National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrogen storage systems

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  2. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  3. Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing R&D Workshop Renaissance Hotel, Washington, DC August 11-12, 2011 Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Ned T. Stetson, Ph.D. Team Lead, Hydrogen Storage...

  4. Hydrogen Storage System Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM M a a r r System

  5. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report...

  6. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  7. Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s) for Capturing Intermittent Renewable Energy ­ Analysis of Test Results for Hydrogen Storage Systems By Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean of Kahua Ranch Hydrogen Storage System 3 3.1 Kahua Ranch Power System 3 3.2 Electrolyzer Experimental

  8. Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 This document provides a summary of the Hydrogen...

  9. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of June 11, 2008, biannual meeting of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group. ssawgsummaryreport0608.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage...

  10. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Cooper, Alan Charles (Macungie, PA); Scott, Aaron Raymond (Allentown, PA)

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005 Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005 This report highlights DOE's systems analysis work related to...

  12. Hydrogen storage of energy for small power supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monaghan, Rory F. D. (Rory Francis Desmond)

    2005-01-01

    Power supply systems for cell phone base stations using hydrogen energy storage, fuel cells or hydrogen-burning generators, and a backup generator could offer an improvement over current power supply systems. Two categories ...

  13. Technical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Table 3.3.3 Technical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles a, i Storage Parameter Units 2020 Ultimate System Gravimetric Capacity kWhkg 1.8...

  14. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    impact of improved hydrogen storage may be through makingand M. Gardiner, Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies andReducing the liquid hydrogen storage dewar cost has only a

  15. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes. ssawgsummaryreport.pdf More Documents &...

  16. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  17. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    to International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (November 2005).05—28 Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: StorageImplementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage

  18. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of metal hydride properties on the performance of hydrogen storage systems. Bob Bowman (JPL storage media. Finally, Matt Ringer (NREL) provided an update on the H2A delivery models that now also. The model was used to evaluate storage system designs. The model includes reaction kinetics, which limit

  19. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  20. Borazine-boron nitride hybrid hydrogen storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narula, Chaitanya K. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Simonson, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Paine, Robert T. (Albuquerque, NM) [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-22

    A hybrid hydrogen storage composition includes a first phase and a second phase adsorbed on the first phase, the first phase including BN for storing hydrogen by physisorption and the second phase including a borazane-borazine system for storing hydrogen in combined form as a hydride.

  1. Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Background paper prepared for...

  2. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  3. Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

  4. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  5. First-Principles Study of the Li-Na-Ca-N-H System: Compound Structures and Hydrogen-Storage Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak

    2012-01-01

    system for reversible hydrogen storage,” J. Alloys Comp, volCompound structures and hydrogen-storage properties,” J.compounds: Application to hydrogen storage materials,” Phys.

  6. Parameter study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale prototype hydrogen storage system as part of a Work For Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. For the current work, we have continued our evaluation of the GM Demonstration System to provide learning to DOE's hydrogen storage programs, specifically the new Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. Baseline refueling data during testing for GM was taken over a narrow range of optimized parameter values. Further testing was conducted over a broader range. Parameters considered included hydrogen pressure and coolant flow rate. This data confirmed the choice of design pressure of the Demonstration System, but indicated that the system was over-designed for cooling. Baseline hydrogen delivery data was insufficient to map out delivery rate as a function of temperature and capacity for the full-scale system. A more rigorous matrix of tests was performed to better define delivery capabilities. These studies were compared with 1-D and 2-D coupled multi-physics modeling results. The relative merits of these models are discussed along with opportunities for improved efficiency or reduced mass and volume.

  7. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles This table lists the technical targets...

  8. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  9. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  10. Method and System for Hydrogen Evolution and Storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM); Tumas, William (Los Alamos, NM); Hay, P. Jeffrey (Los Alamos, NM); Schwarz, Daniel E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cameron, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-10-21

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  11. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  12. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  13. Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Thomas

    2010-05-31

    The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles â?? plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

  14. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Re

  15. DDQ as an electrocatalyst for amine dehydrogenation, a model system for virtual hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luca, Oana R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Wang, Ting [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Konezny, Steven J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Batista, Victor S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Crabtree, Robert H. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-01-01

    2,3-Dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ) is an electrochemical oxidation catalyst for a secondary amine, a model system for virtual hydrogen storage by removal of a hydrogen equivalent from an amine; a computational study provides mechanistic information.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For transportation, the overarching technical challenge for hydrogen storage is how to store the amount of hydrogen required for a conventional driving range (>300 miles) within the vehicular...

  17. Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The current status in terms of weight, volume, and cost of various hydrogen storage technologies is shown below. These values are estimates from storage system developers and the R&D community...

  18. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    2012-08-07

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  19. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  20. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua, Thanh; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, Matt; Lasher, Stephen; McKenney, Kurtis; Law, Karen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  1. Management of Leaks in Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawls, G

    2006-04-27

    A systematic approach to manage hydrogen leakage from components is presented. Methods to evaluate the quantity of hydrogen leakage and permeation from a system are provided by calculation and testing sensitivities. The following technology components of a leak management program are described: (1) Methods to evaluate hydrogen gas loss through leaks; (2) Methods to calculate opening areas of crack like defects; (3) Permeation of hydrogen through metallic piping; (4) Code requirements for acceptable flammability limits; (5) Methods to detect flammable gas; (6) Requirements for adequate ventilation in the vicinity of the hydrogen system; (7) Methods to calculate dilution air requirements for flammable gas mixtures; and (8) Concepts for reduced leakage component selection and permeation barriers.

  2. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab)

  3. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  4. Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas8of EnergyHydrogen Storage

  5. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  6. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost energy-efficient regeneration systems for these irreversible hydrogen storage systems. Significant technical issues remain...

  7. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  8. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  9. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  10. Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE's hydrogen storage research and development (R&D) activities are aimed at increasing the gravimetric and volumetric energy density and reducing the cost of hydrogen storage systems for...

  11. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hassel, Bart A.

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review in favor of studying the slurry-form of AB as it appeared to be difficult to transport a solid form of AB through the thermolysis reactor. UTRC demonstrated the operation of a compact GLS in the laboratory at a scale that would be required for the actual automotive application. The GLS met the targets for weight and volume. UTRC also reported about the unresolved issue associated with the high vapor pressure of fluids that could be used for making a slurry-form of AB. Work on the GLS was halted after the Phase 2 to Phase 3 review as the off-board regeneration efficiency of the spent AB was below the DOE target of 60%. UTRC contributed to the design of an adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system through measurements of the thermal conductivity of a compacted form of Metal Organic Framework (MOF) number 5 and through the development and sizing of a particulate filter. Thermal conductivity is important for the design of the modular adsorbent tank insert (MATI), as developed by Oregon State University (OSU), in order to enable a rapid refueling process. Stringent hydrogen quality requirements can only be met with an efficient particulate filtration system. UTRC developed a method to size the particulate filter by taking into account the effect of the pressure drop on the hydrogen adsorption process in the tank. UTRC raised awareness about the potential use of materials-based H2 storage systems in applications outside the traditional light-duty vehicle market segment by presenting at several conferences about niche application opportunities in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), portable power and others.

  12. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications...

  13. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive...

  14. Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 »DigitalanDepartment of EnergySmall Fuel Cell Systems

  15. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  16. Chemical/hydrogen energy storage systems. Annual report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The progress made in 1979 in the Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Storage Systems Program is described. The program is managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Division of Energy Storage Systems of the Department of Energy. The program consists of research and development activities in the areas of Hydrogen Production, Storage and Materials, End-Use Applications/Systems Studies, and in Chemical Heat Pumps. The report outlines the progress made by key industrial contractors such as General Electric in the development of SPE water electrolyzers; INCO in the studies of surface poisoning (and reactivation) of metal hydrides; and Air Products and Chemicals in the evaluation of hydrogen production at small hydropower sites. The BNL in-house supporting research, as well as that at universities and other national laboratories for which BNL has technical oversight, is also described.

  17. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  18. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  19. Savannah River Hydrogen Storage Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  20. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen...

  1. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems...

  2. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    S. By-ProductSpent Material Removal 2 3 HSECoE Technical Objectives Using systems engineering concepts, design innovative material-based hydrogen storage system architectures...

  4. Characterization and High Throughput Analysis of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelo, Steven James

    2009-01-01

    have great promise as hydrogen storage materials due tofor regenerative hydrogen storage applications. Addition ofrequired of a viable hydrogen storage system, but further

  5. Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

    2005-01-01

    Stetson, N. , Solid Hydrogen Storage Systems for PortableA Review of On-Board Hydrogen Storage Alternatives for FuelA. , Materials for Hydrogen Storage, Materials Today,

  6. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  7. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R.; Hua, T.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Gardiner, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC; U.S. DOE

    2010-05-01

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage are assessed and compared to the targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm. The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) or by central electrolysis. The main conclusions are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity, mid-term target for system volumetric capacity, and the target for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. However, the high-volume manufacturing cost and the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production scenario are, respectively, 2-4 and 1.6-2.4 times the current targets, and the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  8. Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities DOE's hydrogen storage research and development (R&D) activities are aimed...

  9. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment ofofCorrugated Membrane Fuel CellHydrogen

  10. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, Kurtis; Sinha, J.

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  12. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  13. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  14. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Y. F

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  16. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  17. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen...

  18. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  19. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  20. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  1. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  2. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Held in Conjunction with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Rajesh Ahluwalia (ANL) on the concept of using alane slurries in a light mineral oil for hydrogen storage capacity targets (i.e., offer a credit), since the volumetric goals are based on the assumption

  3. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen transport and storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The future use of hydrogen to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, and fuel vehicles will require the creation of a distribution infrastructure of safe, and cost-effective transport and storage. Present storage methods are too expensive and will not meet the performance requirements of future applications. Transport technologies will need to be developed based on the production and storage systems that come into use as the hydrogen energy economy evolves. Different applications will require the development of different types of storage technologies. Utility electricity generation and home and office use will have storage fixed in one location--stationary storage--and size and weight will be less important than energy efficiency and costs of the system. Fueling a vehicle, however, will require hydrogen storage in an ``on-board`` system--mobile storage--with weight and size similar to the gasoline tank in today`s vehicle. Researchers are working to develop physical and solid-state storage systems that will meet these diverse future application demands. Physical storage systems and solid-state storage methods (metal hydrides, gas-on-solids adsorption, and glass microspheres) are described.

  4. National Hydrogen Storage Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Hydrogen Storage Project National Hydrogen Storage Project In July 2003, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a "Grand Challenge" to the global scientific community for...

  5. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  6. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  7. Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003 in Washington, DC. The forum was assembled for innovative and non-conventional brainstorming on this issue of hydrogen storage technologies.

  8. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

  9. Hydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  10. Hydrogen Storage- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Storing enough hydrogen on-board a vehicle to achieve a driving range of greater than 300 miles is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of...

  11. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  12. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  13. Energy Dense, Lighweight, Durable, Systems for Storage and Delivery of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacky Pruez; Samir Shoukry; Gergis William; Thomas Evans; Hermann Alcazar

    2008-12-31

    The work presented in this report summarizes the current state-of-the-art in on-board storage on compressed gaseous hydrogen as well as the development of analysis tools, methods, and theoretical data for devising high performance design configurations for hydrogen storage. The state-of-the-art in the area of compressed hydrogen storage reveals that the current configuration of the hydrogen storage tank is a seamless cylindrical part with two end domes. The tank is composed of an aluminum liner overwrapped with carbon fibers. Such a configuration was proved to sustain internal pressures up to 350 bars (5,000 psi). Finite-element stress analyses were performed on filament-wound hydrogen storage cylindrical tanks under the effect of internal pressure of 700 bars (10,000 psi). Tank deformations, stress fields, and intensities induced at the tank wall were examined. The results indicated that the aluminum liner can not sustain such a high pressure and initiate the tank failure. Thus, hydrogen tanks ought to be built entirely out of composite materials based on carbon fibers or other innovative composite materials. A spherical hydrogen storage tank was suggested within the scope of this project. A stress reduction was achieved by this change of the tank geometry, which allows for increasing the amount of the stored hydrogen and storage energy density. The finite element modeling of both cylindrical and spherical tank design configurations indicate that the formation of stress concentration zones in the vicinity of the valve inlet as well as the presence of high shear stresses in this area. Therefore, it is highly recommended to tailor the tank wall design to be thicker in this region and tapered to the required thickness in the rest of the tank shell. Innovative layout configurations of multiple tanks for enhanced conformability in limited space have been proposed and theoretically modeled using 3D finite element analysis. Optimum tailoring of fiber orientations and lay-ups are needed to relieve the high stress in regions of high stress concentrations between intersecting tanks/ tank sections. Filament winding process is the most suitable way for producing both cylindrical and spherical hydrogen storage tanks with high industrial quality. However, due to the unavailability of such equipment at West Virginia University and limited funding, the composite structures within this work were produced by hand layup and bag molding techniques. More advanced manufacturing processes can significantly increase the structural strength of the tank and enhances its performance and also further increase weight saving capabilities. The concept of using a carbon composite liner seems to be promising in overcoming the low strength of the aluminum liner at internal high pressures. This could be further enhanced by using MetPreg filament winding to produce such a liner. Innovative designs for the polar boss of the storage tanks and the valve connections are still needed to reduce the high stress formed in these zones to allow for the tank to accommodate higher internal pressures. The Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) approach was applied for fault-tolerant design and efficient maintenance of lightweight automotive structures made of composite materials. Potential effects of damage initiation and accumulation are formulated for various design configurations, with emphasis on lightweight fiber-reinforced composites. The CDM model considers damage associated with plasticity and fatigue.

  14. Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage...

  15. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets...

  16. Fundamental Studies of Diffusion and Reactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Walle, Chris G; Peles, Amra; Janotti, Anderson; Wilson-Short, Gareth

    2008-01-01

    novel reversible hydrogen storage materials”, J. Alloysrelationship to enhanced hydrogen storage properties”, J.on the reversi- ble hydrogen storage properties of the

  17. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage...

  18. The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) Status of Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D...

  19. Hydrogen storage compositions (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Hydrogen storage compositions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen storage compositions Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such...

  20. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not directly address any hydrogen storage technical barriers or targets in terms of numbers. Specifically, hydrogen sorption and desorption tests or kinetics measurements were not part of the project scope. However, the insights gained from these studies could help to answer fundamental questions necessary for considering glass-based materials as hydrogen storage media and could be applied indirectly towards the DOE hydrogen storage technical targets such as system weight and volume, system cost and energy density. Such questions are: Can specific macro-crystals, proven to attract hydrogen when in a macroscopic form (bulk), be nucleated in glass matrices as nanocrystals to create two-phased materials? What are suitable compositions that enable to synthetize glass-based, two-phase materials with nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen via surface or bulk interactions? What are the limits of controlling the microstructure of these materials, especially limits for nanocrystals density and size? Finally, from a technological point of view, the fabrication of glass-derived nanocomposites that we explore is a very simple, fast and inexpensive process that does not require costly or specialized equipment which is an important factor for practical applications.

  1. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Storage - Challenges and Opportunities Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company...

  2. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large-Scale Hydrogen Storage in Germany, Hanno Butsch, NOW GmbH Panel 1, Hawaii Hydrogen Projects Status and Lessons Learned,...

  3. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The re

  4. Multi-component hydrogen storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Lewis, Gregory J. (Santa Cruz, CA); Sachtler, J.W. Adriaan (Des Plaines, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL); Lesch, David A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Dosek, Paul M. (Joliet, IL); Wolverton, Christopher M. (Evanston, IL); Siegel, Donald J. (Ann Arbor, MI); Sudik, Andrea C. (Canton, MI); Yang, Jun (Canton, MI)

    2010-09-07

    A reversible hydrogen storage composition having an empirical formula of: Li.sub.(x+z)N.sub.xMg.sub.yB.sub.zH.sub.w where 0.4.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8; 0.2.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.6; 0hydrogen storage compared to binary systems such as MgH.sub.2--LiNH.sub.2.

  5. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar, Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration, originally presented on December 13, 2011.

  6. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  7. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; Kumar, Ashok; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2008-01-01

    Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS 2 / MoS 2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks aremore »considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined. « less

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low cost and accompanied by improved mechanical and thermal stability.

  9. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  11. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  12. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  13. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Karl J. (Fremont, CA)

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  14. Energy Department Awards $4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awards 4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems Energy Department Awards 4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems April 8, 2015 - 2:54pm Addthis The Energy...

  15. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, provide an overview of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE), including projects to design innovative...

  16. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  17. Hydrogen storage composition and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.; Heung, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition based on a metal hydride dispersed in an aerogel prepared by a sol-gel process. The starting material for the aerogel is an organometallic compound, including the alkoxysilanes, organometals of the form M(OR){sub X} where R is an organic ligand of the form C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}, and organometals of the form MO{sub x}Ry where R is an alkyl group, where M is an oxide-forming metal, n, x and y are integers and y is two less than the valence of M. A sol is prepared by combining the starting material, alcohol, water, and an acid. The sol is conditioned to the proper viscosity and a hydride in the form of a fine powder is added. The mixture is polymerized and dried under supercritical conditions. The final product is a composition having a hydride uniformly dispersed throughout an inert, stable and highly porous matrix. It is capable of absorbing up to 30 motes of hydrogen per kilogram at room temperature and pressure, rapidly and reversibly. Hydrogen absorbed by the composition can be readily be recovered by heat or evacuation.

  18. Hydrogen storage composition and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2003-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition based on a metal hydride dispersed in an aerogel prepared by a sol-gel process. The starting material for the aerogel is an organometallic compound, including the alkoxysilanes, organometals of the form M(OR)x and MOxRy, where R is an alkyl group of the form C.sub.n H.sub.2n+1, M is an oxide-forming metal, n, x, and y are integers, and y is two less than the valence of M. A sol is prepared by combining the starting material, alcohol, water, and an acid. The sol is conditioned to the proper viscosity and a hydride in the form of a fine powder is added. The mixture is polymerized and dried under supercritical conditions. The final product is a composition having a hydride uniformly dispersed throughout an inert, stable and highly porous matrix. It is capable of absorbing up to 30 moles of hydrogen per kilogram at room temperature and pressure, rapidly and reversibly. Hydrogen absorbed by the composition can be readily be recovered by heat or evacuation.

  19. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan R&D Manager Office of Technology and Innovations Phone: 847 768 0812

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  20. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

  2. Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  3. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage You are accessing a document from the...

  4. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and...

  5. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical report...

  6. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides information about the Theory Focus...

  7. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report...

  8. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)...

  9. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence This technical report describes the...

  10. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles This...

  11. High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop Summary of the...

  12. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Portable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portable Power Applications DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Portable Power Applications These tables summarize hydrogen storage technical performance targets...

  13. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides a summary of feedback from...

  14. Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE's hydrogen storage R&D activities include testing, analysis, and developing recommended best practices. The status of hydrogen storage testing and analysis projects is detailed in the...

  15. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation)...

  16. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed,...

  17. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials (presentation) High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting...

  18. DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive Applications DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive...

  19. Hydrogen storage compositions (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen storage compositions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen storage compositions You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech...

  20. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angela D. Lueking; Qixiu Li; John V. Badding; Dania Fonseca; Humerto Gutierrez; Apurba Sakti; Kofi Adu; Michael Schimmel

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  2. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  3. ANL Capabilities for Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydride Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  4. Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage- Chemical Hydrides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  5. Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805494

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805494 Enhanced Hydrogen Storage by Palladium Nanoparticles. However, a major problem is the lack of efficient hydrogen storage methods. The United States Department of Energy has established a multistage target for development of hydrogen storage materials that are able

  6. Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances March 21, 2012 Drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter A significant advance in hydrogen storage could make hydrogen a more for recharging the hydrogen storage compound ammonia borane. The LANL technology focuses on using ammonia borane

  7. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  8. Molecular Simulation of Hydrogen Storage in SWNT ? Shigeo MARUYAMAa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Simulation of Hydrogen Storage in SWNT ? Shigeo MARUYAMAa , Tatsuto KIMURAb a Eng. Res efficiency storage of hydrogen with single walled nanotubes (SWNTs) by Dillon et al. [1], experimental determinations of the storage capacity and mechanism of storage have been extensively studied. Hydrogen storage

  9. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on evaluating the performance of candidate materials using their well-characterized experimental test beds compared to the first prototype. Philip Parilla (NREL) described the approach of the carbon Center hydrogen binding energies. Matt Ringer (NREL) and Steve Lasher (TIAX) discussed the use of H2A methodology

  10. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a step in identifying a path forward for advancing a safe, cost-effective and practical means of storing hydrogen. Significant technical barriers remain for safe, cost-effective hydrogen storag

  11. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D On June 26, 2007 the Hydrogen...

  12. Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center of Excellence - Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE Executive Summaries for...

  13. Panel 1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large-Scale Hydrogen Storage in Germany

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGEN ENERGY STORAGEHanno

  14. Engineering an Adsorbent-Based Hydrogen Storage System: What Have We Learned?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographiclighbulbs - high-resolution2 DOE HydrogenStructuresDon

  15. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  16. Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700303 Improved Designs of Metal­Organic Frameworks for Hydrogen Storage** Sang Soo Han, Wei-Qiao Deng, and William A. Goddard, III* Hydrogen fuel is considered% reversible hydrogen storage by 2010, but current mate- rials fall far short of this goal. Consequently, many

  17. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2012-04-03

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  18. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  19. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xia; Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in nano-frameworks did not improve their H2 absorption due to the formation of stable alkaline earth B12H12 intermediates upon rehydrogenation. This project primarily investigated the effect of nano-framework surface chemistry on hydride properties, while the effect of pore size is the focus area of other efforts (e.g., HRL, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) etc.) within the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The projects were complementary in gaining an overall understanding of the influence of nano-frameworks on hydride behavior.

  20. news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi- als is that the hydrogenation and dehydro be possible to discover stable hydrogen hydrates with higher storage Hydrogen Posture Plan www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/ hydrogen_posture_plan.pdf 7. Kuhs, W

  1. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  2. Hydrogen storage characteristics of nanograined free-standing magnesium–nickel films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    materials for hydrogen storage, in Nan- oclusters andtesting of their hydrogen storage properties. The majorityrequirements for on-board hydrogen storage applications [

  3. Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

    2005-01-01

    Uhlemann, M. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Different CarbonEckert, J. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Microporous Metal-16, 2003 40. Smalley,E. , Hydrogen Storage Eased, Technology

  4. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

    2011-12-13

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  5. Physical Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage » Physical Hydrogen

  6. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Biris, A. S.; Mazumder, M. K.; Karabacak, T.; Kannarpady, Ganesh; Sharma, R.

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  7. Hydrogen storage gets new hope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.Food DrivevehĂ­culosStudents build hydrogenHydrogen

  8. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael A.; Page, Richard A.

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to established and qualified standards. Working with industry, academia, and the U.S. government, SwRI set out to develop an accepted set of evaluation standards and analytical methodologies. Critical measurements of hydrogen sorption properties in the Laboratory have been based on three analytical capabilities: 1) a high-pressure Sievert-type volumetric analyzer, modified to improve low-temperature isothermal analyses of physisorption materials and permit in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; 2) a static, high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer employing an advanced magnetic suspension electro-balance, glove-box containment, and capillary interface for in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; and 3) a Laser-induced Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (LTDMS) system for high thermal-resolution desorption and mechanistic analyses. The Laboratory has played an important role in down-selecting materials and systems that have emerged from the MCoEs.

  9. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField | SystemsTaps Universities

  10. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen.Solid and liquid hydrogen carriers for use in hydrogen storage and delivery.

  11. Energy Department Announces up to $4 Million for Advanced Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Up to $4 million in fiscal year 2014 funding will be made available for the continued development of advanced hydrogen storage systems and novel materials to provide adequate onboard storage for a wide range of applications including fuel cell ele

  12. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  13. Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for reversible Hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Liu; John J. Vajo

    2010-02-28

    This program was devoted to significantly extending the limits of hydrogen storage technology for practical transportation applications. To meet the hydrogen capacity goals set forth by the DOE, solid-state materials consisting of light elements were developed. Many light element compounds are known that have high capacities. However, most of these materials are thermodynamically too stable, and they release and store hydrogen much too slowly for practical use. In this project we developed new light element chemical systems that have high hydrogen capacities while also having suitable thermodynamic properties. In addition, we developed methods for increasing the rates of hydrogen exchange in these new materials. The program has significantly advanced (1) the application of combined hydride systems for tuning thermodynamic properties and (2) the use of nanoengineering for improving hydrogen exchange. For example, we found that our strategy for thermodynamic tuning allows both entropy and enthalpy to be favorably adjusted. In addition, we demonstrated that using porous supports as scaffolds to confine hydride materials to nanoscale dimensions could improve rates of hydrogen exchange by > 50x. Although a hydrogen storage material meeting the requirements for commercial development was not achieved, this program has provided foundation and direction for future efforts. More broadly, nanoconfinment using scaffolds has application in other energy storage technologies including batteries and supercapacitors. The overall goal of this program was to develop a safe and cost-effective nanostructured light-element hydride material that overcomes the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to hydrogen reaction and diffusion in current materials and thereby achieve > 6 weight percent hydrogen capacity at temperatures and equilibrium pressures consistent with DOE target values.

  14. Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting Attendee List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A list of attendees for the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  15. Explanations of FreedomCAR/DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of FreedomCAR Targets and Basis for Targets prepared for the Grand Challenge Hydrogen Storage Solicitation.

  16. Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes and David T. Shaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes Yan Chena) and David T. Shaw Department of Electrical and thermogravimetric analysis show a hydrogen storage capacity of 5­7 wt% was achieved reproducibly at room temperature the samples to 300 °C and removing of the catalyst tips, can increase the hydrogen storage capacity up to 13

  17. Application of Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Use in Fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Use in Fueling Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles This report describes the design, commissioning, and operation of a mobile hydrogen delivery and storage of Hydrogen Storage Technologies Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  18. Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206055

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206055 Magnesium Nanocrystals Embedded in a Metal­Organic Framework: Hybrid Hydrogen Storage with Synergistic Effect on Physi- and Chemisorption** Dae-Woon Lim, Ji carrier for the future. In order to use it as a fuel, a compact, safe, and efficient hydrogen storage

  19. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with SWNTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with SWNTs S. Maruyama and T. Kimura, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan The mechanism of efficient hydrogen storage (1) with SWNTs (2, and the storage amount became about 5 wt % regardless of the tube radius. The number of absorbed hydrogen

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tushar K Ghosh

    2008-10-13

    The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

  1. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of aLiBH4/CaH2Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilizedLiBH4/CaH2system ball-milled withTiCl3,TiF3, andTiO2additives have been investigated. It is found that the system withTiCl3additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount ofTiCl3is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of theLiBH4/CaH2system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% ofTiCl3are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts ofTiCl3are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.

  2. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of a L i B H 4 / C a H 2 Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilized LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system ball-milled with TiCl 3 , TiF 3 , and TiO 2 additives have been investigated. It is found that the system with TiCl 3 additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount of TiCl 3 is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of the more »LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% of TiCl 3 are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts of TiCl 3 are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures. « less

  3. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5037: Hydrogen Storage Materials- 2004 vs. 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about hydrogen storage materials (2004 vs. 2006).

  4. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

  5. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore »the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  6. Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Andrew Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vehicular Hydrogen Storage http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/et al. , Reversible hydrogen storage in calcium borohydridereversible hydrogen storage. Chemical Communications, 2010.

  7. Short-range order of low-coverage Ti/Al,,111...: Implications for hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Short-range order of low-coverage Ti/Al,,111...: Implications for hydrogen storage in complex metal-coverage Ti atoms on Al 111 as a model surface system for transition metal doped alanate hydrogen storage the dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen in Ti-doped alanate storage materials. © 2007 American Institute

  8. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S.; Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  9. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  10. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  11. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  12. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen

  13. Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801488

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801488 A Comparison of the H2 Sorption Capacities MOFs with accessible metal sites (AMSs) should have a higher hydrogen storage capacity than those be accommodated are of particular interest because they can be applied in gas storage[1­4] and separation,[4

  14. Hydrogen purification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golben, Peter Mark

    2010-06-15

    The present invention provides a system to purify hydrogen involving the use of a hydride compressor and catalytic converters combined with a process controller.

  15. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies" held on August 19,...

  16. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the activities carried out, key accomplishments, and recommendations from the DOE's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory with...

  17. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies held on August 19, 2014.

  18. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Material...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This table summarizes hydrogen storage technical performance targets for material handling equipment. These targets were developed with input to DOE through extensive...

  19. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First Presented...

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  1. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Craig M. (Kailua, HI); Zidan, Ragaiy A. (Honolulu, HI)

    2002-01-01

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  2. Discovery of novel hydrogen storage materials: an atomic scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery of novel hydrogen storage materials: an atomic scale computational approach Home Author: C. Wolverton, D. J. Siegel, A. R. Akbarzadeh, V. Ozolins Year: 2008 Abstract:...

  3. Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of...

  4. Cryotank for storage of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more energy per pound than any other fuel 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hydrogen at low temperature and high pressure reduces weight, volume and cost of storage...

  5. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials: UOP Approaches High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput...

  6. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    14-15, 2014 Workshop Goal: Identify challenges, benefits and opportunities for commercial hydrogen energy storage applications to support grid services, variable electricity...

  7. Tuning the plasmon energy of Palladium-Hydrogen systems by varying the Hydrogen concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muińo, Ricardo Díez

    to their importance in many applications such as hydrogen storage [16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21]. The novel scheme [8Tuning the plasmon energy of Palladium-Hydrogen systems by varying the Hydrogen concentration V M of bulk PdHx. Hydrogen concentrations between x = 0 and x = 1 are considered. The calculated spectra

  8. Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Summary report from the May 17, 2007 Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting ssawgmaysummary.pdf More...

  9. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in hydrogen storage in metal- containingCatalyzed alanates for hydrogen storage, Journal of Alloysand A. Zuttle, Hydrogen-storage materials for mobile

  10. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  11. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  12. Design and Synthesis of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Hydrogen Storage and Carbon Dioxide Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumida, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    K. ; Kumar, S. Int. J. Hydrogen Storage 2009, 34, 5466. (15)Espinosa-Loza, F. Int. J. Hydrogen Storage 2006, 31, 2274. (K. ; Kumar, S. Int. J. Hydrogen Storage 2009, 34, 5466. (3)

  13. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  14. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES...

  15. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevan

  16. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release – Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200°C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300°C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20°C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  17. Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-13

    Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

  18. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClaine, Andrew W.

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

  19. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  20. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  1. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desnavi, Sameerah; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 ?{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  2. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  3. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected...

  4. New insights into designing metallacarborane based room temperature hydrogen storage media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bora, Pankaj Lochan; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2013-10-28

    Metallacarboranes are promising towards realizing room temperature hydrogen storage media because of the presence of both transition metal and carbon atoms. In metallacarborane clusters, the transition metal adsorbs hydrogen molecules and carbon can link these clusters to form metal organic framework, which can serve as a complete storage medium. Using first principles density functional calculations, we chalk out the underlying principles of designing an efficient metallacarborane based hydrogen storage media. The storage capacity of hydrogen depends upon the number of available transition metal d-orbitals, number of carbons, and dopant atoms in the cluster. These factors control the amount of charge transfer from metal to the cluster, thereby affecting the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules. This correlation between the charge transfer and storage capacity is general in nature, and can be applied to designing efficient hydrogen storage systems. Following this strategy, a search for the best metallacarborane was carried out in which Sc based monocarborane was found to be the most promising H{sub 2} sorbent material with a 9 wt.% of reversible storage at ambient pressure and temperature.

  5. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  6. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  7. LANL/PNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts for Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  8. Storage battery systems analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Storage Battery Systems Analysis supports the battery Exploratory Technology Development and Testing Project with technical and economic analysis of battery systems in various end-use applications. Computer modeling and simulation techniques are used in the analyses. Analysis objectives are achieved through both in-house efforts and outside contracts. In-house studies during FY82 included a study of the relationship between storage battery system reliability and cost, through cost-of-investment and cost-of-service interruption inputs; revision and update of the SOLSTOR computer code in standard FORTRAN 77 form; parametric studies of residential stand-alone photovoltaic systems using the SOLSTOR code; simulation of wind turbine collector/storage battery systems for the community of Kalaupapa, Molokai, Hawaii.

  9. Hydrogen Storage - Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of gasoline (120 MJkg for hydrogen versus 44 MJkg for gasoline). However, on...

  10. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  11. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Storage - Sanjoy Banerjee, CUNY.pdf PDF icon ESS 2010 Update Conference - Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy Storage - Venkat Srinivasan,...

  12. Executive Summaries Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E 55 #12;5 Introduction and Background The use of hydrogen and fuel cells to power light-duty vehicles and petroleum usage.1 In addition to the challenges associated with improving the power density and durability hydrogen storage technologies that offer high specific energy and energy density at acceptable costs

  13. Andrew Weisberg DOE-Annual-030520-1 Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Weisberg DOE-Annual-030520-1 Hydrogen Storage Using Lightweight Tanks DOE Hydrogen Program Myers, Gene Berry This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy · Risk of `suppressed' failure modes with higher variance is neglected in current safety standards

  14. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings, August 14th and 15th, 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A workshop was held to identify on-board storage technical barriers and to explore promising research and development options to overcome them. The specific objectives of the workshop were to review the current status of hydrogen storage technologies, identify the technical challenges that must be overcome to have safe, cost-effective and practical storage systems, identify promising technical approaches to overcome the challenges and prioritize the R&D needs for each of those promising approaches.

  15. Storage, generation, and use of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Rolfe, Jonathan L.; Larsen, Christopher A.; Konduri, Ravi K.

    2006-05-30

    A composition comprising a carrier liquid; a dispersant; and a chemical hydride. The composition can be used in a hydrogen generator to generate hydrogen for use, e.g., as a fuel. A regenerator recovers elemental metal from byproducts of the hydrogen generation process.

  16. Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage - Storage of hydrogen (or its chemical precursors) within the distribution system Fuel Cells - Conversion of hydrogen to electrical power; use of hydrogen to power...

  17. National Hydrogen Storage Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents such as hybrid carbon nanotubes, aerogels, and nanofibers, as well as metal-organic frameworks and conducting polymers. This...

  18. Energy storage connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  19. A comparative analysis of the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petitpas, G; Benard, P; Klebanoff, L E; Xiao, J; Aceves, S M

    2014-07-01

    While conventional low-pressure LH? dewars have existed for decades, advanced methods of cryogenic hydrogen storage have recently been developed. These advanced methods are cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage, which operate best in the temperature range 30–100 K. We present a comparative analysis of both approaches for cryogenic hydrogen storage, examining how pressure and/or sorbent materials are used to effectively increase onboard H? density and dormancy. We start by reviewing some basic aspects of LH? properties and conventional means of storing it. From there we describe the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods, and then explore the relationship between them, clarifying the materials science and physics of the two approaches in trying to solve the same hydrogen storage task (~5–8 kg H?, typical of light duty vehicles). Assuming that the balance of plant and the available volume for the storage system in the vehicle are identical for both approaches, the comparison focuses on how the respective storage capacities, vessel weight and dormancy vary as a function of temperature, pressure and type of cryo-adsorption material (especially, powder MOF-5 and MIL-101). By performing a comparative analysis, we clarify the science of each approach individually, identify the regimes where the attributes of each can be maximized, elucidate the properties of these systems during refueling, and probe the possible benefits of a combined “hybrid” system with both cryo-adsorption and cryo-compression phenomena operating at the same time. In addition the relationships found between onboard H? capacity, pressure vessel and/or sorbent mass and dormancy as a function of rated pressure, type of sorbent material and fueling conditions are useful as general designing guidelines in future engineering efforts using these two hydrogen storage approaches.

  20. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cańizares, Claudio A.

    evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new for existent nuclear and wind power generation facilities. Keywords: hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, hydrogen economy, nuclear power, wind power, electricity markets, mixed-integer stochastic linear

  1. Metal-Containing Organic and Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satcher, Jr., J H; Baumann, T F; Herberg, J L

    2005-01-10

    This document and the accompanying manuscript summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuel cells are important components of the 2003 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative focused on the reduction of America's dependence on oil. To compete with oil as an energy source, however, one must be able to transport and utilize hydrogen at or above the target set by DOE (6 wt.% H{sub 2}) for the transportation sector. Other than liquid hydrogen, current technology falls well short of this DOE target. As a result, a variety of materials have recently been investigated to address this issue. Carbon nanostructures have received significant attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their low molecular weight, tunable microporosity and high specific surface areas. For example, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved 5 to 10 wt.% H{sub 2} storage using metal-doped carbon nanotubes. That study showed that the intimate mix of metal nanoparticles with graphitic carbon resulted in the unanticipated hydrogen adsorption at near ambient conditions. The focus of our LDRD effort was the investigation of metal-doped carbon aerogels (MDCAs) as hydrogen storage materials. In addition to their low mass densities, continuous porosities and high surface areas, these materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because MDCAs contain a nanometric mix of metal nanoparticles and graphitic nanostructures. For FY04, our goals were to: (1) prepare a variety of metal-doped CAs (where the metal is cobalt, nickel or iron) at different densities and carbonization temperatures, (2) characterize the microstructure of these materials and (3) initiate hydrogen adsorption/desorption studies to determine H2 storage properties of these materials. Since the start of this effort, we have successfully prepared and characterized Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogels at different densities and carbonization temperatures. The bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled 'Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel- Doped Carbon Aerogels'. This one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the DOE Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence at NREL, with funding from DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program starting in FY05.

  2. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevant performance properties of new materials as they are discovered and tested.

  3. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  4. A nanocontainer for the storage of hydrogen , X. Gu a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    A nanocontainer for the storage of hydrogen X. Ye a,b , X. Gu a,b , X.G. Gong b , Tony K.M. Shing than the typical pressure of a few hundred bar currently employed for hydrogen storage. At 2.5 GPa. Introduction Storage of hydrogen is a crucial link between hydrogen production and its use as a clean fuel

  5. Development and Validation of a Slurry Model for Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-07-25

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE’s Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. The purpose of this research is to describe the models developed for slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The model was then run using a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, cold-start cycle and hot drive cycle. The system design was adjusted to meet these drive cycles. A sensitivity analysis was then performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction greater than 11 kJ/mol H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of greater than 11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  6. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R&D approach, which involved the rapid down-selection of a large number of options (chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4}) to a smaller, more manageable number. The research began by conducting an extensive review of the technical and patent literature to identify all possible options. The down-selection was based on evaluation of the options against a set of metrics, and to a large extent occurred before experimentation was initiated. Given the vast amount of literature and patents that has evolved over the years, this approach helped to focus efforts and resources on the options with the highest technical and commercial probability of success. Additionally, a detailed engineering analysis methodology was developed for conducting the cost and energy-efficiency calculations. The methodology utilized a number of inputs and tools (Aspen PEA{trademark}, FCHTool, and H2A). The down-selection of chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4} identified three options that were subsequently pursued experimentally. Metal reduction of borate was investigated in Dow's laboratories, research on electrochemical routes to NaBH{sub 4} was conducted at Pennsylvania State University, and Idaho National Laboratory researchers examined various carbothermal routes for producing NaBH{sub 4} from borate. The electrochemical and carbothermal studies did not yield sufficiently positive results. However, NaBH{sub 4} was produced in high yields and purities by an aluminum-based metal reduction pathway. Solid-solid reactive milling, slurry milling, and solution-phase approaches to metal reduction were investigated, and while both reactive milling and solution-phase routes point to fully recyclable processes, the scale-up of reactive milling processes to produce NaBH{sub 4} is expected to be difficult. Alternatively, a low-cost solution-phase approach to NaBH{sub 4} has been identified that is based on conventional process unit operations and should be amenable to scale-up. Numerous advances in AB synthesis have been made in recent years to improve AB yields and purities

  7. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ?6 wt% and ?50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the experiments. Overall, the combined experimental measurements and simulations indicate that hydrogen storage based on enhanced solubility in nano-confined liquids is unlikely to meet the storage densities required for practical use. Only low gravimetric capacities of < 0.5 wt% were achieved. More importantly, solvent filled scaffolds had lower volumetric capacities than corresponding empty scaffolds. Nevertheless, several of the composites measured did show significant (>~ 5x) enhanced hydrogen solubility relative to bulk solvent solubility, when the hydrogen capacity was attributed only to dissolution in the confined solvent. However, when the hydrogen capacity was compared to an empty scaffold that is known to store hydrogen by surface adsorption on the scaffold walls, including the solvent always reduced the hydrogen capacity. For the best composites, this reduction relative to an empty scaffold was ~30%; for the worst it was ~90%. The highest capacities were obtained with the largest solvent molecules and with scaffolds containing 3- dimensionally confined pore geometries. The simulations suggested that the capacity of the composites originated from hydrogen adsorption on the scaffold pore walls at sites not occupied by solvent molecules. Although liquid solvent filled the pores, not all of the adsorption sites on the pore walls were occupied due to restricted motion of the solvent molecules within the confined pore space.

  8. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS DURING STORAGE OF 3013 OXIDE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Askew, N.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-03-14

    As part of a surveillance program intended to ensure the safe storage of plutonium bearing nuclear materials in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS), samples of these materials are shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. These samples are in the form of solids or powders which will have absorbed moisture. Potentially flammable hydrogen gas is generated due to radiolysis of the moisture. The samples are shipped for processing after chemical analysis. To preclude the possibility of a hydrogen deflagration or detonation inside the shipping containers, the shipping times are limited to ensure that hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of every layer of confinement is below the lower flammability limit of 4 volume percent (vol%). This study presents an analysis of the rate of hydrogen accumulation due to radiolysis and calculation of allowable shipping times for typical KAMS materials.

  9. MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCH LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, CO, April15-17, 1980 MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCHSymposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, Colorado, April

  10. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary Dale (Ringwood, NJ)

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  11. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  12. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials- Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report, written by H2 Technology Consulting, provides an introduction to and overview of the recommended best practices in making measurements of the hydrogen storage properties of materials.

  13. Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power-to-Gas: Establishing Criteria for Successful Business Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichman, Joshua; Melaina, Marc

    2015-10-27

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility, sufficient capacity and greater concern for overgeneration. As a result there is growing interest in exploring the role of energy storage and demand response technologies to support grid needs. Hydrogen is a versatile feedstock that can be used in a variety of applications including chemical and industrial processes, as well as a transportation fuel and heating fuel. Traditionally, hydrogen technologies focus on providing services to a single sector; however, participating in multiple sectors has the potential to provide benefits to each sector and increase the revenue for hydrogen technologies. The goal of this work is to explore promising system configurations for hydrogen systems and the conditions that will make for successful business cases in a renewable, low-carbon future. Current electricity market data, electric and gas infrastructure data and credit and incentive information are used to perform a techno-economic analysis to identify promising criteria and locations for successful hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas projects. Infrastructure data will be assessed using geographic information system applications. An operation optimization model is used to co-optimizes participation in energy and ancillary service markets as well as the sale of hydrogen. From previous work we recognize the great opportunity that energy storage and power-to-gas but there is a lack of information about the economic favorability of such systems. This work explores criteria for selecting locations and compares the system cost and potential revenue to establish competitiveness for a variety of equipment configurations. Hydrogen technologies offer unique system flexibility that can enable interactions between multiple energy sectors including electric, transport, heating fuel and industrial. Previous research established that hydrogen technologies, and in particular electrolyzers, can respond fast enough and for sufficient duration to participate in electricity markets. This work recognizes that participation in electricity markets and integration with the gas system can enhance the revenue streams available for hydrogen storage systems and quantifies the economic competitiveness and of these systems. A few of the key results include 1) the most valuable revenue stream for hydrogen systems is to sell the produced hydrogen, 2) participation in both energy and ancillary service markets yields the greatest revenue and 3) electrolyzers acting as demand response devices are particularly favorable.

  14. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  15. 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the following areas: New materials or technologies for hydrogen storage; Compressed and liquid hydrogen tank technologies; and Off-board hydrogen storage systems. Category 2 is...

  16. Integrated technical and economic assessments of transport and storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Transportation will be a major market for hydrogen because of its great size and the value of energy at the wheels of a vehicle in comparison to its heating value. Hydrogen also offers important potential efficiency gains over hydrocarbon fuels. However, hydrogen end-use technologies will not develop without a reliable hydrogen supply infrastructure. By the same token, reliable infrastructures will not develop without end-use demand. Our task is to analyze the costs of various infrastructure options for providing hydrogen, as the number of vehicles serviced increased from very small numbers initially, to moderate numbers in the mid-term and to determine if a smooth transition may be possible. We will determine viable market sizes for transport and storage options by examining the technologies and the capital and operating costs of these systems, as well as related issues such as safety, construction time, etc. The product of our work will be data based scenarios of the likely transitions to hydrogen fuel, beginning with small and progressing to larger numbers of vehicles. We are working closely with the suppliers of relevant technologies to (1) determine realistic component costs, and (2) to assure availability of our analyses to business. Preliminary analyses indicate that the cost of transport and storage is as important as production cost in determining the cost of hydrogen fuel to the consumer, and that home electrolysis and centrally processed liquid hydrogen may provide hydrogen in the initial stages.

  17. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a portion of the work performed Multi-fuel Reformers for Fuel Cells Used in Transportation. One objective for development is to develop advanced fuel processing systems to reform methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and other hydrocarbons into hydrogen for use in transportation fuel cell systems, while a second objective is to develop better systems for on-board hydrogen storage. This report examines techniques and technology available for storage of pure hydrogen on board a vehicle as pure hydrogen of hydrides. The report focuses separately on near- and far-term technologies, with particular emphasis on the former. Development of lighter, more compact near-term storage systems is recommended to enhance competitiveness and simplify fuel cell design. The far-term storage technologies require substantial applied research in order to become serious contenders.

  18. Computational studies of hydrogen storage materials and the development of related methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Timothy Keith

    2007-01-01

    Computational methods, including density functional theory and the cluster expansion formalism, are used to study materials for hydrogen storage. The storage of molecular hydrogen in the metal-organic framework with formula ...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials An agenda for a four-part, theory-focus session on...

  20. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGEN ENERGY

  1. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  2. Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

  3. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage: Statement of Objectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of objectives for the Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage issued in 2003.

  4. Cryo-compressed Hydrogen Storage. Tobias Brunner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with highest density at lower pressure LHLH22 69-65 g/L 1,5 ­ 3 bar Heat exchanger Partial warm up Aftercooler Boil-off loss Pressure supply Complexity Infrastructure Technology leap storage & drive train Liquefaction GH2 LH2 LH2 Return gas 1 kg/min (2 MW) 63 g/L 4 bar LH2 LH2 63 g/L 0.4 MPa High pressure

  5. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage by SWNTs Tatsuto Kimuraa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage by SWNTs Tatsuto Kimuraa and Shigeo Maruyamab of efficient hydrogen storage [1] with SWNTs [2,3] was studied through classical molecular dynamics simulations adsorbed hydrogen molecules was almost proportional to the number of carbon atoms, and the storage amount

  6. Mechanics of hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes Y.L. Chen a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hanqing

    Mechanics of hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes Y.L. Chen a , B. Liu a,Ă, J. Wu a , Y. Huang b 17 July 2008 Keywords: Hydrogen storage Carbon nanotube Continuum model Analytical solution Atomistic simulations a b s t r a c t A continuum mechanics model is established for hydrogen storage in single

  7. Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ prepared Mg­Cu alloy and surface defects. The maximal hydrogen storage contents of Mg­Cu alloy nanoparticles can reach 2.05 Ć 0. Introduction The storage of hydrogen gas is presently accomplished with the stainless steel cylinders under

  8. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5 Cristian I surface area carbon materials for hydrogen storage continues to attract interest because predicted high potential for hydrogen storage on metal-decorated carbon supports, the experimental

  9. Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials Abdullah Al storage processes. Here we analyze the role of atomic Ti catalysts in the hydrogenation of Al-based hydrogen storage materials. We show that Ti atoms near the Al surface activate gas-phase H2, a key step

  10. Hydrogen Storage in New Metal-Organic Frameworks David J. Tranchemontagne,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Hydrogen Storage in New Metal-Organic Frameworks David J. Tranchemontagne, Kyo Sung Park, Hiroyasu show that smaller pores and polarized linkers in MOFs are indeed advantageous for hydrogen storage has been given to utilization of cleaner energy sources, such as methane and hydrogen.1 The storage

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo MARUYAMA1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes * Shigeo-8656 The hydrogen storage mechanism of SWNTs was studied through molecular dynamics simulations. Assuming the simple : Molecular Dynamics Method, Hydrogen Storage, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Lennard-Jones, Adsorption

  12. Validation of Hydrogenography for the search of promising hydrogen storage materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, Bernard

    Validation of Hydrogenography for the search of promising hydrogen storage materials #12;This work was funded as a part of the EU project `NESSHY' (Novel Efficient Solid Storage for Hydrogen, contract) Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft #12;Validation of Hydrogenography for the search of promising hydrogen storage

  13. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities Robert DSTP/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays

  14. Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B.

    Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns Yun Liu a,b,*, Craig nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental mea- surements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estima- tion

  15. Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were excess H2 uptake and surface area, we predict the theoretical total hydrogen storage capacity

  16. New Alkali Doped Pillared Carbon Materials Designed to Achieve Practical Reversible Hydrogen Storage for Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    and room temperature. This satisfies the DOE (Department of Energy) target of hydrogen-storage materials single-wall nanotubes can lead to a hydrogen-storage capacity of 6.0 mass% and 61:7 kg=m3 at 50 bars of roughly 1­20 bars and ambient temperature. Chen et al. reported remarkable hydrogen-storage capacities

  17. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 214501 (2011) Nanoconfinement effects on the reversibility of hydrogen storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    2011-01-01

    of hydrogen storage in ammonia borane: A first-principles study Kiseok Chang,1 Eunja Kim,2 Philippe F. Weck,3-state materials capable of storing hydrogen, the NH3BH3 compound called ammonia borane (AB), with an ideal storage2 kg-1 ) density targets specified by the U.S. Department of Energy for on-board hydrogen storage.4

  18. Ni-dispersed fullerenes: Hydrogen storage and desorption properties Weon Ho Shin and Seong Ho Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ni-dispersed fullerenes: Hydrogen storage and desorption properties Weon Ho Shin and Seong Ho Yang could be viable alternatives to reversible hydrogen storage. It is demonstrated that a single Ni coated-dispersed fullerenes are considered to be the novel hydrogen storage media capable of storing 6.8 wt % H2, thus

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo MARUYAMA #12;The hydrogen storage mechanism of SWNTs was studied through molecular dynamics simulations,12) Fig. 6 Hydrogen storage inside each SWNT #12;Table 1 Potential parameters between SWNTs Tube d0 [Ĺ

  20. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section III. Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    verification and validation tests based on NGV2- 2000, modified for high pressure hydrogen · Supply fully system under NGV 3.1 standards · Designed and developed industry's first hydrogen 10,000 psi (700 bar) in

  1. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGEN ENERGY H 25Energy

  2. Ultrafine Hydrogen Storage Powders - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPPfinal designUltrafast Transformations inmixture ofHydrogen

  3. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Why Perform Materials Development and System Engineering in Parallel? Materials Thermal H 2 Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Wheels Management BoP Engineered...

  4. Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks efficient systems to capture carbon dioxide. Additionally, we have a long-standing collaboration with BASF, and carbon dioxide isotherm measurements were performed at 1-85 bar and 77-298 K on the evacuated forms

  5. Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Barnes; William Liss

    2008-11-14

    This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage – in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

  6. TEST: DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations.

  7. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETOoffor use with DOE Loan0:8: Advancing9:Storage

  8. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

  9. Hydrogen Storage The goal of this project is to develop the metrologies necessary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage METALS The goal of this project is to develop the metrologies necessary for rapid, high-throughput measurement of the hydrogen content of novel materials proposed for hydrogen storage to the research community. Objective Impact and Customers · Hydrogen is promoted as a petroleum replacement

  10. HYDROGEN STORAGE IN NICKEL DOPED MCM-41 Ezgi Dndar Tekkaya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    HYDROGEN STORAGE IN NICKEL DOPED MCM-41 Ezgi Dündar Tekkaya1 and Yuda Yürüm1 1 Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey Hydrogen as an energy carrier of hydrogen results with increasing demand to hydrogen production and storage. Recent studies show

  11. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Nakamura, Kenji (Toyota, JP); Au, Ming (Martinez, GA); Zidan, Ragaiy (Alken, SC)

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  12. Engineering report standard hydrogen monitoring system problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golberg, R.L.

    1996-09-25

    Engineering Report to document moisture problems found during the sampling of the vapors in the dome space for hydrogen in the storage tanks and a recommended solution.

  13. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  14. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2004-09-07

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  15. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  16. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  17. Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015, the ITB Group’s 16th annual technical conference, was held from March 4–5, 2015, in Novi, Michigan.

  18. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  19. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  20. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  1. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase Demonstration Hydrogen Storage Materials

  2. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  3. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  4. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifer, Peter; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Lee, Mark W.; Jalistegi, Satish S.

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have demonstrated the predicted increase in binding energy experimentally, currently at ~10 kJ/mol. The synthetic route for incorporation of boron at the outset is to create appropriately designed copoly- mers, with a boron-free and a boron-carrying monomer, followed by pyrolysis of the polymer, yielding a bo- ron-substituted carbon scaffold in which boron atoms are bonded to carbon atoms by synthesis. This is in contrast to a second route (funded by DE-FG36-08GO18142) in which first high-surface area carbon is cre- ated and doped by surface vapor deposition of boron, with incorporation of the boron into the lattice the final step of the fabrication. The challenge in the first route is to create high surface areas without compromising sp2 boron-carbon bonds. The challenge in the second route is to create sp2 boron-carbon bonds without com- promising high surface areas.

  5. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-tank heat exchanger 4000-psi pressure vessel rating #12;4 System Analysis of Physical Storage stresses ­ 5500 pressure cycles at 1.25 NWP (SAE J2579) Dynamic models for gaseous/liquid refueling) peak pressure 4 atm initial pressure, variable initial temperature Additional storage capacity with pre

  6. Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

    2007-01-01

    ISO 14687: Hydrogen fuel -- Product Specification, 2007.Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific andStorage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and

  7. Cryogenic, compressed, and liquid hydrogen fuel storage in vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Allan B

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen is the viable energy carrier of future energy and transportation systems due to its clean emissions, light weight, and abundance. Its extremely low volumetric density, however, presents significant challenges to ...

  8. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  9. Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poonen, Bjorn

    Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage by William Allan and examined for its potential to provide low cost energy storage using the rapid reaction kinetics of hydrogen by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David E. Hardt Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Theses #12;2 #12;Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine

  10. Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage Long Pan coordination structures represent a promising new entry to the field of hydrogen storage materials.2 To fully that effectively store hydrogen are needed for use in fuel cell powered vehicles. Among the various candidate

  11. HH-sII in small, icy bodies? Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    · HH-sII in small, icy bodies? Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Compounds 0.2 GPa 10 kPa 77 K 110 140Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington Hydrogen Storage H4M holds the largest amount of its atomic number. So: it is easier to sense light atoms, such as hydrogen, in the presence of heavier

  12. Nano- and Microscale Architectures for Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Host for Emerging Energy Storage Systems Introduction Li-ionStorage Systems …………………………………………………………………………………………………………85Architectures for Energy Storage Systems A dissertation

  13. Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary Report Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop...

  14. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Andris R.Abele. Quantum Hydrogen Storage Systems, PresentedTIAX LLC, Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-plant (BOP), but not the hydrogen storage system. This study

  15. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomas Roubicek; Giuseppe Tomassetti

    2013-09-12

    A thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for hydrogen adsorption in metal hydrides is proposed. Beside hydrogen diffusion, the model accounts for phase transformation accompanied by hysteresis, swelling, temperature and heat transfer, strain, and stress. We prove existence of solutions of the ensuing system of partial differential equations by a carefully-designed, semi-implicit approximation scheme. A generalization for a drift-diffusion of multi-component ionized "gas" is outlined, too.

  16. Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and Energy Storage Systems TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  17. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS)...

  18. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Gray, Joshua (Aiken, SC); Stowe, Ashley C. (Knoxville, TN); Sivasubramanian, Premkumar (Aiken, SC)

    2012-02-28

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

  19. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  20. Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's research and development on sorbents and carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage targets breakthrough concepts for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents...

  1. Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.

    2010-02-11

    Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

  2. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase Demonstration Hydrogen Storage

  3. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  4. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  5. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

  6. Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  7. 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is issuing a Grand Challenge to the scientific community by soliciting Applications for research, development and demonstration of hydrogen storage materials and technologies. In addition to...

  8. Webinar: Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies," originally presented on August 19, 2014.

  9. The JET Hydrogen-Oxygen Recombination Sensor – A Safety Device for Hydrogen Isotope Processing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The JET Hydrogen-Oxygen Recombination Sensor – A Safety Device for Hydrogen Isotope Processing Systems

  10. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

  11. Collaborative research on amine borane regeneration and market analysis of hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schubert

    2010-12-06

    Amine borane (AB) is a very high capacity hydrogen storage material that meets DOE gravimetric and volumetric targets for on-board delivery of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This research helped make process toward the ultimate goal of practical generation of spent AB and added to the understanding of materials and processes required to utilize AB in practical applications. In addition, this work helped to enhance our fundamental understanding of the properties of boron materials now being pursued for new frustrated Lewis pair catalyst systems for activation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, of interest for carbon capture and fuels production. This project included four primary areas of investigation: (1) synthesis of borate esters for use as amine borane regeneration intermediates, (2) spent ammonia borane fuel generation and analysis, (3) spent fuel digestion for production of borate esters, and (4) worldwide borate resource analysis. Significant progress was made in each of these areas during the two-year course of this project, which involved extensive collaborations with partners in the Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and particularly with partners at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results of the boron resource analysis studies indicate that sufficient boron reserves exist within the United States to meet forecast requirements for a U.S. fleet of hydrogen FCVs and sufficient resources are available worldwide for a global fleet of FCVs.

  12. Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4 Containers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

  13. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum mediated hydrogenation process leading to reversibility. The Al-AB complexes have comparable hydrogen capacity with other M-AB and have potential to meet DOE’s 2010 and 2015 targets for system wt%.

  14. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Superconducting Magnetic Bearing - Mike Strasik, Boeing.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations Energy Storage...

  15. Solar hydrogen energy system. Annual report, 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veziroglu, T.N.

    1996-12-31

    The paper reports progress on three tasks. Task A, System comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels in terms of EPACT requirements, investigates the feasibility of several alternative fuels, namely, natural gas, methanol, ethanol, hydrogen and electricity, to replace 10% of gasoline by the year 2000. The analysis was divided into two parts: analysis of vehicle technologies and analysis of fuel production, storage and distribution. Task B, Photovoltaic hydrogen production, involves this fuel production method for the future. The process uses hybrid solar collectors to generate dc electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The third task, Hydrogen safety studies, covers two topics: a review of codes, standards, regulations, recommendations, certifications, and pamphlets which address safety of gaseous fuels; and an experimental investigation of hydrogen flame impingement.

  16. Systems analysis of hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermelee, A.; Beller, M.; D'Acierno, J.

    1981-11-01

    The potential for hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines is analyzed for a specific site from both mid-term (1985) and long-term perspectives. The concept of supplementing natural gas with the addition of hydrogen in the existing gas pipeline system serves to provide a transport and storage medium for hydrogen while eliminating the high investment costs associated with constructing separate hydrogen pipelines. This paper examines incentives and barriers to the implementation of this concept. The analysis is performed with the assumption that current developmental programs will achieve a process for cost-effectively separating pure hydrogen from natural gas/hydrogen mixtures to produce a separable and versatile chemical and fuel commodity. The energy systems formulation used to evaluate the role of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure is the Reference Energy System (RES). The RES is a network diagram that provides an analytic framework for incorporating all resources, technologies, and uses of energy in a uniform manner. A major aspect of the study is to perform a market analysis of traditional uses of resources in the various consuming sectors and the potential for hydrogen substitution in these sectors. The market analysis will focus on areas of industry where hydrogen is used as a feedstock rather than for its fuel-use opportunities to replace oil and natural gas. The sectors of industry where hydrogen is currently used and where its use can be expanded or substituted for other resources include petroleum refining, chemicals, iron and steel, and other minor uses.

  17. Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

    2007-01-01

    State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Storage in Solids,” Presentationfor High Density Hydrogen storage,” Fuel Cell Seminar,for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage,” U.S. Department of

  18. Integration and Dynamics of a Renewable Regenerative Hydrogen Fuel Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Integration and Dynamics of a Renewable Regenerative Hydrogen Fuel Cell System by Alvin Peter, hydrogen and electricity storage, and fuel cells. A special design feature of this test bed is the ability of the author. #12;ii Supervisory Committee Integration and Dynamics of a Renewable Regenerative Hydrogen Fuel

  19. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  20. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  1. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 â?? LiAlH4 â??Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the alanate from alkali hydride, Al and hydrogen, was hampering reversibility. The reverse reaction was then studied for the same phase diagram, starting with LiH, NaH, and MgH2, and Al. The study was extended to phase diagrams including KH and CaH2 as well. The observed hydrogen storage capacity in the Al hexahydrides was less than 4 wt. %, well short of DOE targets. The HT assay came on line and after certification with studies on NaAlH4, was first applied to the LiNH2 - LiBH4 - MgH2 phase diagram. The 60-point study elucidated trends within the system locating an optimum material of 0.6 LiNH2 â?? 0.3 MgH2 â?? 0.1 LiBH4 that stored about 4 wt. % H2 reversibly and operated below 220 °C. Also present was the phase Li4(NH2)3BH4, which had been discovered in the LiNH2 -LiBH4 system. This new ternary formulation performed much better than the well-known 2 LiNH2 â?? MgH2 system by 50 °C in the HT assay. The Li4(NH2)3BH4 is a low melting ionic liquid under our test conditions and facilitates the phase transformations required in the hydrogen storage reaction, which no longer relies on a higher energy solid state reaction pathway. Further study showed that the 0.6 LiNH2 â?? 0.3 MgH2 â?? 0.1 LiBH4 formulation was very stable with respect to ammonia and diborane desorption, the observed desorption was from hydrogen. This result could not have been anticipated and was made possible by the efficiency of HT combinatorial methods. Investigation of the analogous LiNH2 â?? LiBH4 â?? CaH2 phase diagram revealed new reversible hydrogen storage materials 0.625 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 and 0.375 LiNH2 + 0.25 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 operating at 1 wt. % reversible hydrogen below 175 °C. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed a new structure for the spent materials which had not been previously observed. While the storage capacity was not impressive, an important aspect is that it boron appears to participate in a low temperature reversible reaction. The last major area of study also focused

  2. Enhanced hydrogen storage properties of LiAlH4 catalyzed by CoFe2O4 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Enhanced hydrogen storage properties of LiAlH4 catalyzed by CoFe2O4 nanoparticles Ziliang Li The catalytic effects of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles on the hydrogen storage properties of LiAlH4 prepared by ball of advanced hydrogen storage materials for safely storing it at high gravimetric and volumetric densities.4

  3. Theoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II. Collision, storage, and adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    of a true hydrogen storage capacity, thus it would be also true that some results of rather high storage storage material or not. Our previous study6 showed that the pristine CNT is not an effective hydrogenTheoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II

  4. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    and electrolyzer costs; hydrogen storage system limitations;and an electrolyzer-hydrogen storage- fuel cell system for400 kW electrolyzer, hydrogen storage tanks, and an internal

  5. Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD); Tiller, Dale B. (Lincoln, NE); Wienhold, Paul D. (Baltimore, MD); Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  7. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

  8. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  9. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  10. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    1986-01-01

    is based on the specific heat of water rather than the latent 'heat of fusion of ice as in ice storage, it requires about 4 times the storage capacity of an equivalent ice storage system. ? Salt Storage: This system utilizes eutectic salts which... freeze and melt around 47 o F. Exist ing chillers can be easily retrofitted for salt storage or chilled water storage. For ice stor age systems, a direct refrigerant system or glycol chillers are suitable. This paper discusses the details of each...

  11. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

  12. Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting OE's Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer...

  13. Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review and Update Meeting |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review and Update Meeting Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review and Update Meeting OE's Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program conducted a peer...

  14. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, dependingElectricity Only active storage systems are considered. Noto assess the value of storage systems, a run was performed

  15. Incorporating solid state drives into distributed storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wacha, Rosie

    2012-01-01

    27 Low Power Storage Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Drives into Distributed Storage Systems Rosie Wacha Big dataINTO DISTRIBUTED STORAGE SYSTEMS A dissertation submitted in

  16. Channel Coding Strategies for Emerging Data Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrys, Ryan C.

    2014-01-01

    CHAPTER 1 Introduction Storage systems have become almostHIT14] Hitachi Global Storage Systems, “Patterned Magneticapplications to dig- ital storage systems,” IEEE Information

  17. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Systems Security Publications Library Energy Storage Power Electronics Advanced Modeling Grid Research Transmission Reliability Renewable Energy Integration Small Business...

  18. Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for HydrogenAmmonia As an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogenusing ammonia as an energy storage medium (Preston, 2006).

  19. Hawaii hydrogen power park Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy source. (Barrier V-Renewable Integration) Hydrogen storage & distribution system. (Barrier V fueled vehicle hydrogen dispensing system. Demonstrate hydrogen as an energy carrier. Investigate. Inform State policy & decision makers. Create environment to mitigate financial risk for investors

  20. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, Harold T. Wight, Gregory Dreier, Ken Borland, Nicholas

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil...

  2. Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization Effort Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization Effort The National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  3. Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen Storage at SAE -- energy efficiency ·Support basic research ·Support technology development Support deployment (vehicles in fireControlled release in fire : Vehicle context RISK = Probability of Occurrence x Severity

  4. Membraneless hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braff, William Allan

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical energy storage systems have been considered for a range of potential large-scale energy storage applications. These applications vary widely, both in the order of magnitude of energy storage that is required ...

  5. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    also novel new on-site hydrogen storage systems. In relationfunding for R&D on hydrogen storage, production and deliveryfor fuel cells and hydrogen storage), fuel cell durability,

  6. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Vol = 1 Prod Vol = 100 Prod Vol = 1000 3.3 Hydrogen StorageHydrogen Storage data collected in CHREC are presented inFigure 3-3: Gaseous Hydrogen Storage System Costs Figure 3-4

  7. Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 37, No. 4, June 2014, pp. 837842. Indian Academy of Sciences. CO impurities effect on LaNi47Al03 hydrogen storage alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    impurities effect on LaNi47Al03 hydrogen storage alloy hydrogenation/dehydrogenation properties QI WAN1 and differential thermal analyses (TG + DTA). The hydrogen storage prop- erties were studied by the pressure in hydrogen containing 300 ppm CO at 30 °C, but hydrogen storage capacity did not degrade when tested at 80 °C

  8. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieninger, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak...

  9. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  10. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  11. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  12. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  13. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  14. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  15. 3D Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Elongated Tetracarboxylate Building Blocks for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    3D Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Elongated Tetracarboxylate Building Blocks for Hydrogen Storage Liqing Ma, Jeong Yong Lee, Jing Li, and Wenbin Lin*, Department of Chemistry, CB#3290, Uni. The porosity and hydrogen uptake of the frameworks were determined by gas adsorption experiments. A wide range

  16. Bulk-scaffolded hydrogen storage and releasing materials and methods for preparing and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Gutowska, Anna [Richland, WA; Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; Li, Xiaohong S [Richland, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA

    2011-06-21

    Compositions are disclosed for storing and releasing hydrogen and methods for preparing and using same. These hydrogen storage and releasing materials exhibit fast release rates at low release temperatures without unwanted side reactions, thus preserving desired levels of purity and enabling applications in combustion and fuel cell applications.

  17. Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Andrew Mark

    2010-01-01

    Energy Conversion and Storage Systems By Andrew Mark DuffinEnergy Conversion and Storage Systems by Andrew Mark Duffin

  18. Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-08-01

    The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

  19. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjectsCyberNotLEDPhase Field modelStorage Systems

  20. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelon, William B.

    2013-05-13

    The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace should make it a very valuable resource for the study of oxides being considered for application to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in that materials can be studied at potential operating temperatures in both reducing and oxidizing environments to determine their stoichiometry, and lattice parameters. Our research, which was predicated, in part, on the use of hydrogenous samples (as opposed to deuteration), demonstrated that such studies are feasible and can yield high quality, refinable data. The precision of the refined hydrogen positions appears to be more than adequate for theory calculations (molecular modeling-thermodynamics) and the uncertainty is certainly less than that achieved by attempting to extrapolate the hydrogen positions from refined deuterium positions. In fact the 2008 annual report from the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), the world's premier neutron scattering laboratory, highlights: Another trend is the increasing interest in hydrogen. This defies the widespread assumption that neutron diffraction experiments need to be done at deuterated samples. In situ experiments on phase transitions involving hydrogen and in particular on the real time behaviour of hydrogen-storage systems increase in number and scope. Our work in this area predates the ILL efforts be several years. Unfortunately, the productivity of our program was significantly curtailed by the unavailability of the MURR powder diffractometer for almost all of the second years of the project. The diffractometer was disassembled to allow partial extraction of the beam tube and replacement of the graphite element that is penetrated by the beam tube. Re-commissioning of the instrument was substantially delayed by errors of the MURR engineering staff, which failed to properly reinstall the sapphire filter that conditions the beam prior to the neutron monochromator, and reduces the radiological background to acceptable levels.

  1. Combinatorial Search for Optimal Hydrogen-Storage Nanomaterials Based on Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoonkyung Lee; Woon Ih Choi; Jisoon Ihm

    2006-08-08

    We perform an extensive combinatorial search for optimal nanostructured hydrogen storage materials among various metal-decorated polymers using first-principles density-functional calculations. We take into account the zero-point vibration as well as the pressure- and temperature-dependent adsorption-desorption probability of hydrogen molecules. An optimal material we identify is Ti-decorated cis-polyacetylene with reversibly usable gravimetric and volumetric density of 7.6 weight percent and 63 kg/m^3 respectively near ambient conditions. We also propose ``thermodynamically usable hydrogen capacity" as a criterion for comparing different storage materials.

  2. Scenario Development and Analysis of Hydrogen as a Large-Scale Energy Storage Medium (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D. M.

    2009-06-10

    The conclusions from this report are: (1) hydrogen has several important advantages over competing technologies, including - very high storage energy density (170 kWh/m{sup 3} vs. 2.4 for CAES and 0.7 for pumped hydro) which allows for potential economic viability of above-ground storage and relatively low environmental impact in comparison with other technologies; and (2) the major disadvantage of hydrogen energy storage is cost but research and deployment of electrolyzers and fuel cells may reduce cost significantly.

  3. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  4. Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

  5. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11,...

  6. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the...

  7. A Basic, and Slightly Acidic, Solution to Hydrogen Storage |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and James Muckerman developed a new catalyst that reversibly converts hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide to a liquid under very mild conditions. Their findings were published in the...

  8. Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents such as hybrid carbon nanotubes, aerogels, and nanofibers, as well as metal-organic frameworks and conducting polymers. A...

  9. Hybrid Two-Dimensional Electronic Systems and Other Applications of sp-2 Bonded Light Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Brian Maxwell

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen Storage (%weight) Gravimetric Energy Density (kW-h/a hydrogen storage systems’ total gravimetric energy densityvolumetric energy density is extremely low. Hydrogen is the

  10. Panel 3, Necessary Conditions for Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Modules Stand-by Power Mobility Power Energy Storage Power-to-Gas Germany * 550 TWh annual demand * Renewable generation 24% in 2012 * Significant transmission...

  11. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yacobi, B.G.

    1985-03-18

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

  12. Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentati...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems International Energy Storage Programs Innovations in Energy Storage...

  13. Integration of Storage Devices into Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and renewable source of energy with zero fuel costs. However, wind generation outputs are highly variableIntegration of Storage Devices into Power Systems with Renewable Energy Sources Final Project System #12;Integration of Storage Devices into Power Systems with Renewable Energy Sources Final Project

  14. Remote I/O Optimization and Evaluation for Tertiary Storage Systems through Storage Resource Broker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Wei-keng

    Remote I/O Optimization and Evaluation for Tertiary Storage Systems through Storage Resource Broker storage systems emerge as a popular place to hold them. SRB, a uniform interface to various storage systems including tertiary storage systems such as HPSS, UniTree etc., becomes an important and convenient

  15. Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma, Shuang Liu, and E. G. Wanga)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guangyu

    Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma as hydrogen adsorbent. A hydrogen storage capacity up to 8 wt % was achieved reproducibly under ambient pressure and at temperature of 300 °C. The high hydrogen storage capacity under the moderate conditions

  16. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  17. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

  18. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Qing "Ken"

    1 SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems under Faulty), for evaluating the performance of block-level storage systems in the presence of faults as well as under normal operations. SPEK can work on both Direct Attached Storage (DAS) and block level networked storage systems

  19. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems Ming Zhang storage systems at block level. It can be used for both DAS (Direct Attached Storage) and block level networked storage systems. Each SPEK tool consists of a controller, several workers, and one or more probers

  20. Routing, Storage Management and Caching, and Security of Peer-to-Peer Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yingwu "Jason"

    Routing, Storage Management and Caching, and Security of Peer-to-Peer Storage Systems Yingwu Zhu such as Napster, Gnutella and Freenet, has inspired a whole new breed of P2P storage systems, which aims-tolerant, and highly-available storage without centralized servers. Many P2P storage systems have been proposed

  1. Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and Energy Storage Systems TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847 Hawai`i Distributed

  2. Dynamic Simulation of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a hydrogen plant. The resulting system is tightly interconnected and operates at very high temperature connecting a nuclear reactor and a hydrogen production plant. This heat transfer loop uses helium as the heat scenarios. The first contribution of this thesis is a novel equation-based model for the heat transfer loop

  3. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  4. Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions Why Hydrogen Production? Hydrogen is a critical. Current methods of hydrogen storage in automobiles are either too bulky (large storage space for gas phase) or require a high input energy (cooling or pressurization systems for liquid hydrogen), making widespread use

  5. An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hua Kun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  6. Webinar: Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a webinar titled "Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies" on Tuesday, August 19, from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). The webinar will feature representatives from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory presenting a unique opportunity for the integration of multiple sectors including transportation, industrial, heating fuel, and electric sectors on hydrogen.

  7. Ultra Efficient Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System - Presentati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra Efficient Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System - Presentation by FuelCell Energy, June 2011 Ultra Efficient Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System - Presentation by...

  8. Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-11

    A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

  9. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, E. E.

    1990-01-01

    "Thermal Storage" is a term that describes a mechanical systems ability to sustain normal HVAC operations through a thermal retention source. This system allows for the curtailment of operating major refrigeration equipment during periods of high kw...

  10. Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

    2007-01-01

    DTIC Review: Energy Supply Alternatives: ADA433359, 2004.Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen2007 Ammonia As an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for

  11. A Joint Theory and Experimental Project in the Synthesis and Testing of Porous COFs for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Goddard, William A.

    2013-06-29

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g/L) densities to be achieved by 2015. From our continuous efforts on hydrogen storage, it is believed that metalation of highly porous solids with high-valence metals is promising and provides a rational direction to realize high volumetric hydrogen density near room temperature. This grant was focused on the study of high surface area covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with these specific objectives (1) to introduce potential metal binding sites through the COF synthesis and (2) to implement metalation experiments and evaluate their respective hydrogen adsorption properties. To maximize our efforts, simulation calculations were also performed (prior to experiments) for the prediction of binding enthalpy of hydrogen for molecular building units containing transition metals and promising COF structures to increase volumetric hydrogen uptake at room temperature. In this effort, first molecular building units with optimal binding energy for hydrogen storage (20 kJ/mol) were designed by quantum mechanical (QM) methods. Employing these results, it was revealed that one of metalated COFs takes up 60 g/L (total) of H2 at 100 bar and 298 K. To realize proposed COF structures, chemistry of COF synthesis has been developed; for instance, new air stable COFs were synthesized via hydrazone (COF-41 to 43) and imine condensation (COF-301, 320, 340, and 366) and some of them were tested the effect on metalation. Finally, a new triazine COF with high volumetric hydrogen uptake capacity was presented as a proposed future direction.

  12. Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, Anna Snider

    2009-09-01

    In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

  13. High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

  14. Microporous Materials Strategies for Hydrogen Storage in MetalOrganic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    efficiency fuel-cell power sources. The vehicles should have a similar range (480 km or 300 miles), operate times the gravimetric energy density of petrol, and fuel cells are expected to perform at least twice at improving hydrogen uptake in these materials is presented. These strategies include the optimization of pore

  15. Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-01-07

    On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

  16. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  17. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Peter (Cary, NC)

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  18. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  19. The Promise Of Data Grouping In Large Scale Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildani, Avani

    2013-01-01

    Martin. Why traditional storage systems donâ??t help us saveB. Dufrasne et al. IBM XIV Storage System Gen3 Architecture,in large scale storage systems. In Proceedings of the 11th

  20. Moneta : : A Storage System for Fast Non-Volatile Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caulfield, Adrian Michael

    2013-01-01

    for nand-flash storage systems. In SAC ’ 08: Proceedings ofHoneyman. Exporting Storage Systems in a Scalable MannerIn Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, pages 18–27, 2005. [

  1. Improving Performance for Flash-Based Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jingpei

    2014-01-01

    Log-structured Flash-based Storage Systems 4.1 Experimental109 Bibliography iv List of Figures Storage system5 Log-less Flash-aware Storage Systems 5.1 Collapsing

  2. Constrained coding and signal processing for data storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aviran, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    of a holographic data storage system. Taken from 2.2.1Codes for Mass Data Storage Systems, Second Edition. hoven,ed model of a data storage system, namely, modulation coding

  3. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01

    energy cost. A tool for optimal ice storage design is developed, considering the charging and discharge times and optimal sizing of ice thermal storage system. Detailed simulation studies using real office building located near Orlando, FL including...

  4. FUNDAMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIAL 2LIBH4 MGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, C.; Anton, D.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-01-10

    While the storage of hydrogen for portable and stationary applications is regarded as critical in bringing PEM fuel cells to commercial acceptance, little is known of the environmental exposure risks posed in utilizing condensed phase chemical storage options as in complex hydrides. It is thus important to understand the effect of environmental exposure of metal hydrides in the case of accident scenarios. Simulated tests were performed following the United Nations standards to test for flammability and water reactivity in air for a destabilized lithium borohydride and magnesium hydride system in a 2 to 1 molar ratio respectively. It was determined that the mixture acted similarly to the parent, lithium borohydride, but at slower rate of reaction seen in magnesium hydride. To quantify environmental exposure kinetics, isothermal calorimetry was utilized to measure the enthalpy of reaction as a function of exposure time to dry and humid air, and liquid water. The reaction with liquid water was found to increase the heat flow significantly during exposure compared to exposure in dry or humid air environments. Calorimetric results showed the maximum normalized heat flow the fully charged material was 6 mW/mg under liquid phase hydrolysis; and 14 mW/mg for the fully discharged material also occurring under liquid phase hydrolysis conditions.

  5. NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -space, MMOD protection) -Vapor/cryocooler cooled shields - Sun shades - Low conductivity/ cooled support propellant - Inventory (Bookkeeping) - Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) - High accuracy low-g techniques;7 NASA Cryogenic Technology Objectives · To develop storage and distribution technologies for cryogens

  6. HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON NANOTUBES JOHN E. FISCHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTIONS * BINDING SITES AND ENERGIES * PROCESSING TO ENHANCE CAPACITY: EX: ELECTROCHEMICAL Li INSERTION surface channels or "groove sites" INCLUSION COMPOUNDS OF CARBON HOST MATERIALS #12;OCTANE: C8H18 - 15.2 @ 10 min LiC3 @ L = 0.5 mm ENHANCED Li STORAGE BY OPENING AND CUTTING Purified/annealed PLV tubes: well

  7. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  8. Lithium-decorated oxidized graphyne for hydrogen storage by first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Zeyu; Wang, Lang; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Libei; Zhu, Chao; Chen, Chi; Miao, Ling Jiang, Jianjun

    2014-11-07

    The geometric stability and hydrogen storage capacity of Li decorated oxidized ?-graphyne are studied based on the first-principles calculations. It is found that oxygen atoms trend to bond with acetylenic carbons and form C=O double bonds on both sides of graphyne. The binding energy of single Li atom on oxidized graphyne is 3.29?eV, owning to the strong interaction between Li atom and O atom. Meanwhile, the dispersion of Li is stable even under a relatively high density. One attached Li atom can at least adsorb six hydrogen molecules around. Benefitting from the porous structure of graphyne and the high attached Li density, a maximum hydrogen storage density 12.03?wt. % is achieved with four Li atoms in graphyne cell. The corresponding average binding energy is 0.24?eV/H{sub 2}, which is suitable for reversible storage. These results indicate that Li decorated graphyne can serve as a promising hydrogen storage material.

  9. Metalloboranes from first-principles calculations: A candidate for high-density hydrogen storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbarzadeh, A R; Tymczak, C J

    2015-01-01

    Using first principles calculations, we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of a new class of compounds, metalloboranes. Metalloboranes are transition metal (TM) and borane compounds that obey a novel-bonding scheme. We have found that the transition metal atoms can bind up to 10 H2 molecules.

  10. Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Chun-Sheng, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-09-21

    Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7 wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19 eV/H?. The adsorption/desorption of H? at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

  11. Time-Based Storage Bandwidth Allocation in Hybrid Storage Systems Rice University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time-Based Storage Bandwidth Allocation in Hybrid Storage Systems Hui Wang Rice University Peter for a hybrid storage system made up of both HDs and SSDs. To continue the example, suppose the HD has slicing treats the storage system as a black box and dedicates the system to a client for its time slice

  12. Palladium-doped Nanoporous Carbon Fibers for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Bhat, Vinay V; van Benthem, Klaus; Tekinalp, Halil; Edie, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Pd-free and Pd-containing activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized from isotropic pitch as a carbon precursor. The source of Pd was a palladium salt that was premixed with pitch before carbonization. Hydrogen adsorption was measured at near-ambient temperatures (5 to 80 oC) and moderate pressures (up to 20 bar). It was found that adsorption on Pd-ACF is always higher than that on corresponding ACF, and in excess of what it would be expected based solely on formation of Pd hydride. This fact can be explained based on the mechanism of hydrogen spillover. It was also found that temperature and pressure have opposite effects on physisorption and spillover. It was hypothesized that a narrow temperature range exists, where the kinetic advantage of H2 spillover in Pd-ACF overlaps synergistically with the thermodynamic advantage of physisorption, thus contributing to enhanced uptakes compared with the Pd-free carbons.

  13. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

  14. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPowerScenario Analysis ModelHydrogen

  15. Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING DeerStudies ofPredictingNovel Hydrogen

  16. Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen

  17. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLake Paiute Reservation | Department ofCompressed Hydrogen

  18. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergyDepartment ofJanuaryAnalysisHydrogen Energy

  19. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  20. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power University of Connecticut logo The...

  1. Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014)...

  2. Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

  3. Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) The...

  4. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service...

  5. Functional design criteria for standard hydrogen monitoring system portable platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-01-17

    Functional design description for a Standard-E cabinet arrangement Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Portable Platform.

  6. Battery storage for supplementing renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The battery storage for renewable energy systems section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  7. Radiation augmentation energy storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christe, K.O.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a method of converting radiation energy into chemical energy to produce a high-performance propellant. It comprises: photolytically converting oxygen to ozone; storing and stabilizing the ozone in liquid oxygen to form an ozone/liquid oxygen solution; and combusting the ozone/liquid oxygen solution with hydrogen.

  8. Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media Sang Soo Han, Hyun Seok Kim, Kyu Sung Han, Jai Young Lee,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media Sang Soo Han, Hyun Seok Kim, Kyu walls that do not provide sites for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. However, after treating nanopores in MWCNTs offer a promising route to hydrogen storage media for onboard practical applications

  9. Impact of Preparation and Handling on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Zn4O(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)3 (MOF-5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Impact of Preparation and Handling on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Zn4O(1 exposed the considerable potential for cryogenic hydrogen storage in microporous metal- organic frameworks gravimetric and volumetric loadings yet reported for a cryogenic hydrogen storage material. The compound Zn4O

  10. Hydrogen storage for vehicular applications: Technology status and key development areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.L.; Handrock, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage technology is reviewed, including gaseous, liquid, hydride, surface adsorbed media, glass microsphere, chemical reaction, and liquid chemical technologies. The review of each technology includes a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, likelihood of success, and key research and development activities. A preferred technological path for the development of effective near-term hydrogen storage includes both cur-rent DOT qualified and advanced compressed storage for down-sized highly efficient but moderate range vehicles, and liquid storage for fleet vehicle applications. Adsorbate media are also suitable for fleet applications but not for intermittent uses. Volume-optimized transition metal hydride beds are also viable for short range applications. Long-term development of coated nanoparticulate or metal matrix high conductivity magnesium alloy, is recommended. In addition, a room temperature adsorbate medium should be developed to avoid cryogenic storage requirements. Chemical storage and oxidative schemes present serious obstacles which must be addressed for these technologies to have a future role.

  11. Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1 DOE HydrogenDepartment of Energy&

  12. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas8of Energy Compressed Hydrogen

  13. Test report : Princeton power systems prototype energy storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

  14. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex,and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flow8, huge PV, solar thermal as well as storage systems will be

  15. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

  16. The Hype About Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2006-01-01

    another promising solution for hydrogen storage. However,storage and delivery, and there are safety issues as well with hydrogen

  17. US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY 2009, AnnualEnergy A.I.D. HigherULDepartmentStorage

  18. Integrated heat pump and heat storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, A.

    1983-09-13

    An integrated heat pump and heat storage system is disclosed comprising a heat pump, a first conduit for supplying return air from an enclosure to the heat pump, a second conduit for supplying heated air from the heat pump to the enclosure, heat storage apparatus. A first damper is operative in a first orientation to permit return air from the enclosure to enter the first conduit and to prevent return air from passing through the heat storage apparatus and operative in a second orientation to cause return air to pass through the heat storage apparatus for being heated thereby before entering the first conduit. A second damper is operative in a first orientation to cause heated air from the second conduit to pass through the heat storage apparatus for giving up a portion of its heat for storage and operative in a second orientation to prevent heated air from the second conduit from passing through the heat storage apparatus and to permit the heated air from the second conduit to reach the enclosure. The heat storage apparatus may comprise phase change materials.

  19. System for thermochemical hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1981-05-22

    Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

  20. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, Mark P. (Knoxville, TN); Kedl, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  1. Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

  2. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  3. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibers as being studied by Northeastern University. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-06-01

    As part of the current technical evaluation effort, the author was tasked with going to Northeastern, interviewing Dr. Baker and his team, seeing a demonstration of the storage process, and making an assessment of the validity of the claim and the soundness of the research. Dr. Baker and his group have a process that, if proven to work, could be the breakthrough that is needed in the area of on-board hydrogen storage. One of the biggest problems may be the fact that the results look so good, that even if they are real, they will be viewed with skepticism by many. The chemisorption value of 5.8 liters of hydrogen per gram of carbon that Dr. Baker claimed at the time of his proposal has now been surpassed many times. Dr. Baker has reported reproducible hydrogen take-up levels as high as 30 liters per gram, depending on fiber structure. The fibers are loaded with hydrogen at ambient temperature using a pressurized feed at levels of about 600--900 psi. The hydrogen will be retained at pressure, but can apparently be essentially totally recovered upon pressure release. This paper reports the findings from the trip to Northeastern.

  4. Independent verification of the saturation hydrogen uptake in MOF-177 and establishment of a benchmark for hydrogen adsorption in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    prior to evaluating H2 storage capacities. Reproducibility of hydrogen adsorption experiments for hydrogen storage applications.1­8 This is due to the availability of a large number of well the targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems set by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for use of hydrogen

  5. MPEG-aware disk storage system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Qian

    2000-01-01

    Disks. Digital Video Standards Multi-ported Disk Storage System. . . . . 3 . 4 . 4 . 5 III MPEG-A WARE DISK STORAGE SYSTEM. IV IMPLEMENTATION BACKGROUND. . . 10 4. 1 ISO 11172 Standard 4. 2 ISO 11172 System. 4. 2. 1 Overview . 4. 2. 2 Start... Code 4. 2. 3 System Bitstream Overview 4. 3 ISO 11172 Video. . 10 . 10 . 10 . 12 . 14 . 16 V IMPLEMENTATION DETAIL 18 5. 1 Software Structure 5. 2 Processing Center. 5. 3 Implemented Modules. 5. 3. 1 Fast-forwarding 5. 3. 2 Quality...

  6. European Hydrogen Energy Conference, Maastricht, 18 -22 June 2007 Hydrogen for Grid Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    into the electricity supply system and overcome limitations of grid development. Hydrogen storage offers some into the possibilities of using - a hydrogen production and storage system to store wind electricity, - a fuel cell3rd European Hydrogen Energy Conference, Maastricht, 18 - 22 June 2007 Hydrogen for Grid

  7. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, RD; Krungleviciute, V; Clingerman, DJ; Mondloch, JE; Peng, Y; Wilmer, CE; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Mirkin, CA

    2013-09-10

    A Cu-carborane-based metal organic framework (MOF), NU-135, which contains a quasi-spherical para-carborane moiety, has been synthesized and characterized. NU-135 exhibits a pore volume of 1.02 cm(3)/g and a gravimetric BET surface area of ca. 2600 m(2)/g, and thus represents the first highly porous carborane-based MOF. As a consequence of the, unique geometry of the carborane unit, NU-135 has a very high volumetric BET surface area of ca. 1900 m(2)/cm(3). CH4, CO2, and H-2 adsorption isotherms were measured over a broad range of pressures and temperatures and are in good agreement with computational predictions. The methane storage capacity of NU-135 at 35 bar and 298 K is ca. 187 v(STP)/v. At 298 K, the pressure required to achieve a methane storage density comparable to that of a compressed natural gas (CNG) tank pressurized to 212 bar, which is a typical storage pressure, is only 65 bar. The methane working capacity (5-65 bar) is 170 v(STP)/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays the groundwork for carborane-based materials with high surface areas.

  8. Repairable File and Storage Systems A Dissertation Presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    Repairable File and Storage Systems A Dissertation Presented by Ningning Zhu to The Graduate School of the Dissertation Repairable File and Storage System by Ningning Zhu Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science Stony stream file/storage system. Repairable file/storage system needs to perform two tasks. First it has

  9. Global existence for a hydrogen storage model with full energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonetti, Elena; Laurençot, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    A thermo-mechanical model describing hydrogen storage by use of metal hydrides has been recently proposed in a paper by Bonetti, Fr\\'emond and Lexcellent. It describes the formation of hydrides using the phase transition approach. By virtue of the laws of continuum thermo-mechanics, the model leads to a phase transition problem in terms of three state variables: the temperature, the phase parameter representing the fraction of one solid phase, and the pressure, and is derived within a generalization of the principle of virtual powers proposed by Fr\\'emond accounting for micro-forces, responsible for the phase transition, in the whole energy balance of the system. Three coupled nonlinear partial differential equations combined with initial and boundary conditions have to be solved. The main difficulty in investigating the resulting system of partial differential equations relies on the presence of the squared time derivative of the order parameter in the energy balance equation. Here, the global existence of a...

  10. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Thomas, Ph.D., President Franklin D. Lomax, Ph.D, CTO & Principal Investigator, and Maxim Lyubovski, Ph.D.

    2011-03-10

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

  11. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    high-pressure stationary hydrogen storage tanks. The storage10] reviewed the hydrogen storage and the delivery cost forwhich applies to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors.

  12. Nano- and Microscale Architectures for Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    ion: Silicon as a Host for Emerging Energy Storage SystemsBeyond Li-ion: Silicon as a Host for Emerging Energy StorageLi-ion: Silicon as a Host for Emerging Energy Storage xv

  13. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex,Please note that thermal storage contains also heat forFigure 1 considers cold thermal storage indirectly. p a p e

  14. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    served California Power Plants and Transmission Lines (energyalmanac.ca.gov) Performs co-optimization of energy and ancillary service products to minimize system production cost...

  15. Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase Demonstration Hydrogen StorageEnergy

  16. PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL SYSTEMS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    splitting system include surface modification to improve system energetics and triple junction amorphous of various -Si triple junction structures, and a study on the ability of -SiC to protect the surface from A photoelectrochemical (PEC) system combines the harvesting of solar energy with the electrolysis of water. When

  17. The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

  18. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage &...

  19. Using Data Mining for Discovering Patterns in Autonomic Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    Using Data Mining for Discovering Patterns in Autonomic Storage Systems Zhenmin Li, Sudarshan M-managing, self-healing and self- protecting, a storage system needs to be able to automatically char- acterize access sequences in a storage system to characterize storage behaviors. More specif- ically, we use

  20. Asymptotic Interference Alignment for Exact Repair in Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Asymptotic Interference Alignment for Exact Repair in Distributed Storage Systems Viveck R. Cadambe consider a distributed storage system where a file of size M is stored in n distributed storage nodes using of this paper is to repair failed nodes in the storage system, by replacing them by their replicas (exact repair

  1. High-Throughput Screening of Mg-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks for Hydrogen Storage near Room Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colón, Yamil J.; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen storage capabilities of 18,383 porous crystalline structures possessing various degrees of Mg functionalization and diverse physical properties were assessed through combined grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and quantum mechanical...

  2. Systems and methods for selective hydrogen transport and measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C

    2013-10-29

    Systems and methods for selectively removing hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-containing fluid volume are disclosed. An exemplary system includes a proton exchange membrane (PEM) selectively permeable to hydrogen by exclusively conducting hydrogen ions. The system also includes metal deposited as layers onto opposite sides or faces of the PEM to form a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), each layer functioning as an electrode so that the MEA functions as an electrochemical cell in which the ionic conductors are hydrogen ions, and the MEA functioning as a hydrogen selective membrane (HSM) when located at the boundary between a hydrogen-containing fluid volume and a second fluid.

  3. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design, fabricate, evaluate, and optimize a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor/heat exchanger system with thin-film or particulate catalysts for hydrogenation of o-nitroanisole and other nitro aromatic compounds, under moderate temperature and pressure.

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  5. TIMING-ACCURATE STORAGE EMULATION: EVALUATING HYPOTHETICAL STORAGE COMPONENTS IN REAL COMPUTER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIMING-ACCURATE STORAGE EMULATION: EVALUATING HYPOTHETICAL STORAGE COMPONENTS IN REAL COMPUTER;ABSTRACT Timing-accurate storage emulation offers a unique performance evaluation capability to experiment with not-yet-existing storage components in the context of real systems executing real

  6. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    System Modification 16 2.5.2.2 Hydrogen Storage System 16 2.5.2.3 Additional Equipment 19 2.5.2.4 System of the HSS Performance in Steady-State and Stand-Alone Operation 43 2.6.3 Advantages of Hydrogen StorageFinal Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy

  7. hStorage-DB: Heterogeneity-aware Data Management to Exploit the Full Capability of Hybrid Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Feng

    .a.chen}@intel.com ABSTRACT As storage systems become increasingly heterogeneous and complex, it adds burdens on DBAs, causing storage system, so that every request will be served with a suitable storage device. With hStorage-DB, we but is particularly impor- tant for a hybrid storage system. To show the effectiveness of hStorage-DB, we have

  8. Sealing off a carbon nanotube with a self-assembled aqueous valve for the storage of hydrogen in GPa pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H Y; Gong, X G; Liu, Zhi-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The end section of a carbon nanotube, cut by acid treatment, contains hydrophillic oxygen groups. Water molecules can self-assemble around these groups to seal off a carbon nanotube and form an "aqueous valve". Molecular dynamics simulations on single-wall (12,12) and (15,15) tubes with dangling carboxyl groups show that the formation of aqueous valves can be achieved both in the absence of and in the presence of high pressure hydrogen. Furthermore, significant diffusion barriers through aqueous valves are identified. It indicates that such valves could hold hydrogen inside the tube with GPa pressure. Releasing hydrogen is easily achieved by melting the "aqueous valve". Such a design provides a recyclable and non- destructive way to store hydrogen in GPa pressure. Under the storage conditions dictated by sealing off the container in liquid water, the hydrogen density inside the container is higher than that for solid hydrogen, which promises excellent weight storage efficiency.

  9. Abstract--A novel methodology for economic evaluation of hydrogen storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cańizares, Claudio A.

    .e. transmission congestion. Index Terms--wind power, nuclear power, hydrogen storage, Hydrogen Economy, power power plant production (MW) NP : nuclear power plant production (MW) CP : electrolyzer consumption (MW with the market (kg) WIND ipwP ,, : wind-nuclear power consumed for wind scenario w and price scenario p in hour i

  10. A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    2. Define reliability in hydrogen energy systems 3.metrics to value reliability in hydrogen energy systems 4.Specify hydrogen energy systems to evaluate 5. Develop

  11. DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField | SystemsTaps4-99Energy

  12. Impact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For high-pressure storage at ambient temperatures, the M3[(M4Cl)3(BTT)8]2 (M-BTT; BTT3- = 1 applications is of paramount importance due to the increasing atmospheric levels of CO2 resulting fromImpact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal

  13. First Principles Based Simulation of Reaction-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen Storage and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-31

    This major part of this proposal is simulating hydrogen interactions in the complex metal hydrides. Over the period of DOE BES support, key achievements include (i) Predicted TiAl3Hx as a precursor state for forming TiAl3 through analyzing the Ti-doped NaAlH4 and demonstrated its catalytic role for hydrogen release; (ii) Explored the possibility of forming similar complex structures with other 3d transition metals in NaAlH4 as well as the impact of such complex structures on hydrogen release/uptake; (iii) Demonstrated the role of TiAl3 in hydriding process; (iv) Predicted a new phase of NaAlH4 that links to Na3AlH6 using first-principles metadynamics; (v) Examined support effect on hydrogen release from supported/encapsulated NaAlH4; and (vi) Expanded research scope beyond hydrogen storage. The success of our research is documented by the peer-reviewed publications.

  14. Hydrogen storage in LiAlH4 : Predictions of the crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of intermediate phases from quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Hydrogen storage in LiAlH4 : Predictions of the crystal structures and reaction mechanisms in decomposition of the potential hydrogen storage material LiAlH4 . First, we explore the decomposition mechanism of monoclinic LiAlH4 into monoclinic Li3AlH6 plus face-centered cubic fcc Al and hydrogen. We find

  15. New Carbon-Based Porous Materials with Increased Heats of Adsorption for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2014-11-03

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are a promising alternative to internal combustion engines that burn gasoline. A significant challenge in developing fuel cell vehicles is to store enough hydrogen on-board to allow the same driving range as current vehicles. One option for storing hydrogen on vehicles is to use tanks filled with porous materials that act as “sponges” to take up large quantities of hydrogen without the need for extremely high pressures. The materials must meet many requirements to make this possible. This project aimed to develop two related classes of porous materials to meet these requirements. All materials were synthesized from molecular constituents in a building-block approach, which allows for the creation of an incredibly wide variety of materials in a tailorable fashion. The materials have extremely high surface areas, to provide many locations for hydrogen to adsorb. In addition, they were designed to contain cations that create large electric fields to bind hydrogen strongly but not too strongly. Molecular modeling played a key role as a guide to experiment throughout the project. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of a material with record hydrogen uptake at cryogenic temperatures. Although the ultimate goal was materials that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, this achievement at cryogenic temperatures is an important step in the right direction. In addition, there is significant interest in applications at these temperatures. The hydrogen uptake, measured independently at NREL was 8.0 wt %. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest validated excess hydrogen uptake reported to date at 77 K. This material was originally sketched on paper based on a hypothesis that extended framework struts would yield materials with excellent hydrogen storage properties. However, before starting the synthesis, we used molecular modeling to assess the performance of the material for hydrogen uptake. Only after modeling suggested record-breaking hydrogen uptake at 77 K did we proceed to synthesize, characterize, and test the material, ultimately yielding experimental results that agreed closely with predictions that were made before the material was synthesized. We also synthesized, characterized, and computationally simulated the behavior of two new materials displaying the highest experimental Brunauer?Emmett?Teller (BET) surface areas of any porous materials reported to date (?7000 m2/g). Key to evacuating the initially solvent-filled materials without pore collapse, and thereby accessing the ultrahigh areas, was the use of a supercritical CO2 activation technique developed by our team. In our efforts to increase the hydrogen binding energy, we developed the first examples of “zwitterionic” metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The two structures feature zwitterionic characteristics arising from N-heterocyclic azolium groups in the linkers and negatively charged Zn2(CO2)5 nodes. These groups interact strongly with the H2 quadrupole. High initial isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen were measured at low H2 loading. Simulations were used to determine the H2 binding sites, and results were compared with inelastic neutron scattering. In addition to MOFs, the project produced a variety of related materials known as porous organic frameworks (POFs), including robust catechol-functionalized POFs with tunable porosities and degrees of functionalization. Post-synthesis metalation was readily carried out with a wide range of metal precursors (CuII, MgII, and MnII salts and complexes), resulting in metalated POFs with enhanced heats of hydrogen adsorption compared to the starting nonmetalated materials. Isosteric heats of adsorption as high as 9.6 kJ/mol were observed, compared to typical values around 5 kJ/mol in unfunctionalized MOFs and POFs. Modeling played an important role throughout the project. For example, we used molecular simulations to determine that the optimal isosteric heat of adsorption (Qst) for maximum hydrogen delivery using MOFs is appro

  16. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

  17. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  18. Characterization of the Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreutzer, Haley Maren

    2012-05-31

    A low-cost and efficient electrical energy storage system is needed to implement intermittent renewable energy sources such as solar and wind while maintaining grid reliability, and could also reduce the use of inefficient peak-load electrical...

  19. Storage monitoring systems for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, C.; Pollock, R.

    1997-12-31

    In September 1993, President Clinton stated the US would ensure that its fissile material meet the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability. Frequent human inspection of the material could be used to ensure these standards. However, it may be more effective and less expensive to replace these manual inspections with virtual inspections via remote monitoring technologies. To prepare for this future, Sandia National Laboratories has developed several monitoring systems, including the Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) and Project Straight-Line. The purpose of this paper is to describe a Sandia effort that merges remote monitoring technologies into a comprehensive storage monitoring system that will meet the near-term as well as the long-term requirements for these types of systems. Topics discussed include: motivations for storage monitoring systems to include remote monitoring; an overview of the needs and challenges of providing a storage monitoring system for the year 2000; an overview of how the MIMS and Straight-Line can be enhanced so that together they create an integrated and synergistic information system by the end of 1997; and suggested milestones for 1998 and 1999 to assure steady progress in preparing for the needs of 2000.

  20. Hybrid vehicle system studies and optimized hydrogen engine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.

    1995-04-26

    We have done system studies of series hydrogen hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. We have evaluated the impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy. Experiments in an available engine at the Sandia CRF demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppM at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppM to meet the 0.2 g/mile ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. LLNL has designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing Onan engine. This head features 15:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses. Initial testing shows promise of achieving an indicated efficiency of nearly 50% and emissions of less than 100 ppM NO{sub x}. Hydrocarbons and CO are to be measured, but are expected to be very low since their only source is engine lubricating oil. A successful friction reduction program on the Onan engine should result in a brake thermal efficiency of about 42% compared to today`s gasoline engines of 32%. Based on system studies requirements, the next generation engine will be about 2 liter displacement and is projected to achieve 46% brake thermal efficiency with outputs of 15 kW for cruise and 40 kW for hill climb.