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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Conversion of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen by reaction with a sulfided catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for removing ammonia from the sour water stream of a coal gasification process. The basic steps comprise stripping the ammonia from the sour water; heating the stripped ammonia to a temperature from between 400.degree. to 1,000.degree. F; passing the gaseous ammonia through a reactor containing a sulfided catalyst to produce elemental hydrogen and nitrogen; and scrubbing the reaction product to obtain an ammonia-free gas. The residual equilibrium ammonia produced by the reactor is recycled into the stripper. The ammonia-free gas may be advantageously treated in a Claus process to recover elemental sulfur. Iron sulfide or cobalt molybdenum sulfide catalysts are used.

Matthews, Charles W. (Denver, CO)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

SRD 134 Hydrogen Sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. HYDROGEN SULFIDE. MW [1]. 34.082. NBP [1]. 212.88 K. TP [1]. 187.7 K. H 2 S. Pc [1 ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen sulfide concentration of a gas of relatively higher hydrogen sulfide concentration is reduced by introducing the gas to a fragmented permeable mass of oil shale for contacting the oil shale in the substantial absence of free oxygen. This yields a gas with relatively lower hydrogen sulfide concentration which is withdrawn from the fragmented permeable mass of oil shale.

Compton, L.E.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tests for Hydrogen Cyanide and Hydrogen Sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A potential source of dangerous concentrations of hydrogen cyanide exists in the plating room of the Machine Shop where open plating baths containing cyanide salts are maintained and where solid cyanide salts are stored. Also the use of hydrogen sulfide in certain steps of the waste disposal process has lead to noticeable and sometimes objectionable concentrations of this gas in the air of the "WD" Building. In view of the toxic properties of these two gases, it was desirable to set up suitable tests to determine the actual concentrations present in the air of the respective working areas.

Joy, E. F.

1949-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hydrogen Sulfide, Oil and Gas, and Peoples Health By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Hydrogen Sulfide in the Environment.................................................................................... 4 3. Hydrogen Sulfide and Oil and Gas......................................................................................... 5

Lana Skrtic

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Molecular Cell Hydrogen Sulfide-Linked Sulfhydration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Article Hydrogen Sulfide-Linked Sulfhydration of NF-kB Mediates Its Antiapoptotic@jhmi.edu DOI 10.1016/j.molcel.2011.10.021 SUMMARY Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) is an antiapoptotic tran- scription factor. We show that the antiapoptotic actions of NF-kB are mediated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S

Dong, Xinzhong

10

Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a "nonequilibrium" plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show-that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a nonequilibrium'' plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a ``nonequilibrium`` plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report...

15

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume II. Laboratory results and process...

16

Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. (more)

Duangmanee, Thanapong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

Ritter, H.

1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ) Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION FROM GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS Final Report Volume I Summary of Results F.C. Brown W.W. Harvey - . - ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

22

Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

Ritter, H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION FROM GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS F i n a l Report - Volume I I L a b o r a t o r y R e s u l t s and P...

24

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrogen Sulfide Dispersion Consequences Analysis in Different Wind Speeds: A CFD Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (h2s) leakage and dispersion from a sulfide recycle installation in different wind speeds are simulated by implementing a 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. H2s concentrations of monitor points which represent dispersion contours ... Keywords: CFD, hydrogen Sulfide, dispersion, concenquences analysis, different wind speeds

Bo Zhang; Guo-ming Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

MODELING OF SYNGAS REACTIONS AND HYDROGEN GENERATION OVER SULFIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research is to analyze pathways of reactions of hydrogen with oxides of carbon over sulfides, and to predict which characteristics of the sulfide catalyst (nature of metal, defect structure) give rise to the lowest barriers toward oxygenated hydrocarbon product. Reversal of these pathways entails the generation of hydrogen, which is also proposed for study. During this study, adsorption reactions of H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules with MoS{sub 2}, both in molecular and solid form, have been modeled using high-level density functional theory. The relative stabilities of pure MoS{sub 2} edges were calculated and small clusters exhibiting properties of the edges were modeled. The results were finalized and published in the journal ''Surface Science''. Hydrogen adsorption energies on both the edges and the clusters were calculated, and the thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption on both systems were evaluated. The adsorption locations and vibrational frequencies were also determined. These additional results were published in a second paper in ''Surface Science''. Most recently, the bonding and effect of alkali and transition metal ions was investigated on the MoS{sub 2} clusters. Potassium atoms bind to the clusters and increase the binding of hydrogen to the clusters while reducing the activation barriers for hydrogen adsorption. Silver attaches to the Mo7S14 cluster and donates its odd electron to the nearby Mo atoms and should have a similar effect to hydrogen as potassium does.

Kamil Klier; Jeffery A. Spirko; Michael L. Neiman

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Plasma-chemical conversion of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen-sulfide-contaminated industrial wastes is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is based on research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. In the plasma-chemical process, the gaseous stream would be purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide for recycle to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional tail-gas clean-up processes associated with the Claus technology. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have confirmed that conversions of over 90% per pass are possible. Experiments with impurities typical of petroleum refinery and natural gas production acid gases have demonstrated that these impurities are compatible with the plasma dissociation process and do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. Other experiments show that the cyclonic-flow pattern hypothesized by the Russian theoretical analysis of the plasma-chemical process can substantially decrease energy requirements for hydrogen sulfide dissociation while increasing conversion. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology. The primary advantage is the potential for recovering hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. The difference could amount to an energy savings of 40 {times} 10{sup 15} to 70 {times} 10{sup 15} J/yr in the refining industry, for an annual savings of $500 million to $1,000 million.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Removal of mercury from gas streams using hydrogen sulfide and amines  

SciTech Connect

Phillips Petroleum Co. has developed an integrated process for treating a natural-gas stream with a precipitating agent to remove mercury and introducing an absorption agent to control the amount of precipitating agent left in the gas stream. In the process, a gas (particularly a sulfur-free natural gas) that contains mercury is contacted with an amount of hydrogen sulfide in excess of the stoichiometric amount of hydrogen sulfide necessary to precipitate sulfides of mercury, with further contact with an amine that is an absorption agent for hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide precipitates sulfides of mercury from the gas stream while the amine absorbs the excess hydrogen sulfide to produce a gas stream of minimal sulfur content with a reduced mercury content that can be below the range of detection.

Miller, A.J.; Tuckett, W.F.

1977-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

A novel and cost-effective hydrogen sulfide removal technology using tire derived rubber particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is corrosive, toxic, and produced during the anaerobic digestion process at wastewater treatment plants. Tire derived rubber particles (TDRPTM) and other rubber (more)

Siefers, Andrea Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factors Applicable to Wastewater Wet Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transport of wastewater in sewer networks causes potential problems associated with gases which include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and methane, in regard (more)

Mudragaddam, Madhuri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY SUPERADIABATIC DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the membrane systems selected, additional equipment such as knockout drums, coalescing filters, and guard beds far and modeling predictions is quite reasonable. Methane 20% H2S/ 80%N2 Air MFC MFC MFC Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610-32405 #12;MFC-3 MFC-1 MFC-2 N2 H2S O2

32

Methods for producing hydrogen (BI) sulfide and/or removing metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a process wherein sulfide production by bacteria is efficiently turned on and off, using pH adjustment. The adjustment of pH impacts sulfide production by bacteria by altering the relative amounts of H.sub.2 S and HS-- in solution and thereby control the inhibition of the bacterial metabolism that produces sulfide. This process can be used to make a bioreactor produce sulfide "on-demand" so that the production of sulfide can be matched to its use as a metal precipitation reagent. The present invention is of significance because it enables the use of a biological reactor, a cost effective sulfide production system, by making the biological reactor produce hydrogen sulfide "on demand", and therefore responsive to production schedules, waste stream generation rate, and health and safety requirements/goals.

Truex, Michael J [Richland, WA; Peyton, Brent M [Pullman, WA; Toth, James J [Kennewick, WA

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E. (St Andrews)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mitigation of hydrogen sulfide emissions in The Geysers KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H/sub 2/S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H/sub 2/S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staff's efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H/sub 2/S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to be promising, cost-effective control options.

Buell, R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen ...  

... methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more ...

40

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability has not been observed. A new test cell specially designed to test the membranes has been constructed to provide basic science data on superpermeability.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of hypochlorite process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases  

SciTech Connect

Sodium hypochlorite reacts readily with hydrogen sulfide to convert the sulfide ion into free sulfur in a neutral or acid solution and to the sulfate ion in an alkaline solution. Sodium hypochlorite can be generated on site by processing geothermal brine in electrolytic cells. An investigation to determine if this reaction could be economically used to remove hydrogen sulfide from geothermal noncondensible gases is reported. Two processes, the LO-CAT Process and the Stretford Process, were selected for comparison with the hypochlorite process. Three geothermal reservoirs were considered for evaluation: Niland KGRA, Baca KGRA, and The Geysers KGRA. Because of the wide variation in the amount of hydrogen sulfide present at The Geysers, two different gas analyses were considered for treatment. Plants were designed to process the effluent noncondensible gases from a 10 MW/sub e/ geothermal power plant. The effluent gas from each plant was to contain a maximum hydrogen sulfide concentration of 35 ppb. Capital costs were estimated for each of the processes at each of the four sites selected. Operating costs were also calculated for each of the processes at each of the sites. The results of these studies are shown.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions at geothermal power plants was evaluated in laboratory scale equipment and by process engineering analysis. The process is based on scrubbing geothermal steam with a metal salt solution to selectively remove and precipitate the contained H/sub 2/S. The metal sulfide is roasted or oxygen/acid leached to regenerate the metal salt, and sulfur is rejected from the system as elemental sulfur or as sulfate. Up to 95 percent removal of H/sub 2/S from simulated geothermal steams was obtained in a 2'' diameter scrubbing column packed with 3 feet of 5/8'' Flexirings by use of a recirculating slurry of copper sulfate/copper sulfide. Information is included on the chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics and process control aspects of the process, scrubber system design, operation, and corrosion, and design proposals and cost estimates for a H/sub 2/S removal system. (LCL)

Harvey, W.W.; Brown, F.C.; Turchan, M.J.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide in a Biotrickling Filter under Extremely Acidic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an extremely corrosive and toxic gas, was commonly generated by urban treatment plants, gas and oil refineries, paper and pulp industries and so on. Biofiltration, which was considered as cost-effective and environment-friendly, ... Keywords: H2S, biotrickling filter, biodegradation, removal efficiency, elimination capacity

Jing Chen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

1983-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Nano-Derived Micro- Temperature Nano-Derived Micro- Hydrogen and -Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks applications for the University Coal Research (UCR) Program to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to (1) improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally

47

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from simulated geothermal brines by reaction with oxygen. Final report, October 6, 1975-February 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling hydrogen sulfide emissions and corrosivity in geothermal systems has been evaluated on a small laboratory pilot plant scale and shown to be technically feasible. The hydrogen sulfide was oxidized by oxygen injected directly into a 11.4-liter-(3-gallon)-per-minute flowing stream of simulated geothermal brine. The oxidation of the sulfide was complete at oxygen:sulfide mole ratios of 1.25:1 to 1.5:1, depending on temperature and total dissolved solids in the brine. The reaction products were free sulfur, sulfite and sulfate. The ratio of these was dependent upon the oxygen:sulfide mole ratios; but, generally, more than 80% of the sulfide was converted to sulfate, approximately 10% to free sulfur and less than 10% to sulfite.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

K. C. Kwon

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

K.C. Kwon

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

K. C. Kwon

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Electrochemical polishing of hydrogen sulfide from coal synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process has been developed for the separation of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification product streams through an electrochemical membrane. This technology is developed for use in coal gasification facilities providing fuel for cogeneration coal fired electrical power facilities and Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell electrical power facilities. H{sub 2}S is removed from the syn-gas by reduction to the sulfide ion and H at the cathode. The sulfide ion migrates to the anode through a molten salt electrolyte suspended in an inert ceramic matrix. Once at the anode it is oxidized to elemental sulfur and swept away for condensation in an inert gas stream. The syn-gas is enriched with the H{sub 2}. Order-of-magnitude reductions in H{sub 2}S have been repeatably recorded (100 ppm to 10 ppm H{sub 2}S) on a single pass through the cell. This process allows removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream and with negligible pressure loss through the separator. Since there are no absorbents used, there is no absorption/regeneration step as with conventional technology. Elemental sulfur is produced as a by-product directly, so there is no need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. This makes the process economically attractive since it is much less equipment intensive than conventional technology.

Gleason, E.F.; Winnick, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are presented in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (Drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

State-of-the-art hydrogen sulfide control for geothermal energy systems: 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing state-of-the-art technologies for removal of hydrogen sulfide are discussed along with a comparative assessment of their efficiencies, reliabilities and costs. Other related topics include the characteristics of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated resources, energy conversion systems, and the sources of hydrogen sulfide emissions. It is indicated that upstream control technologies are preferred over downsteam technologies primarily because upstream removal of hydrogen sulfide inherently controls all downstream emissions including steam-stacking. Two upstream processes for vapor-dominated resources appear promising; the copper sulfate (EIC) process, and the steam converter (Coury) process combined with an off-gas abatement system such as a Stretford unit. For liquid-dominated systems that produce steam, the process where the non-condensible gases are scrubbed with spent geothermal fluid appears to be promising. An efficient downstream technology is the Stretford process for non-condensible gas removal. In this case, partitioning in the surface condenser will determine the overall abatement efficiency. Recommendations for future environmental control technology programs are included.

Stephens, F.B.; Hill, J.H.; Phelps, P.L. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution which show that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be recovered in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Popov, A.A.; Rezunenko, Yu.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates. Several different types of dual-phase membranes were fabricated and tested for their CO{sub 2} permeation in reducing conditions without the presence of oxygen. Although the flux was quite low, on the order of 0.01-0.001 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min, the selectivity of CO{sub 2}/He was almost infinite at temperatures of about 800 C. A different type of dual-phase membrane prepared by Arizona State University (ASU) was also tested at GTI for CO{sub 2} permeation. The measured CO{sub 2} fluxes were 0.015 and 0.02 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min at 750 and 830 C, respectively. These fluxes were higher than the previous flux obtained ({approx}0.01 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min) using the dual-phase membranes prepared by GTI. Further development in membrane development should be conducted to improve the CO{sub 2} flux. ASU has also focused on high temperature permeation/separation experiments to confirm the carbon dioxide separation capabilities of the dual-phase membranes with La{sup 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF6482) supports infiltrated with a Li/Na/K molten carbonate mixture (42.5/32.5/25.0 mole %). The permeation experiments indicated that the addition of O{sub 2} does improve the permeance of CO{sub 2} through the membrane. A simplified membrane reactor model was developed to evaluate the performance of the process. However, the simplified model did not allow the estimation of membrane transport area, an important parameter for evaluating the feasibility of the proposed membrane reactor technology. As a result, an improved model was developed. Results of the improved membrane reactor model show that the membrane shift reaction has promise as a means to simplify the production of a clean stream of hydrogen and a clean stream of carbon dioxide. The focus of additional development work should address the large area required for the CO{sub 2} membrane as identified in the modeling calculations. Also, a more detailed process flow diagram should be developed that includes integration of cooling and preheating feed streams as well as particulate removal so that stea

Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly. Several steelmaking additions have been investigated in this research for their effect on the hydrogen and nitrogen content of steels. It has been established that calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime) acts as a source of hydrogen. Carburizers, such as metallurgical coke, were found to result in no hydrogen pickup when added to liquid steel. Addition of petroleum coke, on the other hand, increased the hydrogen content of liquid steel. Ferroalloy such as medium carbon ferromanganese when added to the liquid iron was found to increase its nitrogen content, the increase being proportional to the amount of ferroalloy added. Similarly, addition of pitch coke, which had a significant nitrogen impurity, increased the nitrogen content of liquid iron. A mathematical model was developed to quantify the absorption of nitrogen and hydrogen from the air bubbles entrained during tapping of liquid steel. During the bottom stirring of liquid metal in a ladle, the inert gas escaping from the top displaces the slag layer and often forms an open eye. The absorption of atmospheric nitrogen through the spout eye was estimated for different slag thickness and gas flow rate. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive set of equations which could predict the nitrogen and hydrogen pickup from their various sources. Estimates of hydrogen and nitrogen pickup during the steel transfer operations such as tapping and ladle stirring and the predicted pickup from steelmaking additions were integrated into empirical equations. The comprehensive model is designed to predict the gas pickup under varying operating conditions such as the metal oxygen and sulfur content, the total tapping or stirring time, the stirring gas flow rate and the slag thickness. The model predictions are based on mathematical and empirical evidence which are derived from thermodynamic and kinetic fundamental principles.

Richard J. Fruehan; Siddhartha Misra

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes.

Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID); Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tuggle, Dale G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Numerical Simulation of Making Hydrogen from Rich Filtration Combustion of Hydrogen Sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Filtration combustion in porous media offers good advantages such as super-adiabatic combustion temperature in making hydrogen from hydrogen sulfur which is extremely toxic and is vastly produced in industry. In order to study the mechanism of making ... Keywords: Filtration combustion, coupled chemistry-hydrodynamics, making hydrogen, computational fluid dynamics

Li Guoneng

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Journal of Power Sources 135 (2004) 184191 A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, a desulfurizer, and two recuperators. Natural gas is internally reformed, and the product, a hydrogen-rich gas sulfide and natural gas Yixin Lu, Laura Schaefer1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University

65

Questions and Answers - What's the difference between hydrogen, nitrogen,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Which element has 11 protonsand 12 neutrons? Which element has 11 protons<br>and 12 neutrons? Previous Question (Which element has 11 protons and 12 neutrons?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Does sodium have any isotopes? Is it radioactive?) Does sodium have anyisotopes? Is it radioactive? What's the difference between hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, copper, gold and magnesium? Hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, copper, gold and magnesium all have different physical and chemical properties. You can find descriptions of all of these elements on our Periodic Table of Elements. The single most important difference between these elements is the number of protons each one contains in its nucleus. The number of protons an atom contains dictates how many electrons it will have. It is the arrangement of

66

Stability Regimes of Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames  

SciTech Connect

One option for combustion in zero-emission Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants is non-premixed combustion of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen in air. An important aspect to non-premixed combustion is flame stability or anchoring, though only a few fundamental stability studies of these flames have taken place to date. The following paper presents the results of experiments investigating the effects of nitrogen diluent fraction, jet diameter, and exit velocity on the static stability limits of a turbulent hydrogen jet flame issuing from a thin-lipped tube into a quiescent atmosphere. Four different stability limits are observed: detachment from the burner lip, reattachment to the burner lip, transition from a laminar lifted flame base to blowout or to a turbulent lifted flame, and transition from a turbulent lifted flame to blowout. The applicability of existing theories and correlations to the stability results is discussed. These results are an important step in assessing the viability of a non-premixed combustion approach using hydrogen diluted with nitrogen as a fuel.

Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method of recovering sulfur from the hydrogen sulfide contained in coke oven gases  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are washed out of the coke oven gas and stripped from the wash liquor in the form of gases and fumes or vapors. The ammonia is decomposed in a nickel catalyzer and a small part of the decomposition gases is supplied directly to a combustion furnace, while the larger part of the combustion gases is first cooled and freed from condensate, and only then supplied to the combustion furnace. In the combustion furnace, the proportion of H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/ needed for the Claus process is adjusted by a partial combustion of the decomposition gases. The gases from the combustion furnace are then processed in the Claus plant to sulfur.

Laufhutte, D.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide--Systems Analysis for IGCC Applications  

SciTech Connect

Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) has been evaluated conceptually for IGCC applications, and the theoretical limits of reaction performance, process performance, and economic potential in IGCC have been estimated. Syngas conditions that have high partial pressures of total sulfur result in substantial liquid sulfur retention within the catalyst bed, with relatively complex processing being required. Applications that have much lower total sulfur partial pressure in the process gas might permit SCOHS operation under conditions where little liquid sulfur is retained in the catalyst, reducing the processing complexity and possibly improving the desulfurization performance. The results from our recent IGCC process evaluations using the SCOHS technology and conventional syngas cleaning are presented, and alternative SCOHS process configurations and applications that provide greater performance and cost potential are identified.

Newby, R.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Alvin, M.A.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation on Durability and Reactivity of Promising Metal Oxide Sorbents During Sulfidation and Regeneration  

SciTech Connect

Research activities and efforts of this research project were concentrated on formulating various metal oxide sorbents with various additives under various formulation conditions, conducting experiments on initial reactivity of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide, and testing hardness of formulated sorbents. Experiments on reactivity of formulated metal oxide sorbents with wet hydrogen sulfide contained in a simulated coal gas mixture were carried out for 120 seconds at 550 o C (see Table 1) to evaluate reactivity of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide. Hardness of formulated sorbents was evaluated in addition to testing their reactivity with hydrogen sulfide. A typical simulated coal gas mixture consists of 9107-ppm hydrogen sulfide (0.005 g; 1 wt %), 0.085-g water (15.84 wt %), 0.0029-g hydrogen (0.58 wt %), and 0.4046-g nitrogen (81.34 wt%).

K. C. Kwon

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

Spurlin, Stanford R. (Ames, IA); Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Influence of technological factors on statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the ammonia process  

SciTech Connect

The basic technological factors that determine the effectiveness of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the cyclic ammonia process are the initial H/sub 2/S content of the gas, the degree of purification, the absorption temperature and the NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ contents of the absorbent solution. The effects of these factors on the statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption are studied. The investigation is based on the phase-equilibrium distributions of components in the absorption-desorption gas-cleaning cycle. The mathematical model is presented which includes the solution of a system of chemical equilibrium equations for reactions in the solution, material balances, and electrical neutrality. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Nazarov, V.G.; Kamennykh, B.M.; Rus'yanov, N.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

NOVEL COMPOSITE HYDROGEN-PERMEABLE MEMBRANES FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS FOR THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Experiments involving methane conversion reactions were conducted with a preliminary pulsed corona discharge reactor design in order to test and improve the reactor and membrane designs using a non-toxic reactant. This report details the direct methane conversion experiments to produce hydrogen, acetylene, and higher hydrocarbons utilizing a co-axial cylinder (CAC) corona discharge reactor, pulsed with a thyratron switch. The reactor was designed to accommodate relatively high flow rates (655 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s) representing a pilot scale easily converted to commercial scale. Parameters expected to influence methane conversion including pulse frequency, charge voltage, capacitance, residence time, and electrode material were investigated. Conversion, selectivity and energy consumption were measured or estimated. C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon products were analyzed with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). In order to obtain quantitative results, the complex sample spectra were de-convoluted via a linear least squares method. Methane conversion as high as 51% was achieved. The products are typically 50%-60% acetylene, 20% propane, 10% ethane and ethylene, and 5% propylene. First Law thermodynamic energy efficiencies for the system (electrical and reactor) were estimated to range from 38% to 6%, with the highest efficiencies occurring at short residence time and low power input (low specific energy) where conversion is the lowest (less than 5%). The highest methane conversion of 51% occurred at a residence time of 18.8 s with a flow rate of 39.4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s (5 ft{sup 3}/h) and a specific energy of 13,000 J/l using niobium and platinum coated stainless steel tubes as cathodes. Under these conditions, the First Law efficiency for the system was 8%. Under similar reaction conditions, methane conversions were {approx}50% higher with niobium and platinum coated stainless steel cathodes than with a stainless steel cathode.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Ji-Jun Zhang; Guibing Zhao; Robyn J. Alcanzare; Linna Wang; Ovid A. Plumb

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an order of magnitude) less energy is required and that sunlight can be used directly. In the case of photoproduction of hydrogen, as compared to water splitting, feeding the anodic compartment of the PEC with an organic pollutant, instead of the usual supporting electrolyte, will bring about a substantial increase of the photocurrent at a given illumination. Thus, the replacement of the photo-oxidation of water by the photodegradation of organic waste will be accompanied by a gain in solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency and hence by a decrease in the cost of the photoproduced hydrogen. Taking into account the benefits and possible revenues obtainable by the waste degradation, this would seem to be a promising approach to the photoproduction of hydrogen. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is another waste effluent requiring extensive treatment, especially in petroleum refineries. The so-called Claus process is normally used to convert the H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. A sulfur recovery process developed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described briefly in Chapter 4 by Dr. C. Linkous as a typical example of the photoproduction of hydrogen in a non oxygen-evolving system. The encouraging results obtained in these investigations of photoelectrochemical hydrogen production combined with organic waste degradation, have prompted a decision to continue the work under the new IEA Hydrogen Agreement Annex 14, Photoelectrolytic Hydrogen Production.

Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)); Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume III. Final report: demonstration plant equipment descriptions, test plan, and operating instructions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The elements of the final, detailed design of the demonstration plant for the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam are summarized. Descriptions are given of all items of equipment in sufficient detail that they can serve as purchase specifications. The process and mechanical design criteria which were used to develop the specifications, and the process descriptions and material and energy balance bases to which the design criteria were applied are included. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Production of Hydrogen by Superadiabatic Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide - Final Technical Report for the Period June 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop an economical process for hydrogen production, with no additional carbon dioxide emission, through the thermal decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in H{sub 2}S-rich waste streams to high-purity hydrogen and elemental sulfur. The novel feature of the process being developed is the superadiabatic combustion (SAC) of part of the H{sub 2}S in the waste stream to provide the thermal energy required for the decomposition reaction such that no additional energy is required. The program is divided into two phases. In Phase 1, detailed thermochemical and kinetic modeling of the SAC reactor with H{sub 2}S-rich fuel gas and air/enriched air feeds is undertaken to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on exit gas products and conversion efficiency, and to identify key process parameters. Preliminary modeling results are used as a basis to conduct a thorough evaluation of SAC process design options, including reactor configuration, operating conditions, and productivity-product separation schemes, with respect to potential product yields, thermal efficiency, capital and operating costs, and reliability, ultimately leading to the preparation of a design package and cost estimate for a bench-scale reactor testing system to be assembled and tested in Phase 2 of the program. A detailed parametric testing plan was also developed for process design optimization and model verification in Phase 2. During Phase 2 of this program, IGT, UIC, and industry advisors UOP and BP Amoco will validate the SAC concept through construction of the bench-scale unit and parametric testing. The computer model developed in Phase 1 will be updated with the experimental data and used in future scale-up efforts. The process design will be refined and the cost estimate updated. Market survey and assessment will continue so that a commercial demonstration project can be identified.

Rachid B. Slimane; Francis S. Lau; Javad Abbasian

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development of Regenerable High Capacity Boron Nitrogen Hydrides as Hydrogen Storage Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this three-phase project is to develop synthesis and hydrogen extraction processes for nitrogen/boron hydride compounds that will permit exploitation of the high hydrogen content of these materials. The primary compound of interest in this project is ammonia-borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}), a white solid, stable at ambient conditions, containing 19.6% of its weight as hydrogen. With a low-pressure on-board storage and an efficient heating system to release hydrogen, ammonia-borane has a potential to meet DOE's year 2015 specific energy and energy density targets. If the ammonia-borane synthesis process could use the ammonia-borane decomposition products as the starting raw material, an efficient recycle loop could be set up for converting the decomposition products back into the starting boron-nitrogen hydride. This project is addressing two key challenges facing the exploitation of the boron/nitrogen hydrides (ammonia-borane), as hydrogen storage material: (1) Development of a simple, efficient, and controllable system for extracting most of the available hydrogen, realizing the high hydrogen density on a system weight/volume basis, and (2) Development of a large-capacity, inexpensive, ammonia-borane regeneration process starting from its decomposition products (BNHx) for recycle. During Phase I of the program both catalytic and non-catalytic decomposition of ammonia borane are being investigated to determine optimum decomposition conditions in terms of temperature for decomposition, rate of hydrogen release, purity of hydrogen produced, thermal efficiency of decomposition, and regenerability of the decomposition products. The non-catalytic studies provide a base-line performance to evaluate catalytic decomposition. Utilization of solid phase catalysts mixed with ammonia-borane was explored for its potential to lower the decomposition temperature, to increase the rate of hydrogen release at a given temperature, to lead to decomposition products amenable for regeneration, and direct catalytic hydrogenation of the decomposition products. Two different approaches of heating ammonia-borane are being investigated: (a) 'heat to material approach' in which a fixed compartmentalized ammonia-borane is heated by a carefully controlled heating pattern, and (b) 'material to heat approach' in which a small amount of ammonia-borane is dispensed at a time in a fixed hot zone. All stages of AB decomposition are exothermic which should allow the small 'hot zone' used in the second approach for heating to be self-sustaining. During the past year hydrogen release efforts focused on the second approach determining the amount of hydrogen released, kinetics of hydrogen release, and the amounts of impurities released as a function of AB decomposition temperature in the 'hot zone.'

Damle, A.

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Batch slurry photocatalytic reactors for the generation of hydrogen from sulfide and sulfite waste streams under solar irradiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, two solar slurry photocatalytic reactors i.e., batch reactor (BR) and batch recycle reactor with continuous supply of inert gas (BRRwCG) were developed for comparing their performance. The performance of the photocatalytic reactors were evaluated based on the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from water containing sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) and sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) ions. The photoreactor of capacity 300 mL was developed with UV-vis transparent walls. The catalytic powders ((CdS/ZnS)/Ag{sub 2}S + (RuO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2})) were kept suspended by means of magnetic stirrer in the BR and gas bubbling and recycling of the suspension in the BRRwCG. The rate constant was found to be 120.86 (einstein{sup -1}) for the BRRwCG whereas, for the BR it was found to be only 10.92 (einstein{sup -1}). The higher rate constant was due to the fast desorption of products and suppression of e{sup -}/h{sup +} recombination. (author)

Priya, R.; Kanmani, S. [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of hydrogen-sulfide on the hydrogen permeance of palladiumcopper alloys at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hydrogen permeance of several 0.1 mm thick PdCu alloy foils (80 wt. % Pd20 wt. % Cu, 60 wt. % Pd40 wt. % Cu and 53 wt.% Pd47 wt. % Cu) was evaluated using transient flux measurements at temperatures ranging from 603 to 1123 K and pressures up to 620 kPa both in the presence and absence of 1000 ppm H2S. Sulfur resistance, as evidenced by no significant change in permeance, was correlated with the temperatures associated with the face-centered-cubic crystalline structure for the alloys in this study. The permeance of the body-centered cubic phase, however, was up to two orders of magnitude lower when exposed to H2S. A smooth transition from sulfur poisoning to sulfur resistance with increasing temperature was correlated with the alloy transition from a body-centered-cubic structure to a face-centered-cubic structure. 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

B. D. Morreale B; M. V. Ciocco B; B. H. Howard A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

84

Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

Spurlin, Stanford R. (Ames, IA); Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Global NOx Measurements in Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbulent hydrogen diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen are currently being studied to assess their ability to achieve the DOE Turbine Programs aggressive emissions goal of 2 ppm NOx in a hydrogen-fueled IGCC gas turbine combustor. Since the unstrained adiabatic flame temperatures of these diluted flames are not low enough to eliminate thermal NOx formation the focus of the current work is to study how the effects of flame residence time and global flame strain can be used to help achieve the stated NOx emissions goal. Dry NOx measurements are presented as a function of jet diameter nitrogen dilution and jet velocity for a turbulent hydrogen/nitrogen jet issuing from a thin-lipped tube in an atmospheric pressure combustor. The NOx emission indices from these experiments are normalized by the flame residence time to ascertain the effects of global flame strain and fuel Lewis Number on the NOx emissions. In addition dilute hydrogen diffusion flame experiments were performed in a high-pressure combustor at 2 4 and 8 atm. The NOx emission data from these experiments are discussed as well as the results from a Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling effort currently underway to help explain the experimental data.

Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impact of hydrogen and oxygen defects on the lattice parameter of chemical vapor deposited zinc sulfide  

SciTech Connect

The lattice parameter of cubic chemical vapor deposited (CVD) ZnS with measured oxygen concentrations < 0.6 at.% and hydrogen impurities of < 0.015 at.% have been measured and found to vary between -0.10% and +0.09% relative to the reference lattice parameter (5.4093 ) of oxygen-free cubic ZnS as reported in the literature. Defects other than substitutional O must be invoked to explain these observed volume changes. The structure and thermodynamic stability of a wide range of native and impurity induced defects in ZnS have been determined by Ab initio calculations. Lattice contraction is caused by S-vacancies, substitutional O on S sites, Zn vacancies, H in S vacancies, peroxy defects, and dissociated water in S-vacancies. The lattice is expanded by interstitial H, H in Zn vacancies, dihydroxy defects, interstitial oxygen, Zn and [ZnHn] complexes (n=1,,4), interstitial Zn, and S2 dumbbells. Oxygen, though present, likely forms substitutional defects for sulfur resulting in lattice contraction rather than as interstitial oxygen resulting in lattice expansion. It is concluded based on measurement and calculations that excess zinc atoms either at anti-sites (i.e. Zn atoms on S-sites) or possibly as interstitial Zn are responsible for the relative increase of the lattice parameter of commercially produced CVD ZnS.

McCloy, John S.; Wolf, Walter; Wimmer, Erich; Zelinski, Brian

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C, probably with the reduction to metallic zinc with the evolution of hydrogen sulfide. The work has shown that ZnS is not a viable candidate for a high-temperature hydrogen separation membrane.

Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNH) compounds: recent developments in hydrogen storage, applications in hydrogenation and catalysis, and new syntheses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong efforts devoted to the exploration of BNH compounds for hydrogen storage have led to impressive advances in the field of boron chemistry. This review summarizes progress in this field from three aspects. It starts with the most recent developments in using BNH compounds for hydrogen storage, covering NH3BH3, B3H8 containing compounds, and CBN compounds. The following section then highlights interesting applications of BNH compounds in hydrogenation and catalysis. The last part is focused on breakthroughs in the syntheses and discovery of new BNH organic analogues. The role of N?H?+H?-?B dihydrogen interactions in molecule packing, thermal hydrogen evolution, and syntheses is also discussed within the review. Part of this research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle.

Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Thomas

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hydrogen Generation through Indirect Biophotolysis in Batch Cultures of the Non-Heterocystous Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nitrogen-fixing non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO2 to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg?day or 7.3 ?mol/mg?day) ) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 ?mol/m2?sec. The addition of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU did not reduce hydrogen production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 hours, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at photosystem II (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Carter, Blaine M.; Gerschler, Jared J.; Benemann, John R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine programs goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

Stetka, Steven S. (Fleetwood, PA); Nazario, Francisco N. (Parsippany, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen - implications for the intramolecular potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raman measurements of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) have been made under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high static pressure. Measurements have been made on H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} to 50 GPa and 1600 K, and on N{sub 2} to 50 GPa and 2000 K. In all three materials the familiar molecular stretching mode (vibron) is accompanied in the high-temperature Raman spectra by one or more lower-frequency peaks due to transitions from excited vibrational states. We find that the frequency differences between these bands decreases with pressure, implying that the anharmonicity of the corresponding part of the intramolecular potential also decreases. This is accompanied by an increase in the measured linewidths of the bands that is consistent with a decrease of the depth of the potential and an approaching molecular dissociation.

Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sulfidation of mixed metal oxides in a fluidized-bed reactor  

SciTech Connect

Mixed metal oxides were used for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a hot gas stream. Sorbents were prepared according to the dry and wet impregnation techniques. The desulfurization performance of the metal oxide sorbents was experimentally tested in a fluidized-bed reactor system. Sulfidation experiments performed under reaction conditions similar to those at the exit of a coal gasifier showed that the preparation procedure and technique, the type and the amount of the impregnated metal oxide, the type of the solid carrier, and the size of the solid reactant affect the H[sub 2]S removal capacity of the sorbents. The pore structure of fresh and sulfided sorbents was analyzed using mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electron microscopy.

Christoforou, S.C.; Efthimiadis, E.A.; Vasalos, I.A. (Aristotelian Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Demonstration of EIC's copper sulfate process for removal of hydrogen sulfide and other trace contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine inlet temperatures and pressures. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results obtained during the operation of an integrated, one-tenth commercial scale pilot plant using EIC's copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and other contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions are discussed. The tests took place over a six month period at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Unit No. 7 at The Geysers Power Plant. These tests were the final phase of a development effort which included the laboratory research and engineering design work which led to the design of the pilot plant. Broadly, the objectives of operating the pilot plant were to confirm the preliminary design criteria which had been developed, and provide data for their revisions, if appropriate, in a plant which contained all the elements of a commercial process using equipment of a size sufficient to provide valid scale-up data. The test campaign was carried out in four phases: water testing; open circuit, i.e., non integrated scrubbing, liquid-solid separation and regeneration testing; closed circuit short term; and closed circuit long term testing.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Method for the determination of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in plutonium by vacuum fusion--gas chromatography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report of a method for the determination of hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in plutonium metal by a vacuum fusion technique is given. The analytical system was connected with an induction heated graphite crucible in a high vacuum system in a glove box for the safe handling of plutonium. The sample reacts with graphite dissolved in a liquid-metal (platinum) bath at high temperature. The gases evolved are transferred to the analytical system by means of a mercury diffusion pump. The volume of the gaseous sample is measured in the buret of an automatic Toepler-pump and then analyzed in a gas chromatograph. Evaluation of the method shows that the limits of detection of the three elements are of the order of 0.8 ug hydrogen, 3.0 ug nitrogen, and 2.5 ug oxygen.

Alm, K.-F.; Andersson, L.-H.

97

ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

Offenhartz, P. O'D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma CVD of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) Films Using Triethylsilane and Nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor (AP-PECVD) deposition using the Surfx Atomflow{trademark} 250D APPJ source with triethylsilane (HSiEt{sub 3}, TES) and nitrogen as the precursor and the reactive gases, respectively. The effect of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the growth characteristics and the properties of a-SiCN:H films was evaluated. The properties of the films were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphological analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chemical and compositional analyses; spectroscopic ellipsometry for optical properties and thickness determination and nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the a-SiCN:H films. Films deposited at low T{sub s} depict organic like features, while the films deposited at high T{sub s} depict ceramic like features. FTIR and XPS studies reveal that an increases in T{sub s} helps in the elimination of organic moieties and incorporation of nitrogen in the film. Films deposited at T{sub s} of 425 C have an index of refraction (n) of 1.84 and hardness (H) of 14.8 GPa. A decrease in the deposition rate between T{sub s} of 25 and 250 C and increase in deposition rate between T{sub s} of 250 and 425 C indicate that the growth of a-SiCN:H films at lower T{sub s} are surface reaction controlled, while at high temperatures film growth is mass-transport controlled. Based on the experimental results, a potential route for film growth is proposed.

Srinivasan Guruvenket; Steven Andrie; Mark Simon; Kyle W. Johnson; Robert A. Sailer

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrogen  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

104

Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

Alonso, Gabriel (Chihuahua, MX); Chianelli, Russell R. (El Paso, TX); Fuentes, Sergio (Ensenada, MX); Torres, Brenda (El Paso, TX)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

nist23  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heptane, hexane, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, isobutane, isopentane, methane, nitrogen, nonane, octane, oxygen, pentane, propane, and water. ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

nist23old  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heptane, hexane, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, isobutane, isopentane, methane, nitrogen, nonane, octane, oxygen, pentane, propane, and water. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the simultaneous removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides from power plant stack gases comprising contacting the stack gases with a supported iron oxide catalyst/absorbent in the presence of sufficient reducing agent selected from the group consisting of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and mixtures thereof, to provide a net reducing atmosphere in the SO.sub.x /NO.sub.x removal zone. The sulfur oxides are removed by absorption substantially as iron sulfide, and nitrogen oxides are removed by catalytic reduction to nitrogen and ammonia. The spent iron oxide catalyst/absorbent is regenerated by oxidation and is recycled to the contacting zone. Sulfur dioxide is also produced during regeneration and can be utilized in the production of sulfuric acid and/or sulfur.

Clay, David T. (Longview, WA); Lynn, Scott (Walnut Creek, CA)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents  

SciTech Connect

A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

Tarrer, Arthur R. (Auburn, AL); Shridharani, Ketan G. (Auburn, AL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An{sub x}Z{sub y} wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effective amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, W.G.; Burns, C.J.; Smith, D.C.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, William G. (Missoula, MT); Burns, Carol J. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Control of nitrogen-16 in BWR (boiling water reactor) main steam lines under hydrogen water chemistry conditions: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary aim of this work was to attempt to identify methods to limit or control the N-16 main steam increases which occur as a result of plant operation under hydrogen water chemistry. The hydrogen water chemistry test data for 8 plants, N-13 chemistry measurements performed at three plants and N-16 main steam concentration measurements made at five plants were analyzed and correlations established. As a result of this study, potential chemical and physical control methods were identified. The test data compilations for the eight plants are included in this report. 6 figs.

Ruiz, C.P.; Lin, C.C.; Wong, T.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hydrogen Film Cooling With Incident and Swept-Shock Interactions in a Mach 6.4 Nitrogen Free Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium ...

Olsen G. C.; Nowak R. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Studies of pure and nitrogen-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films and their possible application for amorphous silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) and nitrogen-incorporated a-C:H (a-C:N:H) thin films were deposited using radio frequency-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and studied for their electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties. Introduction of nitrogen and increase of self bias enhanced the conductivity of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, whereas current-voltage measurement reveals heterojunction formation due to their rectifying behavior. The bandgap of these films was changed over wide range from 1.9 eV to 3.45 eV by varying self bias and the nitrogen incorporation. Further, activation energy was correlated with the electronic structure of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, and conductivity was discussed as a function of bandgap. Moreover, a-C:N:H films exhibited high hardness and elastic modulus, with maximum values as 42 GPa and 430 GPa, respectively, at -100 V. Observed fascinating electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties made it a material of great utility in the development of optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells. In addition, we also performed simulation study for an a-Si:H solar cell, considering a-C:H and C:N:H as window layers, and compared their performance with the a-Si:H solar cell having a-SiC:H as window layer. We also proposed several structures for the development of a near full-spectrum solar cell. Moreover, due to high hardness, a-C:N:H films can be used as a protective and encapsulate layer on solar cells, especially in n-i-p configuration on metal substrate. Nevertheless, a-C:H and a-C:N:H as a window layer can avoid the use of additional hard and protective coating and, hence, minimize the cost of the product.

Dwivedi, Neeraj [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Sushil [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Malik, Hitendra K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as appropriate acknowledgement of this source. Technical Note No. 19 First Printing 1993 Distribution Copies, this plan defines safety equipment and procedures that must be in place in the event H2S and/or steam on steam-flash cond

120

Hydrogen sulfide conversion with nanophase titania  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for disassociating H.sub.2 S in a gaseous feed using an improved catalytic material in which the feed is contacted at a temperature of at least about 275.degree. C. with a catalyst of rutile nanocrystalline titania having grain sizes in the range of from about 1 to about 100 nanometers. Other transition metal catalysts are disclosed, each of nanocrystalline material with grain sizes in the 1-100 nm range.

Beck, Donald D. (Rochester Hills, MI); Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrogen sulfide conversion with nanophase titania  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for disassociating H{sub 2}S in a gaseous feed using an improved catalytic material in which the feed is contacted at a temperature of at least about 275 C with a catalyst of rutile nanocrystalline titania having grain sizes in the range of from about 1 to about 100 nanometers. Other transition metal catalysts are disclosed, each of nanocrystalline material with grain sizes in the 1-100 nm range. 5 figs.

Beck, D.D.; Siegel, R.W.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Core-to-Rydberg band shift and broadening of hydrogen bonded ammonia clusters studied with nitrogen K-edge excitation spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen 1s (N ls) core-to-Rydberg excitation spectra of hydrogen-bonded clusters of ammonia (AM) have been studied in the small cluster regime of beam conditions with time-of-flight (TOF) fragment-mass spectroscopy. By monitoring partial-ion-yield spectra of cluster-origin products, ''cluster'' specific excitation spectra could be recorded. Comparison of the ''cluster'' band with ''monomer'' band revealed that the first resonance bands of clusters corresponding to N 1s{yields} 3sa{sub 1}/3pe of AM monomer are considerably broadened. The changes of the experimental core-to-Rydberg transitions {Delta}FWHM (N 1s{yields} 3sa{sub 1}/3pe) ={approx}0.20/{approx}0.50 eV compare well with the x ray absorption spectra of the clusters generated by using density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The broadening of the core-to-Rydberg bands in small clusters is interpreted as being primarily due to the splitting of non-equivalent core-hole N 1s states caused by both electrostatic core-hole and hydrogen-bonding (H{sub 3}N{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}H-NH{sub 2}) interactions upon dimerization. Under Cs dimer configuration, core-electron binding energy of H-N (H-donor) is significantly decreased by the intermolecular core-hole interaction and causes notable redshifts of core-excitation energies, whereas that of lone-pair nitrogen (H-acceptor) is slightly increased and results in appreciable blueshifts in the core-excitation bands. The result of the hydrogen-bonding interaction strongly appears in the n-{sigma}* orbital correlation, destabilizing H-N donor Rydberg states in the direction opposite to the core-hole interaction, when excited N atom with H-N donor configuration strongly possesses the Rydberg component of anti-bonding {sigma}* (N-H) character. Contributions of other cyclic H-bonded clusters (AM){sub n} with n{>=} 3 to the spectral changes of the N 1s{yields} 3sa{sub 1}/3pe bands are also examined.

Yamanaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Osamu [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Tanaka, Kenichiro [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); XFEL Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

I. Interaction of ammonia with single crystal rhodium catalysts. II. Hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on a W(111) surface: a theoretical molecular orbital approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rates of ammonia decomposition on (110), (100), and (111) single crystal faces of rhodium were measured at 580 to 725/sup 0/K and 10/sup -3/ to 500 x 10/sup -3/ torr. The decomposition rates were proportional to P/sub NH/sub 3//sup/1/2/ and P/sub NH/sub 3// at low and high hydrogen pressures, respectively. The H/sub 2/ kinetic order varied from 0 (low P/sub H/sub 2//) to -1.0 (high P/sub H/). The rate was independent of N/sub 2/ pressure. NH/sub 3/ decomposes about 1.5 times faster than ND/sub 3/ on the (110) and (111) faces. Rates on the (110) surface are over 10 times as rapid as on the (111). LEED, Auger, and flash desorption experiments indicated that boron was a significant surface poison and that the Rh(110) surface was essentially nitrogen-free. A rate expression is derived from a model involving surface species Rh/sub 2/NH, RhH, and RhN on a nearly bare RH surface. The rate limiting process involves the concurrent dehydrogenation of Rh/sub 2/NH and desorption of N/sub 2/. A decreasing NH/sub 3/ order (< 1/2) at high P/sub NH/sub 3// and low T is due to buildup of surface intermediates. The relative bonding energies of hydrogen and nitrogen chemisorbed at three sites on a W(111) surface were obtained via the extended Hueckel molecular orbital theory. The preferred site for both H and N chemisorption was determined as the TOP position, i.e., a single coordination site on top of a protruding W atom. The W(111) surface was simulated by truncated arrays of seven tungsten atoms. The basis set for the calculations included the tungsten valence orbitals plus the filled 5p orbitals needed for repulsion at small internuclear distances. N adsorption in the three-fold holes available on the W(111) lattices used disrupted the W--W bonds sufficiently to cause the overall bond energy to be less than for the single coordination site. The dissymmetry between the three-fold lattices and the four-fold W d orbitals may also be a contributing factor.

Vavere, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrogen-permeable composite metal membrane and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various hydrogen production and hydrogen sulfide decomposition processes are disclosed that utilize composite metal membranes that contain an intermetallic diffusion barrier separating a hydrogen-permeable base metal and a hydrogen-permeable coating metal. The barrier is a thermally stable inorganic proton conductor.

Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR)

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

128

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pasterczyk, James W. (Westmont, IL); Winterer, Markus (Westmont, IL); Krause, Theodore R. (Lisle, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas. 5 figs.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry. Presentation Title, Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review.

135

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm...

136

Electrolytic production of hydrogen. [from carbonaceous materials  

SciTech Connect

A cyclic electrolytic process is claimed for the manufacture of hydrogen from carbonaceous material such as coal, agricultural wastes and garbage to produce commercial hydrogen. An alakli metal sulfate is reduced to an alkali metal sulfide by reaction of the sulfate and carbonaceous fuel at an elevated temperature. The sulfide and impurities derived from the fuel are digested with an aqueous solution to dissolve the sulfide and separate out the impurities. The solution of the alkali sulfide is added to electrolytic cells in which an electric current is utilized to generate hydrogen at the cathode while oxidizing the sulfide substantially to sulfate at the anode. The cell electrolyte temperature is greater than 150/sup 0/C and less than 350/sup 0/C. Under these conditions the polarization problem encountered in hydrogen/oxygen cells is substantially avoided. The alkali sulfate is then separated from the electrolyte stream exiting from the electrolytic cells, reduced again by burning with fuel and recycled to the electrolytic cell.

Spitzer, R.

1978-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the understanding of hydrogen and its interactions in III/V and II/VI compound semiconductors is reviewed. Donor, acceptor and deep level passivation is well established in III/V compounds based on electrical measurements and on spectroscopic studies. The hydrogen donor levels in GaAs and GaP are estimated to lie near E{sub v}+0.5 eV and E{sub v}+0.3 eV, respectively. Arsenic acceptors have been passivated by hydrogen in CdTe and the very first nitrogen-hydrogen local vibrational model spectra in ZnSe have been reported. This long awaited result may lead to an explanation for the poor activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnSe grown by techniques which involve high concentrations of hydrogen.

Haller, E.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

139

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration ... (e.g., water vapor, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen) ... Storage Withdrawals: ...

140

Novel Carbon(C)-Boron(B)-Nitrogen(N)-Containing H2 Storage Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Shih-Yuan Liu University of Oregon Department of Chemistry 1253 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1253 Phone: (541) 346-5573 Email: lsy@uoregon.edu In colloaboration with: * Dr. Tom Autrey, Dr. Abhi Karkamkar, and Mr. Jamie Holladay Pacific Northwest National Laboratory * Dr. David Dixon The University of Alabama * Dr. Paul Osenar Protonex Technology Corporation DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sulfidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Coal gasification is an important process, providing material challenges. Reference 81 describes the evaluation of alloys

142

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

143

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

144

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

III. Final report: demonstration plant equipment descriptions, test plan, and operating instructions Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us |...

146

Hydrogen Sulfide, Oil and Gas, and People's Lana Skrtic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at sewage treatment plants, manure-handling plants, tanneries, and coke oven plants.5 2 EPA, "Report standard cubic feet)."9 Sour gas is routinely `sweetened' at processing facilities called desulfurization Process for Desulfurizing Ultra-deep Natural Gas Near the Wellhead," presented at Natural Gas Technologies

Kammen, Daniel M.

147

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide and health in Rotorua, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rotorua, New Zealand, lies inside a volcanic caldera. Natural steam is extensively used for space and water heating, and electric power generation. This report presents results of a preliminary reconnaissance survey of atmospheric H/sub 2/S levels in the area and attempts to relate these levels to health statistics in the region. 5 refs., 8 tabs. (ACR)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

149

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

150

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

151

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

First commercial test is success for catalytic hydrogen sulfide oxidation process. [LO-CAT catalytic hydrogen sulfide oxidation processes  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the characteristics of the process and the bases for selecting the LO-CAT process for sulfur recovery from refinery process off-gas streams. In addition, the details of the application and the experience gained during the startup at the Tacoma, Washington refinery are described. The LO-CAT uses a nontoxic catalyst solution and a relatively simple processing scheme which employs sulfur sinking for the separation of sulfur from the circulating sulfur slurry. In addition, the LO-CAT process promised very high sulfur recovery efficiency, 99.85% minimum, and essentially an infinite turndown ratio. A discussion is presented of the major problems experienced in the operation of the LO-CAT sulfur recovery unit which have been: sulfur floating, catalyst solution foaming, corrosion, erosion, plugging, and biological growth. Each of these problems has surfaced repeatedly in the operation of the plant. Operating guidelines are provided. 2 refs.

Cabodi, A.J.; Van, H.R.; Hardison, L.C.

1982-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Hydrogen and Clean Fuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of hydrogen and nitrogen. CLICK ON IMAGE TO SEE LARGER VIEW Hydrogen is produced from coal in a process that is similar to SMR but more complex because coal is not a single...

155

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

156

Hydrogen Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. ... These articles, of interest to the hydrogen community, can be viewed by clicking on the title. ...

157

Properties Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. PROPERTIES, ... For information on a PC database that includes hydrogen property information click here. ...

158

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Chicago team. On-board hydrogen storage is critical to the development of future high energy efficiency transportation technologies, such as hydrogen-powered fuel...

159

Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

160

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrogen-Selective Membrane  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2.s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2. s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available This data set, prepared by Elizabeth Holland and colleagues, contains data for wet and dry nitrogen-species deposition for the United States and...

165

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

166

Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth  

SciTech Connect

A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates  

SciTech Connect

A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Ogden, The Hope for Hydrogen, Issues in Science andand James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: MovingHydrogen Highways BY TIMOTHY LIPMAN H 2 T H E S TAT E O F C

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

171

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Newman, Proc. Syrup. Battery Design and Optimization,123, 1364 (1976). Symp, Battery Design and Optimization, S.~ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Pollard, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bioleaching and electrobioleaching of low grade copper sulfide ore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Low grade Copper sulfide ore of Sarcheshmeh copper mine of Iran was leached using bioleaching mode and electrobioleaching mode.

174

On the Mechanism of Castastropic Atmospheric Sulfidation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, On the Mechanism of Castastropic Atmospheric Sulfidation of Electronic Components in Data Centers. Author(s), Linn W. Hobbs. On-Site...

175

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

176

Hydrogen production using ammonia borane  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Understanding Nitrogen Fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from atmospheric nitrogen could, in principle, be more energy-efficient. This is particularly attractive giv

Paul J. Chirik

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

179

Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cost and Performance Comparison Of Stationary Hydrogen Fueling Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or nitrogen from air and the purification of hydrogen from sources such as catalytic reformer off gas, coke oven gas, and ethylene plant effluent gas. Pressure swing systems are based on selective adsorbent beds of hydrogen from natural gas to fuel hydrogen FCV's. Four potential reforming systems were studied: 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August development · Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development · B31.12 Status & Structure · Hydrogen Pipeline issues · Research Needs · Where Do We Go From Here? #12;4 Code

182

Glossary Term - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lepton Previous Term (Lepton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Mercury) Mercury Liquid Nitrogen Liquid nitrogen boils in a frying pan on a desk. The liquid state of the element...

183

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

184

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

185

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

186

Hydrogen Radialysis  

INL scientists have invented a process of forming chemical compositions, such as a hydrides which can provide a source of hydrogen. The process exposes the chemical composition decaying radio-nuclides which provide the energy to with a hydrogen source ...

187

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

188

Hydrogen wishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen Wishes, presented at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies, explores the themes of wishes and peace. It dramatizes the intimacy and power of transforming one's breath and vocalized wishes into a floating sphere, a bubble charged with hydrogen. ...

Winslow Burleson; Paul Nemirovsky; Dan Overholt

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

190

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

191

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

192

Redirection of metabolism for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

This project is to develop and apply techniques in metabolic engineering to improve the biocatalytic potential of the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris for nitrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen gas production. R. palustris, is an ideal platform to develop as a biocatalyst for hydrogen gas production because it is an extremely versatile microbe that produces copious amounts of hydrogen by drawing on abundant natural resources of sunlight and biomass. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, such as R. palustris, generate hydrogen and ammonia during a process known as biological nitrogen fixation. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase and normally consumes nitrogen gas, ATP and electrons. The applied use of nitrogenase for hydrogen production is attractive because hydrogen is an obligatory product of this enzyme and is formed as the only product when nitrogen gas is not supplied. Our challenge is to understand the systems biology of R. palustris sufficiently well to be able to engineer cells to produce hydrogen continuously, as fast as possible and with as high a conversion efficiency as possible of light and electron donating substrates. For many experiments we started with a strain of R. palustris that produces hydrogen constitutively under all growth conditions. We then identified metabolic pathways and enzymes important for removal of electrons from electron-donating organic compounds and for their delivery to nitrogenase in whole R. palustris cells. For this we developed and applied improved techniques in 13C metabolic flux analysis. We identified reactions that are important for generating electrons for nitrogenase and that are yield-limiting for hydrogen production. We then increased hydrogen production by blocking alternative electron-utilizing metabolic pathways by mutagenesis. In addition we found that use of non-growing cells as biocatalysts for hydrogen gas production is an attractive option, because cells divert all resources away from growth and to hydrogen. Also R. palustris cells remain viable in a non-growing state for long periods of time.

Harwood, Caroline S.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reading Comprehension - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen is the most common substance in Earth's _________ crust oceans atmosphere trees . In the Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen is a gas. The particles of a gas move very quickly. They run around and bounce into everyone and everything. The hotter a gas is, the _________ slower faster hotter colder the particles move. When a gas is _________ cooled warmed heated compressed , its particles slow down. If a gas is cooled enough, it can change from a gas to a liquid. For nitrogen, this happens at a very _________ strange warm low high temperature. If you want to change nitrogen from a gas to a liquid, you have to bring its temperature down to 77 Kelvin. That's 321 degrees below zero _________ Kelvin Celsius Centigrade Fahrenheit ! Liquid nitrogen looks like water, but it acts very differently. It

194

Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

Nolan, Paul S. (North Canton, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH); Vecci, Stanley J. (Alliance, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: IAQ-Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monoxide, ethane, formaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen oxides, ozone, propane, radon, and sulfur dioxide. 3. Bioaerosols, including bacteria, fungi, and molds. 4....

196

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C.L.; Russell, L.H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nitrogen spark denoxer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

Ng, Henry K. (Naperville, IL); Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition Metal Sulfide Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells Hua Zhang 1 , Ysmael Verde-Gómez 1 and Allan J. Jacobson 1 Alejandra Ramirez 2 and Russell R. Chianelli 2 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Houston Houston, TX 77204 2 Materials Research and Technology Institute, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 Transition Metal Sulfide Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells Hua Zhang 1 , Ysmael Verde-Gómez 1 and Allan J. Jacobson 1 Alejandra Ramirez 2 and Russell R. Chianelli 2 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Houston Houston, TX 77204 2 Materials Research and Technology Institute, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 March 21, 2003 Objectives ¾ Investigate non-platinum electro-catalysts with CO tolerance ¾ Focus on transition metal sulfides as electro-catalysts

199

Stability and Reactivity of Iron Sulfide Films in Sour Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Iron sulfide scales form on steels in the presence of H2S, notably in the extreme environments that exist in the oil and gas fields. Our research...

200

Looping Sulfide Oxidation Process for Anode Copper Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Multiple-sulfur isotope effects during photolysis of carbonyl sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine sulfur isotope effects during ultraviolet photolysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) to carbon monoxide (CO) and elemental sulfur (S[superscript 0]). The OCS gas at 3.7 to 501 ...

Lin, Ying

202

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond, S.M. (Raymond A.) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

JV Task-121 Electrochemical Synthesis of Nitrogen Fertilizers  

SciTech Connect

An electrolytic renewable nitrogen fertilizer process that utilizes wind-generated electricity, N{sub 2} extracted from air, and syngas produced via the gasification of biomass to produce nitrogen fertilizer ammonia was developed at the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center. This novel process provides an important way to directly utilize biosyngas generated mainly via the biomass gasification in place of the high-purity hydrogen which is required for Haber Bosch-based production of the fertilizer for the production of the widely used nitrogen fertilizers. Our preliminary economic projection shows that the economic competitiveness of the electrochemical nitrogen fertilizer process strongly depends upon the cost of hydrogen gas and the cost of electricity. It is therefore expected the cost of nitrogen fertilizer production could be considerably decreased owing to the direct use of cost-effective 'hydrogen-equivalent' biosyngas compared to the high-purity hydrogen. The technical feasibility of the electrolytic process has been proven via studying ammonia production using humidified carbon monoxide as the hydrogen-equivalent vs. the high-purity hydrogen. Process optimization efforts have been focused on the development of catalysts for ammonia formation, electrolytic membrane systems, and membrane-electrode assemblies. The status of the electrochemical ammonia process is characterized by a current efficiency of 43% using humidified carbon monoxide as a feedstock to the anode chamber and a current efficiency of 56% using high-purity hydrogen as the anode gas feedstock. Further optimization of the electrolytic process for higher current efficiency and decreased energy consumption is ongoing at the EERC.

Junhua Jiang; Ted Aulich

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

JV Task-121 Electrochemical Synthesis of Nitrogen Fertilizers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrolytic renewable nitrogen fertilizer process that utilizes wind-generated electricity, N{sub 2} extracted from air, and syngas produced via the gasification of biomass to produce nitrogen fertilizer ammonia was developed at the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center. This novel process provides an important way to directly utilize biosyngas generated mainly via the biomass gasification in place of the high-purity hydrogen which is required for Haber Bosch-based production of the fertilizer for the production of the widely used nitrogen fertilizers. Our preliminary economic projection shows that the economic competitiveness of the electrochemical nitrogen fertilizer process strongly depends upon the cost of hydrogen gas and the cost of electricity. It is therefore expected the cost of nitrogen fertilizer production could be considerably decreased owing to the direct use of cost-effective 'hydrogen-equivalent' biosyngas compared to the high-purity hydrogen. The technical feasibility of the electrolytic process has been proven via studying ammonia production using humidified carbon monoxide as the hydrogen-equivalent vs. the high-purity hydrogen. Process optimization efforts have been focused on the development of catalysts for ammonia formation, electrolytic membrane systems, and membrane-electrode assemblies. The status of the electrochemical ammonia process is characterized by a current efficiency of 43% using humidified carbon monoxide as a feedstock to the anode chamber and a current efficiency of 56% using high-purity hydrogen as the anode gas feedstock. Further optimization of the electrolytic process for higher current efficiency and decreased energy consumption is ongoing at the EERC.

Junhua Jiang; Ted Aulich

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When some of the uncertainties associated with lightning are reviewed, it becomes difficult to support a large production of fixed nitrogen from the lightning shock wave.

G. A. Dawson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings for use in high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of iron-aluminide weld overlay coatings for high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation resistance critically depends on the determination of the aluminum concentration range for which good corrosion behavior and weldability coexist. This study demonstrated that a sound weld overlay composition with about 30 at.% Al has relatively low corrosion rates in a highly aggressive oxidizing/sulfidizing (H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar) environment at 800 C. Its corrosion resistance was superior to alloys with compositions like that of type 310 stainless steel and Fecralloy. The results with this overlay composition can be explained on the basis of what is known about the effects of variations in aluminum and chromium concentrations on high-temperature oxidation/sulfidation from studies with bulk iron aluminides. While higher aluminum concentrations are even better for long-term corrosion resistance, the ability to reliably produce weld overlays of such compositions without hydrogen cracking is problematical and is the subject of continuing development.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hydrogen Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ASHRAE 62.1, 7 air changes per hour, 100 ... I, Division II, Group B: testing and research laboratory; ... Planning Guidance for Hydrogen Projects as a ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

HOW LINDE MAKES HEAVY WATER FROM HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

A heavy water plant to be operated in conjunction with an ammonium nitrate fertilizer plant is described. Initial electrolytic deuterium enrichment of hydrogen takes place in a three-stage water electrolysis plant. A part of the hydrogen produced for the ammonia synthesis plant is run through the hydrogen distillation plant, the deuterium drained off, and the hydrogen returned. Natural water is used to scrub deuterium from electrolytic hydrogen before feeding to the cells. Contaminants such as water, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen are frozen out, and the purified enriched hydrogen is fractionated following an interim step which catalyzes concentrated HD to an equilibrium mixture of D/sub 2/ , HD, and H/sub 2/. Pure oxygen burns the final fractionation product to water containing 99.8% deuterium oxide. (J.R.D.)

1959-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

211

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Hydrogen Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from...

212

Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydrogen Bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

Pence, Dallas T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

217

Hydrogen: Helpful Links & Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helpful Links & Contacts. Helpful Links. Hydrogen Information, Website. ... Contacts for Commercial Hydrogen Measurement. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi [Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi (Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

222

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Cycle Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set prepared by Elisabeth Holland and colleagues titled "Global N Cycle: Fluxes and N2O Mixing Ratios...

223

Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts with successive oxidation catalysts with successive oxidation and hydrogenation steps at increased temperature to make the intermetallic alloy hydrogenation or oxidation catalysts less susceptible to deactivation by gas impurities, such as hydrogen sulfide; to increase the ability of the hydrogenation and oxidation catalysts to regenerate after sulfur poisoning; and to increase the activity of the hydrogenation and oxidation catalysts to a point close to their original activities after gas impurity poisoning and regeneration. The treatment processes of the present invention are particularly useful for nickel-containing intermetallic alloy hydrogenation catalysts and platinum-containing intermetallic alloy hydrogenation catalysts and best results are obtained for the zirconium/nickel intermetallic alloy hydrogenation catalysts. 23 figs.

Wright, R.B.

1990-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal transformations of nitrogen and sulfur forms in peat related to coalification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical pathways for nitrogen and sulfur transformations during coalification are elucidated by comparing the chemical forms of unaltered peats, lignites, and coals and pyrolyzed peats using a combination of spectroscopic techniques in unaltered peats, the NMR and XPS spectra are consistent with the presence of amide nitrogen. The spectra indicate that a thermal transformation of amide nitrogen into pyrrolic and pyridinic forms occurs after thermal stress that is roughly equivalent to lignitification. High total nitrogen levels are found in pyrolyzed peats relative to lignites and higher-rank coals, suggesting that some amides initially found in peat are lost via nonthermal pathways during coalification. Lignites contain the highest levels of quaternary nitrogen, and they are associated with protonated pyridinic structures. Most quaternary nitrogen is formed during lignitification as a result of the creation and interaction of basic nitrogen species with acidic functionalities and is lost completely during bitumenization. Sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (S-XANES) of unaltered peats detect the presence of disulfide, mercapto, aliphatic sulfide, and aromatic forms of organically bound sulfur. XPS and S-XANES results show that the relative level of aromatic sulfur increases as the severity of peat pyrolysis increases. The relative level of aromatic sulfur increases through the selective loss of disulfide, aliphatic sulfide, and SO{sub 3} groups and through the transformation of aliphatic sulfur forms. Aliphatic sulfur is present mostly as mercapto and disulfide species in peats and in lignites but not in higher-rank coals. These results indicate that mercapto and disulfide species are lost after lignitification. Organic sulfur in peats exist mainly as aromatic forms, consistent with the level of aromatic sulfur increasing with the increasing degree of coalification. 91 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

S.R. Kelemen; M. Afeworki; M.L. Gorbaty; P.J. Kwiatek; M. Sansone; C.C. Walters; A.D. Cohen [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

MODEL OF DIFFUSERS / PERMEATORS FOR HYDROGEN PROCESSING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper.

Hang, T; William Jacobs, W

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

227

Storing Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reaction Behavior of Sulfides Associated with Stibnite in Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, we aim at the behavior of sulfides involved PbS, Cu2S, Bi2S3 and FeS2 in Na2CO3-NaCl molten salt, using XRD and TG-DTA methods based

229

Hydrogen Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

230

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

231

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,and James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: Movingof Energy, National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, November 2002.

Ogden, Joan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen SRNL Connection  

hydrogen storage. Why is Savannah River National Laboratory conducting hydrogen research and development? ... Both the Department of Energys hydrogen ...

235

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

236

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap...

237

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen...

238

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

239

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government interests, a variety of vendors, and numerous utilities. Keywords: Hydrogen production, natural gas, costs Purpose Assess progress toward the 2005 DOE Hydrogen...

240

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Futures Simulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen scenarios will affect carbon and other environmental effluents and U.S. oil import requirements Outputs: Delivered hydrogen costs (cost per gallon of gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project ID: 273 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

242

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project ID: 268 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

243

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Electrolytic Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Principal Investigator Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production:...

244

Surface Segregation in a PdCu Alloy Hydrogen Separation Membrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separation of hydrogen from mixed gas streams is an important step for hydrogen generation technologies, including hydrocarbon reforming and coal/biomass gasification. Dense palladium-based membranes have received significant attention for this application because of palladiums ability to dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at its surface for subsequent transport of hydrogen atoms through its bulk. Alloying palladium with minor components, like copper, has been shown to improve both the membranes structural characteristics and resistance to poisoning of its catalytic surface [1]. Surface segregationa composition difference between the bulk material and its surfaceis common in alloys and can affect important surface processes. Rational design of alloy membranes requires that surface segregation be understood, and possibly controlled. In this work, we examine surface segregation in a polycrystalline Pd70Cu30 hydrogen separation membrane as a function of thermal treatment and adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

Miller, J.B.; Matranga, C.S.; Gellman, A.J.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

246

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

247

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen Technology Validation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

249

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

HEUNG, LEUNGK.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

Perdieu, Louisa H. (Overland Park, KS)

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Freeze the Rainbow! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! What happens when the world's most beloved cryogenic liquid meets one of the most common household appliances? Find out when we try to microwave liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A little while ago we received an email from Star of the Sea Catholic School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, asking what happens when you place liquid nitrogen in a microwave. Well, I just happen to have some liquid nitrogen! Steve: And I just happen to have a microwave!

254

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze the Rainbow! Freeze the Rainbow! Previous Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!) Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: ...meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol! Joanna: While a mix of 70 percent ethylene glycol and 30 percent water doesn't freeze until 60 degrees below zero, it's still no match for liquid nitrogen. At 321 degrees below zero, liquid nitrogen easily freezes

255

Sulfide ceramics in molten-salt electrolyte batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfide ceramics are finding application in the manufacture of advanced batteries with molten salt electrolyte. Use of these ceramics as a peripheral seal component has permitted development of bipolar Li/FeS{sub 2} batteries. This bipolar battery has a molten lithium halide electrolyte and operates at 400 to 450C. Initial development and physical properties evaluations indicate the ability to form metal/ceramic bonded seal (13-cm ID) components for use in high-temperature corrosive environments. These sealants are generally CaAl{sub 2}S{sub 4}-based ceramics. Structural ceramics (composites with oxide or nitride fillers), highly wetting sealant formulations, and protective coatings are also being developed. Sulfide ceramics show great promise because of their relatively low melting point, high-temperature viscous flow, chemical stability, high-strength bonding, and tailored coefficients of thermal expansion. Our methodology of generating laminated metal/ceramic pellets (e.g., molybdenum/sulfide ceramic/molybdenum) with which to optimize materials formulation and seal processing is described.

Kaun, T.D.; Hash, M.C.; Simon, D.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

258

Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorption by Activated Carbon made from Anaerobic Digestion By-product.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas, produced from anaerobic digestion of cattle manure, is an attractive alternative energy source as it is rich in methane. However, it is necessary to (more)

Ho, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directly, as in a traditional H , 23.1% CO, 5.8% CO , 6.6% H O, 0.5% H S, and2 2 2 2 coal-fired power plant was activated using coal-fired power plants. With improved gas turbine tech- steam by replacing the N flow temperature was examined as a2 function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal

Cal, Mark P.

260

Cost of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations. [DOW, EIC, Stretford, and iron catalyst processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H{sub 2}S emission abatement processes considered feasible for control of airborne emissions included two upstream and two downstream treatment techniques. From literature describing the technical aspects of the processes, individual treatment cost functions were developed. These functions were then used to estimate the range of costs that may be encountered when controlling H{sub 2}S emissions to meet given standards. Treatment costs include estimates of certain fixed charges and overheads that normally apply to long lived capital investment projects of similar nature. Continuing experience with control technology for H{sub 2}S abatement indicates process application may have a significant impact on the total cost of geothermal electricity at sites with H{sub 2}S concentrations in excess of 50 ppM{sub w}. Approximately four sites of the 38 USGS high temperature hydrothermal systems fall into this category. At Baca, New Mexico the cost of controlling H{sub 2}S emissions was estimated to be 5.5 mills per kWh. Calculations were based on a 50 MWe flashed steam plant using the Stretford-Peroxide combination of processes to achieve 99% abatement.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence of Sulfite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

citnlc lmsM cobdt citntq rrc rulfitq pH 7.t. Squrro: l0mM ofWackenrodcr's Scction 4.4),but rrc doubtthis wassignificant.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence of Sulfite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption becn is with havc correlated the LIV (ChenOH - end mtwulfidcs havc bcen -duliguc (1972), andt9? t) and ludi$ (1979) havc applicdrhis informationto

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17671774 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e. an activation energy is required for chemi- cal adsorption to occur and once that energy is supplied and gas-phase regeneration experiments were [1] Cal MP, Strickler BW, Lizzio AA. High temperature hydro, PA: US Department of Energy/Federal removal requirement set at one of the DOE's IGCC plants. Energy

Cal, Mark P.

264

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Co-adsorption studies of hydrogen with nitrogen in zeolites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of co-adsorption studies of N{sub 2} with H{sub 2} makes it possible to obtain information about adsorption of N{sub 2} by monitoring changes in the rotational spectrum of the co-adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules. The authors present such results on N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} in Na-13X. The authors have demonstrated that inelastic neutron scattering studies of H{sub 2} co-adsorbed with other molecules can be used as an effective probe of their adsorption sites and interactions with zeolite hosts. Simulation studies are clearly required for extracting the wealth of detail which is evident in these data.

Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center; Trouw, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McMenomy, M. [Swarthmore Coll., PA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Co-adsorption studies of hydrogen with nitrogen in zeolites.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of co-adsorption studies of N{sub 2} with H{sub 2} makes it possible to obtain information about adsorption of N{sub 2} by monitoring changes in the rotational spectrum of the co-adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules. We present such results on N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} in Na-13X.

Eckert, J.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lithium Super-Ionic Sulfide Carbon (LiSISC) Composite for Li-S ...  

Lithium Super-Ionic Sulfide Carbon (LiSISC) Composite for Li-S Batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

271

EXTRACTION OF HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS WITH ETHYL SULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting Pu>s6/sup > /om an aqueous ammonium nitrate-containing nitric acid solution with ethyl sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power...

274

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

275

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

276

Introduction to hydrogen energy  

SciTech Connect

The book comprises the following papers: primary energy sources suitable for hydrogen production, thermochemical and electrolytic production of hydrogen from water, hydrogen storage and transmission methods, hydrogen-oxygen utilization devices, residential and industrial utilization of energy, industrial utilization of hydrogen, use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation, an assessment of hydrogen-fueled navy ships, mechanisms and strategies of market penetration for hydrogen, and fossil/hydrogen energy mix and population control. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (LK)

Veziroglu, T.N. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Smol, Robert (East Patchogue, NY); Farber, Gerald (Elmont, NY); Naphtali, Leonard M. (Washington, DC)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nitrogen fixation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, Hao-Lin (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sulfide-Driven Arsenic Mobilization from Arsenopyrite and Black Shale Pyrite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black shale formations.

Zhu, W.; Young, L; Yee, N; Serfes, M; Rhine, E; Reinfelder, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of Low-cost Hydrogen Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research was aimed at understanding and improving the speed and reproducibility of our resistive hydrogen sensor, along with complementary efforts in manufacturability and further design improvements. Maskworks were designed to allow for the printing and firing of multi-sensor layouts (15 per substrate) and a large batch of these sensors was produced using standard thick-film manufacturing lines. Piece-to-piece variations of both the as-made resistance and the response of these sensors to hydrogen were within acceptable tolerances, and the sensor design has now been released for commercial prototyping. Automated testing was begun in order to develop long-term performance data. Dynamic response of selected sensors was measured before and after exposures to methane, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon monoxide, in order to assess the effects of interference gases and surface poisoning. As expected, H{sub 2}S degrades the sensor somewhat, whereas CH{sub 4} and CO do not create significant interference when air is present.

Lauf, R.J.

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

282

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal,...

283

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Basics Hydrogen is a clean-burning fuel, and when combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, it produces heat and electricity with only water vapor as a by-product. But hydrogen...

284

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background: The photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen has drawn properties In order to develop better materials for solar energy applications, in-depth photoelectrochemical simulated solar irradiance. Hydrogen production experiments are conducted in a sealed aluminum cell

Raftery, Dan

285

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: The Hype About Hydrogen By Joseph J. Romm ReviewedJ. Romm. The Hype About Hydrogen. Washington, DC: IslandEmissions. The Hype About Hydrogen describes in detail what

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

287

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen (H2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen (H2) Hydrogen (H2) Historical Records from Ice Cores Deuterium Record from Dome C, Antarctica Continuous Measurements Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE,...

289

Hydrogen Program Overview  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: Why Hydrogen?

290

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

291

An experimental investigation of the ignition properties of hydrogen and carbon monoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for syngas turbine applications S.M. Walton *, X. He, B.T. Zigler, M.S. Wooldridge Department of Mechanical of simulated syngas mixtures of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon. Keywords: Carbon monoxide; Hydrogen; Syngas; Ignition; Rapid compression facility 1. Introduction Syngas

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

292

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 27 (2002) 403412 www.elsevier.com/locate/ijhydene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 27 (2002) 403­412 www with the titanium atoms in the B2 TiFe surfaces. ? 2002 International Association for Hydrogen Energy. Published the mechanism of gas (hydro- gen, oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) adsorption onto metal surfaces [8­14]. For example

Kim, Jai Sam

293

Summary of research on hydrogen production from fossil fuels conducted at NETL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this presentation we will summarize the work performed at NETL on the production of hydrogen via partial oxidation/dry reforming of methane and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide. We have determined that high pressure resulted in greater carbon formation on the reforming catalysts, lower methane and CO2 conversions, as well as a H2/CO ratio. The results also showed that Rh/alumina catalyst is the most resistant toward carbon deposition both at lower and at higher pressures. We studied the catalytic partial oxidation of methane over Ni-MgO solid solutions supported on metal foams and the results showed that the foam-supported catalysts reach near-equilibrium conversions of methane and H2/CO selectivities. The rates of carbon deposition differ greatly among the catalysts, varying from 0.24 mg C/g cat h for the dipped foams to 7.0 mg C/g cat h for the powder-coated foams, suggesting that the exposed Cr on all of the foam samples may interact with the Ni-MgO catalyst to kinetically limit carbon formation. Effects of sulfur poisoning on reforming catalysts were studies and pulse sulfidation of catalyst appeared to be reversible for some of the catalysts but not for all. Under pulse sulfidation conditions, the 0.5%Rh/alumina and NiMg2Ox-1100C (solid solution) catalysts were fully regenerated after reduction with hydrogen. Rh catalyst showed the best overall activity, less carbon deposition, both fresh and when it was exposed to pulses of H2S. Sulfidation under steady state conditions significantly reduced catalyst activity. Decomposition of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur was studied over several supported metal oxides and metal oxide catalysts at a temperature range of 650-850C. H2S conversions and effective activation energies were estimated using Arrhenius plots. The results of these studies will further our understanding of catalytic reactions and may help in developing better and robust catalysts for the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels

Shamsi, Abolghasem

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines - Natural Gas Pipelines for Hydrogen Use #12;3 OAK embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures relevant to hydrogen gas transmission pipeline behavior as function of pressure and temperature - Effects of steel composition, microstructure

295

www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration capabilities · Control and load profile software Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power Systems · Off Power ...Powering Change #12;www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Profile Designer and manufacturer-grid renewable power · On-grid community or residential power · Grid incentives for load control · Renewable

296

Small-scale costs of hydrogen derived from ammonia. [As ammonia  

SciTech Connect

A systems study was made to assess the economic prospects for using purchased industrial ammonia as a hydrogen distribution and storage medium for users requiring 33 to 330 million std ft/sup 3/ per year (MSCFY) of hydrogen (or 0.1 to 1.0 MSCFD) at a plant capacity factor of 0.9. Projected costs to the end user were determined for the dissociated ammonia product (75 vol % hydrogen, 25 vol % nitrogen), and for ultra-high-purity hydrogen (99.999%) obtained by separation of the nitrogen. Costs were also projected for hydrogen produced by steam-reforming of natural gas, for electrolytic hydrogen, and for purchased (merchant) liquid hydrogen. The costs of ammonia and its hydrogen, and liquid hydrogen made by ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), are also listed for comparison. The latter costs from a recent study were updated to include more realistic (higher) hydrogen purification costs. All of the costs, expressed as 1980 $/MBTU in 1990, were obtained for two sets of forecast energy prices on the basis that advanced technology electrolyzers and OTEC products would be available in 1990. Results of the analysis showed that merchant liquid hydrogen was substantially higher in cost than all of the other options. Although hydrogen derived from industrial ammonia was significantly higher in cost than electrolytic hydrogen or hydrogen derived from OTEC ammonia, it can be produced using state-of-the-art technology. Possible reductions in the total cost of obtaining hydrogen via ammonia could make it lower in cost than electrolytic hydrogen. Hydrogen produced from natural gas was lowest in cost, among the land-based sources, for plant sizes exceeding 100 MSCFY. Other comparisons are provided, including the cost of ammonia made from coal. The criteria and methodology applied in the study are described. Uses of the product hydrogen are suggested along with recommendations for future work.

Strickland, G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antifreeze! Antifreeze! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! A burning candle is placed in a container of liquid nitrogen! Filmed in front of a live studio audience. Well, they were live when we started... [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Steve: Now, then. I'm a little bit afraid to ask this next question because I think I already know the answer, but is anyone in here feeling a little... dangerous? You're willing to take a chance? Because I am willing to do an experiment they haven't let me do since 'The Incident.' Now, because of the danger, I cannot have a volunteer. I must do this on my

298

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery...

299

Hydrogen Absorption Property of Encapsulated Lani4.25A10.75  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For hydrogen economy to become a reality, hydrogen production will have to be greatly increased from what it is today. Hydrogen will have to be recovered from a variety of gas streams including low concentration streams with efficient methods. Efficient process for recovering hydrogen in low concentration streams is not available today. Powder of LaNi4.25Al0.75 was encapsulated in a porous silica matrix to produce a stable composite material. The material was packed in a column and tested for hydrogen absorption from streams containing nitrogen, methane or carbon monoxide. The composite material removed hydrogen from nitrogen containing methane very well, but suffered decrease in capacity and rate when carbon monoxide was present. Using fluorinated metal hydride powder improved the kinetics but not the tolerance to carbon monoxide.

Heung, L.K.

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

302

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

303

RECTIFIED ABSORPTION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating and recovering heavy hydrogen isotopes from gaseous mixtures by multiple stage cyclic absorption and rectification from an approximate solvent. In particular, it is useful for recovering such isoteoes from ammonia feedstock streams containing nitrogen solvent. Modifications of the process ranging from isobaric to isothermal are provided. Certain impurities are tolerated, giving advantages over conventional fractional distillation processes. (AEC)

Hunt, C.D.; Hanson, D.N.

1961-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nitrogen chiller acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the inspection and testing requirements for the Nitrogen Chiller unit. The Chiller will support the Rotary Mode core Sampling System during the summer. The Chiller cools the Nitrogen Purge Gas that is used when drilling in tank wastes to cool the drill bit.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stations Stations Public-use hydrogen fueling stations are very much like gasoline ones. In fact, sometimes, hydrogen and gasoline cars can be fueled at the same station. These stations offer self-service pumps, convenience stores, and other services in high-traffic locations. Photo of a Shell fueling station showing the site convenience store and hydrogen and gasoline fuel pumps. This fueling station in Washington, D.C., provides drivers with both hydrogen and gasoline fuels Many future hydrogen fueling stations will be expansions of existing fueling stations. These facilities will offer hydrogen pumps in addition to gasoline or natural gas pumps. Other hydrogen fueling stations will be "standalone" operations. These stations will be designed and constructed to

306

Predictive models for emission of hydrogen powered car using various artificial intelligent tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of artificial intelligent models as virtual sensors to predict relevant emissions such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen for a hydrogen powered car. The virtual sensors are ... Keywords: Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems, Artificial intelligent techniques, Back-propagation neural networks with LevenbergMarquardt algorithm, Hydrogen emission prediction, Hydrogen powered car, UTAS artificial neural networks

Vishy Karri; Tien Nhut Ho

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Initiators of coal hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initiators examined include cyclic and linear silico-organic compounds, the effects of which on the hydrogenation process are studied. The substances not only localize the active radicals before these are stabilised by hydrogen, but actually activate the destruction reaction of the coal substance and in this way generate atomic hydrogen: radical polymerization inhibitors thus convert to activators and hydrogen transfer. (8 refs.)

Krichko, A.A.; Dembovskaya, E.A.; Gorlov, E.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

309

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  | HydrOgEn & Our EnErgy FuturE U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov u.S. department of Energy |  www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future Contents Introduction ................................................... p.1 Hydrogen - An Overview ................................... p.3 Production ..................................................... p.5 Delivery ....................................................... p.15 Storage ........................................................ p.19 Application and Use ........................................ p.25 Safety, Codes and Standards ............................... p.33

310

Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work has been to identify aspects of cell fabrication and treatment which are critical for achieving high efficiency Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. In approaching the problem several comparisons were made of the effects of specific steps in two methods of cell fabrication. These methods had previously given cells of about 6% and a maximum of 9% efficiency. Three areas requiring special attention and specific means to achieve acceptable results were identified. (1) The Cu/sub 2/S/CdS heterojunction area must be minimized. If single source evaporations of CdS are made on substrates whose temperatures (approx. 220/sup 0/C) are monitored and controlled using welded thermocouples, the CdS films will have adequately large grains (grain diameter greater than or equal to 2 ..mu..m) and will not develop significant etch pits during texturing in a mild etchant solution. (2) The termination of the wet barrier processing steps must be done carefully. An acceptable termination involves minimizing the amount of cuprous chloride retained on the cell surface during transfer to a rinsing stage while providing adequate exclusion of air from the space above the surface of the cuprous chloride solution. (3) Once formed, the Cu/sub 2/S layer should not be exposed to high temperatures (>100/sup 0/C) for long periods of time (> 5 min) if surface adsorbed moisture or oxygen are present. Heat treatments in ampoules under flowing hydrogen atmospheres should be preceded and followed by periods of at least 30 minutes at room temperature in the reducing ambient. If all these precautions are taken, wet chemical barrier processing of thermally evaporated CdS films on zinc-plated copper foil substrates yields cells of nearly 8% conversion efficiency without AR coating.

Szedon, J.R.; Biter, W.J.; Abel, J.A.; Dickey, H.C.; Shirland, F.A.

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Enz, Glenn L. (N. Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Theoretical Studies on Heavy Metal Sulfides in Solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Calculating the stabilities, Raman and UV spectra and acidities of As sulfides in aqueous solution', J. A. Tossell, M. D. Zimmermann and G. R. Helz. Some of the Raman spectra obtained by reacting aqueous As(OH)3 with aqueous bisulfide are shown, taken from Wood, et al. (2002). To interpret these spectra we have carried out an extensive series of calculations, detailed for the case of AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} in Table 1 below. By employing state of the art quantum chemical techniques to determine gas-phase harmonic and anharmonic frequencies and solution phase corrections we can accurately match features in the experimental spectrum shown in the top figure. The AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -}...22 H{sub 2}O nanocluster employed is shown in the lower figure. For this species we have calculated the equilibrium structure and the harmonic vibrational spectrum at the CBSB7 B3LYP level. For the free solute species AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} we have carried out a whole series of calculations, evaluating harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies at a number of different quantum mechanical levels. In the spectra below, Fig. 3 and Fig. 5 from Wood, et al. (2002), the features around 700-800 cm{sup -1} are attributed to As-O stretches and those around 350-450 cm{sup -1} to As-S stretches. In the nanocluster an isolated vibrational feature is observed at 425 cm{sup -1}, an As=S stretch, close to the value (415 cm{sup -1}) determined by Wood, et al. (2002). Analysis of the calculated frequencies for AsS(SH){sub 2}{sup -} within a polarizable continuum model yields a similar result. Taking the highest level harmonic results, obtained from a CCSD calculation, and adding anharmonic and PCM corrections at the B3LYP level (designated (3) + (5) - (1) in Table 1) gives a frequency for the intense high frequency As=S stretch within 15 cm{sup -1} of experiment. Although there is still interesting work to be done on the stabilities and the Raman and UV spectra of As sulfides, most of the basic concepts have been worked out and we are therefore proposing to move to a new area, that of humic acids (while continuing our studies complexes formed by As oxides and sulfides, now applied to functional groups present in humic acids).

Tossell, John A.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Superconductors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Main Index Next Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen Superconductors What happens when a magnet is placed on a superconductor? Play the video to find...

317

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

318

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Instant Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freezing Balloons! Freezing Balloons! Previous Video (Freezing Balloons!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Flowers!) Shattering Flowers! Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Need a bunch of balloons blown-up quickly? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We've been making videos for a while now and we've learned that people like balloons and liquid nitrogen! Steve: So... Here you go! Balloon: Crackling... Balloon: Pop! Joanna: Ooh! Balloon: Pop! Balloon: Pop! Steve: If you'd like to know the science of what's going on behind this, please one of our first videos, "Liquid Nitrogen Experiments: The Balloon."

319

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

320

Changes in dimethyl sulfide oceanic distribution due to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here we report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. We find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associated with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sythesis of metal sulfide nanomaerials via thermal decomposition of single-source percursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present a synthetic method for the formation of cuprous sulfide (Cu2S) and lead sulfide (PbS) nanomaterials directly on substrates from the thermolysis of single-source precursors. We find that the final morphology and arrangement of the nanomaterials may be controlled through the concentration of the dissolved precursors and choice of solvent. One-dimensional (1-D) morphologies may also be grown onto substrates with the addition of a metal catalyst layer through solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. These synthetic techniques may be expanded to other metal sulfide materials.

Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Zeid, Tahani W.; Yang, Peidong; Mokari, Taleb

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Analysis Repository H2A Analysis Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Scenario Analysis Well-to-Wheels Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Systems Analysis > Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Printable Version Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center The Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center provides consistent and transparent data that can serve as the basis for hydrogen-related calculations, modeling, and other analytical activities. This new site features the Hydrogen Data Book with data pertinent to hydrogen infrastructure analysis; links to external databases related to

326

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production from Renewables...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 1998 DOE Hydrogen Program Review. Keywords: Technoeconomic analysis; hydrogen production; costs; hydrogen storage; renewable Purpose To determine technical and economic...

327

Hydrogen Program Contacts; DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2008 Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 FY 2008 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program JoAnn Milliken, DOE Hydrogen Program Manager and Chief Engineer Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies...

328

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Distributed Hydrogen Production via Steam Methane Reforming Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed...

329

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass feedstock price Units: million Btu Supporting Information: LHV Description: Electricity price Units: kWh Description: Hydrogen fill pressure Units: psi Description:...

330

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biogas Resources Characterization Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power...

331

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Deployment System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

routine to determine the layout of a least-cost infrastructure. Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; costs; fuel cells Purpose Initially, electrolytic H2 production...

332

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

333

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Technology Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of hydrogen fueling systems for transportation: An application of perspective-based scenario analysis using the analytic hierarchy process Project ID: 121 Principal...

334

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project ID:...

335

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Pathways Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 2020 ProductsDeliverables Description: FY 2012 Progress Report Publication Title: FY 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report ArticleAbstract Title: Effects of...

336

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Transition Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Period of Performance Start: June 2005 End: May 2008 Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways Objectives: Use agent-based modeling to provide...

337

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Vehicle Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas. ProductsDeliverables Description: Report Publication Title:...

338

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Passenger Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

estimated the cost of both gasoline and methanol onboard fuel processors, as well as the cost of stationary hydrogen fueling system components including steam methane reformers,...

339

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

340

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide: heterojunction cell research. Quarterly progress report-3, March 1, 1979-June 1, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made on improving the photon efficiency of the planar CdS/Cu/sub 2/S solar cell. Current in excess of 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ have been achieved. Mixed sulfide solar cells responsive to heat treatment are now being produced. The morphology of the Cu/sub 2/S/CdZnS junction has been examined and found to be significantly different than the morphology on CdS/Su/sub 2/S cells. Efficiencies measured under ELH simulation approaching 8% have been achieved. Work in the analytical task has focused on establishing the experimental techniques to study the trap levels in the CdS and to provide a working model for the voltage instabilities in some (CdZn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells. Cells under roof top exposure continue to be monitored.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the electronic level of hydrogen (thick red bar) was notdescribing the behavior of hydrogen atoms as impuritiesenergy of interstitial hydrogen as a function of Fermi level

Van de Walle, Chris G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

Ishimoto, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen with compressed natural gas before dispensing theindustry. Both compressed natural gas, CNG, and hydrogen arenatural gas reformers or water electrolysers. The hydrogen must be compressed

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals  

SciTech Connect

433 of 9384 ) United States Patent 5,000,859 Suciu , et al. March 19, 1991 Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals

Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wikoff, Penny M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Beller, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carpenter, Charles J. (Lynn Haven, FL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Ecodynamic and Eddy-Admitting Dimethyl Sulfide Simulations in a Global Ocean Biogeochemistry/Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe planetary-scale modeling of mixed-layer dimethyl sulfide (DMS) processing and distributions, conducted at a resolution of 0.28 using the Parallel Ocean Program (POP). Ecodynamic routines embedded within POP track the ...

Shaoping Chu; Scott Elliott; Mathew Maltrud; Jose Hernandez; David Erickson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production R&D Hydrogen Production R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts

350

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

351

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercialization decision in 2015 leads to beginning of mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell cars by 2020. FY2006 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Budget Request 13% 28% 12% 15% 22% 3% 6% 1%...

352

Hydrogen Posture Plan  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Hydrogen Posture Plan, published in December 2006, outlines a coordinated plan for activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, both at the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportat

353

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future (40 pages) expands on DOE's series of one-page fact sheets to provide an in-depth look at hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. It provides additional information on the sc

354

Hydrogen Fuel Quality (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Jim Ohi of NREL's presentation on Hydrogen Fuel Quality at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation on May 15-18, 2007 in Arlington, Virginia.

Ohi, J.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments: Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage Sponsored by: TMS...

356

Hydrogen Assisted Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC): Laboratory Research and Field Experiences: Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Program Organizers: Suresh Divi, TIMET

357

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen (which would not have to be stored, and which would be distributed locady only). Filling station

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Flash hydrogenation of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

Manowitz, Bernard (Brightwaters, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Sheehan, Thomas V. (Hampton Bays, NY); Winsche, Warren E. (Bellport, NY); Raseman, Chad J. (Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Purification of Hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a process for purifying hydrogen containing various gaseous impurities by passing the hydrogen over a large surface of uranium metal at a temperature above the decomposition temperature of uranium hydride, and below the decomposition temperature of the compounds formed by the combination of the uranium with the impurities in the hydrogen.

Newton, A.S.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sensitive hydrogen leak detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery- powered electric vehicles, approaches the breadth and magnitude of hydrogens public good benefits. What History

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen (H) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H). ...

365

Strong Lines of Hydrogen ( H )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen (H) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Strong Lines of Hydrogen ( H ). ...

366

LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrogen energy assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Methanol tolerant oxygen reduction catalysts based on transition metal sulfides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen reduction activity and methanol tolerance of a range of transition metal sulfide electrocatalysts have been evaluated in half-cell experiments and in a liquid-feed solid polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell. These catalysts were prepared in high surface area form by direct synthesis onto various surface-functionalized carbon blacks. Of the materials tested, mixed-metal catalysts based on ReRuS and MoRuS were observed to give the best oxygen reduction activities. In addition, significant increases in performance were observed when employing sulfur-functionalized carbon black, which were attributed to the preferential deposition of active Ru sites in the catalyst-preparation process. Although the intrinsic activity of the best material tested, namely, Mo{sub 2}Ru{sub 5}S{sub 5} on sulfur-treated XC-72, was lower than Pt (by ca. 1545 mV throughout the entire polarization curve), its activity relative to Pt increased significantly in methanol-contaminated electrolytes. This was due to methanol oxidation side reactions reducing the net activity of the Pt, especially at low overpotentials.

Reeve, R.W.; Christensen, P.A.; Hamnett, A.; Haydock, S.A.; Roy, S.C. [Univ. of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

Kaun, T.D.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lennox, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Commercialization planning for the lithium/metal sulfide battery  

SciTech Connect

A federally supported battery development program has been underway at Argonne National laboratory since 1973 that is directed to the development and commercialization of high-energy batteries that meet national needs. This program has received a high national priority from the Energy Research Development Administration (and previously the Atomic Energy Commission) with appropriate R and D funding because achievement of the program goals is perceived as having a potentially important impact upon the energy resources in the U.S. The commercial production of high-energy-density batteries, if produced at costs that are attractive, can result in the reduction of petroleum consumption in applications such as utility peak-shaving or personal transportation. This would be accomplished by shifting these applications away from petroleum-fueled combustion turbines and internal combustion engines to battery peaking plants for utilities and battery-powered automobiles which can use electricity produced from energy sources such as coal or nuclear fuel. The energy storage that is projected for mature lithium/metal sulfide (Li/Ms) batteries is about 4 to 5 times that of today's lead--acid battery per unit weight and about 3 to 4 times per unit volume. Achievement of these performance goals and the cost goals for the cells of $20 to $35/kWh would make this system very attractive for many applications of commercial interest. 4 figures, 5 tables.

Chilenskas, A.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

374

Hydrogen Use and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USE AND SAFETY USE AND SAFETY The lightest and most common element in the universe, hydrogen has been safely used for decades in industrial applications. Currently, over 9 million tons of hydrogen are produced in the U.S. each year and 3.2 trillion cubic feet are used to make many common products. They include glass, margarine, soap, vitamins, peanut butter, toothpaste and almost all metal products. Hydrogen has been used as a fuel since the 1950s by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. space program. Hydrogen - A Safe, Clean Fuel for Vehicles Hydrogen has another use - one that can help our nation reduce its consumption of fossil fuels. Hydrogen can be used to power fuel cell vehicles. When combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, hydrogen generates electricity used

375

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project Summary Full Title: Production of Hydrogen by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project ID: 91 Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; photovoltaic (PV) Purpose To evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. Performer Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Organization: Florida Solar Energy Center Address: 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Telephone: 321-638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu Sponsor(s) Name: Michael Ashworth Organization: Florida Energy Office Name: Neil Rossmeissl Organization: DOE/Advanced Utilities Concepts Division Name: H.T. Everett Organization: NASA/Kennedy Space Center Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

376

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considered.) 4. Gaseous hydrogen generated at the refueling station from natural gas by steam methane reforming, stored as a compressed gas at 5000 psi and dispensed to the vehicle...

377

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Early Market Transition of Fuel Cell Vehicles Macro-System Model Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Water for Hydrogen Pathways 2010 A Portfolio...

378

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& RELIABILITY ZERONEAR ZERO ZERONEAR ZERO EMISSIONS EMISSIONS Why Hydrogen? Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil S e q u e s t r a t i o n Biomass Hydro Wind...

379

METHOD OF FIXING NITROGEN FOR PRODUCING OXIDES OF NITROGEN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fixing nitrogen from air by compressing the air, irradiating the compressed air in a nuclear reactor, cooling to remove NO/ sub 2/, compressing the cooled gas, further cooling to remove N/sub 2/O and recirculating the cooled compressed air to the reactor.

Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydrogen Filling Station  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen Filling Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

Demonstration of a nitrogen based carburizing atmosphere. Third quarterly report, 1 April-30 June 1979  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption tests have been completed on a Radiant Tube Box (RTB) furnace which has a fibrous insulation. On this furnace an average of 9.7% of the energy used in processing parts with the conventional endothermic atmosphere practice was saved using nitrogen based atmosphere systems. Furthermore, the natural gas required at the heat treating facility to process the parts was reduced an average of 28.7%. Energy consumption of the furnace while idling under a methanol atmosphere was determined. When combined with the earlier reported data on endothermic and pure nitrogen atmospheres, a linear relationship between energy consumption and hydrogen concentration of the furnace atmosphere was found.

Peartree, R.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hydrogen Separation Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. By appropriately changing the catalysts coupled with the membrane, essentially the same system can be used to facilitate alkane dehydrogenation and coupling, aromatics processing, and hydrogen sulfide decomposition.

Roark, Shane E.; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

Atmospheric Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production Of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) by lightning flashes has been computed from a model of gaseous molecular reactions occurring as heated lightning-channel air cools by mixing with surrounding ambient air. The effect of ozone (O3) on ...

R. D. Hill; R. G. Rinker; H. Dale Wilson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an apparatus and a method for determining concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

Schmidt, G.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrogen Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards James Ohi National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Background The development and promulgation of codes and standards are essential if hydrogen is to become a significant energy carrier and fuel because codes and standards are critical to establishing a market-receptive environment for commercializing hydrogen-based products and systems. The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with the help of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) and other key stakeholders, are coordinating a collaborative national effort by government and industry to prepare, review, and promulgate hydrogen codes and standards needed to expedite hydrogen infrastructure development. The

390

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Washington, DC July 13, 2005 JoAnn Milliken DOE Hydrogen Program Planning U.S. Energy Dependence is Driven By Transportation * The U.S. imports 55% of its oil; expected to grow to 68% by 2025 under the status quo. * Transportation accounts for 2/3 of the 20 million barrels of oil our nation uses each day. * Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles will help in the near -mid term; a replacement for petroleum is needed for the long-term. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Million barrels per day Marine Rail Actual Projection Cars Air Light Trucks Heavy Vehicles U.S. Production Off-Road Projection Hydrogen Provides a Solution Producing hydrogen from domestic resources, including renewable, nuclear, and coal

391

Hydrogen Based Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Based Bacteria Hydrogen Based Bacteria Name: Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: i was in my Biology class and a very respectable someone mentioned something about the discovery of a hydrogen based bacteria. my teacher wasnt aware of this study, and assigned me to find out about it. so i thought i would Email you and see if you people knew anything about it. Awaiting your repsonse Replies: I'm not quite sure what you mean by hydrogen based bacteria but I will take a stab that you mean bacteria that use hydrogen for energy. Some bacteria are chemolithotrophs which mean that they are autrophs but don't use the sun as their energy source; they get their energy from chemical sources. There are bacteria that use hydrogen as their energy source. They are diverse as a group and are all facultative. The overall chemical reaction looks like this:

392

Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

Friedman, Joseph (Encino, CA); Oberg, Carl L. (Canoga Park, CA); Russell, Larry H. (Agoura, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

395

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

396

Nucleation and Characteristics of Liquid Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments on a refrigerating catalyst?liquid nitrogen (LN)?in different cloud chambers and their results. The nucleation threshold temperature of liquid nitrogen is 0C, and when the temperature less than ?2C, the ice ...

Cao Xuecheng; Wang Weimin

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Triboluminescent properties of zinc sulfide phosphors due to hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The emission of light due to crystal fracture, or triboluminescence (TL), is a phenomenon that has been known for centuries. One of the most common examples of TL is the flash created from chewing Wint-O-Green Lifesavers . From 2004 to 2006, research was completed using the two-stage light gas gun located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama to measure the TL properties for zinc sulfide doped with both manganese (ZnS:Mn) and copper (ZnS:Cu). Results clearly show that hypervelocity impact-induced TL has been observed for both ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. For ZnS:Mn, TL produced during 4.7 and 5.7km/s impacts was statistically more luminous than was observed from similar data collected at 3.3km/s. The TL decay time for ZnS:Mn was found to be 292 58 s, which is totally consistent with earlier measurements that did not use impact as an excitation source. Further, the emission of TL from ZnS:Mn undergoing hypervelocity impact has been demonstrated to have a significant component at the known peak emission wavelength of ZnS:Mn of 585nm. Small TL emission generated as a result of hypervelocity impact was also observed from ZnS:Cu. The most intriguing conclusion from this research is that it may be possible to discriminate impact velocity by measuring the time-integrated luminosity of TL phosphors. An ability to measure the velocity of a hypervelocity impact is a significant indicator of the potential usefulness for this concept for use as an impact sensor in future spacecraft.

Bergeron, Mr. Noah P. [Louisiana Tech University; HollermanPh.D., Dr. William A. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette; Goedeke, Shawn [ORNL; Moore, R. J. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

OpenEI - hydrogen  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Tue, 14 Dec 2010...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compatibility of Materials Compatibility of Materials August 13, 2013 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Webinar Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 SAND2013-6278P 2 Webinar Objectives * Provide context for hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen compatibility of materials - Distinguish embrittlement, compatibility and suitability - Examples of hydrogen embrittlement * Historical perspective - Previous work on hydrogen compatibility - Motivation of "Materials Guide" * Identify the landscape of materials compatibility documents

403

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

404

Initiators of coal hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results are given of an investigation of the influence of additions of certain organosilicon compounds of cyclic and linear nature on the coal hydrogenation process.

Krichko, A.A.; Dembovskaya, E.A.; Gorlov, E.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials data related to hydrogen embrittlement - Modeled after existing metals handbooks - Data culled from open literature * Peer-reviewed scientific articles * Public...

406

Enabling the Hydrogen Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Act of 2002 to develop research and standards for gas pipeline integrity, safety ... for materials used in hydrogen systems (eg, pipelines) developed in ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

distributed production facilities have relatively low delivery costs, but the hydrogen production costs are likely to be higher-lower volume production means higher equipment...

408

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy costs, energy alternatives, and the role of hydrogenenergy in profound ways. But hydrogen also poses the greatest challenges of any alternative

Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sustainable hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hydrogen MOS Quality Boulder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... b. The recommendations of the FSS based on its December 2008 review of the proposed method of sale for hydrogen engine fuel are: ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

Optimized hydrogen piston engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen piston engines can be simultaneously optimized for improved thermal efficiency and for extremely low emissions. Using these engines in constant-speed, constant-load systems such as series hybrid-electric automobiles or home cogeneration systems can result in significantly improved energy efficiency. For the same electrical energy produced, the emissions from such engines can be comparable to those from natural gas-fired steam power plants. These hydrogen-fueled high-efficiency, low-emission (HELE) engines are a mechanical equivalent of hydrogen fuel cells. HELE engines could facilitate the transition to a hydrogen fuel cell economy using near-term technology.

Smith, J.R.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

Remick, R. J.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The fuel cell an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen is the key to making it happen.

416

Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With hydrogen gaining acceptance as an energy carrier for fuel cell vehicles and stationary fuel cell applications, a new community of hydrogen users is emerging and continues to grow. With this growth has come the need to spread the word about safe practices for handling, storing, and using hydrogen. Like all energy forms, hydrogen can be used safely through proper procedures and engineering techniques. However, hydrogen involves a degree of risk that must be respected, and the importance of avoiding complacency or haste in the safe conduct and performance of projects involving hydrogen cannot be overstated. To encourage and promote the safe use of hydrogen, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed and continues to enhance two software tools in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program: the Hydrogen Safety Best Practices online manual (www.H2BestPractices.org) and the Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned database (www.H2Incidents.org).

Fassbender, Linda L.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimistic hydrogen-demand scenarios, natural gas use woulddemand Model Presidents H 2 initiative (100% of ?eet) (50% of ?eet) (21% of ?eet) Natural gas

Ogden, Joan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop November 3 rd , 2010 Research, Engineering, and Applications Center for Hydrogen Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore, CA Introduction: On November 3 rd , 2010, Sandia...

419

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids --Hydrogen Storage Materials --Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis --Thermochemical Hydrogen * Fuel Cells --Polymer Electrolyte --Modeling & Analysis --Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product String representation...

422

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen Show!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulators! Insulators! Previous Video (Insulators!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Superconductors!) Superconductors! Liquid Nitrogen Show! All of your favorite liquid nitrogen experiments all in one place! Flowers! Balloons! Racquetballs! Nothing is safe! Just sit back, relax, and enjoy the show! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Usually, every couple years, Jefferson Lab hosts an Open House. This is the one time the public and come and tour our accelerator and end stations. Steve: During the 2010 Open House, our cameraman snuck into one of the ongoing cryo shows that are held throughout the day. He missed half of it. So if you want to see the entire thing, check our website to see when the

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Hydrogen is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research is under way to make hydrogen vehicles practical for widespread use.

424

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

425

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEPARATION PLANTS NITROGEN OXYGEN INDUSTRIAL AREA GALVESTON BAY GULF OF MEXICO BAYTOWN MONT BELVIEU Refrigeration GN2 to N2 Liquefier To Feed H2 Flash Compressor H2 Recycle Compressor LN2 Add. To Storage/Fill #12

426

Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combination moisture and hydrogen getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

Harrah, Larry A. (Albuquerque, NM); Mead, Keith E. (Peralta, NM); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT MODIFICATIONS-HYDROGEN FLUORIDE CONDENSERS, FV-2004, FV-2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of-gas from the hydrofluorinator will be cooled and 94% of the hydrogen fluoride condensed by two heat exchangers connected in series. The first unit, watercooled, discharges gas and condensed vapor at 50 to 65 F. The second unit, freon-cooled, discharges condensed vapor and noncondensable hydrogen and nitrogen at --60 to -- 75 F. This report concerns a design description of tbe condensers and a heat transfer evaluation. The condensers will be fabricated at ORNL. (auth)

Mann, S.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hydrogen Car Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Hydrogen Car Co Place Los Angeles, California Zip 90036 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product The Hydrogen Car Company produces hydrogen internal combustion...

432

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California White Paper/High Efficiency Generation Of Hydrogen Fuels Using NuclearU.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Hydrogen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Table 4 Storage andHydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Hydrogen tube-trailer Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

436

Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) Place Rochester Hills, Michigan Zip 48309 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Vehicles Product It commercializes hydrogen storage technology based on metal-hydrides for portable and stationary power systems as well as fuel-cell vehicles. References Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) is a company located in Rochester Hills, Michigan . References

437

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Storage and Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Partial List of Incompatible chemicals (Toxic Hazards) Substances in the left hand column should be stored and handled so that they cannot possibly accidentally contact corresponding substances in the center column, because toxic materials (right hand column) would be produced. Arsenical Materials Any Reducing Agent Arsine Azides Acids Hydrogen Azide Cyanides Acids Hydrogen Cyanide Hypochlorites Acids Chlorine or Hypochlorous Acid Nitrates Sulfuric Acid Nitrogen Dioxide Nitric acid Copper, Brass, Heavy Metals Nitrogen Dioxide Nitrites Acids Nitrous Fumes Phosphorus Caustic Alkalies/ Reducers Phosphine Selenides Reducers Hydrogen Selenide Sulfides Acids Hydrogen Sulfide Tellurides Reducers Hydrogen Telluride

439

Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this photoelectrochemical hydrogen research project is defined by multijunction photoelectrode concepts for solar-powered water splitting, with the goal of efficient, stable, and economic operation. From an initial selection of several planar photoelectrode designs, the Hybrid Photoelectrode (HPE) has been identified as the most promising candidate technology. This photoelectrode consists of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) junction and a solid-state photovoltaic (PV) junction. Immersed in aqueous electrolyte and exposed to sunlight, these two junctions provide the necessary voltage to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The efficiency of the conversion process is determined by the performance of the PEC- and the PV-junctions and on their spectral match. Based on their stability and cost effectiveness, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and tungsten oxide (WO3) films have been studied and developed as candidate semiconductor materials for the PEC junction (photoanode). High-temperature synthesis methods, as reported for some high-performance metal oxides, have been found incompatible with multijunction device fabrication. A low-temperature reactive sputtering process has been developed instead. In the parameter space investigated so far, the optoelectronic properties of WO3 films were superior to those of Fe2O3 films, which showed high recombination of photo-generated carriers. For the PV-junction, amorphous-silicon-based multijunction devices have been studied. Tandem junctions were preferred over triple junctions for better stability and spectral matching with the PEC junction. Based on a tandem a-SiGe/a-SiGe device and a tungsten trioxide film, a prototype hybrid photoelectrode has been demonstrated at 0.7% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency. The PEC junction performance has been identified as the most critical element for higher-efficiency devices. Research into sputter-deposited tungsten trioxide films has yielded samples with higher photocurrents of up to 1.3 mA/cm2. An improved a-Si/aSi tandem device has been demonstrated that would provide a better voltage match to the recently improved WO3 films. For a hybrid photoelectrode based on these component devices the projected STH efficiency is 1.3%. For significant efficiency enhancements, metal oxide films with increased optical absorption, thus lower bandgap, are necessary. Initial experiments were successful in lowering the WO3 bandgap by nitrogen doping, from 3.0 eV to 2.1 eV. Optimizing the electronic properties of these compounds, or other reduced-bandgap materials such as Fe2O3, is the most immediate challenge. As the photocurrent levels of the PEC junction are improved, increasing attention will have to be paid to the matching PV junction.

Miller, E.L.; Marsen, B.; Paluselli, D.; Rocheleau, R.

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

1989-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS CONTENTS 11.1 GLOSSARY Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS OBJECTIVES This module is for reference only. Hydrogen MODULE 11: GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS PAGE 11-1 11.1 Glossary This glossary covers words, phrases

444

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and replaced by coal gasification with carbon sequestration and, to a lesser extent, by biomass gasification. By 2050, biomass and wind, combined, provide 35% of hydrogen supplies. Hydrogen production from nuclear.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/posture_plan04.html. sequestration sites opt for more coal gasification while those with ample wind or biomass

445

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen from Renewable Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen from Renewable Energy Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 3: Hydrogen From Renewable Energy Sources: Pathway to 10 Quads for...

446

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Transition to Hydrogen Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project Summary Full Title: A Smooth Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project ID: 87 Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Brief Description: This project contrasts the options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Keywords: Infrastructure; costs; hydrogen production Purpose The case for hydrogen-powered transportation requires an assessment of present and prospective methods for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen. This project examines one potential pathway: on-site production of hydrogen to fuel light-duty vehicles. Performer Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

447

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen byPhotovolta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Project ID: 132 Principal Investigator: DL Block Purpose Compare the cost of hydrogen produced using photo electric chemical systems to the cost of hydrogen...

448

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis - DOE Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conditions, using multiple sites, varying climates, and a variety of hydrogen sources. Analyze detailed fuel cell and hydrogen data from * vehicles and infrastructure to...

449

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Impact of Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Energy Markets Project ID: 99 Principal Investigator: Harry Vidas Keywords: Hydrogen production; hydrogen supply; infrastructure; costs Purpose This project addresses the...

450

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 5030: Hydrogen Baseline Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kg of hydrogen) .56 Production unit energy efficiency 70% Compression electricity consumption (kWhrkg of hydrogen) 2.9 Total system energy efficiency 65% Feedstock and Utility...

451

NMR Studies of Molecular Hydrogen in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using NMR, the concentrations of molecular hydrogen have been measured directly in hydrogenated amorphous silicon made by the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique.

Su, T.; Chen, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Crandall, R. S.; Mahan, A. H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hydrogen Embrittlement in Vanadium-based Hydrogen Separation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the important materials that face a challenge to overcome the hydrogen embrittlement is vanadium-based hydrogen separation membranes for an...

453

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Storing hydrogen for renewable energy technologies can be challenging, especially for intermittent resources such as solar and wind. Whether for stationary,...

454

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort (INEEL) Don Karner (ETA) 2004 Fuel Cell Seminar - San Antonio Session 5B - Hydrogen DOE - Advanced Vehicle Testing...

455

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the potential penetration of hydrogen into the economy and associated impacts on oil imports and CO2 gas emissions; Address the problem of how hydrogen might be...

456

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

457

Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 Hydrogen Resource Assessment Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power Anelia Milbrandt and Margaret Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617...

458

Materials and mechanisms of high temperature lithium sulfide batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New materials have encouraged development of bipolar Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} batteries for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Current technology employs a two-phase Li-alloy negative electrode low-melting, LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr molten salt electrolyte, and either an FeS or an upper-plateau (UP) FeS{sub 2} positive electrode. These components are assembled in a sealed bipolar battery configuration. Use of the two-phase Li-alloy ({alpha} + {beta} Li-Al and Li{sub 5}Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}) negative electrode provides in situ overcharge tolerance that renders the bipolar design viable. Employing LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr electrolyte in ``electrolyte-starved`` calls achieves low-burdened cells, that possess low area-specific impedance; comparable to that of flooded cells using LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte. The combination of dense UP FeS{sub 2} electrodes and low-melting electrolyte produces a stable and reversible couple, achieving over 1000 cycle life in flooded cells, with high power capabilities. In addition, a family of stable sulfide ceramic/sealant materials was developed that produce high-strength bonds between a variety of metals and ceramics, which renders lithium/iron suffide bipolar stacks practical. Bipolar Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} cells and four-cell stacks using these seals are being built and tested in the 13 cm diameter size for EV applications. To date, Li-Al/FeS{sub 2} cells have attained 400 W/kg power at 80% DOD and 180 Wh/kg energy at the 30 W/kg rate. When cell performance characteristics are used to model full-scale EV and hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries, they are projected to meet or exceed the performance requirements for a large variety of EV and HV applications. Efficient production and application of Li-alloys and Li-salt electrolyte are critical to approaching battery cost objectives.

Kaun, T.D.; Hash, M.C.; Henriksen, G.L.; Jansen, A.N.; Vissers, D.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

460

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen sulfide nitrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

462

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) Pinakin Patel and Ludwig Lipp Presentation at DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage and Dispensing Workshop at ANL Argonne, IL March 20, 2013 2 * Experience with all fuel cells - MCFC, SOFC, PEM, PAFC, etc. * Excellent progress in commercialization of MCFC technology (>300 MW installed + backlog, >50 MW per year production rate, 11 MW single site unit in Korea, >1.5 billion kWh produced) * Unique internal reforming technology for high efficiency fuel cells FCE Overview $- $2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000 $10,000 2003 2007 2011 mid-term Product cost per kW 3 H 2 Peak and Back- up Power Fuel Cell Cars DFC ® Power Plant (Electricity + Hydrogen) Solid State Hydrogen Separator (EHS) Solid State Hydrogen

463

Hydrogen Fuel Quality  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hydrogen Purity Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Association Compressed Gas Association Roger A. Smith Technical Director April 26, 2004 Hydrogen Purity Standard Compressed Gas Association 2 Compressed Gas Association ‹ 150 Members „ Industrial Gas Companies „ Equipment Manufacturers „ Other Gas Industry Associations „ Other SDOs ‹ Manufacturers, Fillers, Distributors, and Transporters of Industrial and Medical Gases Compressed Gas Association 3 Hydrogen Activities ‹ Committees „ Hydrogen Fuel Technology „ Bulk Distribution Equipment „ Hazardous Materials Codes „ Gas Specifications „ Cylinders, Valves & PRD's ‹ International „ Europe (EIGA) „ Japan (JIGA) „ Asia (AIGA) „ United Nations Compressed Gas Association 4 Hydrogen Purity Standard ‹ Draft hydrogen purity standard for stationary fuel cells and ICE's in 10 months

465

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

466

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Praxair Hydrogen Liquefaction Hydrogen Compression 3 Praxair at a Glance The largest industrial gas company in North and South America Only U.S. Hydrogen Supplier in All Sizes...

467

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It appears to us that hydrogen is a highly promising option0616 The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen Daniel Sperling Joan OgdenThe Bumpy Road to Hydrogen 1 Daniel Sperling and Joan Ogden

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Renewable Resources for Hydrogen (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of renewable resources for hydrogen. It was presented at the National Hydrogen Association Hydrogen Conference & Expo in Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hydrogen Data Book from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Data Book contains a wide range of factual information on hydrogen and fuel cells (e.g., hydrogen properties, hydrogen production and delivery data, and information on fuel cells and fuel cell vehicles), and it also provides other data that might be useful in analyses of hydrogen infrastructure in the United States (e.g., demographic data and data on energy supply and/or infrastructure). Its made available from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center along with a wealth of related information. The related information includes guidelines for DOE Hydrogen Program Analysis, various calculator tools, a hydrogen glossary, related websites, and analysis tools relevant to hydrogen and fuel cells. [From http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/cocoon/morf/hydrogen

470

Hydrogen Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reduce carbon emissions through low-carbon hydrogen fuel for electricity generation and carbon sequestration technologies. References Hydrogen Energy1 LinkedIn Connections...

471

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engine Conversion,from Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engines, SAE 02FFL-dynamometer ...13 Figure 2. CNG Brake Thermal Efficiency (

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is the simplest element on Earth. A hydrogen atom consists of only one proton and one electron. It is also the most plentiful element in the universe.

473

CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for