-lived in nature.

Madore, Barry F; Petrillo, Kristen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)  

SciTech Connect

We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

Ardila, David R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Song, Inseok, E-mail: ardila@ipac.caltech.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia at Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Heavy Ion Physics at the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector is one of the two large detectors built to carry on high pT physics at the Large Hadron Collider. The detector is designed to perform optimally at the challenging nominal LHC machine luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1. ATLAS has a finely segmented electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters covering 10 units of rapidity. The inner tracking system is composed of sicilicon pixel detector, silicon central tracker, transition radiation tracker and a 2T solenoidal magnet, covering 5 units of rapidity. The muon spectrometer is located outside the calorimeter volume. Muon chambers and air core toroids are used to track muons of momentum larger than 4 GeV. The ATLAS detector has a superb performance for jet physics because of its calorimeters. Simulation studies also indicate that it will be possible to tag b-jets in the heavy ion environment. Upsilon and J/Psi can be reconstructed through the di-muon decay channel. The detector is ideal for the study of global variables, namely total energy flow and ...

Takai, H; The ATLAS collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ATLAS Upgrade Instrumentation in the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planned upgrades of the LHC over the next decade should allow the machine to operate at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with instantaneous luminosities in the range 5--7e34 cm^-2 s^-1. With these parameters, ATLAS could collect 3,000 fb^-1 of data in approximately 10 years. However, the conditions under which this data would be acquired are much harsher than those currently encountered at the LHC. For example, the number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing will rise from the level of 20--30 per 50 ns crossing observed in 2012 to 140--200 every 25 ns. In order to deepen our understanding of the newly discovered Higgs boson and to extend our searches for physics beyond that new particle, the ATLAS detector, trigger, and readout will have to undergo significant upgrades. In this whitepaper we describe R&D necessary for ATLAS to continue to run effectively at the highest luminosities foreseen from the LHC. Emphasis is placed on those R&D efforts in which US institutions are playing a leading role.

Gustaaf Brooijmans; Hal Evans; Abe Seiden

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Controls and data acquisition on Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The control and data acquisition systems for Atlas will use a large degree of decentralization. By distributing control points close to the systems being controlled, the authors expect to simplify the task of isolating electronic systems from the large expected EMI pulses, allow connection of the various parts of the system by high-level fiber-optic networks, allow a simple configuration of the control and data acquisition screen rooms, and simplify the software efforts through the resulting modularization. The Atlas control system must control capacitor charging, machine and diagnostic timing and triggering, marx module diagnostics, vacuum systems, gas handling for railgaps, safety interlocks, and oil handling. Many of these tasks will be performed by industrial-style programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Each of 38 Marx bank maintenance units will have a control and diagnostic package which will monitor both charging and discharging current and railgap trigger timing. An unusual feature of digitizers to record each Marx module`s output waveform, plus nanosecond resolution time interval meters to record the firing time of each railgap. The machine data acquisition system for Atlas will be built around an SQL database, use National Instruments LabVIEW software to control data acquisition instruments and provide links for a variety of experimentalists` data analysis packages. World Wide Web access will provide an interface through which users can monitor experimental data and machine status.

Scudder, D.W.; Hosack, K.W.; Parsons, W.M.; Reass, W.A.; Thompson, M.C.; Wysocki, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creager, J. [Allied Signal, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; /Regina U.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; /Uppsala U.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; /Copenhagen U.; Demers, S.; /SLAC; Farrington, S.; /Oxford U.; Igonkina, O.; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; /Tokyo U.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Tools for Trigger Aware Analyses in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to search for rare processes, all four LHC experiments have to use advanced triggering methods for selecting and recording the events of interest. At the expected nominal LHC operating conditions only about 0.0005% of the collision events can be kept for physics analysis in ATLAS. Therefore the understanding and evaluation of the trigger performance is one of the most crucial parts of any physics analysis. ATLASs first level trigger is composed of custom-built hardware, while the second and third levels are implemented using regular PCs running reconstruction and selection algorithms. Because of this split, accessing the results of the trigger execution for the two stages is different. The complexity of the software trigger presents further difficulties in accessing the trigger data. To make the job of the physicists easier when evaluating the trigger performance, multiple general-use tools are provided by the ATLAS Trigger Analysis Tools group. The TrigDecisionTool, a general tool, is provided to...

Krasznahorkay, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Stelzer, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Teacher Resource Center: Curricular Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curricular Resources Curricular Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center provides workshops and consultations on Mathematics and Science Curriculum development. Here are a list of resources for educators. See the 'Customized Workshops" link in the "Teacher's Lounge" for information about more workshops available through the TRC. Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning

269

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 2012 Regular Session has requested LADOTD to study the effects of hydrokinetic turbines as hydrokinetic power, through the installation of turbines on riverbeds, bridge piers, or beneath barges there are about 82 permits to install such turbines in different locations in the United States with 43 of those

270

Hospitality resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

271

Healthcare resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

272

Congregation resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

273

PREPARATION OF NORTHERN MID-CONTINENT PETROLEUM ATLAS  

SciTech Connect

Report covers the fifth year of the Digital Petroleum Atlas (DPA) Project. To the present day, the DPA remains a long-term effort to develop new methodologies for efficient and timely access to the latest petroleum data and technology for the domestic oil and gas industry, research organizations and local governmental units. The DPA is an evolving approach to generating and publishing petroleum reservoir, field, play and basin studies. Atlas products are integrated with the Kansas Geological Survey web site and are available for every field in Kansas (6,395 fields in Kansas), anywhere in the world using a standard point-and-click world-wide-web interface (http://www.kgs.ku.edu/PRS/petroIndex.html). In order to provide efficient transfer of the technology for client-defined solutions, all information and technology in the DPA can be accessed, manipulated and downloaded. The DPA increases and improves online access from data through to ''final publication''. Until recently the petroleum atlas circulated like all scholarly information, through personal exchanges, subscriptions, and libraries. Today, digital scientific information is becoming the norm. The result--a dramatic increase in the international and disciplinary scope of information exchange in the petroleum industry. Digital communication has made traditional collaborative activity more informal, intimate, instantaneous, and continuous. At the present the DPA provides worldwide access to constantly increasing data and interpreted information. For example, data from each of over 300,000 oil and gas wells in Kansas are being accessed online for projects in locations from Chanute, Kansas, to Houston, Texas, to Berlin, Germany. Programs developed through the DPA provide oil and gas operators and the public tools to make exploration and development decisions using production data, interpreted well logs, and real-time mapped petroleum information. The DPA provides online access to digital versions of published bulletins, maps, and reports. Through the DPA, we provide online tools that permit colleagues and customers to better query, interpret, map, and display the latest information and research results in earth science databases that could be scattered anywhere in the world. These ''published'' products are living, created on demand, customized to best address a specific natural resource question, and access data that is continuously updated and improved. The DPA has significantly altered the relationship between research results, data access, the transfer of technology, and our relationship with our clients. The fifth year of the project moved forward to expand the development and integration of relational databases into the DPA. The result is that most of the pages in the DPA are generated on demand using online clients. Previously completed products, such as field and basin studies, are automatically updated with the latest production and well data. Raster images such has completion reports are scanned and uploaded into relational databases and can be used for efficient construction of larger scale studies. Content of the DPA has increased to cover every field in Kansas. The DPA Project continues to provide improved access to a ''published'' product and ongoing technology transfer activity. The DPA is widely used by oil and gas producers and other groups interested in natural resources.

Lee C. Gerhard; Timothy R. Carr

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program: Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aspects General Environmental Research Hydrokinetic & Wave Technologies Hydropower Facts Research and Development Resource Assessment Technology Transfer Virtual...

275

Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.windatlas.ca/en/index.php Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-wind-energy-atlas-potential- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Environment Canada's Wind Energy Atlas website aims at developing new meteorological tools to be used by Canada's wind energy industry. It offers the possibility to browse through the results of the numerical simulations that were run on all of Canada in order to determine its wind energy potential. Consultants and the general public will find valuable data about

276

Microsoft PowerPoint - ATLAS_upgrade_physics_program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guy Savard Guy Savard Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago Science with the ATLAS Efficiency and Intensity Upgrade ATLAS Users Meeting August 8-9 2009 2 G. Savard 2009 ATLAS S&T Review May 18-19, 2009 Outline Evolving landscape for low-energy nuclear physics Self-assessment of ATLAS present and near future program Process followed to evaluate near and longer term physics program needs and role in community Option proposed - Physics - Machine - Instrumentation 3 G. Savard 2009 ATLAS S&T Review May 18-19, 2009 The new landscape: what is coming to a town near us ---- FRIB ---- At full power - Fast beams - Reaccelerated beams at a few % of that Starts operating ~ 2017-18

277

Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International Communications Awards Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International Communications Awards May 7, 2013 - 8:55am Addthis NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) recently walked away with two prestigious 2013 Blue Pencil & Gold Screen Awards presented by the National Association of Government Communicators (NAGC).

278

A step towards a computing grid for the LHC experiments: ATLAS Data Challenge 1  

SciTech Connect

The ATLAS Collaboration at CERN is preparing for the data taking and analysis at the LHC that will start in 2007. Therefore, a series of Data Challenges was started in 2002 whose goals are the validation of the Computing Model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made. A major feature of the first Data Challenge was the preparation and the deployment of the software required for the production of large event samples as a worldwide-distributed activity. It should be noted that it was not an option to ''run everything at CERN'' even if we had wanted to; the resources were not available at CERN to carry out the production on a reasonable time-scale. The great challenge of organizing and then carrying out this large-scale production at a significant number of sites around the world had the refore to be faced. However, the benefits of this are manifold: apart from realizing the required computing resources, this exercise created worldwide momentum for ATLAS computing as a whole. This report describes in detail the main steps carried out in DC1 and what has been learned from them as a step towards a computing Grid for the LHC experiments.

Sturrock, R.; Bischof, R.; Epp, B.; Ghete, V.M.; Kuhn, D.; Mello, A.G.; Caron, B.; Vetterli, M.C.; Karapetian, G.; Martens, K.; Agarwal, A.; Poffenberger, P.; McPherson, R.A.; Sobie, R.J.; Armstrong, S.; Benekos, N.; Boisvert, V.; Boonekamp, M.; Brandt, S.; Casado, P.; Elsing, M.; Gianotti, F.; Goossens, L.; Grote, M.; Jansen, J.B.; Mair, K.; Nairz, A.; Padilla, C.; Poppleton, A.; Poulard, G.; Richter-Was, E.; Rosati, S.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Wengler, T.; Xu, G.F.; Ping, J.L.; Chudoba, J.; Kosina, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Svec, J.; Tas, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Lytken, E.; Nielsen, J.L.; Waananen, A.; Tapprogge, S.; Calvet, D.; Albrand, S.; Collot, J.; Fulachier, J.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Ohlsson-Malek, S.; Viret, S.; Wielers, M.; Bernardet, K.; Correard, S.; Rozanov, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J-B.; Arnault, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Hrivnac, J.; Lechowski, M.; Parrour, G.; Perus, A.; Rousseau, D.; Schaffer, A.; Unal, G.; Derue, F.; Chevalier, L.; Hassani, S.; Laporte, J-F.; Nicolaidou, R.; Pomarede, D.; Virchaux, M.; Nesvadba, N.; Baranov, Sergei; Putzer, A.; Khonich, A.; Duckeck, G.; Schieferdecker, P.; Kiryunin, A.; Schieck, J.; Lagouri, Th.; Duchovni, E.; Levinson, L.; Schrager, D.; Negri, G.; Bilokon, H.; Spogli, L.; Barberis, D.; Parodi, F.; Cataldi, G.; Gorini, E.; Primavera, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Cavalli, D.; Heldmann, M.; Lari, T.; Perini, L.; Rebatto, D.; Resconi, S.; Tartarelli, F.; Vaccarossa, L.; Biglietti, M.; Carlino, G.; Conventi, F.; Doria, A.; Merola, L.; Polesello, G.; Vercesi, V.; De Salvo, A.; Di Mattia, A.; Luminari, L.; Nisati, A.; Reale, M.; Testa, M.; Farilla, A.; Verducci, M.; Cobal, M.; Santi, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ishino, M.; Mashimo, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Sakamoto, H.; Tanaka, J.; Ueda, I.; Bentvelsen, S.; Fornaini, A.; Gorfine, G.; Groep, D.; Templon, J.; Koster, J.; Konstantinov, A.; Myklebust, T.; Ould-Saada, F.; Bold, T.; Kaczmarska, A.; Malecki, P.; Szymocha, T.; Turala, M.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Khoreauli, G.; Gromova, N.; Tsulaia, V.; et al.

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The in-situ commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter is taking place since three years. During this period, it has been fully tested by means of frequent calibration runs, and the analysis of the large cosmic muon data samples and of the few beam splash events that occurred on September 10th, 2008. This has allowed to obtain a stable set of calibration constants for the first collisions, and to measure the in-situ calorimeter performances that were found to be at the expected level.

S. Laplace

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Non-SUSY Searches at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector has begun the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) with \\int L dt = ~45 pb^-1 of data collected in 2010. After no significant evidence of new physics was found in the data, limits on possible signatures have been set, many of which have already placed more stringent limits than previous measurements. These proceedings review recent limits obtained on various BSM models, including excited quarks, axigluons, contact interactions, quantum black holes, heavy gauge bosons (W', Z'), gravitons, fourth-generation quarks and leptoquarks.

E. N. Thompson; ATLAS Collaboration

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Musto, Elisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Elisa Musto

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Resource Directory helps members maintain technical excellence in their professions. Technical Resources Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemi

285

ATLAS Tags Web Service calls Athena via Athenaeum Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Physics experiments start using a Web Service style application to access functionality of their main frameworks. Those frameworks, however, are not ready to be executed in a standard Web Service environment as frameworks are too complex, monolithic and use non-standard and non-portable technologies. ATLAS Tag Browser is one of those Web Service. To provide the possibility to extract full ATLAS events from the standard Web Service, we need to access to full ATLAS offline framework - Athena. As Athena cannot run directly within any Web Service, the client server approach has been chosen. Web Service calls Athena remotely over XML-RPC connection using Athenaeum framework.

Hrivnac, J; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell' Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

The GALEX Ultraviolet Atlas of Nearby Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present images, integrated photometry, surface-brightness and color profiles for a total of 1034 nearby galaxies recently observed by the GALEX satellite in its far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1516A) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2267A) bands. (...) This data set has been complemented with archival optical, near-infrared, and far-infrared fluxes and colors. We find that the integrated (FUV-K) color provides robust discrimination between elliptical and spiral/irregular galaxies and also among spiral galaxies of different sub-types. Elliptical galaxies with brighter K-band luminosities (i.e. more massive) are redder in (NUV-K) color but bluer in (FUV-NUV) than less massive ellipticals. In the case of the spiral/irregular galaxies our analysis shows the presence of a relatively tight correlation between the (FUV-NUV) color and the total infrared-to-UV ratio. The correlation found between (FUV-NUV) color and K-band luminosity (with lower luminosity objects being bluer than more luminous ones) can be explained as due to an increase in the dust content with galaxy luminosity. The images in this Atlas along with the profiles and integrated properties are publicly available through a dedicated web page at http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/GALEX_Atlas/

A. Gil de Paz; S. Boissier; B. F. Madore; M. Seibert; Y. H. Joe; A. Boselli; T. K. Wyder; D. Thilker; L. Bianchi; S. -C. Rey; R. M. Rich; T. A. Barlow; T. Conrow; K. Forster; P. G. Friedman; D. C. Martin; P. Morrissey; S. G. Neff; D. Schiminovich; T. Small; J. Donas; T. M. Heckman; Y. -W. Lee; B. Milliard; A. S. Szalay; S. Yi

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

288

Event Reconstruction Algorithms for the ATLAS Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment under construction at CERN is due to begin operation at the end of 2007. The detector will record the results of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The trigger is a three-tier system designed to identify in real-time potentially interesting events that are then saved for detailed offline analysis. The trigger system will select approximately 200 Hz of potentially interesting events out of the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate (with 10{sup 9} interactions per second at the nominal luminosity). Algorithms used in the trigger system to identify different event features of interest will be described, as well as their expected performance in terms of selection efficiency, background rejection and computation time per event. The talk will concentrate on recent improvements and on performance studies, using a very detailed simulation of the ATLAS detector and electronics chain that emulates the raw data as it will appear at the input to the trigger system.

Fonseca-Martin, T.; /CERN; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Adragna, P.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Aleksandrov, E.; /Dubna, JINR; Aleksandrov, I.; /Dubna, JINR; Amorim, A.; /Lisbon, LIFEP; Anderson, K.; /Chicago U., EFI; Anduaga, X.; /La Plata U.; Aracena, I.; /SLAC; Asquith, L.; /University Coll. London; Avolio, G.; /CERN; Backlund, S.; /CERN; Badescu, E.; /Bucharest, IFIN-HH; Baines, J.; /Rutherford; Barria, P.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Bartoldus, R.; /SLAC; Batreanu, S.; /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /CERN; Beck, H.P.; /Bern U.; Bee, C.; /Marseille, CPPM; Bell, P.; /Manchester U.; Bell, W.H.; /Glasgow U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Regina U. /CERN /Annecy, LAPP /Paris, IN2P3 /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /Argonne /CERN /UC, Irvine /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /CERN /Montreal U. /CERN /Glasgow U. /Michigan State U. /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /New York U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /UC, Irvine /CERN /Glasgow U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /UC, Irvine /Valencia U. /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /University Coll. London /New York U.; /more authors..

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools < Transmission‎ | Resource Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Planning Public Involvement GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database ACEII.jpg ACE-II: Areas of Conservation Emphasis Provides an easily-accessible and standardized way to view the best available statewide data on California's biological richness and biodiversity CAPS.jpg CAPS: Crucial Areas Planning System Online tool that maps crucial habitat as well as key wildlife connectivity areas in Montana. The aim of the mapping system is to consider fish,

290

Transmission/Resource Library/MOU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library/MOU < Transmission‎ | Resource Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs)for Interstate Transmission Projects Multi-state transmission siting and permitting projects benefit from effective collaboration between government entities, tribes, project

291

The integration of climatic data sets for wind resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One barrier to wind energy development, in many regions of the world, is the lack of reliable information about the spacial distribution of the wind energy resource. The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program`s wind resource assessment group is to improve the characterization of the wind resource in many of these regions in support of U.S. wind energy industry. NREL provides wind resource assessments for our clients in the form of reports, atlases, and wind resource maps. The assessments estimate the level of the wind resource, at wind turbine hub heights (typically 30m to 50m above ground level), for locations exposed to the prevailing winds.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

293

ATLAS Tags Web Service calls Athena via Athenaeum Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Physics experiments start using a Web Service style application to access functionality of their main frameworks. Those frameworks, however, are not ready to be executed in a standard Web Service environment as frameworks are too complex, monolithic and use non-standard and non-portable technologies. ATLAS Tag Browser is one of those Web Service. To provide the possibility to extract full ATLAS events from the standard Web Service, we need to access to full ATLAS offline framework - Athena. As Athena cannot run directly within any Web Service, the client server approach has been chosen. Web Service calls Athena remotely over XML-RPC connection using Athenaeum framework. The paper will discuss integration of Athenaeum framework with ATLAS Tag database service, its distributed deployment, monitoring and performance.

Hrivnac, J; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The ATLAS PanDA Pilot in Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) was designed to meet ATLAS requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. Submitted jobs are executed on worker nodes by pilot jobs sent to the grid sites by pilot factories. This poster provides an overview of the PanDA pilot system and presents major features added in light of recent operational experience, including multi-job processing, advanced job recovery for jobs with output storage failures, gLExec based identity switching from the generic pilot to the actual user, and other security measures. The PanDA system serves all ATLAS distributed processing and is the primary system for distributed analysis; it is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing real LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its evolution.

Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

TOGA COARE Aircraft Mission Summary Images: An Electronic Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electronic atlas of research aircraft missions in TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment) has been prepared and is available on the Internet via World Wide Web browsers such as Mosaic. These ...

S. E. Yuter; R. A. Houze Jr.; S. R. Brodzik; B. F. Smull; J. R. Daugherty; F. D. Marks Jr.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Computer-based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Color-shaded and contoured images of global gridded instrumental data have been produced as a computer-based atlas, available to the climate community through Internet. Each image simultaneously depicts anomaly maps of surface temperature, sea ...

Raymond S. Bradley; Linda G. Ahern; Frank T. Keimig

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NETL: News Release - Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Latest Edition of DOE Publication Provides Updated, Additional Information on Geologic...

298

EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

Niinikoski, T O

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

Olof Lundberg

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

The ATLAS b-Jet Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The online event selection is crucial to reject most of the events containing uninteresting background collisions while preserving as much as possible the interesting physical signals. The b-jet selection is part of the trigger strategy of the ATLAS experiment and a set of dedicated triggers was contributing to the event selection for the 2011 running. The b-jets acceptance is increased and the background reduced by lowering jet transverse energy thresholds at the first trigger level and applying b-tagging techniques at the subsequent levels. Different physics channels, especially topologies containing more than one b-jet where higher rejection factors are achieved, benefit from using the b-jet trigger. An overview of the b-jet trigger menu and performance on data is presented.

Per Hansson

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Developments of the ATLAS Jet Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been a lot of recent changes in the ATLAS jet trigger. The standard strategy, based on Regions Of Interest, is not well-suited for multi-jet events since it leads to pathologies and efficiency losses. This philosophy has been changed for the jet trigger, and we now have the possibility of unpacking the full calorimeter at Event Filter and (even for a small subset of the events) at an intermediate level between Level-1 and Level-2. We also moved to the use of calibrated scale at trigger level, and to the application of noise cuts to reduce rate spikes. We will present the performance of the jet trigger in 2011, when most of these changes were operational

Lopes, L; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Performance of the ATLAS Jet Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been a lot of recent changes in the ATLAS jet trigger. The standard strategy, based on Regions Of Interest, is not well-suited for multi-jet events since it leads to pathologies and efficiency losses. This philosophy has been changed for the jet trigger, and we now have the possibility of unpacking the full calorimeter at Event Filter and (even for a small subset of the events) at an intermediate level between Level-1 and Level-2. We also moved to the use of calibrated scale at trigger level, and to the application of noise cuts to reduce rate spikes. We will present the performance of the jet trigger in 2011, when most of these changes were operational

Lopes, L; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Safety Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Print LBNLPub-3000: Health and Safety Manual Berkeley Lab safety guide, policies and procedures. Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Staff Contact information for the...

304

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

305

Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 2004-06 Ocean Atlas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together ...

Forget, Gael

306

Mobile Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Have a mobile device? Find tips and information here. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email For information call the Service Desk at (505) 667-5809 or email mobilelibrary@lanl.gov The following resources are optimized for mobile devices or have mobile apps available for download. Resource Available App Mobile Website Available off Yellow Network with Pairing or Login Additional Information AACR Journals Apple Yes, the Journals are optimized for mobile viewing. Not the whole AACR site. Instructional pdf on pairing with voucher ACS Apple Android No American Institute of Physics Apple No American Mathematical Society No Yes Instructions for pairing mobile devices, tablets, laptops, etc. American Physical Society No Annual Reviews No Yes Instructions for pairing with mobile device available on website.

307

A Nuclear Physics Program at the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS collaboration has significant interest in the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. We submitted a Letter of Intent to the United States Department of Energy in March 2002. The following document is a slightly modified version of that LOI. More details are available at: http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/SM/ions

S. Aronson; K. Assamagan; H. Gordon; M. Leite; M. Levine; P. Nevski; H. Takai; S. White; B. Cole; J. L. Nagle

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

The KAMM/WAsP Numerical Wind Atlas A powerful ingredient for wind energy planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KAMM/WAsP Numerical Wind Atlas A powerful ingredient for wind energy planning J. Badger, N.G. Mortensen, J.C. Hansen Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory Great Wall World Renewable Energy Forum Beijing, 23-27 October 2006 #12;Wind Farm Planning National Wind Atlas Environmental Atlases Maps

309

Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of the expression 'CSC studies' ('computing system commissioning'), which is occasionally referred to in these volumes. The work reported does generally assume that the detector is fully operational, and in this sense represents an idealised detector: establishing the best performance of the ATLAS detector with LHC proton-proton collisions is a challenging task for the future. The results summarised here therefore represent the best estimate of ATLAS capabilities before real operational experience of the full detector with beam. Unless otherwise stated, simulations also do not include the effect of additional interactions in the same or other bunch-crossings, and the effect of neutron background is neglected. Thus simulations correspond to the low-luminosity performance of the ATLAS detector. This report is broadly divided into two parts: firstly the performance for identification of physics objects is examined in detail, followed by a detailed assessment of the performance of the trigger system. This part is subdivided into chapters surveying the capabilities for charged particle tracking, each of electron/photon, muon and tau identification, jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction, b-tagging algorithms and performance, and finally the trigger system performance. In each chapter of the report, there is a further subdivision into shorter notes describing different aspects studied. The second major subdivision of the report addresses physics measurement capabilities, and new physics search sensitivities. Individual chapters in this part discuss ATLAS physics capabilities in Standard Model QCD and electroweak processes, in the top quark sector, in b-physics, in searches for Higgs bosons, supersymmetry searches, and finally searches for other new particles predicted in more exotic models.

Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Online Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Resources Online Resources       General Information Discovering New Physics - Fermilab: where physicists unravel the mysteries of the universe Electromagnetic Simulation: Charged Particle Motion in E/M Field (by Fu-Kwun Hwang, National Taiwan Normal University) Fermilabyrinth - Online versions of exhibits at the Lederman Science Center Fermilab Virtual Tour - Photos of accelerators and detectors with figure captions International Particle Physics Outreach Group (from CERN) Fermilab Homepage - Links to general information, experiments and projects (Fermilab at Work), particle physics (inquiring minds), resources for students (education) and more High-Energy Physics Acronyms - (from Fermilab) Particle Physics - a list of links from the American Physical Society)

311

Federal agency resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

312

Multifamily housing resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

313

Entertainment venue resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

314

Higher education resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

315

Data center resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

316

Senior care resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

317

Auto dealer resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

318

Center Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources for Planning Center Activities Resources for Planning Center Activities       QuarkNet at Work - Resources Home QuarkNet is a teacher professional development effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Teachers work on particle physics experiments during a summer and join a cadre of scientists and teachers working to introduce some aspects of their research into their classrooms. This allows tomorrow's particle physicists to peek over the shoulder of today's experimenters. These resources are available for lead teachers and mentors at Quartnet Centers as they design activities for associate teacher workshops and follow-on activities. Important Findings from Previous Years Mentor Tips Associate Teacher Institute Toolkit

319

Resource Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online search and networking tool that connects AOCS members with their peers who share a common technical interest, geographic location, or affinity. Resource Directory Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished div

320

The heart of ATLAS Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS silicon tracker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been built under the french-swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. Two opposing beams of protons will collide with a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV, an energy seven million times that of the first accelerator. The LHC takes particle physics research to a new frontier. On September 10th 2008, the first single pilot beam of $2 x 10^9$ protons was circulated successfully through the entire LHC, with an injection energy of 0.45 TeV. The first collisions are expected in Summer 2009. One of the experiments designed to search for new particle phenomena is the ATLAS experiment. This is a general purpose detector capable of detecting and measuring the broadest range of particle signals. At the heart of the ATLAS detector lies the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). It is a central part of the inner detector providing precision measurements of particle trajectories over a large $\\eta$ range. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the performance and commissioning of the SCT detector....

Magrath, Caroline Alexandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Trilepton signatures from SUSY at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the potential of the ATLAS detector to discover trilepton final state signatures from decays of supersymmetric particles at the LHC. An inclusive and an exclusive trilepton search have been conducted for a range of different mSUGRA scenarios, in the focus point region, in the bulk region, and at the edge of the current experimental limits on SUSY. It is found that a simple inclusive selection, based on the presence of three leptons and at least one high-$p_T$ jet in the final state, has the potential to be an excellent candidate for an early physics programme at the LHC. The exclusive trilepton selection, optimised for the focus point region, relies on stringent lepton track isolation and also includes cuts on variables such as transverse missing energy and on the hadronic activity in the event. In a heavy SUSY scenario, where all scalar and coloured sparticles may be too heavy to be observed at the LHC, hadronically quiet trilepton final states could be amongst the few accessible channels to d...

Potter, C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The ATLAS Trigger Performance and Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV at record breaking luminosities. The three?level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch?crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 ?s. Then follow two levels of software?based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets, and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections during the 2011-2012 run. We also discuss the trigger evolution and redesign put in place to cope with the continuously rising luminosity and in particular t...

Bartsch, V; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data- taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1+/-0.9 {\\mu}m and a relative momentum resolution {\\sigma}p/p = (4.83+/-0.16) \\times 10-4 GeV-1 \\times pT have been measured for high momentum tracks.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Performance of the ATLAS trigger system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009-2011 LHC running at centre of mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. The first level uses custom electronics to reject most background collisions, in less than 2.5 us, using information from the calorimeter and muon detectors. The upper two trigger levels are software-based triggers. The trigger system selects events by identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the performance of these trigger selections based on extensive online running during the 2011 LHC run and discuss issues encountered during 2011 operations. Distributions of key selection variables are shown calculated at the different trigger levels and are compared with of...

Casadei, D; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and heavy ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV were produced by the LHC and recorded using the ATLAS experiment's trigger system in 2010. The LHC is designed with a maximum bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the ATLAS trigger system is designed to record approximately 200 of these per second. The trigger system selects events by rapidly identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. An overview of the ATLAS trigger system, the evolution of the system during 2010 and the performance of the trigger system components and selections based on the 2010 collision data are shown. A brief outline of plans for the trigger system in 2011 is presented

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; ?kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amors, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; ?sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jrg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger System in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV and heavy ion collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 2.76 TeV were produced by the LHC and recorded using the ATLAS experiment's trigger system in 2010. The LHC is designed with a maximum bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the ATLAS trigger system is designed to record approximately 200 of these per second. The trigger system selects events by rapidly identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. An overview of the ATLAS trigger system, the evolution of the system during 2010 and the performance of the trigger system components and selections based on the 2010 collision data are shown. A brief outline of plans for the trigger system in 2011 is presented

The ATLAS Collaboration

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Preparation of Northern Mid-Contient Petroleum Atlas.  

SciTech Connect

As proposed, the second year program will continue and expand upon the Kansas elements of the original program, and provide improved on-line access to the prototype atlas. The second year of the program will result in a prototype digital atlas sufficient to demonstrate the approach and provide a permanent improvement in data access to Kansas operators. The ultimate goal of providing an interactive history-matching interface with a regional data base remains for future development as the program covers more geographic territory and the data base expands. The long-term goal is to expand beyond the prototype atlas to include significant reservoirs representing the major plays in Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, the Williston basin portion of Montana, the Denver-Julesberg basin of eastern Colorado and southeastern Colorado.

Gerhard, L.C.; Carr, T.R.; Watney, W.L.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Directory Resource Directory The guidance documents and reports below have been used by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners to build their programs and guide them to early successes. The tools and calculators can be used by homeowners, business owners, and program designers to help determine energy savings and other benefits associated with energy efficiency upgrades. Guidance Documents and Reports Background Program Evaluation Program Updates and Lessons Learned Program Design Marketing and Driving Demand Financing and Incentives Workforce Development Partnering with Utilities Technical Resources Tools and Calculators For Homes For Commercial Buildings Emissions and Equivalency Calculators Guidance Documents and Reports Background Recovery Through Retrofit Report

329

Reading Comprehension - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the planet Earth. Food, water, and sunlight are all examples of a natural resource unnatural resource science resource . A natural resource is a material found in...

330

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

331

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/atlasIII/2010atlasII Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/2010-carbon-sequestration-atlas-unite Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships This atlas updates the carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration potential for the United States and Canada, and it provides updated information on field activities of the regional carbon sequestration partnerships (RCSPs). In

332

Florida's 22nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2nd congressional district: Energy Resources 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Florida. Registered Energy Companies in Florida's 22nd congressional district AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd Advanced Green Technologies Apollo Energy Systems Inc Atlas Solar Innovations BTX Holdings Inc Biomass Resources Corporation China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc Citrus Energy LLC Cyclone Power Technologies Inc Ener1 Inc EnerFuel Energy 5 0 Energy 5 0 LLC Enerize Corp Florida Power and Light Company Hydro Alternative Energy Kitson Partners Lone Star Transmission LLC NanoEner Technologies NextEra Energy Resources formerly FPL Energy LLC

333

Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Commissioning of the ATLAS reconstruction software with first data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Looking towards first LHC collisions, the ATLAS detector is being commissioned using the physics data available: cosmic rays and data taken during the LHC single beam operations at 450 GeV. During the installation of the ATLAS detector in the cavern, cosmic rays were collected with the different parts of the detector that were available. Combined cosmic runs taken with the full installed detector with and without magnetic field as well as a few single beam events recently recorded are being used to commission the full system prior to the first proton collisions.

Maria Moreno Llacer

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Opportunities for Use and Development of Collaborative Tools in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents an assessment of the current and expected needs of the ATLAS Collaboration in the development, deployment, usage, and maintenance of collaborative tools to facilitate its internal and external communications, member training, education, and public outreach. It is prepared in response to a request by the ATLAS management to investigate these needs, to survey the current status, and to propose solutions where needed. We conclude the document with a set of recommendations designed to address selected immediate needs and to position the Collaboration for the anticipated growing demands for collaborative tools in a Grid-enabled analysis environment.

Goldfarb, S; McKee, S P; Neal, H A; Finholt, T A; Olson, G M; Birnholtz, J P; Hofer, E; Storr, M; Vitaglione, G; Hardin, J B; Severance, C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ATLAS RPC Quality Assurance results at INFN Lecce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main results of the quality assurance tests performed on the Resistive Plate Chamber used by the ATLAS experiment at LHC as muon trigger chambers are reported and discussed. Since July 2004, about 270 RPC units has been certified at INFN Lecce site and delivered to CERN, for being integrated in the final muon station of the ATLAS barrel region. We show the key RPC characteristics which qualify the performance of this detector technology as muon trigger chamber in the harsh LHC enviroments. These are dark current, chamber efficiency, noise rate, gas volume tomography, and gas leakage.

Bianco, M; Cataldi, G; Cazzato, A; Chiodini, G; Coluccia, M R; Creti, P; Grancagnolo, F; Perrino, R; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Tassielli, G F; Ventura, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes progress in the second year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is providing advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. Data is being assembled to analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration potential from a single object (e.g., power plant or well) to a region and across geographic boundaries. The MIDCARB system is robust and capable of being updated from multiple sources on a daily basis. The MIDCARB project has developed improved online tools to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The MIDCARB project is a functional template for distributed data systems to address CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas. The system links together data from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microsoft PowerPoint - CJC_ATLAS09 [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transfer using RIB + transfer using RIB + 7 Li ti t ATLAS reactions at ATLAS W. B. Walters, C. J. Chiara ATLAS Workshop 8 August 2009 * Investigation of single-particle and i l h l t t single-hole states in neutron-rich nuclei e g near nuclei, e.g. near N=82 (energies, spins parities ) spins, parities...). * Idea presented here is "borrowed", but serves as a reminder of how recently developed techniques y p q can be extended to future ATLAS use. Pioneering work by D. C. Radford: highly selective study of n transfer to RIB. 9 Be( 134 Te, 8 Be) 135 Te at 4 MeV/A, 4x10 5 ions/s; CLARION + HyBall at HRIBF 8 B b k i t 2 l i l i ti l d t t 8 Be breaks up into 2α-a clean signal in particle detector. γ spectrum gated by 2α i H

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341

Photon and di-photon production at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The latest ATLAS measurements of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV at the LHC are presented, as well as the measurement of the di-photon production cross section.

Marco Delmastro

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

342

Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO-AND MESOSCALE MODELLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO- AND MESOSCALE MODELLING Niels G. Mortensen1 , Jens Enevoldsen Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Laila Georgy Youssef, Usama Said Said, Ashour Abd El-Salam Moussa, Mohammad Akmal Mahmoud Wind Energy Department, New and Renewable

344

Searching for Black Holes with the ATLAS Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models with extra spacial dimensions offer a new way to address problems in the Standard Model. The most spectacular manifestation of these would be the production and decay of microscopic black holes. The outlook and potential of the ATLAS detector at the LHC to discover and measure black holes in models with large extra dimensions is presented.

Frost, James [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Performance and Improvements of the ATLAS Jet Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the harsh conditions of the LHC, with proton bunches colliding every 50 ns and up to 40 pp interactions per bunch crossing, the ATLAS trigger system has to be flexible to maintaining an unbiased efficiency for a wide variety of physics studies while providing a fast rejection of non-interesting events. Jets are the most commonly produced objects at the LHC, essential for many physics measurements that range from precise QCD studies to searches for New Physics beyond the Standard Model, or even unexpected physics signals. The ATLAS jet trigger is the primary mean for selecting events with high pT jets and its good performance is fundamental to achieve the physics goals of ATLAS. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one (L1) being hardware based, with a 2 ?s latency, and the two following ones (called collectively High Level Triggers or HLT) being softwared based with larger processing times. It was designed to work in a Region of Interest (RoI) based approach, where the second lev...

Conde Muino, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Livelihood Assets Atlas Mountainous Districts of NWFP (Pakistan)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livelihood Assets Atlas Mountainous Districts of NWFP (Pakistan) April 2009 SDPISustainable Mountainous Districts of NWFP (Pakistan) Abid Qaiyum Suleri, Babar Shahbaz, Sahab Haq Rana Nazir Mehmood and Gulbaz Ali Khan Sustainable Development Policy Institute 20 Hill Road, F-6/3, Islamabad - Pakistan www

Richner, Heinz

347

Executive Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Executive Resources Division provides integrated executive policy and operational personnel support services in a centralized location to the Senior Executive Service (SES), Senior-Level (SL), Scientific and Professional (ST), Excepted Service and political appointees. Additional SES information can be found on the SES website which is located on the Office of Personnel Managements (OPM) website.

348

Wind and Solar Resource Assessment of Sri Lanka and the Maldives (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Solar Resource Assessment of Sri Lanka and the Maldives CD contains an electronic version of Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Sri Lanka and the Maldives (NREL/TP-500-34518), Solar Resource Assessment for Sri Lanka and the Maldives (NREL/TO-710-34645), Sri Lanka Wind Farm Analysis and Site Selection Assistance (NREL/SR-500-34646), GIS Data Viewer (software and data files with a readme file), and Hourly Solar and Typical Meteorological Year Data with a readme file.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Failure Atlas for Rolling Bearings in Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T.E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2nd edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The content of the atlas comprises plate pages from the book that contain bearing failure images, application data, and descriptions of failure mode, image, and suspected failure causes. Rolling bearings are a critical component of the mainshaft system, gearbox and generator in the rapidly developing technology of power generating wind turbines. The demands for long service life are stringent; the design load, speed and temperature regimes are demanding and the environmental conditions including weather, contamination, impediments to monitoring and maintenance are often unfavorable. As a result, experience has shown that the rolling bearings are prone to a variety of failure modes that may prevent achievement of design lives. Morphological failure diagnosis is extensively used in the failure analysis and improvement of bearing operation. Accumulated experience shows that the failure appearance and mode of failure causation in wind turbine bearings has many distinguishing features. The present Atlas is a first effort to collect an interpreted database of specifically wind turbine related rolling bearing failures and make it widely available. This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T. E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2d edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The main body of that book is a comprehensive collection of self-contained pages called Plates, containing failure images, bearing and application data, and three descriptions: failure mode, image and suspected failure causes. The Plates are sorted by main failure mode into chapters. Each chapter is preceded by a general technical discussion of the failure mode, its appearance and causes. The Plates part is supplemented by an introductory part, describing the appearance classification and failure classification systems used, and by several indexes. The present Atlas is intended as a supplement to the book. It has the same structure but contains only Plate pages, arranged in chapters, each with a chapter heading page giving a short definition of the failure mode illustrated. Each Plate page is self contained, with images, bearing and application data, and descriptions of the failure mode, the images and the suspected causes. Images are provided in two resolutions: The text page includes 6 by 9 cm images. In addition, high resolution image files are attached, to be retrieved by clicking on their 'push pin' icon. While the material in the present Atlas is self-contained, it is nonetheless a supplement to the book and the complete interpretation of the terse image descriptions and of the system underlying the failure code presupposes familiarity with the book. Since this Atlas is a supplement to the book, its chapter numbering follows that of the book. Not all failure modes covered in the book have been found among the observed wind turbines. For that reason, and because of the omission of introductory matter, the chapter numbers in this Atlas are not a continuous sequence.

Tallian, T. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The European Solar Radiation Atlas 1 Page J., M. Albuisson, L. Wald, 2001. The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy, 71, 81-83, 2001.1 The European Solar Radiation Atlas Author manuscript, published in "Solar Energy 71, 1 (2001) 81-83" DOI : 10.1016/S0038-092X(00)00157-2 #12 provided address the four most widely developed solar energy applications using simplified design methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

351

arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControl...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

arcControlTower, the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract content Panda, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the panda server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with t...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

ProgramTopics Resource assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessments + BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas + Bioenergy KDF + Biomass Energy Data Book + Biomass Scenario Model + Building Component Library + CLIMWAT 2.0 + Previous Results...

354

Image Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

355

Teacher Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources Teacher Programs JLab Science Activities for Teachers - An afternoon science program for 5th, 6th and 8th grade teachers. [Program Dates: September 2013 - May 2014] Teacher Night at Jefferson Lab - Teacher Night will be held on April 2nd, 2014. Please sign-up by March 19th, 2014! Education Events Physics Fest - Cryogenics, electricity and more! Reserve your space today! Science Series - Science lectures for high school and middle school students! [Video Archive] Education Events Mailing List - An electronic mailing list to keep you informed of Jefferson Lab's public education events! Workshops and Local Groups The Virginia Section of the American Nuclear Society - Single and multi-day workshops on the science of nuclear energy and radiation.

356

Teacher Resource Center: Fermilab Web Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Web Resources Fermilab Web Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The following materials are on the webserver. Fermilab Resources for Students - You might bookmark some of these resources to give your students easy access to information. Fermilab Resources for Students - You might bookmark some of these resources to give your students easy access to information. Photographs and video clips from Fermilab's Visual Media Services

357

Florida's 23rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rd congressional district: Energy Resources rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Florida. Registered Energy Companies in Florida's 23rd congressional district AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd Advanced Green Technologies Apollo Energy Systems Inc Atlas Solar Innovations BTX Holdings Inc Biomass Resources Corporation China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc Cyclone Power Technologies Inc Ener1 Inc EnerFuel Energy 5 0 Energy 5 0 LLC Enerize Corp Gamma Solar Corporation Kitson Partners LPG Electrical, Inc NanoEner Technologies Renewable Spirits LLC Silescent Lighting Corp Southeast Renewable Fuels LLC SRF Registered Financial Organizations in Florida's 23rd congressional district

358

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. Risk has two components: (1) The likelihood, or probability, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential consequence if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, consequence, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Properties of Jets Measured with Charged Particles with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 The Large Hadron Collider and ATLAS3.1 The Large Hadron Collider Complex . . . . . . . .of QCD at the Large Hadron Collider. These improvements will

Zenz, Seth Conrad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GIS Data from the 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas of the United States and Canada. Source National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Date Released August 12th, 2008 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords canada...

362

GIS Data from the 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas of the United States and Canada. Source National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Date Released August 08th, 2008 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords canada...

363

Search for the Higgs Boson in the Vector Boson Fusion Channel at the ATLAS Detector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The search for the Higgs boson has been a cornerstone of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva Switzerland. The ATLAS experiment (more)

Ouellette, Eric Alexandre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC December 14-15, 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 22-23, 2013 November 22-23, 2013 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II experiments that cannot be scheduled during the present cycle will have to be resubmitted at the next PAC meeting. It is our intention to try as hard as possible to schedule a full experimental program and to accommodate as many, if not all, of the priority II experiments.

365

Heat exchangers in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Liquid Argon Calorimeter plays a central role in the future ATLAS detector at LHC. It is built from two end-caps and one barrel, housed in three separated cryostats. While operating, the cryostats will be filled with liquid argon at a temperature of approximately 87 K. Before the cryostats are filled with liquid argon, the calorimeter must be cooled down from ambient temperature to the temperature of filling. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter will be cooled down at least twice. First in the CERN West Area for cold tests, and a second time in its final position in the underground cavern of the ATLAS detector. Estimation of the cool-down time is therefore of significance.This diploma thesis evaluates the cool-down time of the Barrel Liquid Argon Calorimeter, which is defined as the time needed to cool down from ambient temperature to the temperature in which the cryostat can be filled with liquid argon...

Korperud, N

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The ECR heavy-ion source for ATLAS  

SciTech Connect

The ATLAS PII-ECR ion source is the first ECR ion source to be designed for operation in a high voltage platform. The source system is required to provide beams of heavy ions with a velocity of 0.01c for subsequent acceleration by the superconducting ATLAS Positive Ion Injector Linac. At present, the ability of the system to provide high charge state ions with velocities up to .01c is probably unique and as such has generated significant interest in the atomic physics community. A beamline for atomic physics has been installed and is now in use. The source began operation in October, 1987. The source capabilities and operating experiences to date will be discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Pardo, R.C.; Billquist, P.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

ATLAS reach for Quarkonium cross section and polarization measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC is preparing to take data from the first proton-proton collisions expected in the next few months. We report on the analysis of simulated data samples for production of heavy Quarkonium states J/psi and Upsilon, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 pb^-1 with center of mass energy of 14 TeV expected at the early ATLAS data. We review various aspects of prompt Quarkonium production at LHC: the accessible ranges in transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, spin alignment of vector states, separation of color octet and color singlet production mechanism and feasibility of observing radiative decays Xi_c and Xi_b decays. Strategies of various measurements are outlined and methods of separating promptly produced J/psi and Upsilon mesons from various backgrounds are discussed.

Etzion, Erez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Quarkonium production and polarization with early data at ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC is preparing to take data from the first proton-proton collisions expected in the next few months. We report on the analysis of simulated data samples for production of heavy Quarqonium states J/?->μμ and Υ->μμ, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 pb-1 with center of mass energy of 14 TeV expected at the early ATLAS data. The report will review various aspects of prompt Quarqonium production at LHC: the accessible ranges in transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, spin alignment of vector states, separation of color octet and color singlet production mechanism and feasibility of observing radiative decays of ? c and ? b decays. Strategies of various measurements are outlined and methods of separating promptly produced J/? and Υ mesons from various backgrounds are discussed.

Etzion, Erez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ATLAS reach for Quarkonium production and polarization measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC is preparing to take data from the first proton-proton collisions expected in the next few months. We report on the analysis of simulated data samples for production of heavy Quarkonium states J/psi and Upsilon, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 pb^-1 with center of mass energy of 14 TeV expected at the early ATLAS data. We review various aspects of prompt Quarkonium production at LHC: the accessible ranges in transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, spin alignment of vector states, separation of color octet and color singlet production mechanism and feasibility of observing radiative decays Xi_c and Xi_b decays. Strategies of various measurements are outlined and methods of separating promptly produced J/psi and Upsilon mesons from various backgrounds are discussed.

Etzion, Erez; 8th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm and Beauty Hadrons

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Design and Performance of the ATLAS jet trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS jet trigger, in combination with other triggers, provides an important ingredient to studies of Standard Model physics and searches for new physics at the LHC. The ATLAS jet trigger system has undergone substantial modifications over the past few years of LHC operations, as experience developed with triggering in a high luminosity and high event pileup environment. In particular, the region-of-interest (ROI) based strategy has been replaced by a full scan of the calorimeter data at the third trigger level, and by a full scan of the level-1 trigger input at level-2 for some specific trigger chains. Hadronic calibration and cleaning techniques are applied in order to provide improved performance and increased stability in high luminosity data taking conditions. In this presentation we describe the structure and performance of the jet trigger in recent data taking conditions.

Rubbo, F; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Preparation of Northern Mid-Continent Petroleum Atlas  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the fourth year of the Digital Petroleum Atlas (DPA) Project. The DPA is a longterm effort to develop a new methodology for efficient and timely access to the latest petroleum data and technology for the domestic oil and gas industry, research organizations and local governmental units. The DPA is a new and evolving approach to generating and publishing petroleum reservoir, field, play and basin studies.

Gerhard, Lee C.; Carr, Timothy R.; Watney, W. Lynn

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Physics at a High-Luminosity LHC with ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics accessible at the high-luminosity phase of the LHC extends well beyond that of the earlier LHC program. This white paper, submitted as input to the Snowmass Community Planning Study 2013, contains preliminary studies of selected topics, spanning from Higgs boson studies to new particle searches and rare top quark decays. They illustrate the substantially enhanced physics reach with an increased integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1, and motivate the planned upgrades of the LHC machine and ATLAS detector.

ATLAS Collaboration

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Prospects to measure the Higgs boson properties in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As soon as a significant signal in one of the Higgs boson discovery channels is observed, it will be important to establish its nature. To do this, a precise measurements of its properties is important. In this article the prospects to measure the Higgs boson mass, width, spin and CP-quantum numbers, couplings to the known Standard Model particles and self-couplings by the ATLAS experiment are summarized. 1

A. Dahlhoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electron and Photon Reconstruction and Identification with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the reconstruction and identification of electrons and photons in the ATLAS detector is presented. Electrons and photons are crucial for both a thorough understanding of the detector and physics studies. An electrons identification efficiency of 64% can be reached for a jet rejection of 10^5. The electromagnetic energy scale can be estimated with a permil accuracy. The reconstruction process is described along with the identification and calibration techniques developed to obtain the required performance.

Turlay, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

376

Energy Basics: Hydropower Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Hydropower Resources...

377

The ATLAS PanDA Pilot in Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) [1-2] was designed to meet ATLAS [3] requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. Submitted jobs are executed on worker nodes by pilot jobs sent to the grid sites by pilot factories. This paper provides an overview of the PanDA pilot [4] system and presents major features added in light of recent operational experience, including multi-job processing, advanced job recovery for jobs with output storage failures, gLExec [5-6] based identity switching from the generic pilot to the actual user, and other security measures. The PanDA system serves all ATLAS distributed processing and is the primary system for distributed analysis; it is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing real LHC data on the OSG [7], EGI [8] and Nordugrid [9-10] infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its evolution.

Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Maeno, T; Stradling, A; Wenaus, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A new ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade project.  

SciTech Connect

The ATLAS facility provides beams of essentially all stable isotopes at energies above the Coulomb barrier for nuclear physics research. We have developed a two-stage ATLAS upgrade plan which includes the replacement of aging split-ring cavities by high-performance quarter-wave resonators (QWR) capable of accelerating {approx}100 p{mu}A ion beams. The first stage of the upgrade project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act includes accelerator efficiency increase by adding a new RFQ injector, development and construction of a new cryomodule containing up to 3 SC solenoids and 8 QWRs. A new 72.75 MHz resonator is designed for an optimum ion velocity {beta} = 0.075. To achieve record high accelerating voltage {approx}2.5 MV at this very low velocity range, EM properties of the resonator are highly optimized to reduce peak surface fields. The resonator will be equipped with a piezoelectric fast tuner and capacitive coupler to transmit several kilowatts of RF power. The vast experience gained during the development, commissioning and operation of the ATLAS energy upgrade cryomodule [1] will be applied for the design of the new cryomodule.

Ostroumov, P. N.; Fuerst, J. D.; Kelly, M. P.; Mustapha, B.; Shepard, K. W.; Xu, J.; Physics

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The ATLAS High Level Trigger Configuration and Steering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In March 2010 the four LHC experiments saw the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Still within the year a collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. At ATLAS, events of potential interest for ATLAS physics are selected by a three level trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first level (L1) is implemented in customized hardware, the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers. Within the ATLAS physics program more than 500 trigger signatures are defined. The HLT tests each signature on each L1-accepted event, the test outcome is recorded for later analysis. The HLT-Steering is responsible for this. It foremost ensures the independent test of each signature, guarantying unbiased trigger decisions. Yet, to minimize data readout and execution time, cached detector data and once-calculated trigger objects are reused to form the decision. Some signature tests are performed only on a scaled-down fraction of candidate events, in order to reduce the output rate a...

Stelzer, J; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Implementation And Performance of the ATLAS Second Level Jet Trigger  

SciTech Connect

ATLAS is one of the four major LHC experiments, designed to cover a wide range of physics topics. In order to cope with a rate of 40MHz and 25 interactions per bunch crossing, the ATLAS trigger system is divided in three different levels. The jet selection starts at first level with dedicated processors that search for high E{sub T} hadronic energy depositions. At the LVL2, the jet signatures are verified with the execution of a dedicated, fast jet reconstruction algorithm, followed by a calibration algorithm. Three possible granularities have been proposed and are being evaluated: cell based (standard), energy sums calculated at each Front-End Board and the use of the LVL1 Trigger Towers. In this presentation, the design and implementation of the jet trigger of ATLAS will be discussed in detail, emphasazing the major difficulties of each selection step. The performance of the jet algorithm, including timing, efficiencies and rates will also be shown, with detailed comparisons of the different unpacking modes.

Conde Muino, Patricia; /Lisbon, LIFEP; Aracena, I.; /SLAC; Brelier, B.; /Montreal U.; Cranmer, K.; /Brookhaven; Delsart, P.A.; /Montreal U.; Dufour, M.A.; /McGill U.; Eckweiler, S.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Ferland, J.; /Montreal U.; Idarraga, J.; /Montreal U.; Johns, K.; /Arizona U.; LeCompte, T.; /Argonne; Potter, C.; Robertson, S.; Santamarina Rios, C.; /McGill U.; Segura, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Silverstein, D.; /SLAC; Vachon, B.; /McGill U.

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained using the ATLAS readout, data acquisition, and reconstruction software indicate that the liquid argon calorimeter is well-prepared for collisions at the dawn of the LHC era.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Fast Hardware Tracker for the ATLAS Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hadron collider experiments, triggering the detector to store interesting events for offline analysis is a challenge due to the high rates and multiplicities of particles produced. Maintaining high trigger efficiency for the physics we are most interested in while at the same time suppressing high rate physics from inclusive QCD processes is a difficult but important problem. It is essential that the trigger system be flexible and robust, with sufficient redundancy and operating margin. Providing high quality track reconstruction over the full ATLAS detector by the start of processing at LVL2 is an important element to achieve these needs. As the instantaneous luminosity increases, the computational load on the LVL2 system will significantly increase due to the need for more sophisticated algorithms to suppress backgrounds. The Fast Tracker (FTK) is a proposed upgrade to the ATLAS trigger system. It is designed to enable early rejection of background events and thus leave more LVL2 execution time by moving track reconstruction into a hardware system that takes massively parallel processing to the extreme. The FTK system completes global track reconstruction with near offline resolution shortly after the start of LVL2 processing by rapidly finding and fitting tracks in the inner detector for events passing LVL1 using pattern recognition from a large, pre-computed bank of possible hit patterns. We describe the FTK system design and expected performance in the areas of b-tagging, {\\tau}-tagging, and lepton isolation which play and important role in the ATLAS physics program.

Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

BudkerINP contribution to the ATLAS TDAQ SysAdmin group activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure · ATLAS TDAQ SysAdmin Group Activities ­ IT infrastructure management technologies involved and maintenance of the computing infrastructure, ­ commissioning of new hardware items. · All these tasks Coordination, CERN IT Department) dealing with other aspects of maintenance and operation of ATLAS experiment

384

Links between Indo-Pacific climate variability and drought in the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Links between Indo-Pacific climate variability and drought in the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas Abstract Drought patterns across monsoon and temper- ate Asia over the period 1877­2005 are linked to Indo Dipole (IOD). Using the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas (MADA) composed of a high-resolution network

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

385

Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 200406 Ocean Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together they form a full ...

Gal Forget

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential December 21, 2012 - 9:58am Addthis Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department’s seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here. Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). See this map here.

387

ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

Shawn McKee

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

389

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

390

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

391

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

392

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

393

OpenEI:Projects/Public Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This page is used to coordinate the plans to collect energy data, tools, This page is used to coordinate the plans to collect energy data, tools, models, and other digital assets (that have appropriate licensing terms) within OpenEI. Contents 1 Goals, Tips, and Strategies 2 Inventory of Specific Resources 3 Inventory of General Sources 4 Inventory of Potential Sources 5 Others (Quick Links) 6 Data from the 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada (by NETL) 7 NREL GIS Data 8 SWERA GIS and TMY Data (often NREL or others are original source) 9 See Also 10 Participants Goals, Tips, and Strategies We met our goal for December 2010 -- 100 datasets -- and we surpassed it!. Let's continue to add datasets available in the lists below, including the "General Resources" list. We still want to identify and keep track of NREL

394

Illinois' 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Illinois. Registered Networking Organizations in Illinois' 3rd congressional district Chicago Clean Energy Alliance Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 3rd congressional district Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co Brad Foote Gear Works CNT Energy Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Carbon Opportunity Group Carbon Solutions Group Centre for Neighbourhood Technology Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Chromatin Inc

395

Illinois' 5th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5th congressional district: Energy Resources 5th congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Illinois. Registered Networking Organizations in Illinois' 5th congressional district Chicago Clean Energy Alliance Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 5th congressional district Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co CNT Energy Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Carbon Opportunity Group Carbon Solutions Group Centre for Neighbourhood Technology Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Chromatin Inc Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA)

396

Illinois' 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2nd congressional district: Energy Resources 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Illinois. Registered Networking Organizations in Illinois' 2nd congressional district Chicago Clean Energy Alliance Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 2nd congressional district Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co CNT Energy Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Carbon Opportunity Group Carbon Solutions Group Centre for Neighbourhood Technology Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Chromatin Inc Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA)

397

Current/performance scaling studies for the Atlas project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atlas is a high energy pulse power facility being built at Los Alamos to enhance the ability to address issues relevant to the Department of Energy`s stockpile stewardship program. Projected to be operational by 1999, Atlas is designed to deliver between forty to fifty megaamperes of current to an imploding cylindrical load, nominally a 70 gram aluminum liner. Because of the current levels and the energy densities generated, much consideration has been given to the type of transmission line required to deliver current to the load. The merits and disadvantages of several designs have been studied and debated over the past year. As part of this study the authors have investigated the effect of changes in machine inductance on liner performance. Typically, whenever one tries to reduce inductance in order to increase current, the engineering design for a machine becomes more stringent. To address the issue of making changes in transmission line (TL) inductance they have used a one-dimensional MHD model to calculate the peak velocities for an aluminum liner, and the maximum pressures that can be generated when the liner impacts an aluminum target. The thicknesses and radii of the lines have been optimized for a range of transmission line inductances that corresponds to the two principal proposed TL concepts. For these simulations they define performance to relate to the pressures generated in the target, although for some experiments this may not be the best indicator. The results indicate that an increase in inductance of x% results in a decrease in target pressure of approximately x/2%. The two primary designs for the Atlas transmission line differ in inductance by 35%, implying a difference in performance of 17%, with the lower inductance design generating the higher pressure in the target.

Keinigs, R.; Lee, H.; Trainor, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ATLAS measurements of minimum bias and soft QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first measurements of charged particle production in proton?proton collisions at center?of?mass energy s ?=?900? GeV and 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Minimum bias distributions are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |?| 500? MeV and compared with the predictions from various Monte Carlo models. Activity in the underlying event was measured with respect to the highest p T track in the event. Both the minimum bias and underlying event measurements are fully corrected for detector effects to obtain distributions at the hadron level.

Maaike Limper; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ATLAS and CMS hints for a mirror Higgs boson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ATLAS and CMS have provided hints for the existence of a Higgs-like particle with mass of about 144 GeV with production cross section into standard decay channels which is about 50% that of the standard model Higgs boson. We show that this 50% suppression is exactly what the mirror matter model predicts when the two scalar mass eigenstates, each required to be maximal admixtures of a standard and mirror-Higgs boson, are separated in mass by more than their decay widths but less than the experimental resolution. We discuss prospects for the future confirmation of this interesting hint for nonstandard Higgs physics.

Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed study is presented of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction of tracks, leptons, photons, missing energy and jets is investigated, together with the performance of b-tagging and the trigger. The physics potential for a variety of interesting physics processes, within the Standard Model and beyond, is examined. The study comprises a series of notes based on simulations of the detector and physics processes, with particular emphasis given to the data expected from the first years of operation of the LHC at CERN.

The ATLAS Collaboration; G. Aad; E. Abat; B. Abbott; J. Abdallah; A. A. Abdelalim; A. Abdesselam; O. Abdinov; B. Abi; M. Abolins; H. Abramowicz; B. S. Acharya; D. L. Adams; T. N. Addy; C. Adorisio; P. Adragna; T. Adye; J. A. Aguilar-Saavedra; M. Aharrouche; S. P. Ahlen; F. Ahles; A. Ahmad; H. Ahmed; G. Aielli; T. Akdogan; T. P. A. Akesson; G. Akimoto; M. S. Alam; M. A. Alam; J. Albert; S. Albrand; M. Aleksa; I. N. Aleksandrov; F. Alessandria; C. Alexa; G. Alexander; G. Alexandre; T. Alexopoulos; M. Alhroob; G. Alimonti; J. Alison; M. Aliyev; P. P. Allport; S. E. Allwood-Spiers; A. Aloisio; R. Alon; A. Alonso; J. Alonso; M. G. Alviggi; K. Amako; P. Amaral; C. Amelung; V. V. Ammosov; A. Amorim; G. Amoros; N. Amram; C. Anastopoulos; C. F. Anders; K. J. Anderson; A. Andreazza; V. Andrei; M-L. Andrieux; X. S. Anduaga; F. Anghinolfi; A. Antonaki; M. Antonelli; S. Antonelli; B. Antunovic; F. A. Anulli; G. Arabidze; I. Aracena; Y. Arai; A. T. H. Arce; J. P. Archambault; S. Arfaoui; J-F. Arguin; T. Argyropoulos; E. Arik; M. Arik; A. J. Armbruster; O. Arnaez; C. Arnault; A. Artamonov; D. Arutinov; M. Asai; S. Asai; S. Ask; B. Asman; D. Asner; L. Asquith; K. Assamagan; A. Astbury; A. Astvatsatourov; T. Atkinson; G. Atoian; B. Auerbach; E. Auge; K. Augsten; M. A. Aurousseau; N. Austin; G. Avolio; R. Avramidou; A. Axen; C. Ay; G. Azuelos; Y. Azuma; M. A. Baak; G. Baccaglioni; C. Bacci; H. Bachacou; K. Bachas; M. Backes; E. Badescu; P. Bagnaia; Y. Bai; D. C. Bailey; J. T. Baines; O. K. Baker; F. Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa; E. Banas; S. Banerjee; D. Banfi; A. Bangert; V. Bansal; S. P. Baranov; S. Baranov; A. Barashkou; T. B. Barber; E. L. Barberio; D. Barberis; M. B. Barbero; D. Y. Bardin; T. Barillari; M. Barisonzi; T. Barklow; N. B. Barlow; B. M. Barnett; R. M. Barnett; S. Baron; A. Baroncelli; A. J. Barr; F. Barreiro; J. Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa; P. Barrillon; R. Bartoldus; D. Bartsch; J. Bastos; R. L. Bates; J. R. Batley; A. Battaglia; M. Battistin; F. Bauer; M. Bazalova; B. Beare; P. H. Beauchemin; R. B. Beccherle; N. Becerici; P. Bechtle; G. A. Beck; H. P. Beck; M. Beckingham; K. H. Becks; I. Bedajanek; A. J. Beddall; A. Beddall; P. Bednar; V. A. Bednyakov; C. Bee; S. Behar Harpaz; P. K. Behera; M. Beimforde; C. Belanger-Champagne; P. J. Bell; W. H. Bell; G. Bella; L. Bellagamba; F. Bellina; M. Bellomo; A. Belloni; K. Belotskiy; O. Beltramello; S. Ben Ami; O. Benary; D. Benchekroun; M. Bendel; B. H. Benedict; N. Benekos; Y. Benhammou; G. P. Benincasa; D. P. Benjamin; M. Benoit; J. R. Bensinger; K. Benslama; S. Bentvelsen; M. Beretta; D. Berge; E. Bergeaas Kuutmann; N. Berger; F. Berghaus; E. Berglund; J. Beringer; K. Bernardet; P. Bernat; R. Bernhard; C. Bernius; T. Berry; A. Bertin; N. Besson; S. Bethke; R. M. Bianchi; M. Bianco; O. Biebel; J. Biesiada; M. Biglietti; H. Bilokon; S. Binet; A. Bingul; C. Bini; C. Biscarat; M. Bischofberger; U. Bitenc; K. M. Black; R. E. Blair; G. Blanchot; C. Blocker; J. Blocki; A. Blondel; W. Blum; U. Blumenschein; C. Boaretto; G. J. Bobbink; A. Bocci; B. Bodine; J. Boek; N. Boelaert; S. Boeser; J. A. Bogaerts; A. Bogouch; C. Bohm; J. Bohm; V. Boisvert; T. Bold; V. Boldea; V. G. Bondarenko; M. Bondioli; M. Boonekamp; C. N. Booth; P. S. L. Booth; J. R. A. Booth; A. Borisov; G. Borissov; I. Borjanovic; S. Borroni; K. Bos; D. Boscherini; M. Bosman; M. Bosteels; H. Boterenbrood; J. Bouchami; J. Boudreau; E. V. Bouhova-Thacker; C. Boulahouache; C. Bourdarios; J. Boyd; I. R. Boyko; A. Braem; P. Branchini; G. W. Brandenburg; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; U. Bratzler; J. E. Brau; H. M. Braun; B. Brelier; J. Bremer; R. Brenner; S. Bressler; D. Breton; N. D. Brett; D. Britton; F. M. Brochu; I. Brock; R. Brock; E. Brodet; F. Broggi; G. Brooijmans; W. K. Brooks; E. Brubaker; P. A. Bruckman de Renstrom; D. Bruncko; R. Bruneliere; S. Brunet; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; M. Bruschi; T. Buanes; F. B. Bucci; P. Buchholz; A. G. Buckley; I. A. Budagov; V. Buescher; L. Bugge; F. Bujor; O. Bulekov; M. Bunse; T. Buran; H. Burckhart; S. Burdin; S. Burke; E. Busato; C. P. Buszello; F. Butin; B. Butler; J. M. Butler; C. M. Buttar; J. M. Butterworth; T. Byatt; S. Cabrera Urban; D. Caforio; O. Cakir; P. Calafiura; G. Calderini; R. Calkins; L. P. Caloba; R. Caloi; D. Calvet; P. Camarri; M. Cambiaghi; D. Cameron; F. Campabadal Segura; S. Campana; M. Campanelli; V. Canale; J. Cantero; M. D. M. Capeans Garrido; I. Caprini; M. Caprini; M. Capua; R. Caputo; C. Caramarcu; R. Cardarelli; T. Carli; G. Carlino; L. Carminati; B. Caron; S. Caron; S. Carron Montero; A. A. Carter; J. R. Carter; J. Carvalho; D. Casadei; M. P. Casado; M. Cascella; C. Caso; A. M. Castaneda Hernadez; E. Castaneda Miranda; V. Castillo Gimenez; N. F. Castro; G. Cataldi; A. Catinaccio; J. R. Catmore; A. Cattai; G. Cattani; S. Caughron; D. Cauz; P. Cavalleri; D. Cavalli; M. Cavalli-Sforza

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Clean Cities: Information Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Publications Technical Assistance Information Resources Learn about Clean Cities by exploring these information resources. Publications View Clean Cities-branded publications or search for publications about alternative fuels and vehicles. Technical Assistance Learn about technical assistance available to help organizations overcome

402

NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Solar Resource Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Resource Data The following solar resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Cooperative Networks for Renewable Resource...

403

K-12 school resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

404

Sector-specific resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

405

Grocery & convenience stores resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

406

The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of the DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility was designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the German NAF will be reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. The main emphasis of this presentation is the ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the different components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the German NAF will be presented. The ATLAS usage of the different components will be shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question will be addressed if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for efficient data analysis in the era of LHC data t...

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

1 The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility is designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the NAF is reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. Emphasis is put on ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the di erent components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the NAF is presented in this paper. The ATLAS usage of the di erent components are shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question is addressed, if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for effcient data analysis in the era of LHC data taking.

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources ...

409

Drivers and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drivers and Resources Regulatory Drivers National Laws Executive Orders DOE Orders and Directives Information Resources DOE P2 Web Sites Other P2 Web Sites Environmental...

410

Cultural resources GIS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cultural resources are inherently spatial entities, and the paper based inventory systems that have prevailed for cultural resources have been relatively effective at recording and (more)

Clark, Kinney E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

412

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Commissioning of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger with Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system was designed to select potentially interesting events and reduce the incoming rate to 100-200 Hz. The first trigger level (LVL1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the second and third trigger levels are realized in software. Based on calorimeter information and hits in dedicated muon-trigger detectors, the LVL1 decision is made by the central-trigger processor yielding an output rate of less than 100 kHz. The allowed latency for the trigger decision at this stage is less than 2.5 microseconds. Installation of the final LVL1 trigger system at the ATLAS site is in full swing, to be completed later this year. We present a status report of the main components of the first-level trigger and the in-situ commissioning of the full trigger chain with cosmic-ray muons.

Thilo Pauly

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Results from the commissioning of the ATLAS Pixel detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Pixel detector is a high-resolution, low-noise silicon-based device designed to provide tracking and vertexing information within a distance of 12 cm from the LHC beam axis. It consists of approximately 80 million pixel channels with radiation-hard front-end electronics connected through optical fibers to a custom-controlled DAQ system away from the detector. Following the successful installation of the detector in June 2007, an intense commissioning period was conducted in the year 2008 and more than 400,000 cosmic-ray tracks were recorded in conjunction with other ATLAS sub-detectors. By the end of the year, 96% of the detector was tuned, calibrated, and taking data at 99.8% tracking hit efficiency and with noise occupancy at the 10^-10 level. We present here the results of the commissioning, calibration, and data-taking as well as the outlook for future performance with LHC collision-based data.

J. Biesiada; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Atlas of experimentally-induced neoplasia in beagle dogs  

SciTech Connect

Beagle dogs have been utilized extensively in biomedical research. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has sponsored life-span dose-effect radiation studies in beagles at various laboratories. Because results from studies in the various laboratories were to be compared, all the investigators strove to use similar nomenclature and criteria to describe biological effects. For this reason, pathologists from these laboratories met on five occasions between 1976 and 1977 to discuss nomenclature and histologic criteria for diagnoses. At these meeting, criteria were discussed for histopathologic description of lesions in bone, liver, lung, hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, mammary gland, pituitary, testis, and thyroid. To provide further assurance of cooperation among the DOE laboratories involved, DOE organized several Task Groups in 1985, composed of staff members from the laboratories. The Task Group on Biological Effects was asked to standardize nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for pathology; this beagle pathology atlas is the result of that request. The atlas describes target organs of particular interest: lungs for radionuclides delivered by inhalation; bones for bone-seeking radionuclides; and hematopoietic and other soft tissues for external irradiation.

Dagle, G.E.; Watson, C.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An atlas of thermal data for biomass and other fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is recognized as a major source of renewable energy. In order to convert biomass energy to more useful forms, it is necessary to have accurate scientific data on the thermal properties of biomass. This Atlas has been written to supply a uniform source of that information. In the last few decades Thermal analysis (TA) tools such as thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermo mechanical analysis, etc. have become more important. The data obtained from these techniques can provide useful information in terms of reaction mechanism, kinetic parameters, thermal stability, phase transformation, heat of reaction, etc. for gas-solid and gas-liquid systems. Unfortunately, there are no ASTM standards set for the collection of these types of data using TA techniques and therefore, different investigators use different conditions which suit their requirements for measuring this thermal data. As a result, the information obtained from different laboratories is not comparable. This Atlas provides the ability to compare new laboratory results with a wide variety of related data available in the literature and helps ensure consistency in using these data.

Gaur, S.; Reed, T.B. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Atlas chamber, power flow channel, and diagnostic interface design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Atlas pulsed-power machine, presently being designed at Los Alamos, will deliver a pulse of {approximately} 45 MA, in 4--5 {micro}sec, with energies of up to 6 MJ (from a bank of 36 MJ maximum) to a load assembly, located in vacuum. Design considerations for the vacuum vessel, power flow channel from the vessel inward, are presented. In contrast to Sandia`s PBFA II-Z, where 20 MA currents and 2--2.5 MJ of energy are delivered to ({approximately} 15 mg) loads in {approximately} 100 nsec, the Atlas structures will have to be designed for longer timescales and higher energies to drive heavy lines ({approximately} 70 g). Design issues for the chamber include materials stresses, formation of (and protection from) debris and molten jets, impulse loading, and survivability and ease of replacement of internal structures. For the power flow channel designs, issues are minimizing inductance, preventing movement of conductors during and after firing, damage mitigation, reducing the cost of materials and installation, and electrical insulation. A key issue for damage mitigation is the radius within which total destruction of material objects occurs. Choices of vessel size, insulator materials, cost and ease of manufacturing, and mechanical stability issues are presently in the conceptual design phase. Typical access requirements for diagnostics (including radial and axial X-ray backlighting, flux loops, spectroscopy, interferometry, bolometry, etc.) are provided for in the design.

Wurden, G.A.; Davis, H.A.; Taylor, A.; Bowman, D.; Ballard, E.; Ney, S.; Scudder, D.; Trainor, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chicago, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co CNT Energy...

419

Business and Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business and Technical Resources. Small Business Administration. The SBA provides information on programs for starting ...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Teacher Resource Center: Science Fair Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Fair Resources Science Fair Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center collection is available for use onsite. The TRC is a member of the DuPage Library System. This list was prepared for a presentation to several regional library systems. The Science Fair and Beyond, was presented by Susan Dahl, sdahl@fnal.gov, 630-840-3094. (links checked October 27, 2009) See the 'Customized Workshops" link in the "Teacher's Lounge" for information about more workshops available through the TRC. Explore the Education Office website for other opportunities and services.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrokinetic resource atlas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Poster for the paper "A Log Service Package for the ATLAS TDAQ/DCS Group"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the poster for the paper "A new design and implementation of the ATLAS Log Service package", which has been accepted in the International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) 2010.

Murillo Garca, R; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Muon identification with the event filter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC's  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN offers unprecedented challenges to the design and construction of detectors and trigger/data acquisition systems. For ATLAS, a three level trigger system has been developed to extract interesting physics signatures with ...

Gabriella Cataldi

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Minimum Bias Measurements with the ATLAS Detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Masters thesis,1 ATLAS & LHC 1.1 Large Hadron Collider 1.2 Physics at theDetector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by Michael A.

Leyton, Michael A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Commissioning and early physics analysis with the ATLAS and CMS experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These lecture notes for graduate students and young postdocs introduce the commissioning and early physics programme of the high-transverse-momentum experiments ATLAS and CMS, operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Andreas Hoecker

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Commissioning of Particle ID at ATLAS and CMS with Early LHC Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes latest results on lepton (electron, muon and tau) and photon particle identification at the ATLAS and CMS experiments, with emphasis on how the particle identification can be validated and its performance determined using early LHC data.

T. Berger-Hryn'ova; for the ATLAS; CMS collaborations

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Fast Line-by-Line Method for Atmospheric Absorption Computations: The Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally fast line-by-line method for the determination of atmospheric absorption is described. This method is based on the creation of an Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas (4A) covering all possible plausible atmospheric ...

N. A. Scott; A. Chedin

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Atlas of the Scientific Cruises in the Gulf of California, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volumes in the Gulf of California, Mexico, 1984-1988. Atlasvolumes in the Gulf of California, Mexico, 1984-1988. Atlasvolumes in the Gulf of California, Mexico, 1984-1988. Atlas

Schwartzlose, Richard A.; Lluch-Cota, Salvador E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Septal Flash Assessment on CRT Candidates Based on Statistical Atlases of Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a complete framework for the automatic detection and quantification of abnormal heart motion patterns using Statistical Atlases of Motion built from healthy populations. The method is illustrated on CRT patients with identified ...

Nicolas Duchateau; Mathieu Craene; Etel Silva; Marta Sitges; Bart H. Bijnens; Alejandro F. Frangi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Education: Digital Resource Center -- Ceramics: Web resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glossary of cement/ceramic terminology plus high school lesson plans and resources, 0 ... WEB: Ceramic Glossary Ceramic Terminology and Abbreviations...

430

Recent results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector has to undergo significant updates at the end of the current decade, in order to withstand the increased occupancy and radiation damage that will be produced by the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. In this presentation we give an overview of the recent accomplishments of the R&D activity on the planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS Inner Detector upgrade.

Giovanni Marchiori; for the ATLAS Upgrade PPS Collaboration

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Results from the Commissioning of the ATLAS Pixel Detector with Cosmic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. With approximately 80 million readout channels, the ATLAS silicon pixel detector is a high-acceptance, high-resolution, low-noise tracking device. Providing the desired refinement in charged track pattern recognition capability in order to meet the stringent track reconstruction requirements, the pixel detector largely defines the ability of ATLAS to effectively resolve primary and secondary vertices and perform efficient flavor tagging essential for discovery of new physics. Being the last sub-system installed in ATLAS by July 2007, the pixel detector was successfully connected, commissioned, and tested in situ while meeting an extremely tight schedule, and was ready to take data upon the projected turn-on of the LHC. Since fall 2008, the pixel detector has been included in the combined ATLAS detector operation, collecting cosmic muon data. Details from the pixel detector installation and commissioning, as well as details on calibration procedures and the results obtained with collected cosmic data, are presented along with a summary of the detector status.

E. Galyaev; for the ATLAS collaboration

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

APPENDICES ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 APPENDICES ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Appendix A: Summary of Methodology for Determining Stationary CO 2 Source Emissions DOE's RCSPs have identified 4,245 CO 2 stationary sources with total annual emissions of more than 3,279 million metric tons of CO 2 . These sources include electricity generating plants, ethanol plants, petroleum and natural gas processing facilities, cement plants, agricultural processing facilities, industrial facilities, refineries and chemical plants, fertilizer producing facilities, and unclassified. Estimates were derived using databases and emissions factors, as listed in tables in the methodology. The full methodology lists the documents used to identify each CO 2 stationary source, as well as the practical quantitative method (i.e., emission factors, continuous

434

A Catalog and Atlas of Cataclysmic Variables - The Living Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Catalog and Atlas of Cataclysmic Variables (Edition 1 - 1993) and Edition 2 - 1997) has been a valuable source of information for the cataclysmic variable (CV) community. However, the goal of having a central location for all objects is slowly being lost as each new edition is generated. There can also be a long time delay between new information becoming available on an object and its publication in the catalog. To eliminate these concerns, as well as to make the catalog more accessible, we have created a web site which will contain a ``living'' edition of the catalog. We have also added orbital period information, as well as finding charts for novae, to the catalog.

Downes, R A; Shara, M M; Ritter, H G; Kolb, U; Duerbeck, H W; Ritter, Hans; Kolb, Ulrich; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Architecture and Administration of the ATLAS Online Computing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The needs of ATLAS experiment at the upcoming LHC accelerator, CERN, in terms of data transmission rates and processing power require a large cluster of computers (of the order of thousands) administrated and exploited in a coherent and optimal manner. Requirements like stability, robustness and fast recovery in case of failure impose a server-client system architecture with servers distributed in a tree like structure and clients booted from the network. For security reasons, the system should be accessible only through an application gateway and, also to ensure the autonomy of the system, the network services should be provided internally by dedicated machines in synchronization with CERN IT department's central services. The paper describes a small scale implementation of the system architecture that fits the given requirements and constraints. Emphasis will be put on the mechanisms and tools used to net boot the clients via the "Boot With Me" project and to synchronize information within the cluster via t...

Dobson, M; Ertorer, E; Garitaonandia, H; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Malciu, I M; Panikashvili, E; Topurov, A; nel, G; Computing In High Energy and Nuclear Physics

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Searches for MSSM Higgs bosons at ATLAS and CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) predicts the existence of three neutral and two charged Higgs bosons. Searches for these MSSM Higgs bosons are presented, based on proton-proton collisions recorded in 2011 and 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The neutral Higgs bosons are searched through their decays into pairs of oppositely charged tau leptons. The exclusion limits at 95% confidence level are shown as a function of the $m_A$ and $\\tan\\beta$ parameters. The search for the charged Higgs bosons is based on their production through the decays of top quarks in the $t\\bar{t}$ process, $t \\to bH^+$. The Higgs bosons subsequently decay predominantly into a tau lepton and a neutrino. Upper limits are set on the branching fraction $B(t \\to bH^+)$, combining the final states with leptonic and hadronic tau decay modes.

Stan Lai

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Commissioning of the calorimetry in the ATLAS tau trigger system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calorimeters are fundamental in the three levels of the ATLAS tau trigger system. The first level trigger (L1) uses the electromagnetic (e.m.) and hadronic (had) calorimeters to make its decision. In the High Level Triggers (HLT), these systems are also crucial: both the second level trigger (L2) and the third level trigger (Event Filter -EF) heavily exploit the calorimeter based information to identify tau leptons decaying hadronically. Whilst the granularity of the first level is coarse, the second and third level triggers have the final full detector read-out. This contribution focuses on the commissioning of the calorimetry in the three levels of the tau trigger in real data. Efficiency measurements with respect to tau candidates reconstructed by the offline algorithms, and distributions of calorimeter based tau information reconstructed at trigger level, are compared to prediction of the Monte Carlo and the trigger performance in first data assessed.

Sfyrla, Anna; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fully hadronic tt cross section with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement of the tt production cross section in the all-hadronic decay mode is presented using 4.7 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2011. Events are selected using a multi-jet trigger. Kinematic and b-tagging requirements are then applied to identify tt event candidates. A kinematic fit reconstructs the event topology of the final state extracting the top-quark mass which is then used to measure the production cross section with an unbinned likelihood fit. The result is found in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV.

Andrea Coccaro; on behalf of the ATLAS collaboration

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

The ATLAS Muon Trigger vertical slice at LHC startup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger system has a three-levels structure, implemented to retain interesting physics events, here described for the muon case ("Muon Vertical Slice"). The first level, implemented in a custom hardware, uses measurements from the trigger chambers of the Muon Spectrometer to select muons with high transverse momentum and defines a Region of Interest (RoI) in the detector. RoIs are then processed by a second trigger level, in which fast algorithms run on an online software architecture. Full granularity information from precision chambers is accessed inside RoIs. A third trigger level (Event Filter), using offline-like algorithms and accessing the full event, provide the best possible muon reconstruction/identification and finally confirm or discard the trigger hypothesis formed at earlier levels. Implementation and performance of the full muon trigger slice, together with first events triggered with LHC beams on, are presented.

Grancagnolo, Sergio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Commissioning of the calorimetry in the ATLAS tau trigger system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calorimeters are fundamental in the three levels of the ATLAS tau trigger system. The first level trigger (L1) uses the electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic (HAD) calorimeters to make its decision. In the High Level Triggers (HLT), these systems are also crucial: both the second level trigger (L2) and the third level trigger (Event Filter -EF) heavily exploit the calorimeter based information to identify tau leptons decaying hadronically. Whilst the granularity of the first level is coarse, the second and third level triggers have the final full detector read-out. This contribution focuses on the commissioning of the calorimetry in the three levels of the tau trigger in real data. Efficiency measurements with respect to tau candidates reconstructed by the offline algorithms, and distributions of calorimeter based tau information reconstructed at trigger level, are compared to prediction of the Monte Carlo and the trigger performance in first data assessed.

Sfyrla, Anna; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Development and Online Opertation of Minimum Bias Triggers in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of minimum bias triggers should allow for a highly efficient selection on pp-collisions, while minimising any possible bias in the event selection. In ATLAS two main minimum bias triggers have been developed using complementary technologies. A hardware based first level trigger, consisting of 32 plastic scintillators, has proven to efficienctly select pp-interactions. In particular during the start-up phase this trigger played a crucial role for the commissioning of the central trigger processor and detector sub-systems. A complementary selection is achieved by a multi-level minimum bias trigger, seeded off a random trigger on filled bunches. For the event selection at higher trigger levels a dedicated algorithm was developed, able to cope with around 86 millions of detector signals per bunch-crossing. We will present these trigger systems and their deployment online, highlighting their performance and trigger efficiencies. We outline as well the operation with increasing beam intensities and lumin...

Martin, T; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. The TileCal calibration system comprises radioactive source, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This contribution presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems as well as the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability. The performance of the Tile Calorimeter with the cosmic muons and collision data is also presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution and associated stabilities.

Bernardo Sotto-Maior Peralva

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Detector Control System of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main task of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter Detector Control System (DCS) is to enable the coherent and safe operation of the calorimeter. All actions initiated by the operator, as well as all errors, warnings and alarms concerning the hardware of the detector are handled by DCS. The Tile calorimeter DCS controls and monitors mainly the low voltage and high voltage power supply systems, but it is also interfaced with the infrastructure (cooling system and racks), the calibration systems, the data acquisition system, configuration and conditions databases and the detector safety system. The system has been operational since the beginning of LHC operation and has been extensively used in the operation of the detector. In the last months effort was directed to the implementation of automatic recovery of power supplies after trips. Current status, results and latest developments will be presented.

Arabidze, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Ribeiro, G; Santos, H; Vinagre, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Detector Control System of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve tracking robustness and precision of the ATLAS inner tracker, an additional, fourth pixel layer is foreseen, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). It will be installed between the innermost present Pixel layer and a new, smaller beam pipe and is presently under construction. As, once installed into the experiment, no access is possible, a highly reliable control system is required. It has to supply the detector with all entities required for operation and protect it at all times. Design constraints are the high power density inside the detector volume, the sensitivity of the sensors against heat-ups, and the protection of the front end electronics against transients. We present the architecture of the control system with an emphasis on the CO2 cooling system, the power supply system, and protection strategies. As we aim for a common operation of Pixel and IBL detector, the integration of the IBL control system into the Pixel control system will also be discussed.

Kersten, S; Lantzsch, K; Zeitnitz, C; Verlaat, B; Meroni, C; Citterio, M; Gensolen, F; Mttig, P; Kind, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Teacher Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Resource Center: Putting It All Together Teacher Resource Center: Putting It All Together TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center provides a preview collection of K-12 instructional materials. TRC services include professional development workshops, consultation assistance, bibliographies and reference assistance. Educators have access to curriculum materials, books, multimedia, educational supply catalogs, periodicals and newsletters. The collection

447

Solar Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448