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1

November 10, 2004: First hydrogen refueling station opens in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2004: First hydrogen refueling station opens in Washington, DC. November 10, 2004: First hydrogen refueling station opens in Washington, DC. November 10, 2004: First hydrogen...

2

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,Year 2006 UCDITSRR0604 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Quantifying Consumer Sensitivity to Hydrogen Refueling Station Coverage (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Cory Welch at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting focuses on consumer sensitivity to hydrogen refueling station coverage.

Welch, C.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Optimization of compression and storage requirements at hydrogen refueling stations.  

SciTech Connect

The transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles requires detailed technical and economic analyses of all aspects of hydrogen infrastructure, including refueling stations. The cost of such stations is a major contributor to the delivered cost of hydrogen. Hydrogen refueling stations require not only dispensers to transfer fuel onto a vehicle, but also an array of such ancillary equipment as a cascade charging system, storage vessels, compressors and/or pumps/evaporators. This paper provides detailed information on design requirements for gaseous and liquid hydrogen refueling stations and their associated capital and operating costs, which in turn impact hydrogen selling price at various levels of hydrogen demand. It summarizes an engineering economics approach which captures the effect of variations in station size, seasonal, daily and hourly demand, and alternative dispensing rates and pressures on station cost. Tradeoffs in the capacity of refueling station compressors, storage vessels, and the cascade charging system result in many possible configurations for the station. Total costs can be minimized by optimizing that configuration. Using a methodology to iterate among the costs of compression, storage and cascade charging, it was found that the optimum hourly capacity of the compressor is approximately twice the station's average hourly demand, and the optimum capacity of the cascade charging system is approximately 15% of the station's average daily demand. Further, for an hourly demand profile typical of today's gasoline stations, onsite hydrogen storage equivalent to at least 1/3 of the station's average daily demand is needed to accommodate peak demand.

Elgowainy, A.; Mintz, M.; Kelly, B.; Hooks, M.; Paster, M. (Energy Systems); (Nexant, Inc.); (TIAX LLC)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Table 4 Storage andHydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Hydrogen tube-trailer Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the natural gas reformer station. Station 4: On-sitereforming of natural gas at the station b. MeOH 100 (case 3)cost of natural gas at the station is much lower (roughly

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the natural gas reformer station. Station 4. On-siteSMR 300) use natural gas at the station; Case 3 (MeOH 100)reforming of natural gas at the station. 100 (case 3) =

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storing and transporting hydrogen. Golden, CO: NREL; 1998. [V. Survey of the economics of hydrogen technologies. Golden,liquid or gaseous form. Hydrogen can be produced from a va-

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen using a steam methane reformer (SMR). The SMR isElectrolyzer Steam methane reformer Methanol reformer

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen using a steam methane reformer (SMR). The SMR is1.7 kg/h $99,000 Steam methane reformer 100 kg/day 4.2 kg/hyes yes yes a. Steam methane reformer cost, compressor cost,

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pdc - Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression Over 185 Compressors in the Worlds 220+ Hydrogen Energy Facilities Diaphragm Compressor Technology: Benefits of Technology: - Highest duty cycle of all current technologies - Lowest power consumption of the technologies - Lowest cooling requirements Challenges: - High(er) capital cost amongst the technologies - Currently - If not run properly, susceptible to maintenance problems. - Compressor likes to "run often". Cost Constraints of All Technologies General Cost Issues Currently Facing Compressor Manufacturers: Low Volume. Take Away: Buy More, Save More. Lack of clear codes and standards for industry. Take Away: Standardize, Standardize, Standardize Cost Constraints of All Technologies

15

Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -Appendix A: Summary of Cost Estimates for 10 Station Types

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -COST ESTIMATES.

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: CASCADE Refueling Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liss Brief Description: Calculate sizing, fueling, and tradeoff issues for compressed gas fueling stations. Keywords: Natural gas; hydrogen; vehicle; refueling; storage;...

19

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices. ManyTable 3-6: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from7: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from Stations

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project ID: 273 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

480 kg/day natural gas reformation station. The table belowReciprocating gas compressor Electrolyzer Station: Thisfor reformer-type stations (natural gas), however, is more

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Dispenser Delivery and Installation Cost Hydrogen Cost Natural GasNatural Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Production Volume StorageNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High -pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range (kg/day) 1. Steam methane reformer 2. Electrolyzer,Station Type 1. Steam methane reformer 2. Electrolyzer,Type Station Type 1. Steam methane reformer 2. Electrolyzer,

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4: Energy Station Grid electricity Cogen Heat Exhaust (CO2)Recycled Reformate Grid electricity Cogen Heat Electricity

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs CNG = compressed natural gas CPUC = California PublicNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High -pressure hydrogen compressor CompressedNatural gas Air Burner air blower Steam methane reformer (SMR) & pressure shift adsorption reactor (PSA) Compressed

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs CNG = compressed natural gas CPUC = California PublicNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High-pressure hydrogen compressor CompressedNatural gas Air Burner air blower Steam methane reformer (SMR) & pressure shift adsorption reactor (PSA) Compressed

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices. ManyTable 3-6: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 3-7: Electricity Production/ Control Cost Summary from

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

Ted Barnes; William Liss

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Refueling stations for natural gas vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unavailability of natural gas vehicle (NGV) refueling stations constitutes one of the major barriers to the wide spread utilization of natural gas in the transportation market. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the current technical and economic status of compressed natural gas vehicle refueling stations and to identify the components or design features that offer the greatest potential for performance improvements and/or cost reductions. Both fast-fill- and slow-fill-type refueling systems will be discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Biederman, R.T.; Jasionowski, W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

List of Refueling Stations Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refueling Stations Incentives Refueling Stations Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 6 Refueling Stations Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 6) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Fuel Vehicle Loan Program (Missouri) State Loan Program Missouri Schools Local Government Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations No Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Refueling - Corporate Tax Credit (Colorado) Corporate Tax Credit Colorado Commercial Renewable Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations No Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program Pennsylvania Commercial Industrial Residential General Public/Consumer Nonprofit Schools Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels

31

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

32

Using Distributed Tri-generation Systems for Neighborhood Hydrogen Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Distributed Tri-generation Systems for Neighborhood Hydrogen Refueling Xuping Li and Joan: Xuping Li (Xupli@ucdavis.edu), Joan Ogden (jmogden@ucdavis.edu) INTRODUCTION TRI-GENERATION SYSTEM AND NEIGHBORHOOD REFUELING DESCRIPTION METHODS AND DATA CONCLUSIONS An engineering/economic model for H2 tri-generation

California at Davis, University of

33

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fueling Station Economics Model Fueling Station Economics Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model Project ID: 193 Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Brief Description: The Gas Technology Institute developed a hydrogen fueling station economics model as part of their project to develop a natural gas to hydrogen fuel station. Keywords: Compressed gas; vehicle; refueling station; cost; natural gas Purpose Calculate hydrogen fueling station costs, including capital, operating, and maintenance costs. Performer Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Organization: Gas Technology Institute Address: 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plains, IL 60018-1804 Telephone: 847-768-0530 Email: william.liss@gastechnology.org Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

34

Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING INFRASTRUCTURE IN INDIA Prof. L. M. Das Centre for Energy Studies Indian Institute of Technology Delhi INDIA " The earth was not given to us by our parents , it has been loaned to us by our children" Kenyan Proverb Same feeling exists in all societies Our moral responsibility---to handover a safer earth to future generation IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 -:Hydrogen:- Not a Radically New Concept JULES VERNE Mysterious Island (1876) ...." I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it, used singly or together will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light of an intensity of which coal is not capable.........water will be coal of the future" IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 Source: T. Nejat Veziroglu , Hydrogen Energy Technologies, UNIDO

36

Operating experience with a liquid-hydrogen fueled Buick and refueling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of liquid-hydrogen storage and refueling systems for vehicular applications was made in a recently completed project. The vehicle used in the project was a 1979 Buick Century sedan with a 3.8-L displacement turbocharged V6 engine and an automatic transmission. The vehicle had a fuel economy for driving in the high altitude Los Alamos area that was equivalent to 2.4 km/L of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis. About 22% less energy was required using hydrogen rather than gasoline to go a given distance based on the Environmental Protection Agency estimate of 7.2 km/L of gasoline for this vehicle. At the end of the project the engine had been operated for 138 h and the car driven 3633 km during the 17 months that the vehicle was operated on hydrogen . Two types of onboard liquid-hydrogen storage tanks were tested in the vehicle: the first was an aluminum Dewar with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 110 L; the second was a Dewar with an aluminum outer vessel, two copper vapor-cooled thermal radiation shields, and a stainless steel inner vessel with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 155 L. The Buick had an unrefueled range of about 274 km with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km with the second. The Buick was fueled at least 65 times involving a minimum of 8.1 kL of liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and a semiautomatic refueling station. A refueling time of nine minutes was achieved, and liquid hydrogen losses during refueling were measured. The project has demonstrated that liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle, and its refueling, can be accomplished over an extended period without any major difficulties; nevertheless, appropriate testing is still needed to quantitatively address the question of safety for liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle.

Stewart, W.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Consumer Preferences for Refueling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumer Preferences for Refueling Availability Project Summary Full Title: Discrete Choice Analysis of Consumer Preferences for Refueling Availability Project ID: 249 Principal...

38

Hydrogen Filling Station  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrogen Filling Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stations Stations Public-use hydrogen fueling stations are very much like gasoline ones. In fact, sometimes, hydrogen and gasoline cars can be fueled at the same station. These stations offer self-service pumps, convenience stores, and other services in high-traffic locations. Photo of a Shell fueling station showing the site convenience store and hydrogen and gasoline fuel pumps. This fueling station in Washington, D.C., provides drivers with both hydrogen and gasoline fuels Many future hydrogen fueling stations will be expansions of existing fueling stations. These facilities will offer hydrogen pumps in addition to gasoline or natural gas pumps. Other hydrogen fueling stations will be "standalone" operations. These stations will be designed and constructed to

42

Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station Technologies Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station Technologies July 18, 2012 - 3:36pm Addthis As part of the U.S. Energy Department's commitment to give American businesses more options to cut energy costs and reduce reliance on imported oil, the Department today announced a $1.4 million investment to Wallingford- based Proton Energy Systems to collect and analyze performance data for hydrogen fueling stations and advanced refueling components. The projects will also help to track the performance and technical progress of innovative refueling systems to find ways to lower costs and improve operation. These investments are part of the Department's broader strategy

43

Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truck distribution Gas station Fig. 5. Integrated naturalTruck distribution Gas station Vehicle operation Fig. 7.gas extraction, hydrogen production, hydrogen delivery, refueling stations,

Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydrogen vehicle fueling station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe a hydrogen vehicle fueling station that receives and stores hydrogen in liquid form and dispenses it either as a liquid or compressed gas. The economics that accrue from the favorable weight and volume advantages of liquid hydrogen support this concept both now and probably for some time to come. The model for liquid transfer to a 120-liter vehicle tank shows that transfer times under five minutes are feasible with pump-assisted transfer, or for pressure transfer with subcooling greater than 1 K. The model for compressed gas transfer shows that underfilling of nearly 30% can occur during rapid filling. Cooling the fill gas to 214 K completely eliminates underfilling.

Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

48

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline could provide fuel for vehicle refueling stations and hydrogen-based DG projects along its current length,

Lipman, Timothy; Kammen, Daniel; Ogden, Joan; Sperling, Dan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen...

50

Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of fuel availability to choice of alternativeof adequate refueling availability for AFVs. Referenceslocate/enpol Refueling availability for alternative fuel

Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Quantitative Analysis of Station Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Station Analysis of Station Hydrogen * Role of ENAA (Engineering Advancement Association of Japan) - To manage the construction and operation of hydrogen stations in national project, JHFC Project - To act as secretariat of ISO/TC197 (Hydrogen technologies) committee of Japan Kazuo Koseki Chief Secretary of ISO/TC197 of Japan ENAA Yokohama Daikoku Station (Desulfurized Gasoline) Yokohama Asahi Station (Naphtha) Senju Station (LPG) Kawasaki Station (Methanol) Yokohama Asahi Station Naphtha PSA Compressor Storage Tanks Dispenser Reformer Buffer Tank 25 MPa 35 MPa 1073 K 0.8 MPa Inlet : 0.6 MPa Outlet : 40 MPa Vent Stack 40 MPa Result of Quantitative Analysis Concentration. vol.ppm Min.Detect Analysis Impurity Gasoline Naphtha LPG Methanol Conc. Method CO 0.05 0.06 0.02 0.06 0.01 GC-FID

52

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refueling Infrastructure for Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Prepared under Task No. H278.2350 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

53

Hydrogen at the Fueling Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen) Service Stations 101 Hydrogen) Service Stations 101 Steven M. Schlasner September 22, 2004 2 DISCLAIMER Opinions expressed within are strictly those of the presenter and do not necessarily represent ConocoPhillips Company. 3 Presentation Outline * Introduction to ConocoPhillips * Introduction to Service Stations * Comparison of Conventional with Hydrogen Fueling Stations * Hydrogen Fueling Life Cycle * Practical Design Example * Concluding Observations 4 ConocoPhillips * 7 th on Fortune's list of largest companies (2003 revenues) * 3 rd largest integrated petroleum company in U.S. * 1 st (largest) petroleum refiner in U.S. * 14,000 retail outlets (350 company-owned) in 44 states * Brands: Conoco, Phillips 66, 76 * 32,800 miles pipeline, owned or interest in * 64 terminals: crude, LPG, refined products

54

Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operators garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The stations efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce onsite hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

57

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at every compressed gas hydrogen station regardless of size.Table 16: Compressed Gas Refueling Station Capital Costs C bTable 17; Compressed Gas Refueling Station Operating Costs

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at every compressed gas hydrogen station regardless of size.Table 16: Compressed Gas Refueling Station Capital Costs C bTable 17; Compressed Gas Refueling Station Operating Costs

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Home and Neighborhood Refueling as a New Paradigm for Hydrogen Vehicles Xuping Li and Dr. Joan Ogden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will not be achieved until hydrogen takes a substantial market share as an energy carrier for vehicles. The analysis an appealing hydrogen pathway, especially during the early stage of market penetration. Additionally, home REFUELING METHODOLOGY SUMMARY REFFERENCES Overall, this project aims at informing private and public

California at Davis, University of

60

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for vehicle refueling and compressed natural gas (CNG)for CNG vehicles, aswell as CNG/hydrogen blends (City of Las Vegas, 2002). Clean

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glory Days of the Gas Station. Bull?nch Press, Boston.M.K. , 1993. The American Gas Station. Motorbooks Interna-History of Americas Gas Stations. Macmillan Publishing Co,

Melaina, Marc W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refueling and compressed natural gas (CNG) for CNG vehicles,Natural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen Hydrogen CompressedNatural gas Air Recycled Reformate MCFC or SOFC Fuel Cell Reformate Hydrogen Compressed

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Home and Neighborhood Refueling for Hydrogen Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on simulation and detailed analyses of home and neighborhood refueling tri-generation for Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCV) can be facilitated by a home refueling/ tri-generation system

California at Davis, University of

64

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Gopal [HD Systems

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations

67

A Tool to Optimize the Initial Distribution of Hydrogen Filling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important barrier towards the introduction of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) running on hydrogen is the lack of widespread refueling infrastructure. The niche of buses for public transport, taxis and deliverers with a local application area might not be large enough to generate the reductions of FCV costs that are necessary for a general technology switch. Thus, fuel availability at trunk roads probably plays a crucial role in generating demand for FCVs also from private consumers. In this paper we assume that consumers are more likely to consider buying a FCV the more frequently they are exposed to hydrogen refueling opportunities on long distant trips. We introduce a tool to test different small scale initial distributions of hydrogen outlets within the German trunk road system for their potential success to generate a large scale adoption of FCVs. The tool makes use of agent based trip modeling and Geographic Information System (GIS) supported spatial modeling. We demonstrate its potentials by testing a ring shaped distribution of hydrogen outlets at highway filling stations. We find that the structure of an optimized initial distribution of filling stations depends on what drivers consider a sufficiently small distance between refueling opportunities.

Malte Schwoon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Energy Station Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Project Summary Full Title: Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station Previous Title(s): Validation of an Integrated System for a Hydrogen-Fueled Power Park Project ID: 128 Principal Investigator: Dan Tyndall Keywords: Power parks; co-production; hydrogen; electricity; digester gas Purpose Demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) designed to produce power and hydrogen from digester gas. Performer Principal Investigator: Dan Tyndall Organization: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Address: 7201 Hamilton Blvd. Allentown, PA 18195 Telephone: 610-481-6055 Email: tyndaldw@airproducts.com Period of Performance Start: September 2001 End: March 2009

69

FNS Presentation - Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicles Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Operations Federal Network for Sustainability Idaho Falls, Idaho - July 2006 Jim Francfort INL/CON-06-11569 Presentation Outline * Background & Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design & operations * Fuel Dispensing * Hydrogen & HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * Briefly, other AVTA Activities * WWW Information 2 AVTA Background & Goal * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) & the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

70

Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Station...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limited Access Yes Yes Addition to Existing Station With Gasoline Yes With Compressed Natural Gas New Construction Standalone Yes Yes With Gasoline With Compressed Natural Gas...

72

Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Renewable Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station Edward C. Heydorn - Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Pinakin Patel - FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fred Jahnke - FuelCell Energy, Inc. "Delivering Renewable Hydrogen - A Focus on Near-Term Applications" Palm Springs, CA 16 November 2009 Presentation Outline * Hydrogen Energy Station Technology Overview * Process Description * Performance and Economic Parameters * Proposed Demonstration on Renewable Feedstock * Status of Shop Validation Test * Conclusion 2 Objectives * Determine the economic and technical viability of a hydrogen energy station designed to co-produce power and hydrogen Utilize technology development roadmap to provide deliverables and go/no-go decision

73

Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

TIAX, LLC

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydrogen Fueling - Coming Soon to a Station Near You (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet providing information useful to local permitting officials facing hydrogen fueling station proposals.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrogen Fueling - Coming Soon to a Station Near You  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet providing information useful to local permitting officials facing hydrogen fueling station proposals.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

From Hydrogen Fuel Stations to Bean Counters, NIST Weights ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From Hydrogen Fuel Stations to Bean Counters, NIST Weights and Measures Works to Meet Market Needs. ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refueling Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Digg

78

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cells for Generation and Cogeneration, Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency InstallationNatural gas ($/MMBtu) Electricity ($/kWh) Demand charge ($/

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duane B. Thomas, C.E. (Sandy) Simbeck, Dale Padro, C.E.G.Duane B. Thomas, C.E. (Sandy) Simbeck, Dale Padro, C.E.G.Ernst & Young Thomas, C.E. (Sandy) Source Costs of Storing

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Padro, C.E.G. Padro, C.E.G. Padro, C.E.G. Thomas, SandyThomas, SandyThomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Year

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

NIST Transient Flow Standard for Vehicle Refueling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Today, hydrogen-fueled demonstration vehicles are refueled from ... However, hydrogen dispenser manufacturers have found ... gas as a vehicle fuel of ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fueling Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fueling Station Evaluation The California Air Resources Board (ARB) may not enforce any element of

85

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considered.) 4. Gaseous hydrogen generated at the refueling station from natural gas by steam methane reforming, stored as a compressed gas at 5000 psi and dispensed to the vehicle...

86

Unitized Design for Home Refueling Appliance for Hydrogen Generation to 5,000 psi - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Timothy Norman (Primary Contact), Monjid Hamdan Giner, Inc. (formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC) 89 Rumford Avenue Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0556 Email: tnorman@ginerinc.com DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001486 Project Start Date: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 14, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Detail design and demonstrate subsystems for a unitized * electrolyzer system for residential refueling at 5,000 psi to meet DOE targets for a home refueling appliance (HRA) Fabricate and demonstrate unitized 5,000 psi system * Identify and team with commercialization partner(s) * Technical Barriers

87

Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: Results of California Drive Clinics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public willing to pay for hydrogen buses? A comparativeon the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy 2007; 32: 4295- 4.

Martin, Elliot W; Shaheen, Susan A; Lipman, T E; Lidicker, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for compressed gas truck stations compared to pipelineLH 2 Trucks Gas Pipelines Refueling station a RefuelingPlant Compressed Gas Trucks Refueling station a (compressor,

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: ?¢???¢ Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). ?¢???¢ Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. ?¢???¢ Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. ?¢???¢ Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. ?¢???¢ Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. ?¢???¢ Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

Edward C. Heydorn

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Digg

91

Hydrogen Refueling System Based on Autothermal Cyclic Reforming Ravi V. Kumar, George N. Kastanas, Shawn Barge,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the production of hydrogen or syngas from many fuels, including natural gas, diesel fuel, coal, and renewable hydrogen generating and dispensing system is shown in Figure 2. The hydrogen-rich syngas generated the water. The syngas is purified in a Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) system. The PSA delivers high purity

92

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

93

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act: Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Packs and Hydrogen Refueling for Lift Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEB Grocery Company, Inc. (H-E-B) is a privately-held supermarket chain with 310 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. H-E-B converted 14 of its lift reach trucks to fuel cell power using Nuvera Fuel Cells PowerEdge units to verify the value proposition and environmental benefits associated with the technology. Issues associated with the increasing power requirements of the distribution center operation, along with high ambient temperature in the summer and other operating conditions (such as air quality and floor surface condition), surfaced opportunities for improving Nuveras PowerEdge fuel cell system design in high-throughput forklift environments. The project included on-site generation of hydrogen from a steam methane reformer, called PowerTap manufactured by Nuvera. The hydrogen was generated, compressed and stored in equipment located outside H-E-Bs facility, and provided to the forklifts by hydrogen dispensers located in high forklift traffic areas. The PowerEdge fuel cell units logged over 25,300 operating hours over the course of the two-year project period. The PowerTap hydrogen generator produced more than 11,100 kg of hydrogen over the same period. Hydrogen availability at the pump was 99.9%. H-E-B management has determined that fuel cell forklifts help alleviate several issues in its distribution centers, including truck operator downtime associated with battery changing, truck and battery maintenance costs, and reduction of grid electricity usage. Data collected from this initial installation demonstrated a 10% productivity improvement, which enabled H-E-B to make economic decisions on expanding the fleet of PowerEdge and PowerTap units in the fleet, which it plans to undertake upon successful demonstration of the new PowerEdge reach truck product. H-E-B has also expressed interst in other uses of hydrogen produced on site in the future, such as for APUs used in tractor trailers and refrigerated transport trucks in its fleet.

Block, Gus

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydrogen Station Siting and Refueling Analysis Using Geographic Information Systems: A Case Study of Sacramento County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in CaliforniaCase of Compressed Natural Gas (Cng) Vehicles in Californiaof compressed natural gas (CNG), yet natural gas is viewed

Nicholas, Michael A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Technical Options For Distributed Hydrogen Refueling Stations in a Market Driven Situation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

according to French electricity prices, that is around aThe natural gas and electricity prices have been extractedneeded natural gas/electricity price ratio needed so that

Simonnet, Antoine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen Station Siting and Refueling Analysis Using Geographic Information Systems: A Case Study of Sacramento County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) VehiclesVehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (Cng) Vehiclessimilar to that of compressed natural gas (CNG), yet natural

Nicholas, Michael A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Technical Options For Distributed Hydrogen Refueling Stations in a Market Driven Situation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

French electricity and natural gas prices, we actually loseis adimensional, the natural gas price and electricity priceline, the needed natural gas/electricity price ratio needed

Simonnet, Antoine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing Jim Francfort for Lee Slezak WestStart CALSTART Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Symposium - February 2006 INL/CON-06-01109 Presentation Outline * Background and Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design and operations * Fuel Dispensing * Prototype Dispenser Testing * Hydrogen and HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * WWW Information AVTA Background and Goal * AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

99

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and use (such as in fuel cell and internal combustion engine technologies), to minimize production costs, and to develop methods for hydrogen infrastructure design, construction,...

100

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternativ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen On April 2-3, 2008, participants from industry, government agencies, universities, and national...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EUHYFIS Hydrogen Filling Station Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EUHYFIS Hydrogen Filling Station Consortium EUHYFIS Hydrogen Filling Station Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name EUHYFIS (Hydrogen Filling Station Consortium) Place Oldenburg, Germany Zip 26123 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Oldenburg-based, consortium of the Bauer Kompressoren, Casale Chemicals and PLANET (Planungsgruppe Energie und Technik) with the objective to provide hydrogen infrastructure. Coordinates 53.138699°, 8.21144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.138699,"lon":8.21144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

102

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: June 3, 2013 2: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #782: June 3, 2013 Number of Refueling Stations Continues to Shrink on

103

Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening February 18, 2005 - 10:26am Addthis CHINO, CALIF. - In a major step toward achieving President George W. Bush's vision for a hydrogen economy, Assistant Secretary of Energy David Garman today joined representatives of ChevronTexaco, Hyundai-Kia and UTC Fuel Cells at the opening of a hydrogen fueling station in Chino, CA. The station is a major part of the Department of Energy's Hydrogen "Learning Demonstration," which brings together automobile makers and energy companies to test fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen fueling systems in real-world conditions. "Hydrogen fuel cells represent one of the most encouraging, innovative

104

Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening Bush Hydrogen Vision "Fueled" By California Station Opening February 18, 2005 - 10:26am Addthis CHINO, CALIF. - In a major step toward achieving President George W. Bush's vision for a hydrogen economy, Assistant Secretary of Energy David Garman today joined representatives of ChevronTexaco, Hyundai-Kia and UTC Fuel Cells at the opening of a hydrogen fueling station in Chino, CA. The station is a major part of the Department of Energy's Hydrogen "Learning Demonstration," which brings together automobile makers and energy companies to test fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen fueling systems in real-world conditions. "Hydrogen fuel cells represent one of the most encouraging, innovative

105

Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) Template for California Hydrogen Dispensing Stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report explains the Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) requirements for hydrogen dispensing stations in the State of California. The reports shows the basic components of a hydrogen dispensing station in a simple schematic drawing; the permits and approvals that would typically be required for the construction and operation of a hydrogen dispensing station; and a basic permit that might be employed by an Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

Rivkin, C.; Blake, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.; Post, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at work or "corner" gas-stations, stations near freewaysvisiting a well-populated gas station. On the other hand, anHydrogen PEMFC E-Station Natural gas Air High-pressure

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Next Generation Hydrogen Stations: All Composite Data Products through Fall 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 14 composite data products (CDPs) for next generation hydrogen stations.

Sprik, S.; Wipke, K.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Help Design the Hydrogen Fueling Station of Tomorrow | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Make Your Mark in the 2011 Hydrogen Student Design Contest A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling...

109

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

110

Technical Analysis: Integrating a Hydrogen Energy Station into a Federal Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be achievable, and as typical load profiles for the fueling station and for the buildings are often partiallyTechnical Analysis: Integrating a Hydrogen Energy Station into a Federal Building Stefan Unnasch NREL/CP-610-32405 #12;electric power demand from the fuel cell and vehicle hydrogen demand result

111

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on industry experiences with natural gas stations.Few natural gas stations have yet to achieve a 47% capacitynts 0 .2 % of to tal gas stations. Achieving low co st hydr

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on industry experiences with natural gas stations.Few natural gas stations have yet to achieve a 47% capacitynts 0 .2 % of to tal gas stations. Achieving low co st hydr

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Fuel-Travel-Back Approach to Hydrogen Station Siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only 18% of existing gas station number is needed to achievean intersection like 4-corner gas stations in real life, butis only 708 or 18% of gas stations in the study region. This

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue; Chen, Chien-Wei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

115

Renewable Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its efforts to promote hydrogen as an alternative transportation fuel, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) is implementing a renewable hydrogen fueling demonstration project. The project involves hydrogen production by electrolysis using NYPA's large renewable hydropower generating resources. An earlier EPRI report (1014383) provides background and results from a preliminary engineering and feasibility study. This report provides an update on the project and the refueling station bid and procurement p...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Prof. Jinyang Zheng Director of IPE, Zhejiang University Director of Engineering Research Center for High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education Vice Director of China National Safety Committee of Pressure Vessels Vice President of CMES-P.R. China China Representative of ISO/TC197 and ISO/TC58 U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Development of Vehicles,Dec.10-11,2009, Washington Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG,CNG-H2,H2 Vehicles and Fuels in China Content Hydrogen Production CNG Refueling Station Hydrogen Refueling Station Shanxi HCNG Project U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and

117

Energy Department Applauds Worlds First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Station in Orange County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Washington, D.C. The U.S. Department of Energy today issued the following statement in support of the commissioning of the worlds first tri-generation fuel cell and hydrogen energy station to...

118

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for each hydrogen production cost quote. Table 2-6: HydrogenTable 2-25: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 2-26: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for each hydrogen production cost quote. Table 2-6: HydrogenTable 2-25: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 2-26: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Importance of Interregional Refueling Availability to the Purchase Decision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveys about refueling availability No experience using aof Interregional Refueling Availability to the Purchasewith refueling availability (pretest only) ? Respondents

Nicholas, Michael A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. LipmanElectricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. Lipmanof electricity, hydrogen, and thermal energy; 2) a survey of

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Effect of Scale and Electricity Price 5. CONCLUSIONdominate and thus electricity price does not substantiallyof both hydrogen and electricity prices given various FCV

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Effect of Scale and Electricity Price 5. CONCLUSIONdominate and thus electricity price does not substantiallyof both hydrogen and electricity prices given various FCV

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range (kg/day) 1. Steam methane reformer 2. Electrolyzer,Methane Reformer, 100 2. Steam Methane Reformer, 1000 3.100 # of stations 1. Steam Methane Reformer 2. Steam Methane

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range (kg/day) 1. Steam methane reformer 2. Electrolyzer,Methane Reformer, 100 2. Steam Methane Reformer, 1000 3.100 # of stations 1. Steam Methane Reformer 2. Steam Methane

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alaska, with lower natural gas prices, on-peak electricitythe following reasons: Natural gas prices are based off 1998of the station Assumed natural gas price used by the author/

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alaska, with lower natural gas prices, on-peak electricitythe following reasons: Natural gas prices are based off 1998of the station Assumed natural gas price used by the author/

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Vandenborre Hydrogen Systems in Belgium, a subsidiary of Stuart Energy, Canada now owned by Hydrogenics ltd % Fig 1. Hydrogen storage pressure tanks Fig 2. Hydrogen storage The above pictures show the compressed hydrogen storage at the site. The hydrogen storage is placed closed to the electrolyser unit. The pressure

129

L/CNG - Refueling Systems  

INL has developed a LNG/CNG refueling process and method for dispensing liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on demand. ...

130

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

131

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/GeneratorFuel Cell Deployment and Hydrogen Infrastructure, WorldwideOffice (2005), Florida Hydrogen Business Partnership,

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategy for Hydrogen Energy Technologies, Florida HydrogenEdition, National Energy Technology Laboratory, DOE/NETL-Incentives: Advanced energy technologies require advanced

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the levels of maturity of the various SSCs to provide guidance for future technology developments. The conceptual design information presented in this report is very preliminary in nature. Significant uncertainty remains about several aspects of the process and even the radiation and mechanical performance of plate-type coated-particle fuel.

Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Zaharia, Nathaniel M [ORNL; Cooper, Eliott J [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride saltcooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energys Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published [1], and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the levels of maturity of the various SSCs to provide guidance for future technology developments. The conceptual design information presented in this report is very preliminary in nature. Significant uncertainty remains about several aspects of the process and even the radiation and mechanical performance of plate-type coated-particle fuel.

Varma, V.K.; Holcomb, D.E.; Bradley, E.C.; Zaharia, N.M.; Cooper, E.J.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential of hydro- gen energy stations as a source ofVegas energy station that has a lower electricity to hydro-hydro- gen roadmap in an effort led by the New York State Energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.

Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Hydrogen and Distributed Generation Initiativesscale adoption of clean distributed generation and limit thebarriers to distributed generation facilities. Clean Energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 29 (2004) 355367  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal in China is very abundant, but the distribution of coal mines is unbalanced, most of which. The distribution of coal mines in China. via methanol reforming in refueling stations or onboard. At present natural gas steam reforming (NGSR), coal gasiÿcation, and water electrolysis, and hydrogen can be stored

de Weck, Olivier L.

142

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for distributed power generation and/or hydrogen. Inpro- mote distributed power generation and stationary fuelthermal effi- ciency of power generation. Typical uses of

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Edward C. Heydorn Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. 7201 Hamilton Blvd Allentown, PA 18195 Phone: (610) 481-7099 Email: heydorec@airproducts.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Jim Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-01GO11087 Subcontractor: FuelCell Energy, Danbury, CT Project Start Date: September 30, 2001 Project End Date: December 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis *

144

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

states. Proactively Address Regulatory Incentives: Advanced energyenergy station research, development, demonstration, and incentive activities that are primarily being initiated at the statestates. Proactively Address Regulatory Incentives: Ad- vanced energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

convenience and security similar to home refueling. Theconvenience and security similar to home refueling. This canfreedom, and security of refueling at home to early vehicle

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Distributed Ethanol Reforming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Bio-derived liquid fuels can be produced from renewable agricultural products, such as wood chips. Background Bio-derived renewable fuels are attractive for their high energy density and ease of transport. One scenario for a sustainable hydrogen economy considers that these bio-derived liquid fuels will be produced at plants close to the biomass resource, and then transported to distributed hydrogen production centers (e.g., hydrogen refueling stations), where the fuels will be reformed via the steam reforming process, similar to the current centralized production of hydrogen by the steam reforming of natural gas. Hydrogen produced by reforming these fuels must first be purified and compressed to appropriate storage and dispensing pressures. Compressing

148

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs for compressed gas stations include rent for land,Costs for Compressed Gas Stations. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCEPortable Refueler Stations (Compressed Gas Truck Delivery)

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of battery and hydrogen energy storage systems integratedenergy future: comparing hydrogen and electricity transmission, storagethe greater energy storage and quick refueling of hydrogen

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

refueling stations or stationary power facilities. Due to its relatively low volumetric energy density, transportation, storage and final delivery to the point of use can be one...

151

Liquid-hydrogen-fueled-vehicle tests. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program for the development of a baseline liquid-hydrogen fueled vehicle and a liquid-hydrogen-refueling system was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on September 30, 1981. This program involved the cooperative efforts of the Laboratory (funded by the US Department of Energy), the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DFVLR) of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the State of New Mexico through the New Mexico Energy Institute (NMEI). The results of the program provide a reference point from which future progress and improvements in liquid-hydrogen on-board storage and refueling capabilities may be measured. The NMEI provided the program a 1979 Buick Century 4-door sedan with 3.8-L (231-in./sup 3/) displacement turbocharged V6 engine and automatic transmission. The DFVLR provided an on-board liquid-hydrogen storage tank and a refueling station. The DFVLR tank, and the engine modifications for operation on hydrogen rather than gasoline, represented readily available, state-of-the-art capabilities when the program began in March 1979. The original tank provided by the DFVLR was replaced with a larger capacity tank, which was fabricated using more advanced cryogenic engineering technology. The vehicle was refueled at least 60 times with liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and the semiautomatic refueling station designed and built by the DFVLR. At the end of program, the engine had been operated for 133 h and the car driven for 3540 km (2200 miles) on hydrogen without any major difficulties. The vehicle obtained 2.4 km/L (5.7 miles/gal) of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L (21 miles/gal) of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis for driving in the high-altitude Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Albuquerque areas. Without refueling, the car had a range of about 274 km (170 miles) with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km (225 miles) with the second tank.

Stewart, W.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Liquid-hydrogen-fueled-vehicle tests. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program for the development of a baseline liquid-hydrogen fueled vehicle and a liquid-hydrogen-refueling system was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on September 30, 1981. This program involved the cooperative efforts of the Laboratory (fundd by the US Department of Energy), the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DFVLR) of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the State of New Mexico through the New Mexico Energy Institute (NMEI). The results of the program provide a reference point from which future progress and improvements in liquid-hydrogen on-board storage and refueling capabilities may be measured. The NMEI provided the program a 1979 Buick Century 4-door sedan with 3.8-L (231-in./sup 3/) displacement turbocharged V6 engine and automatic transmission. The DFVLR provided an on-board liquid-hydrogen storage tank and a refueling station. The DFVLR tank, and the engine modifications for operation on hydrogen rather than gasoline, represented readily available, state-of-the-art capabilities when the program began in March 1979. The original tank provided by the DFVLR was replaced with a larger capacity tank, which was fabricated using more advanced cryogenic engineering technology. The vehicle was refueled at least 60 times with liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and the semiautomatic refueling station designed and built by the DFVLR. At the end of program, the engine had been operated for 133 h and the car driven for 3540 km (2200 miles) on hydrogen without any major difficulties. The vehicle obtained 2.4 km/L (5.7 miles/gal) of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L (21 miles/gal) of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis for driving in the high-altitude Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Albuquerque areas. Without refueling, the car had a range of about 274 km (170 miles) with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km (225 miles) with the second tank.

Stewart, W.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline Stations Gas Station Density (/km 2 ) Trucks Figurepopulation density or gas station density) to grid spacingstations). Distance (this is particularly important for compressed gas

Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles:Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure. Annu. Rev. Energybuilding up hydrogen infrastructure that are guided by the

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Cluster Strategy for a Cluster Strategy for Near term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Michael Nicholas, Joan Ogden Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis November 16, 2009 Scope of study * Analyze "cluster" strategy for introducing H2 vehicles and refueling infrastructure in So. California over the next decade, to satisfy ZEV regulation. * Analyze: Station placement within the Los Angeles Basin Convenience of the refueling network (travel time to stations) Economics - capital and operating costs of stations; cost of H2 station build-out for different rollout scenarios. Transition costs for H2 to reach cost competitiveness with gasoline on cents/mile basis Options for meeting 33% renewable H2 requirement

156

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogenCNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in...

157

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at a refueling station or stationary power site. Infrastructure includes the pipelines, trucks, storage facilities, compressors, and dispensers involved in the process of...

158

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives for Avoided electricity costs due to self- fuel cell installation/operation or generation hydrogen dispensing Avoided natural gas

Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell Pump Storage Larger Reformer Natural Gas Compressor FCVPure H 2 Storage Reformer Compressor FCV Natural Gas Lipman,Storage Small Reformer Service Station Compressor Natural Gas

Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Steam Methane Reforming Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation Coal Gasification Biomass Combustion Engines Hybrid Vehicles Onboard Storage Onboard Reforming Refueling Options Where possible

162

Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration team for the National Hydrogen Roadmap in 2002.in the H2A, a group of hydrogen analysts convened by theframework for analyzing hydrogen systems, and serves on the

Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of home refueling for automobiles also includes compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, battery

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Chassis Dynamometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a more accurate assessment of the benefits of new fuels and vehicle technologies, and is essential for assessing the performance of heavy hybrid trucks and buses. The ReFUEL...

165

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure b Storage Gas truck station (G) 30% a,b Liquid H 2for compressed gas truck stations compared to pipelineplant Compressed gas trucks Refueling station a (compressor,

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12021: Cost Projections...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: November 28, 2012 Item: Delivery costs associated with distributed production refueling station functions, Compression,...

168

Department of Energy Announces $64 Million in Hydrogen Research &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$64 Million in Hydrogen Research & $64 Million in Hydrogen Research & Development Projects Department of Energy Announces $64 Million in Hydrogen Research & Development Projects May 25, 2005 - 12:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the selection of over $64 million in research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. "Since President Bush first laid out his vision for a hydrogen economy, we've witnessed incredible innovation and tremendous advancement," Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman said. "We hope that through our ingenuity, investment and effort, hydrogen vehicles will someday be as commonplace as the cars we drive today."

169

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-01-0474 -01-0474 The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions Thomas Wallner and Henry K. Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert W. Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham Copyright © 2007 SAE International ABSTRACT Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane

172

Outage dose reduction achievements during shorter refueling outages  

SciTech Connect

Achievement of dose reduction goals has been demonstrated at the Limerick Generating Station during the past three refueling outages in 1995-96. Shorter refueling outages were accomplished by carefully selecting outage work and thoroughly planning the work. Limerick Unit 1 completed its outage in 35 d; Unit 2 in 23 d in 1995; Unit 1 completed its outage in 24 d in 1996. The four previous outages at Unit I had taken from 100 to 127 days. European plants were visited by plant supervisors to develop improved management approaches to optimizing outage performance from work planning to work implement. Cofrentes in Spain and KKL Leibstadt in Switzerland were visited in 1994 because of their similar design and outage durations consistently below 35 d. This paper describes the radiation protection practices observed at European plants and implemented at Limerick to achieve efficiency of work practices and adequacy of radiological controls. Specific radiation protection initiatives discussed include electronic dosimetry system, break areas, wash sinks, scrub suits, zone mapping and self-monitoring. Outage achievements in 1995 and 1996 has assured Limerick continued BWR industry leadership as the lowest annual person-rem BWRs in the U.S..

Harris, W.O.; Taylor, S. [Limerick Generating Station, Sanatoga, PA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2024 Date: September 19, 2012 2024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 24, 2012 Item: Hydrogen produced and dispensed in distributed facilities at high-volume refueling stations using current technology and DOE's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 projected prices for industrial natural gas result in a hydrogen levelized cost of $4.49 per gallon-gasoline-equivalent (gge) (untaxed) including compression, storage and dispensing costs. The hydrogen production portion of this cost is $2.03/gge. In comparison, current analyses using low-cost natural gas with a price of $2.00 per MMBtu can decrease the hydrogen levelized cost to $3.68 per gge (untaxed) including

174

Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas Air High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogen storageNatural Gas Reformer H2 Purifier HigTT-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sustainable Hydrogen Fueling Station, California State University, Los Angeles - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report David Blekhman California State University Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90032 Phone: (323) 343-4569 Email: blekhman@calstatela.edu DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000443 Subcontractors: * General Physics Corporation, Elkridge, MD * Weaver Construction, Anaheim, CA Project Start Date: January, 2009 Project End Date: December, 2012 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Procure core equipment for the California State *

176

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. GTI has been developing high-efficiency steam methane reformers and fuel processing technology looks to introduce innovative, compact natural gas steam reforming system and appliance quality hydrogen system integration for efficient operation of the unit. High- Efficiency Natural Gas Steam Reformer

177

Economic Analysis of Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Fueling Stations Matt Jones, Sandy Allan, Joan Ogden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) to calculate the effect on hydrogen price for three scenarios: constant electricity input, off Electricity Input Shown PRODUCTION STORAGE COMPRESSOR DISPENSER OTHER Storage Tank Electrolyzer Unit Transformer/Reactor Unit Compressor Units (2) Gas Holder Balance of Plant 3 units @ 46 kg/h 3 units Electrical

California at Davis, University of

178

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

179

Dose Reduction Options for Refueling Tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved operational practices and successful deployment of several exposure reduction technologies have assisted the industry in meeting current regulatory limits. However, based on an analysis of industry collective and individual exposures, activities directly related to refueling continue to account for a significant, repetitive portion of the total fuel cycle exposure, and to individual exposure for many of the industrys highest dose workers. This severely challenges the industrys ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

ReFuel America | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ReFuel America ReFuel America Jump to: navigation, search Name ReFuel America Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip NC 28210 Product A US subsidiary of publicly-listed NewGen Technologies, focused on providing advanced fuels with increased performance and decreased harmful emissions for all petroleum engine use. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle SymposiumC.A.R.B. , Battery Electric Vehicles Refueling, Energy UsePlug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles : the case of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicleshome refueling for compressed natural gas vehicles, batteryalso includes compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, battery

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of home refueling for automobiles also includes compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, battery electric vehicles (BEV), EVS24 International Battery, Hybrid and

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Option Analysis Project Kick Off Meeting SOW, Budget, Schedule Tan-Ping Chen DOE Hydrogen Delivery Analysis and High Pressure Tanks R&D Project Review Meeting February 8-9, 2005 Argonne National Laboratory 2 Project Team Real world infrastructure project experience * Air Liquide * GTI * Nexant Technology forward looking expertise * Tiax * NREL Ultimate users to advise on H2 infrastructure path * ChevronTexaco Technology Venture (CTTV) * Pinnacle West (PW) 3 Current Gas Station Operation in US 220 million cars for 280 million people = roughly 1 car/person Gasoline dispensed per station = 2,000 gallons/d Gasoline filled in the station = 8-10 gallons/car Cars pulled in per station = 200-250/d Fueling peaks at the morning and afternoon rush hours People do refueling close to home and work place

187

A Simplified Integrated Model for Studying Transitions to a Hydrogen Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

654. Mintz, M. , et al. , Hydrogen: On the Horizon of Just aa Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles: A SouthernInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 1999. 24: p. 709-

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles Powered by a Fuel Cell and by Internal Combustion Engine for Canada Project ID: 117 Principal Investigator: Xianguo Li Purpose In this study, a full life cycle analysis of an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) has been carried out. The impact of the material and fuel used in the vehicle on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions is analyzed for Canada. Four different methods of obtaining hydrogen were analyzed; using coal and nuclear power to produce electricity and extraction of hydrogen through electrolysis and via steam reforming of natural gas in a natural gas plant and in a hydrogen refueling station.

189

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Hydrogen Program New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This project will develop a small appliance for refueling hydrogen vehicles by the homeowner that is low cost and uses inexpensive off-peak electricity to produce hydrogen from...

190

Instrumentation and Control Technologies for Refueling the AHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process and mechanisms for refueling the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) are currently undergoing preconceptual design. The instrumentation and controls (I&C) required for the fuel transfer are simultaneously under design as part of this process. Overall, the AHTR's refueling system will consist of a fully automated, optically guided mechanical transfer system with operator intervention only required for exception handling. The refueling system design remains too immature to enable selection of particular instrumentation components. This paper provides an overview of the refueling process for the AHTR, the I&C requirements for the refueling, the current I&C design and technology status, and the envisioned process for developing and validating the required technology.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most about the vehicle. Hydrogen Vehicle Manufacturers:Hydrogen vehicle manufacturers share the same concerns asmanufacturers have similar systems in without the vehicle

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279738 Varnish cache server Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Dataset Summary Description Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of MaterialsGuidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures.To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an extensive review of reports and journal publications to gather existing materials data for inclusion in the Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials. Additionally, Sandia is working internationally with collaborators to acquire newly generated data for inclusion in the Technical Reference. SAND2012-7321 is an archival report issued by Sandia National Laboratories representing the reference information compiled as of September 2012. Updates and additions of individual sections of this report are available at http://www.sandia.gov/matlsTechRef.Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of MaterialsThe Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials is intended to be a complement to the Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials. Although still in the development stage, the Technical Database will provide a repository of technical data measured in hydrogen and is meant to be an engineering tool to aid the selection of materials for use in hydrogen.

193

Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History * Alternative Fuel Vehicle Policy Initiatives - Nixon (1973) Domestic Oil & Nuclear: Zero imports in a decade - Carter (1977) Efficiency & Synfuels: Cut imports in...

194

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NextEnergy (Detroit) Station Infrastructure Lessons Learned 4 UNITED STATES Department of Energy Infrastructure Lessons Learned Infrastructure Legal Contracts Legal agreements take...

195

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing natural gas stations are hydrogen production andof the agencies natural gas station. While the cost of thefor example, natural gas for stations with reformers). Costs

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Stations 700 bar Retail Stations 700 bar Retail Stations (Shell Newport Beach) Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects (BC Hydro Renewable Power - HARP) Lightweight Transport Trailers...

197

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2005 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements, Richard Klippstein, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (PDF 225 KB) Auto-thermal Reforming Based Refueling Station at SunLine Services, John Harness, HyRadix, Inc....

198

Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

Doncals, Richard A. (Washington, PA); Paik, Nam-Chin (Pittsburgh, PA); Andre, Sandra V. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Porter, Charles A. (Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rathbun, Roy W. (Greensburg, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA); Petras, Diane S. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize the total pipeline length, which is the mostrefueling station num. : network pipeline length: 349.35km local pipeline length: 527.59 km refueling capacity: 2700

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize the total pipeline length, which is the mostrefueling station num. : network pipeline length: 349.35km local pipeline length: 527.59 km refueling capacity: 2700

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2006 Progress Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project through a competitive solicitation process in 2003. The purpose of this project is to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examines the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure. Four industry teams have signed cooperative agreements with DOE and are supporting plans for more than 130 fuel cell vehicles and 20 hydrogen refueling stations over the 5-year project duration. This paper provides a status update covering the progress accomplished by the demonstration and validation project over the last six months; the first composite data products from the project were published in March 2006. The composite data products aggregate individual performance into a range that protects the intellectual property of the companies involved, while publicizing the progress the hydrogen and fuel cell industry is making as a whole relative to the program objectives and timeline. Updates to previously published composite data products, such as on-road fuel economy and vehicle/infrastructure safety, will be presented along with new composite data products, such as fuel cell stack efficiency and refueling behavior.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torres, P. Patel. Distributed Generation of Hydrogen Usingis the concept o f distributed generation (DG): electricitylikely to encourage distributed generation, possibly even

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydrogen  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

204

Power system simulation and optimization models for planning nuclear refueling cycles  

SciTech Connect

From Operation Research Society of America; San Diego, California, USA (12 Nov 1973). The mid-range system being modeled may include a mix of fossil, nuclear, hydro, pumped-storage, and peaking units. For any predetermined nuclear refueling schedule, the program (ORSIM) determines an approximately optical plan of operation for the system. This includes the determination of a maintenance schedule for the non-nuclear units and a schedule of energy delivery for each plant in the system. The criterion of optimality is the minimization of the total discounted operating cost of the system over the specified study period. Over this period, the model computes the expected station load factors, the loss of load probability and unserved energy for the system, and the production costs of operating so as to meet the forecasted loads on the system. The code takes account of variations and growth in demand over the planning horizon, occurrence of unit forced outages, planned shutdowns for nuclear refuelings, maintenance scheduling, allocations of fixed hydro and nuclear energies, and interactions between nuclear unit reloadings and fuel costs. 13 references. (auth)

Turnage, J.C.; Bennett, L.L.; Joy, D.S.; Prince, B.E.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Maintain HCUs on-line, shorten refueling outages  

SciTech Connect

This article examines how removing maintenance of hydraulic control units from the outage scope lets the outage focus available resources on critical-path items, saving significant time and money and enhancing capacity factors. Because of their cost impact, refueling outages are a prime focus of efforts to improve the competitive operation of nuclear powerplants. An approach drawing wide interest is reducing the outage work scope by performing on-line key tasks normally consigned to refueling outages. applying this approach to maintenance of hydraulic control units (HCUs) on boiling-water reactors (BWRs) can be extremely fruitful.

Bell, T.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Testing of a refuelable zinc/air bus battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report tests of a refuelable zinc/air battery of modular, bipolar-cell design, intended for fleet electric busses and vans. The stack consists of twelve 250-cm{sup 2} cells built of two units: (1) a copper-clad glass-reinforced epoxy board supporting anode and cathode current collectors, and (2) polymer frame providing for air- and electrolyte distribution and zinc fuel storage. The stack was refueled in 4 min. by a hydraulic transfer of zinc particles entrained in solution flow.

Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Koopman, R.; Hargrove, D.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen (which would not have to be stored, and which would be distributed locady only). Filling station

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #523: June 16, 2008 Operational...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentrated in California with smaller concentrations of hydrogen stations around the Detroit area and along the East Coast. Operational Hydrogen Refueling Stations as of January...

209

Going Bunkers: The Joint Route Selection and Refueling Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing shipping vessel profitability is a central problem in marine transportation. We consider two commonly used types of vessels---liners (ships whose routes are fixed in advance) and trampers (ships for which future route ... Keywords: maritime transportation, refueling, routing, shipping, stochastic prices

Omar Besbes; Sergei Savin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized. Two examples of this type of analysis focus on: Alternative fuel consumption Vehicle utilization. Figure 1 - An image of a vertical, stacked bar chart titled 'Alternative Fuel Use in AFVs.' The frequency data axis is labeled 'Gallons of Gasoline Equivalent' with a scale of 0-1,400,000 in increments of 200,000. The stacked bar labeled 'CNG Dual Fuel Vehicles' shows CNG from 0-300,000 gallons and Gasoline from 300,000-800,000 gallons. The stacked bar labeled 'E-85 Flex Fuel Vehicles' shows E85 from 0-1,000,000 gallons and Gasoline from 1,000,000-1,250,000 gallons.

211

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

212

Next Generation H2 Station Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Sam Sprik (Primary Contact), Keith Wipke, Todd Ramsden, Chris Ainscough, Jen Kurtz National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-4431 Email: sam.sprik@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Collect data from state-of-the-art hydrogen (H2) fueling * facilities, such as those funded by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), to enrich the analyses and composite data products (CDPs) on H2 fueling originally established by the Learning Demonstration project.

213

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Hydrogen Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Analyzing the Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability in the Transition to Hydrogen Vehicles Project ID: 281 Principal Investigator: David Greene Brief Description: This analysis was focused on the role that combined heat and hydrogen power (CHHP) could play in increasing hydrogen refueling availability during the transition to hydrogen vehicles. Keywords: Stationary fuel cell; hydrogen; plug-in hybrid electric vehicle; hydrogen fuel cell vehicle; combined heat, hydrogen and power; internal combustion engine Performer Principal Investigator: David Greene Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

214

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind energy electrolytic hydrogen fueling station. ProposalandTheir SuitabilityforHydrogenProductionintheAreaSeptember 2004,HydrogenandFuelCellsConference

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

217

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN PRESS M.W. Melaina / Energy Policy 35 (2007) 49194934from natural gas for vehicles. Energy Policy 30, 613619.GAO, 2000. Energy Policy Act of 1992: Limited Progress in

Melaina, Marc W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have been installed, vehicle manufacturers will not producedecades. In 2001, vehicle manufacturers sold some 17 million

Melaina, Marc W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Refueling Simulation Strategy of a CANDU Reactor Based on Optimum Zone Controller Water Levels  

SciTech Connect

An optimum refueling simulation method was developed for application to a Canada deuterium uranium 713-MW(electric) (CANDU-6) reactor. The objective of the optimization was to maintain the operating range of the zone controller unit (ZCU) water level so that the reference zone power distribution is reproduced following the refueling operation. The zone controller level on the refueling operation was estimated by the generalized perturbation method, which provides sensitivities of the zone power to an individual refueling operation and the zone controller level. By constructing a system equation of the zone power, the zone controller level was obtained, which was used to find the most suitable combination of the refueling channels. The 250-full-power-day refueling simulations showed that the channel and bundle powers are well controlled below the license limits when the ZCU water level remains in the typical operating range.

Choi, Hangbok; Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hazard and Risk Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are expected as the hydrogen infrastructure grows. And like developers of conventional gas stations, hydrogen-fueling-station developers must analyze and mitigate potential...

224

Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluating the Safety of a Natural Gas Home Refueling Appliance (HRA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fact sheet summarizing the National Renewable Energy Laboratory safety evaluation of Phill, Fuelmaker Corporation's natural gas home refueling appliance, used to fill CNG vehicles at home.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Safety Evaluation of the FuelMaker Home Refueling Concept: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes results of a National Renewable Energy Laboratory safety evaluation of the FuelMaker natural gas vehicle home refueling appliance (HRA, aka Phill).

Waterland, L. R.; Powars, C.; Stickles, P.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Benefits and Costs of Hydrogen Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processor Herbaceous Biomass Woody Biomass Petroleum Natural Gas Flared Gas Natural Gas #12;Production/Compression Pathways Gaseous H2 Liquid H2 Centralized Decentralized Electricity Methanol Flared Gas Landfill Gas Are Key Steps for Gaseous H2 NA NG Recovery (97.5%) Compressed G.H2 at Refueling Stations LNG Gasification

Argonne National Laboratory

228

Mitigation of SCC Initiation on BWR Core Internals by Means of Hydrogen Water Chemistry During Start-Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen injection has been applied as a preventive measure against the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) phenomenon in many boiling water reactors. However, it can be applied only during normal plant operation since hydrogen is usually injected into the feedwater and this system is in standby mode during start-up operations. It is estimated that the core internals are subjected to the strain rate that may cause susceptibility to SCC initiation during start-up. Therefore, it is beneficial to perform hydrogen injection during start-up as well in order to suppress SCC initiation.For this purpose, we installed an additional hydrogen injection system to be used during plant start-up at the Tokai-2 power station. This trial Hydrogen water chemistry During Start-up (HDS) system was applied following the 19th refueling and maintenance outage in December 2002. By comparing results obtained during this start-up with HDS to previous start-up data using normal water chemistry, we made the following observations. First, as the reactor water temperature increased from initial conditions up to 180 deg. C via nuclear heating, dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide concentrations decreased to levels lower than previously observed. Second, during subsequent nuclear heating, up to 250 deg. C, the dissolved oxygen concentration did not exceed 1 ppb, and the electrochemical corrosion potential was maintained in a low range near -400 mV versus the standard hydrogen electrode.

Abe, Ayumi; Tobita, Hidehiro; Nagata, Nobuaki; Dozaki, Koji; Takiguchi, Hideki [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

On the Scheduling of Systems of UAVs and Fuel Service Stations for Long-Term Mission Fulfillment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The duration of missions that can be accomplished by a system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is limited by the battery or fuel capacity of its constituent UAVs. However, a system of UAVs that is supported by automated refueling stations may support ... Keywords: Autonomous operation, Fuel service stations, Persistence, Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)

Jonghoe Kim; Byung Duk Song; James R. Morrison

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Fuel Type Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Include private stations Not all stations are open to the public. Choose this option to also search private fueling stations. Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that stations are open, available to the public, and have the fuel prior to making a trip to that location. Some stations in our database have addresses that could not be located by the Station Locator application. This may result in the station appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at

231

Optimal Refueling Pattern Search for a CANDU Reactor Using a Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results from the application of genetic algorithms to a refueling optimization of a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor. This work aims at making a mathematical model of the refueling optimization problem including the objective function and constraints and developing a method based on genetic algorithms to solve the problem. The model of the optimization problem and the proposed method comply with the key features of the refueling strategy of the CANDU reactor which adopts an on-power refueling operation. In this study, a genetic algorithm combined with an elitism strategy was used to automatically search for the refueling patterns. The objective of the optimization was to maximize the discharge burn-up of the refueling bundles, minimize the maximum channel power, or minimize the maximum change in the zone controller unit (ZCU) water levels. A combination of these objectives was also investigated. The constraints include the discharge burn-up, maximum channel power, maximum bundle power, channel power peaking factor and the ZCU water level. A refueling pattern that represents the refueling rate and channels was coded by a one-dimensional binary chromosome, which is a string of binary numbers 0 and 1. A computer program was developed in FORTRAN 90 running on an HP 9000 workstation to conduct the search for the optimal refueling patterns for a CANDU reactor at the equilibrium state. The results showed that it was possible to apply genetic algorithms to automatically search for the refueling channels of the CANDU reactor. The optimal refueling patterns were compared with the solutions obtained from the AUTOREFUEL program and the results were consistent with each other. (authors)

Quang Binh, DO; Gyuhong, ROH; Hangbok, CHOI [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dukjindong 150, Yusong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicles Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 INL Alternative Fuel Fleet (318 vehicles) * 79 B20 motor coach buses * 7 Dedicated LNG motor coach buses * 154 Bi-fuel light-duty CNG vehicles * 52 Bi-fuel E85 (85% ethanol)...

233

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close More Search Options Include private stations Include...

234

OpenEI - hydrogen  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Tue, 14 Dec 2010...

235

Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case of natural gas vehicles. Energy Policy 35, 58655875.gas for vehicles. Energy Policy 30, 613619. Fracchia,DC. GAO, 2000. Energy Policy Act of 1992: Limited Progress

Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Bank Workshop on CNG Vehicles, Washington, DC. GAO,tanks, such as gasoline/CNG vehicles. ARTICLE IN PRESS M.

Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of natural gas vehicles. Energy Policy 35, 5865from natural gas for vehicles. Energy Policy 30, 613619.

Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-van employ compressed hydrogen gas storage. Although the energy density of compressedhydrogen gasis lower,less costly and more energy efficient, refueling canbe accomplished rapidly, and hydrogen canbe produced from~--- - ~ .. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY Joan

240

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us Interaction with industrial, academic, and government partners is key to moving advanced vehicle and fuel technologies into the marketplace and the U.S. economy. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is available to members of the research community interested in testing advanced fuels, prototype engines, and hybrid powertrains. There are a variety of ways to get involved with NREL's advanced vehicle and fuels research activities: Work collaboratively with NREL through one of our technology partnership agreements. We can assist you in selecting the agreement most suitable for your research project. Gain access to NREL's expertise and specialized research facilities through a work-for-others agreement. In addition, NREL's patented transportation technologies are available for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Engine Dynamometer Test Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Dynamometer Test Cells Engine Dynamometer Test Cells The ReFUEL Laboratory features two engine dynamometer test cells-one for heavy-duty engines and another for light-duty engines. Heavy-Duty Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Capabilities Photo of heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell in laboratory setting. Heavy-duty engines are certified as meeting emission regulations by the manufacturer using an engine dynamometer. These protocols, known as the Heavy-Duty Federal Test Procedures (HD-FTP), are highly standardized, and results can be readily compared between laboratories. Because the heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell performs the HD-FTP on engines up to 600 hp, advanced fuels can be evaluated in a way that is meaningful to the engine-research community. In addition to testing a wide

242

NREL: Technology Transfer - Renewable Hydrogen Bus Teaches ...  

The bus filled up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses hydrogen made with wind and solar energy.

243

Fuel Examination and Crud Analysis from Columbia Generating Station EOC20  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Columbia Generating Station end of cycle-20 (EOC-20) refueling outage, 2- and 3-cycle ATRIUM-10 fuel assemblies were examined to assess the impact of reduced Cycle 20 feedwater iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) transport on crud loadings of fuel and fuel performance in general.BackgroundCrud spallation was observed on 2- and 3-cycle fuel at Columbia Generating Station (CGS) during EOC19. This observation was linked to moderate feedwater (FW) zinc (Zn) and iron ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

244

An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposiumvehicles, and plug-in hybrid vehicles demonstrate itsSymposium plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV), and hydrogen fuel

Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Project Summary Full Title: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are 'H2E-Stations' a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? Project ID: 244 Principal Investigator: Timothy Lipman Brief Description: This project expands on a previously conducted, preliminary H2E-Station analysis in a number of important directions. Purpose This analysis, based on an integrated Excel/MATLAB/Simulink fuel cell system cost and performance model called CETEEM, includes the following: several energy station designs based on different sizes of fuel cell systems and hydrogen storage and delivery systems for service station and office building settings; characterization of a typical year of operation

246

Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

CX-009556: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Validation of Hydrogen Refueling Station Performance and Advanced Refueling Components CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.22 Date: 12/10/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

248

Technical Plan --Codes and Standards 3.7 Hydrogen Codes and Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a chemical feedstock, but its use as an energy carrier on a large-scale commercial basis remains largely by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for gaseous hydrogen refueling (TS 20012) and Multi standards for on-board liquid- (ISO 13985) and gaseous- or gaseous blend- (ISO 15869) hydrogen storage

249

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

day (10 buses) Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage Systemday (100 buses) Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage Systemnatural gas stations are hydrogen production and storage, a

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

SciTech Connect

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Permitting Hydrogen Facilities Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy The objective of this U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Permitting Web site is to help local permitting officials deal with proposed hydrogen fueling stations, fuel cell installations for telecommunications backup power, and other hydrogen projects. Resources for local permitting officials who are looking to address project proposals include current citations for hydrogen fueling stations and a listing of setback requirements on the Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicle Data Center Web site. In addition, this overview of telecommunications fuel cell use and an animation that demonstrates telecommunications site layout using hydrogen fuel cells for backup power should provide helpful

252

Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

REFUEL: an EU road map for biofuels , E. Deurwaarder and S. Lensink, ECN policy Studies, the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFUEL: an EU road map for biofuels M. Londo1 , E. Deurwaarder and S. Lensink, ECN policy Studies), Poland K. Könighofer, Joanneum Research, Austria Abstract A successful mid-term development of biofuels calls for a robust road map. REFUEL assesses inter alia least-cost biofuel chain options, their benefits

254

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC. (PRAXAIR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

development and testing of an automatic cyclic reformer (ACR) which shall be the heart of the hydrogen refueling station. This research and development will lead to broader...

255

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves ...  

... up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses some of the greenest hydrogen in the world made using wind and solar energy.

256

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2CAS Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decisions and actions of drivers; hydrogen fueling station investors; combined heat, hydrogen, and power system owners; and vehicle original equipment manufacturers are modeled....

257

Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure drop across the core was restricted to no more than 1.5 atm during normal operation to minimize the upward force on the core. Also, the flow velocity in the core was restricted to 3 m/s to minimize erosion of the fuel plates. Section 3.1.1 of this report discusses the design restrictions in more detail.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon How best to achieve the benchmark of 300 miles of travel without refueling? It may be to use the lightweight compound ammonia-borane to carry the hydrogen. With hydrogen accounting for almost 20 percent of its weight, this stable, non-flammable compound is one of the highest-capacity materials for storing hydrogen. In a car, the introduction of a chemical catalyst would release the hydrogen as needed, thus avoiding on-board storage of large quantities of flammable hydrogen gas. When the ammonia-borane fuel is depleted of hydrogen, it would be regenerated at a

259

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

alternative fuels stations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fuels stations fuels stations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Data text/csv icon alt_fuel_stations_apr_4_2012.csv (csv, 2.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles 12,782 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations

262

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Effective Refueling Outage Preparation and Execution Guidance--Revision to 1014480  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides updated, current guidance to assist outage managers and teams during preparation and execution phases of a nuclear refueling outage. Included is guidance on how the outage activities support long-range and strategic plans developed by the site or fleet of units.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Autonomous aerial refueling of UAVS utilizing a vision based navigation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major technological obstacle to be overcome for practical and reliable autonomous probe-and-drogue aerial refueling is obtaining accurate relative position and attitude measurements during the docking phase. An integrated controller-sensor-navigation system for this task must be robust and possess good disturbance rejection properties. Previous attempts to solve this problem have used video servoing with pattern recognition algorithms and the differential Global Positioning System. This thesis seeks to determine the feasibility of autonomous aerial refueling by developing a robust docking controller and integrating it with the relative position and attitude measurements from a novel Vision-based Navigation (VisNav) sensor. VisNav accurately determines the line of sight vector between a positioning sensing diode and a target configured with multiple light emitting diode beacons. A study is conducted to determine the best number and placement of the beacons on the drogue and the best location to mount the sensor on an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV). Optimal Nonzero Set Point and optimal Command Generator Tracker controllers are developed and used to simulate six degree-of-freedom docking maneuvers using dynamical system models of a UAV and a refueling drogue. Test cases for stationary and moving drogues in atmospheric turbulence are evaluated in terms of docking position errors, control effort, control rate, and quadratic cost. Simulation results demonstrate that a Proportional Integral Filter Command Generator Tracker controller, coupled with the VisNav sensor and navigation system, provides a viable candidate solution to the autonomous aerial refueling problem. The beacon lights can be placed in the location of lights currently on the drogue, and the sensor can be placed at the base of the refueling probe on the UAV.

Kimmett, Jennifer Jones

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Hydrogen is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research is under way to make hydrogen vehicles practical for widespread use.

265

Demonstration of zinc/air fuel battery to enhance the range and mission of fleet electric vehicles: Preliminary results in the refueling of a multicell module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report progress in an effort to develop and demonstrate a refuelable zinc/air battery for fleet electric vehicle applications. A refuelable module consisting of twelve bipolar cells with internal flow system has been refueled at rates of nearly 4 cells per minute refueling time of 10 minutes for a 15 kW, 55 kWh battery. The module is refueled by entrainment of 0.5-mm particles in rapidly flowing electrolyte, which delivers the particles into hoppers above each cell in a parallel-flow hydraulic circuit. The concept of user-recovery is presented as an alternative to centralized service infrastructure during market entry.

Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Keene, L.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.; Koopman, R.

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Alternative Fueling Station Locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locations Alternative Fueling Station Locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, view U.S. maps, and more. Access up-to-date fuel station data here: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/data_download The dataset available for download here provides a "snapshot" of the alternative fueling station information for: compressed natural gas (CNG), E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), propane/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biodiesel, electricity, hydrogen, and liquefied natural gas

267

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Deadline Extended for Early Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deadline Extended for Early Market Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Funding Deadline Extended for Early Market Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Funding Opportunity Jun 26, 2013 DOE has extended the application deadline for the "Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Trucks, Roof-top Backup Power, and Advanced Hydrogen Refueling Components" funding opportunity announcement. Applications are now due by 5:00 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2013. Letters of intent are due on July 12, 2013. In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, on June 11 the Energy Department announced up to $9 million in new funding to accelerate the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for use in vehicles, backup power systems, and hydrogen refueling components. These investments will strengthen U.S. leadership in cost-effective

268

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

269

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ???¢????????real-world???¢??????? retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation???¢????????s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products???¢???????? Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user???¢????????s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

271

Zinc air refuelable battery: alternative zinc fuel morphologies and cell behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multicell zinc/air batteries have been tested previously in the laboratory and as part of the propulsion system of an electric bus; cut zinc wire was used as the anode material. This battery is refueled by a hydraulic transport of 0.5-1 mm zinc particles into hoppers above each cell. We report an investigation concerning alternative zinc fuel morphologies, and energy losses associated with refueling and with overnight or prolonged standby. Three types of fuel pellets were fabricated, tested and compared with results for cut wire: spheres produced in a fluidized bed electrolysis cell; elongated particles produced by gas-atomization; and pellets produced by chopping 1 mm porous plates made of compacted zinc fines. Relative sizes of the particles and cell gap dimensions are critical. All three types transported within the cell 1553 and showed acceptable discharge characteristics, but a fluidized bed approach appears especially attractive for owner/user recovery operations.

Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

273

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hydrogen Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydrogen Solar Ltd Place Guildford, United Kingdom Zip GU2 7YG Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product Hydrogen Solar Ltd is developing innovative technology to convert sunlight directly into hydrogen fuel for vehicle refueling and other applications. Coordinates 51.237086°, -0.570516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.237086,"lon":-0.570516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

psi (total both tanks) Boost Compressor Main Compressor CNG Output Pilot Plant - CNG Substation Street Service Low Pressure Natural Gas High Pressure Storage (3 levels) Pilot Plant...

278

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fueling station HFSS High-flux solar simulator HFV Hydrogen-fueled vehicle HGEF Hawaii Gateway Energy Center XIV. Acronyms, Abbreviations and Definitions XIV-10 DOE...

279

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

280

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips November 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Smartphone users are familiar with the prompt, "Would you like this site to use your current location?" If you're looking for somewhere to fuel your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips November 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Smartphone users are familiar with the prompt, "Would you like this site to use your current location?" If you're looking for somewhere to fuel your

282

Rethink DC Metro Stations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis intends to rethink the role of Metro stations in the Washington Metropolitan Area. It considers Metro stations as more than infrastructure, but with (more)

Leung, Yathim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than those for conventional fuels (at least several minutes to refuel 5 kg of H 2 ). Thermal management that enables rapid refueling is a critical issue that must be...

284

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In addition, it was speculated prior to testing that the use of HCNG fuel could extend oil change intervals, thus reducing operating costs and waste products such as used engine...

285

Fact sheet produced by the U.S. Department of Energy describing hydrogen safety.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Developing safe, reliable, compact, and cost-effective hydrogen stor- age technologies is one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a form of energy. To be competitive with conventional vehicles, hydrogen- powered cars must be able to travel more than 300 mi between fills. This is a challenging goal because hydrogen has physical characteristics that make it difficult to store in large quantities without taking up a significant amount of space. Where and How Will Hydrogen be Stored? Hydrogen storage will be required onboard vehicles and at hydrogen production sites, hydrogen refueling sta- tions, and stationary power sites. Possible approaches to storing hydrogen include: * Physical storage of compressed

286

A refuelable zinc/air battery for fleet electric vehicle propulsion  

SciTech Connect

We report the development and on-vehicle testing of an engineering prototype zinc/air battery. The battery is refueled by periodic exchange of spent electrolyte for zinc particles entrained in fresh electrolyte. The technology is intended to provide a capability for nearly continuous vehicle operation, using the fleet s home base for 10 minute refuelings and zinc recycling instead of commercial infrastructure. In the battery, the zinc fuel particles are stored in hoppers, from which they are gravity fed into individual cells and completely consumed during discharge. A six-celled (7V) engineering prototype battery was combined with a 6 V lead/acid battery to form a parallel hybrid unit, which was tested in series with the 216 V battery of an electric shuttle bus over a 75 mile circuit. The battery has an energy density of 140 Wh/kg and a mass density of 1.5 kg/L. Cost, energy efficiency, and alternative hybrid configurations are discussed.

Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Hargrove, D.; Koopman, R.; Peterman, K.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Inexpensive Delivery of Compressed Hydrogen with Advanced Vessel Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delivery of compressed hydrogen delivery of compressed hydrogen with advanced vessel technology Gene Berry Andrew Weisberg Salvador M. Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (925) 422-0864 saceves@LLNL.GOV DOE and FreedomCar & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC January 25, 2006 LLNL is developing innovative concepts for efficient containment of hydrogen in light duty vehicles concepts may offer advantages for hydrogen delivery Conformable containers efficiently use available space in the vehicle. We are pursuing multiple approaches to conformability High Strength insulated pressure vessels extend LH 2 dormancy 10x, eliminate boiloff, and enable efficiencies of flexible refueling (compressed/cryogenic H 2 /(L)H 2 ) The PVT properties of H

288

Reducing Duration of Refueling Outage by Optimizing Core Design and Shuffling Sequence  

SciTech Connect

Reducing the duration of refueling outage is possible by optimizing the core design and the shuffling sequence. For both options software tools have been developed that have been applied to the three most recent cycles of the Borssele plant in the Netherlands. Applicability of the shuffling sequence optimization to boiling water reactors has been demonstrated by a comparison to a recent shuffle plan used in the Hatch plant located in the United States. Their uses have shown that both core design and shuffling sequence optimization can be exploited to reduce the time needed for reloading a core with an in-core shuffling scheme. Ex-core shuffling schemes for pressurized water reactors can still have substantial benefit from a core design using a minimized number of insert shuffles.

Wakker, P.H.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Bloois, J.T. van; Sutton, W.R. III

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

290

Hydrogen storage of energy for small power supply systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power supply systems for cell phone base stations using hydrogen energy storage, fuel cells or hydrogen-burning generators, and a backup generator could offer an improvement over current power supply systems. Two categories ...

Monaghan, Rory F. D. (Rory Francis Desmond)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CAISO Station Displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the results of a project to build Station One-Line Diagram displays for the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) system. The development and maintenance of the Station One-line displays for energy management system applications has historically been a very time consuming, tedious and error prone task. Several man-years of effort may be required to build the station displays for a large interconnected power system. Once these stations displays have bee...

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

WWVB Station Library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST time and frequency broadcast stations. ... International Conference, Washington, DC, August 2001. WWVB Improvements: New Power from an ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to expand access to data and give consumers more transportation options that save money at the pump, the Energy Department today launched a new mobile app to help drivers find stations that provide alternative fuel for vehicles. Developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from the Energy Department, the Alternative Fueling Station Locator app provides information on more than 15,000 stations across the country. Users can search for stations that offer electricity, biodiesel (B20), natural gas (compressed and liquefied), ethanol (E85), hydrogen, and propane. After the

294

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to expand access to data and give consumers more transportation options that save money at the pump, the Energy Department today launched a new mobile app to help drivers find stations that provide alternative fuel for vehicles. Developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from the Energy Department, the Alternative Fueling Station Locator app provides information on more than 15,000 stations across the country. Users can search for stations that offer electricity, biodiesel (B20), natural gas (compressed and liquefied), ethanol (E85), hydrogen, and propane. After the

295

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Project Summary Full Title: Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Scenario Analysis Project ID: 189 Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Keywords: Hydrogen fueling; infrastructure; fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose This analysis estimates the spatial distribution of hydrogen fueling stations necessary to support the 5 million fuel cell vehicle scenario, based on demographic demand patterns for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and strategy of focusing development on specific regions of the U.S. that may have high hydrogen demand. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 Telephone: 303-275-4479

296

Hydrogen Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. ... These articles, of interest to the hydrogen community, can be viewed by clicking on the title. ...

297

Properties Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. PROPERTIES, ... For information on a PC database that includes hydrogen property information click here. ...

298

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling Station Dec 16, 2013 The 10th annual Hydrogen Student Design Contest will challenge student teams to design a transportable, containerized hydrogen fueling station solution. Registration for the contest, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, is open until January 15, 2014. Through the contest, multidisciplinary student teams will demonstrate their talents in engineering, public planning, architecture, marketing, and entrepreneurship. In previous years, teams have designed fueling stations, airport systems, and green buildings-all using hydrogen. The Grand Prize winning team will receive an expenses-paid trip to present their winning entry to hundreds of industry professionals in a session at

299

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Chicago team. On-board hydrogen storage is critical to the development of future high energy efficiency transportation technologies, such as hydrogen-powered fuel...

300

Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station - Fountain Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tri-Generation Success Tri-Generation Success Story World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station- Fountain Valley The Fountain Valley energy station, supported in part by a $2.2 million grant from the Energy Department, is the world's first tri-generation hydrogen energy and electrical power station to provide transportation fuel to the public and electric power to an industrial facility. Located at the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant in Fountain Valley, California, the unit is a combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) system that co-produces hydrogen in addition to electricity and heat, making it a tri-generation system. The hydrogen produced by the system

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2011 December 12, 2011 Energy Department Awards More Than $7 Million for Innovative Hydrogen Storage Technologies in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles The U.S. Department of Energy today announced more than $7 million to fund four projects in California, Washington and Oregon to advance hydrogen storage technologies to be used in fuel cell electric vehicles. December 1, 2011 Baldor Specialty Foods relies on fuel cell technology from Oorja Protonics to power lift-trucks like the one pictured above, refueling takes less than one minute | Photo Courtesy of Oorja Protonics. Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend How fuel cell powered lift trucks are helping companies like Baldor Specialty Foods ensure that their customers have access to the freshest seasonal produce.

302

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic resources with the potential

303

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: News Archives - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 January February March April May June July August September October November December January 10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Brian Larsen DOE Fuel Cell Bus Analysis Finds Fuel Economy to be up to Two Times Higher than Diesel DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Releases 2012 Annual Progress Report Rescheduled for January 17: DOE Webinar on Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings February Automotive Fuel Cell Cost and Durability Target Request For Information Issued Energy Department Announces New Investment to Advance Cost-Competitive Hydrogen Fuel Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Webinar February 22: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols March Energy Department Study Examines Potential to Reduce Transportation Petroleum Use and Carbon Emissions

304

Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

305

Stations in Special Wind Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stations in Special Wind Regions. ... station_matrix_912850.xlsx (Excel file). [ SED Home | Extreme Winds Home | Previous | Next ] ...

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Refueling and density control in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of pellet injection and gas puff refueling have been studied in the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch. Multiple deuterium pellets (less than or equal to 6 x 10/sup 19/D atoms/pellet) with velocities ranging from 300 to 700 m/sec have been injected into plasmas with n-bar/sub e/ approx.1 to 5 X 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/, I/sub phi/ approx.100 to 250 kA, T/sub e/(0) approx.150 to 300 eV and discharge durations of less than or equal to 20 msec. Photographs and an array D/sub ..cap alpha../ detectors show substantial deflection of the pellet trajectory in both the poloidal and toroidal planes, due to asymmetric ablation of the pellet by electrons streaming along field lines. To compensate for the poloidal deflection, the injector was moved up +14 cm off-axis, allowing the pellets to curve down to the midplane. In this fashion, central peaking of the pellet density deposition profile can be obtained. Both electron and ion temperatures fall in response to the density rise, such that ..beta../sub theta/(..beta../sub theta/ identical to n-bar/sub e/(T/sub e/(0) + T/sub i/)/(B/sub theta/(a))/sup 2/) remains roughly constant. Energy confinement is momentarily degraded, and typically a decrease in F (F identical to B/sub phi/(a)/(B/sub phi/)) is seen as magnetic energy is converted to plasma energy when the pellet ablates. As a result of pellet injection at I/sub phi/ = 150 kA we observe T/sub e/(0) ..cap alpha.. n-bar/sub e//sup -.9 +- .1/, while the helicity based resistivity eta/sub k/ transiently varies as n-bar/sub e//sup .7 +- .1/. While the achievement of center-peaked density profiles is possible with pellet injection, gas puffing at rates strong enough to show a 50% increase in n-bar/sub e/ over a period of 10 msec (approx.150 torr-litres/sec) leads to hollow density profiles. The refueling requirements for parameters expected in the next generation RFPs (ZTH, RFX) can be extrapolated from these data using modified tokamak pellet ablation codes.

Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Watt, R.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Buechl, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

California Hydrogen Highway Network October 3, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Highway Hydrogen Highway Network April 3, 2008 California Air Resources Board California Blueprint Plan * Phased approach to infrastructure implementation * Environmental goals * Shared risk CaH2Net Background * Governor's Executive Order, S-7-04 formed the CaH2Net in April 2004 * A Blueprint Plan, May 2005 * Legislative Authority - SB76, $6.5 Million, stations, vehicles, support - Budget Act 2006, $6.5 Million, ZBuses, stations - Budget Act 2007, $6 Million, stations, support The State's Contribution * Vehicles * Stations * CaH2Net Membership * Hydrogen Fuel Quality Standard * Environmental Standards for Hydrogen * Public outreach and education Over 90% of Californians Breathe Unhealthy Air at Times 0-5 Days >100 Days 6-50 Days 50-100 Days Days Over State 24-Hour PM10 Standard

308

Effective Personnel Exposure Control in Shortened Refueling Outages: Final Report: Review of Remote Monitoring Systems in Radiation Protection Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote monitoring technology (RMT) significantly enhances worker protection and reduces worker radiation exposure, particularly during shortened refueling outages. This report provides a brief description of the hardware and features of remote monitoring systems, then focuses on nuclear plant experiences in applying such systems for enhanced radiation protection. It also discusses EPRI's RMT research program and formation of the RMT Working Group to support research in this area. Such information will gr...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Technologies and Systems Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Strategic Initiatives for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7- 8, 2003 U.S. Department of Energy ■ Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 2 Copyright: Design & Operation Standards Relevant Design and Operating Standards ANSI/ASME B31.8 49 CFR 192 CGA H 2 Pipeline Standard (in development) Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 3 Copyright: Future H 2 Infrastructure Wind Powered Electrolytic Separation Local Reformers Users Stationary Power Sources Vehicle Fueling Stations Distance from Source to User (Miles) <500 0-5 <2,000 <50 Off-peak Hydroelectric Powered Electrolytic Separation Large Reformers (scale economies) Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

310

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects by Performing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performing Organization Performing Organization Below are hydrogen analyses and analytical models grouped by performing organization. A B D E F G I L M N O P R S T U W A Aalborg University Wind Power Integration Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Ceramic Membrane Reactors for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Anhui University of Technology Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Pathways in Shanghai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Vehicle Introduction Decisions (AVID) Model AirCRED Model All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Consumer Adoption and Infrastructure Development Including Combined Hydrogen, Heat, and Power Cost Implications of Hydrogen Quality Requirements

311

Key Issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM1 project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories Design, Maintenance and Logistic Support, Outage Management. Most of the key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

Degrave, Claude [Electricite de France, EDF-SEPTEN, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Ogden, The Hope for Hydrogen, Issues in Science andand James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: MovingHydrogen Highways BY TIMOTHY LIPMAN H 2 T H E S TAT E O F C

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors September 28, 2011 - 3:22pm Addthis A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling station. A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling station. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program Since 2004, the Hydrogen Student Design Contest has challenged university students from across the globe to use their skills in design, engineering, economics, environmental science, business and marketing to devise innovative hydrogen energy applications for real-world use. "You have to innovative and you have to stretch yourself-it was a

314

Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Research and Development

316

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in California Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in California September 15, 2011 - 5:51pm Addthis A customer fills up at a new Energy Department supported fuel cell hydrogen energy station in Fountain Valley, California. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals. A customer fills up at a new Energy Department supported fuel cell hydrogen energy station in Fountain Valley, California. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program Imagine pulling-up to a fuel station that supplies your car with clean, renewable fuel. Now imagine that, while you're filling up, this same

318

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

319

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Basics to Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Basics Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

Stottler, Gary

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

323

The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevron 2005 Chevron 2005 The Road to Hydrogen - Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing Rick Zalesky President, Hydrogen Unit Chevron Technology Ventures July 13, 2005 2 © Chevron 2005 CTV Hydrogen Strategy Develop organizational capability to be a market leader should hydrogen be adopted in the fuels portfolio Leverage hydrogen as an extension of our existing businesses Ensure CVX is positioned to actively participate in the development of hydrogen technologies and related regulations and legislation Enhance CVX's reputation as a leader in fuel processing 3 © Chevron 2005 Chevron Hydrogen Energy Stations 4 © Chevron 2005 Integrated Hydrogen Energy Stations: Scalable, Distributed Manufacturing Technology Convergence and integration Molecular-scale design

324

Alcohol-fueled vehicles: An alternative fuels vehicle, emissions, and refueling infrastructure technology assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in alternative motor vehicle fuels has grown tremendously over the last few years. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the California Clean Air Act are primarily responsible for this resurgence and have spurred both the motor fuels and vehicle manufacturing industries into action. For the first time, all three U.S. auto manufacturers are offering alternative fuel vehicles to the motoring public. At the same time, a small but growing alternative fuels refueling infrastructure is beginning to develop across the country. Although the recent growth in alternative motor fuels use is impressive, their market niche is still being defined. Environmental regulations, a key driver behind alternative fuel use, is forcing both car makers and the petroleum industry to clean up their products. As a result, alternative fuels no longer have a lock on the clean air market and will have to compete with conventional vehicles in meeting stringent future vehicle emission standards. The development of cleaner burning gasoline powered vehicles has signaled a shift in the marketing of alternative fuels. While they will continue to play a major part in the clean vehicle market, alternative fuels are increasingly recognized as a means to reduce oil imports. This new role is clearly defined in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The Act identifies alternative fuels as a key strategy for reducing imports of foreign oil and mandates their use for federal and state fleets, while reserving the right to require private and municipal fleet use as well.

McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.; Lyons, J.K. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search...

326

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

327

Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carriers and Potential Carriers and Carriers and Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery Delivery TIAX LLC 1601 S. D Anza Blvd. Cupertino CA, 95014 Tel. 408-517-1550 Reference: D0348 © 2007 TIAX LLC Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland Matthew Hooks Stefan Unnasch Stephen Lasher 1 Novel Hydrogen Carriers Project Overview Cost Density (wt. and vol.) Energy requirements Forecourt storage requirements Codes and standards H H 2 2 Plant, Liquefier, LH Plant, Liquefier, LH 2 2 storage storage H H 2 2 Tube Trailer Tube Trailer LH 2 2 Tank/ Fueling Station LH Tank/ Fueling Station The efficient delivery of hydrogen is necessary for the adoption of hydrogen as a transportation fuel, but numerous challenges must be met. 2 "Conventional" delivery options are limited by volumetric density,

328

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen fuel could then be compressed into a liquid and delivered to filling stationshydrogen per day, which would be enough to refuel about 500 vehicles each day. Each filling station

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

330

Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August development · Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development · B31.12 Status & Structure · Hydrogen Pipeline issues · Research Needs · Where Do We Go From Here? #12;4 Code

331

Rethinking hydrogen fueling insights from delivery modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century gasoline fueling has evolved from being performed by a variety of informal, diverse methods to being performed through the use of a standardized, highly automated system that exploits the fuel's benefits and mitigates its hazards. Any effort to transition to another fuel with different properties--with both advantages and disadvantages--must make similar adjustments. This paper discusses the existing gasoline refueling infrastructure and its evolution. It then describes the hydrogen delivery scenario analysis model, an Excel-based tool that calculates the levelized cost of delivering hydrogen from a central production facility to a vehicle by the use of currently available technologies and a typical profile of vehicle use and fueling demand. The results are shown for a status quo, or gasoline-centric case, in which demand reflects the current gasoline-based system and supply responds accordingly, and a hydrogen-centric case, in which some of those patterns are altered. The paper highlights fueling requirements that are particularly problematic for hydrogen and concludes with a discussion of alternative fueling paradigms.

Mintz, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Gardiner, M.; Energy Systems; U. S. DOE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Introduction 2 Cost 3 Hydrogen Production Strategy 4 Objectives 5 Manufacturing Challenges 6 References Introduction The United States imports 55% percent of it's oil consumption and is expected to grow to 68% by the year 2025. A substitution for petroleum needs to happen to help fix this growing problem. So in 2003 the Bush Administration started this Hydrogen Fuel initiative. 1.2 Billion dollars was spent in the first five years for better hydrogen technologies. The goal is for there to be commercialization decisions made by 2015 and for hydrogen vehicles to being mass-produced and on the road with hydrogen filling stations by the year 2020. Cost The cost of hydrogen fuel is supposed to be gasoline gallon equivalent

333

HyLights wird gefrdert Europische Kommission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand of vehicles and refuelling infrastructure in the transition from demo phase to first commercial in demo phase and first commercial market phase! Missing coherence of EU actors and different level stations Hydrogen refuelled 4 ICE buses, 1 FC bus 1 ICE car, 1 fork lift 3 FC buses 27 FC buses 5 in D & 3

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

336

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: DOE H2A Production Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filling-station) facilities. Required input to the models includes capital and operating costs for the hydrogen production process, fuel type and use, and financial parameters...

337

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: U.S. and International Renewable Hydrogen Demonstrationfueling station powered by renewable electricity. The systemand Natural Gas, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, U.S.

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Vehicles and E85 Stations Needed to Achieve Ethanol Goals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the numbers of stations and vehicles necessary to achieve future goals for sales of ethanol fuel (E85). The paper does not analyze issues related to the supply of ethanol which may turn out to be of even greater concern. A model of consumers decisions to purchase E85 versus gasoline based on prices, availability, and refueling frequency is derived and preliminary results for 2010, 2017 and 2030 consistent with the President s 2007 biofuels program goals are presented (1). A limited sensitivity analysis is carried out to indicate key uncertainties in the trade-off between the number of stations and fuels. The analysis indicates that to meet a 2017 goal of 26 billion gallons of E85 sold, on the order of 30% to 80% of all stations may need to offer E85, and that 125 to 200 million flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) may need to be on the road, even if oil prices remain high. These conclusions are tentative for three reasons: (1) there is considerable uncertainty about key parameter values, such as the price elasticity of choice between E85 and gasoline, (2) the future prices of E85 and gasoline are uncertain; and (3) the method of analysis used is highly aggregated; it does not consider the potential benefits of regional strategies nor the possible existence of market segments predisposed to purchase E85. Nonetheless, the preliminary results indicate that the 2017 biofuels program goals are ambitious and will require a massive effort to produce FFVs and insure widespread availability of E85.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NREL: News Feature - Eco-Friendly SUV Gets a Hydrogen Mileage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen fuel cell vehicles being tested at NREL. The new station is part of NREL and Xcel Energy's Wind to Hydrogen (Wind2H2) project. Wind2H2 uses wind and solar energy to...

340

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

On-board hydrogen storage system using metal hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen powered hybrid electric bus has been developed for demonstration in normal city bus service in the City of Augusta, Georgia, USA. The development team, called H2Fuel Bus Team, consists of representatives from government, industry and research institutions. The bus uses hydrogen to fuel an internal combustion engine which drives an electric generator. The generator charges a set of batteries which runs the electric bus. The hydrogen fuel and the hybrid concept combine to achieve the goal of near-zero emission and high fuel efficiency. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a solid form using an on-board metal hydride storage system. The system was designed for a hydrogen capacity of 25 kg. It uses the engine coolant for heat to generate a discharge pressure higher than 6 atm. The operation conditions are temperature from ambient to 70 degrees C, hydrogen discharge rate to 6 kg/hr, and refueling time 1.5 hours. Preliminary tests showed that the performance of the on-board storage system exceeded the design requirements. Long term tests have been planned to begin in 2 months. This paper discusses the design and performance of the on-board hydrogen storage system.

Heung, L.K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

343

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

344

Hydrogen Radialysis  

INL scientists have invented a process of forming chemical compositions, such as a hydrides which can provide a source of hydrogen. The process exposes the chemical composition decaying radio-nuclides which provide the energy to with a hydrogen source ...

345

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

346

Hydrogen wishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen Wishes, presented at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies, explores the themes of wishes and peace. It dramatizes the intimacy and power of transforming one's breath and vocalized wishes into a floating sphere, a bubble charged with hydrogen. ...

Winslow Burleson; Paul Nemirovsky; Dan Overholt

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

348

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

349

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

350

Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors Hydrogen Student Design Contest Inspires and Opens Doors September 28, 2011 - 3:22pm Addthis A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling station. A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling station. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program Since 2004, the Hydrogen Student Design Contest has challenged university students from across the globe to use their skills in design, engineering, economics, environmental science, business and marketing to devise innovative hydrogen energy applications for real-world use. "You have to innovative and you have to stretch yourself-it was a

351

Modeling of a horizontal steam generator for the submerged nuclear power station concept  

SciTech Connect

A submerged nuclear power station has been proposed as an alternative power station with a relatively low environmental impact for use by both industrialized and developing countries. The station would be placed 10 m above the seabed at a depth of 30--100 m and a distance of 10--30 km from shore. The submerged nuclear power station would be manufactured and refueled in a central facility, thus gaining the economies of factoryfabrication and the flexibility of short-lead-time deployment. To minimize the size of the submerged hull, horizontal steam generators are proposed for the primary-to-secondary heat transfer, instead of the more traditional vertical steam generators. The horizontal steam generators for SNPS would be similar in design to the horizontal steam generators used in the N-Reactors except the tube orientation is horizontal (the tube`s inlet and outlet connection points on the tubesheet are at the same elevation). Previous RELAP5 input decks for horizontal steam generators have been either very simplistic (Loviisa PWR) or used a vertical tube orientation (N-Reactor). This paper will present the development and testing of a RELAP5 horizontal steam generator model, complete with a simple secondary water level control system, that accounts for the dynamic flow conditions which exist inside horizontal steam generators.

Palmrose, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modeling of a horizontal steam generator for the submerged nuclear power station concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A submerged nuclear power station has been proposed as an alternative power station with a relatively low environmental impact for use by both industrialized and developing countries. The station would be placed 10 m above the seabed at a depth of 30--100 m and a distance of 10--30 km from shore. The submerged nuclear power station would be manufactured and refueled in a central facility, thus gaining the economies of factoryfabrication and the flexibility of short-lead-time deployment. To minimize the size of the submerged hull, horizontal steam generators are proposed for the primary-to-secondary heat transfer, instead of the more traditional vertical steam generators. The horizontal steam generators for SNPS would be similar in design to the horizontal steam generators used in the N-Reactors except the tube orientation is horizontal (the tube's inlet and outlet connection points on the tubesheet are at the same elevation). Previous RELAP5 input decks for horizontal steam generators have been either very simplistic (Loviisa PWR) or used a vertical tube orientation (N-Reactor). This paper will present the development and testing of a RELAP5 horizontal steam generator model, complete with a simple secondary water level control system, that accounts for the dynamic flow conditions which exist inside horizontal steam generators.

Palmrose, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C.L.; Russell, L.H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project contributed significantly to the development of new codes and standards, both domestically and internationally. The NHA collaborated with codes and standards development organizations to identify technical areas of expertise that would be required to produce the codes and standards that industry and DOE felt were required to facilitate commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure. NHA staff participated directly in technical committees and working groups where issues could be discussed with the appropriate industry groups. In other cases, the NHA recommended specific industry experts to serve on technical committees and working groups where the need for this specific industry expertise would be on-going, and where this approach was likely to contribute to timely completion of the effort. The project also facilitated dialog between codes and standards development organizations, hydrogen and fuel cell experts, the government and national labs, researchers, code officials, industry associations, as well as the public regarding the timeframes for needed codes and standards, industry consensus on technical issues, procedures for implementing changes, and general principles of hydrogen safety. The project facilitated hands-on learning, as participants in several NHA workshops and technical meetings were able to experience hydrogen vehicles, witness hydrogen refueling demonstrations, see metal hydride storage cartridges in operation, and view other hydrogen energy products.

Hall, Karen I.

2007-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL: News - NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

713 713 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released New application for iPhone helps users find stations offering electricity, biodiesel, natural gas, and other alternative fuels. November 7, 2013 iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. The Alternative Fueling Station Locator App, now available through Apple's App Store, allows iPhone users to select an alternative fuel and

356

Robotic dissolution station  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a robotic station for dissolving active metals in acid in an automated fashion. A vessel with cap, containing the active metal is placed onto a shuttle which retracts to a point at which it is directly beneath a cap removing and retaining mechanism. After the cap is removed, a tube carrying an appropriate acid is inserted into the vessel, and the acid is introduced. The structure of the station forms an open hood which is swept of gases generated by the dissolution and the air removed to a remote location for scrubbing. After the reaction is complete, the shuttle extends and the vessel may be removed by a robot arm.

Beugelsdijk, T.J.; Hollen, R.M.; Temer, D.J.; Haggart, R.J.; Erkkila, T.H.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen » Laws & Incentives Hydrogen » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations

359

Energy Department Applauds World's First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Fountain Valley tri-generation fuel cell and hydrogen energy station uses biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel for a fuel cell. The system...

360

Hydrogen Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ASHRAE 62.1, 7 air changes per hour, 100 ... I, Division II, Group B: testing and research laboratory; ... Planning Guidance for Hydrogen Projects as a ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

362

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Hydrogen Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from...

363

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Hydrogen and Fuel Cells EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. Image of the back of hydrogen fueling stations inside a black fenceline. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for applied research and development (R&D) of cutting edge hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. DOE supports R&D that makes it cheaper and easier to produce, deliver, and store hydrogen, while also working to lower the costs of fuel

364

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hydrogen Bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

International Space Station Again  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the fifth time in 2 1/2 years, the International Space Station (ISS) had to execute a collision avoidance maneuver in early April to ensure a safe miss distance for a piece of orbital debris. As solar activity increases during the next few years, the frequency of ISS collision avoidance might increase as many hundreds of resident space objects drift down through the ISS orbital regime. The subject of concern in late March 2011 was a fragment from Cosmos 2251, the Russian communications satellite which had accidentally collided with the U.S. Iridium 33 communications satellite in February 2009, producing more than

Iss Airlock Shields; A Note On Active; A Publication Of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Solid hydrogen pellet injection into the ORMAK Tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid hydrogen spheres were injected into the ORMAK tokamak as a test of pellet refueling for tokamak fusion reactors. Pellets 70 ..mu..m and 210 ..mu..m in diameter were injected with speeds of 91 m/sec and 100 m/sec, respectively. Each of the 210-..mu..m pellets added about 1% to the number of particles contained in the plasma. Excited neutrals, ablated from these hydrogen spheres, emitted light which was monitored either by a photomultiplier or by a high speed framing camera. From these light signals it was possible to measure pellet lifetimes, ablation rates, and the spatial distribution of hydrogen atoms in the ablation clouds. The average measured lifetime of the 70-..mu..m pellets was 422 ..mu..sec, and the 210-..mu..m spheres lasted 880 ..mu..sec under bombardment by the plasma. These lifetimes and measured ablation rates are in good agreement with a theoretical model which takes into account shielding of plasma electrons by hydrogen atoms ablated from spherical hydrogen ice.

Foster, C. A.; Colchin, R. J.; Milora, S. L.; Kim, K.; Turnbull, R. J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project ID: 200 Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Keywords: Costs; vehicle characteristics Purpose HyDIVE permits rigorous analysis of the interdependence between hydrogen fuel vehicle demand growth and hydrogen fueling station coverage. Performer Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-4436 Email: cory_welch@nrel.gov Additional Performers: PA Government Services Period of Performance Start: October 2006 End: December 2007 Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Vehicle Options

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

371

INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride makes it difficult to remove the heat of reaction, especially in the relatively short target refueling times, see Attachment 3. This document describes a detailed numerical model for general metal hydride beds that couples reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer, for both hydriding and dehydriding of the bed. The detailed model is part of a comprehensive methodology for the design, evaluation and modification of hydrogen storage systems. In Hardy [2007], scoping models for reaction kinetics, bed geometry and heat removal parameters are discussed. The scoping models are used to perform a quick assessment of storage systems and identify those which have the potential to meet DOE performance targets. The operational characteristics of successful candidate systems are then evaluated with the more detailed models discussed in this document. The detailed analysis for hydrogen storage systems is modeled in either 2 or 3-dimensions, via the general purpose finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics{reg_sign}. The two-dimensional model serves to provide rapid evaluation of bed configurations and physical processes, while the three-dimensional model, which requires a much longer run time, is used to investigate detailed effects that do not readily lend themselves to two-dimensional representations. The model is general and can be adapted to any geometry or storage media. In this document, the model is applied to a modified cylindrical shell and tube geometry with radial fins perpendicular to the axis, see Figures 4.1-1 and 4.1-2. Sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, is used as the hydrogen storage medium. The model can be run on any DOS, LINUX or Unix based system.

Hardy, B

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

373

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Station Based on GEGR SCPO Technology (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bgqrpg`srcbFwbpmeclDscjgleQr_rgml Bgqrpg`srcbFwbpmeclDscjgleQr_rgml @_qcbmlECEPQANMRcaflmjmew UcgUcg*Ic Jgs ECEjm`_jPcqc_paf BMC//-.4-0..5 0 ECEjm`_jPcqc_paf Lmt0..5 QANMPcdmpkcpdmpFwbpmeclNpmbsargml Kmqramqrcddcargtcfwbpmecl npmbsargmlslgr Amkn_ar&3rgkcqqk_jjcp rf_l?AP' Kmbsj_pbcqgeldmpk_qq npmbsargml C_qcmdmulcpqfgn K_glrcl_lacdpcc

374

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cells for Generation and Cogeneration Center for Energy and Environmental Studies Princeton University Princeton, NJ

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cells for Generation and Cogeneration Center for Energy and Environmental Studies Princeton University Princeton, NJ

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust (CO2) Grid electricity Cogen Heat Recycled ReformateRecycled Reformate Grid electricity Cogen Heat Electricity

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust (CO2) Grid electricity Cogen Heat Recycled ReformateRecycled Reformate Grid electricity Cogen Heat Electricity

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the H2Hwy Network cost estimate for scenarios A, B, anda tool to compare existing cost estimates, and compare theseIt compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from a

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the H2Hwy Network cost estimate for scenarios A, B, anda tool to compare existing cost estimates, and compare theseIt compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from a

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installation

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installation

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reforme Purifier Natural gas Storage System Contingenc y100 kg /day Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage System1000 kg/day Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage System

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reforme Purifier Natural gas Storage System Contingenc y100 kg /day Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage System1000 kg/day Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage System

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James, John S. Lettow, C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, & Reed C. Kuhn (DTI, Arlington, VA 4. C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, John P. Reardon,C.E.G. Amos, Wade C.E. (Sandy) Author A N I N I A A I N I A

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James, John S. Lettow, C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, & Reed C. Kuhn (DTI, Arlington, VA 4. C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, John P. Reardon,C.E.G. Amos, Wade C.E. (Sandy) Author A N I N I A A I N I A

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen: Helpful Links & Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helpful Links & Contacts. Helpful Links. Hydrogen Information, Website. ... Contacts for Commercial Hydrogen Measurement. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

NETL: News Release - Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Station Provides Transportation Fuel from Domestic Resources for Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles Washington, D.C. - A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles and equipment, lessening U.S. dependence on foreign oil. The facility will produce, compress, store and dispense hydrogen as a fuel source for vehicles that have been converted to run on hydrogen, as well as other types of ground equipment at the airport.

388

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

389

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

390

Wachs Cutter Tooling Station (4495)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is similar to previously operated facility tooling and will utilize an existing hydraulic unit. The temporary station location will require electrical feed, ventilation,...

391

The Station Nightclub Fire 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The final report, "Report of the Technical Investigation of The Station Nightclub Fire (NIST NCSTAR 2), Volume 1 and Volume 2 ," includes details of ...

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Check Out the New Alternative Fuel Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Check Out the New Alternative Fuel Station Locator Check Out the New Alternative Fuel Station Locator Check Out the New Alternative Fuel Station Locator November 19, 2012 - 2:29pm Addthis Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles

393

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Britta K. Gross Britta K. Gross Manager, Hydrogen and Electrical Infrastructure General Motors Corporation NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned -- Hydrogen Infrastructure -- Sacramento, CA April 3, 2008 * Very limited access to today's stations - Stations not made available or... - No-go access contracts/liability clauses or ... - Assurance of access by customers/drivers * "OEM x vehicles/drivers have priority over OEM y" * e.g. "Can't fuel on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons 4-7pm" * Very limited availability of 700bar fueling - Every major OEM is developing 700bar capability (GM vehicles since 2004) - With only two exceptions, 700bar is the baseline * Current stations are largely behind-the-fence, demo-like, and lagging in technology availability (note: vehicle technology refreshed every 3-4 years)

395

Site Vice-President Oconee Nuclear Station Attachment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tube Inservice Inspection of the Unit 2 EOC-23 Refueling Outage will be transmitted separately. If there are any questions you may contact Corey Gray at (864) 873-6325. Sincerely, D ye Baxter,

Dave Baxter; Oconee Nuclear Station; Duke Energy; Luis Reyes; Andy Hutto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Woodsdale Generating Station project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is written for those who are planning new generation construction, particularly combustion turbine units, which will, according to projections, constitute a significant portion of new generation construction during the 1990's. Our project management and schedule for the Woodsdale Generating Station is presented to aid others in the planning, organization, and scheduling for new combustion turbine stations.

Carey, R.P. (Cincinnati Gas and Electric Co., OH (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Safety, Codes, and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes, and Standards Safety, Codes, and Standards NREL's hydrogen safety, codes, and standards projects focus on ensuring safe operation, handling, and use of hydrogen and hydrogen systems through safety sensors and codes and standards for buildings and equipment. Safety Sensors To facilitate hydrogen safety, NREL is testing hydrogen sensors that detect leaks and monitor gas purity at the Safety Sensor Testing Laboratory. Because hydrogen is colorless and odorless, sensors are important for safe hydrogen fueling stations, equipment, and facilities. NREL researchers are testing fiber-optic sensor configurations resistant to electromagnetic interference. They also are testing protective and self-cleaning overlayer coatings for sensors. For remote hydrogen sensing, NREL is assessing sensor requirements and design options for innovative

399

station locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288500 Varnish cache server station locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol

400

Storing Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste heat rejection systems for geothermal power stations have a significantly greater influence on plant operating performances and costs than do corresponding systems in fossil- and nuclear-fueled stations. With thermal efficiencies of only about 10%, geothermal power cycles can reject four times as much heat per kilowatt of output. Geothermal sites in the United States tend to be in water-short areas that could require use of more expensive wet/dry or dry-type cooling towers. With relatively low-temperature heat sources, the cycle economics are more sensitive to diurnal and seasonal variations in sink temperatures. Factors such as the necessity for hydrogen sulfide scrubbers in off-gas systems or the need to treat cooling tower blowdown before reinjection can add to the cost and complexity of goethermal waste heat rejection systems. Working fluids most commonly considered for geothermal cycles are water, ammonia, Freon-22, isobutane, and isopentane. Both low-level and barometric-leg direct-contact condensers are used, and reinforced concrete has been proposed for condenser vessels. Multipass surface condensers also have wide application. Corrosion problems at some locations have led to increased interest in titanium tubing. Studies at ORNL indicate that fluted vertical tubes can enhance condensing film coefficients by factors of 4 to 7.

Robertson, R C

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrogen Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

403

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

404

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,and James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: Movingof Energy, National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, November 2002.

Ogden, Joan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen SRNL Connection  

hydrogen storage. Why is Savannah River National Laboratory conducting hydrogen research and development? ... Both the Department of Energys hydrogen ...

408

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

409

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap...

410

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen...

411

SOLID STATE HYDRIDE SYSTEM ENGINEERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A typical hydrogen refueling station was designed based on DOE targets and existing gasoline filling station operations. The purpose of this design was to determine typical heat loads, how these heat loads will be handled, and approximate equipment sizes. For the station model, two DOE targets that had the most impact on the design were vehicle driving range and refueling time. The target that hydrogen fueled vehicles should have the equivalent driving range as present automobiles, requires 5 kg hydrogen storage. Assuming refueling occurs when the tank is 80% empty yields a refueling quantity of 4 kg. The DOE target for 2010 of a refueling time of 3 minutes was used in this design. There is additional time needed for payment of the fuel, and connecting and disconnecting hoses and grounds. It was assumed that this could be accomplished in 5 minutes. Using 8 minutes for each vehicle refueling gives a maximum hourly refueling rate of 7.5 cars per hour per fueling point.

Anton, D; Mark Jones, M; Bruce Hardy, B

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Stations to someone by E-mail Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fueling Stations Photo of a liquefied petroleum gas fueling station. Thousands of liquefied petroleum gas (propane) fueling stations are

414

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government interests, a variety of vendors, and numerous utilities. Keywords: Hydrogen production, natural gas, costs Purpose Assess progress toward the 2005 DOE Hydrogen...

415

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Futures Simulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen scenarios will affect carbon and other environmental effluents and U.S. oil import requirements Outputs: Delivered hydrogen costs (cost per gallon of gas...

416

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project ID: 268 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

417

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Electrolytic Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Principal Investigator Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production:...

418

Pilgrim Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Station Station Jump to: navigation, search Name Pilgrim Station Facility Pilgrim Stage Station Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner ReunionPower/Exergy Developer Exergy Location Twin Falls County ID Coordinates 42.741336°, -114.865865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.741336,"lon":-114.865865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

Hydrogen Technology Validation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

420

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chinese Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Chinese Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chinese Station Biomass Facility Facility...

422

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Power Plant Data for Dresden Generating Station Author: DOE/EIA Keywords: Dresden Generating Station, Illinois, Nuclear, Plant, Reactor, Generation, Capacity

423

Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station Location Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the primary transit infrastructure finance method.Paper 2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through StationWP-2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station

Ian Carlton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 7:40 PM To: Gopstein, Avi (S4) Subject: Hydrogen Infrastructure Latest Advancements Attachments: Air Products Written Comments to 2011 2012 AB118 Investment Plan.pdf Follow Up Flag: Follow up Flag Status: Flagged Categories: QTR Transparency Avi, You may recall we met in DC when the McKinsey team from Germany came to discuss the EU study on hydrogen infrastructure. At that time I mention a significant advance in infrastructure that would be announced soon. Attached is our testimony to the California Energy Commission on deploying that technology. We were awarded the project to build 9 stations in southern California with the backing of

425

Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

Thomas, Jr., C. E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydrogen: WM Articles & Other Hydrogen News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vermont Station Tour; September Workshop. B-023, Winter 2009 (Jul, 2008 to Sep, 2009), US National Work Group (USNWG) includes: ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

429

Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage are assessed and compared to the targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm. The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) or by central electrolysis. The main conclusions are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity, mid-term target for system volumetric capacity, and the target for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. However, the high-volume manufacturing cost and the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production scenario are, respectively, 2-4 and 1.6-2.4 times the current targets, and the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

Ahluwalia, R.; Hua, T.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Gardiner, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC; U.S. DOE

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Near Term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denver, CO Denver, CO September 22, 2004 Abbas Akhil, DER and Energy Storage Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-7308 aaakhil@sandia.gov Near-term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration Near-term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration Integration Scenarios and Issues Integration Scenarios and Issues ! How and where can electrolysis systems be integrated in the grid? " Siting/location " Operational issues " Investments " Benefits " Ownership ! Objectives are " Capture "grid" benefits " Seek to reduce emissions Siting and Location Siting and Location ! Electrolysis systems can be sited at " Existing generating stations " Transmission substations " Distribution substations ! Each locations has different

432

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation (DG) of electrical power with a hydrogenthese options for the electrical power production and wasteInc. bition Place. Electrical power generated by a Hydro-

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust (CO 2 ) Grid electricity Cogen Heat Natural gas Airutility grid, 2) re-use of thermal energy waste heat forGrid electricity Exhaust (CO 2 ) Recycled Reformate Natural gas Air Water H2 Purifier Source: Weinert, 2005 Cogen Heat

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charge exemptions and net metering policies) that recognizecharge exemptions and net metering policies) that recognize

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of excellence for alternative energy technology education,create curricula in alternative energy technologies to helpin order to develop alternative energy sources and energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Efficiency and performance measurements of a PDC Inc. single stage diaphragm hydrogen compressor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis I used measured data from Humboldt State Universitys hydrogen fueling station, and ideal gas thermodynamic models, to calculate the specific energy (kWh/kg) (more)

Allen, Andrea Leticia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station Storage Storage Cost $500/kg Natural gas feedstocknatural gas steam methane reforming (SMR) includes hydrogen production and storagefor storage, distribution or use H 2 Natural gas Figure 3

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Rapidly refuelable fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power...

440

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessment of Natural Gas Splitting with a Concentrating Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production via thermal decomposition of methane using a solar reactor is analyzed for two different applications: (1) for a fueling station and (2) for power production. For the fueling station, the selling price of hydrogen is controlled by the high cost of hydrogen storage and compression, combined with storage limitations of the system, which prevents maximum hydrogen production. Two alternate scenarios to lower the hydrogen production cost are evaluated: (1) sending the hydrogen directly to a pipeline network and (2) adding a small electric heater, which provides heat to the solar reactor when the hydrogen supply is low. For power production, the economics of two options for the carbon produced from the solar process are evaluated: (1) selling the carbon black and (2) burning the carbon to produce more power.

Spath, P. L.; Amos, W. A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

444

Introduction to hydrogen energy  

SciTech Connect

The book comprises the following papers: primary energy sources suitable for hydrogen production, thermochemical and electrolytic production of hydrogen from water, hydrogen storage and transmission methods, hydrogen-oxygen utilization devices, residential and industrial utilization of energy, industrial utilization of hydrogen, use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation, an assessment of hydrogen-fueled navy ships, mechanisms and strategies of market penetration for hydrogen, and fossil/hydrogen energy mix and population control. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (LK)

Veziroglu, T.N. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Daily Reporting Rainfall Station DON & PROSERPINE RIVERS Manual Heavy Rainfall Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily Reporting Rainfall Station DON & PROSERPINE RIVERS Manual Heavy Rainfall Station Manual River Station Telemetry Rainfall Station Telemetry River Station Revised: Nov 2009 MAP 121.1 FLOOD WARNING Bowen Tide TM Bowen P/S AL GretaCk Peter Faust Dam Crystal Brook Andromache R GoorgangaCk Jocheims TM

Greenslade, Diana

446

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Smol, Robert (East Patchogue, NY); Farber, Gerald (Elmont, NY); Naphtali, Leonard M. (Washington, DC)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluating the Safety of a Natural Gas Home Refueling Appliance (HRA); Natural Gas Infrastructure Evaluation (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and infrastructure R&D through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petroleum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline and diesel.

450

V O L U M E 2 Well-to-Wheel Energy Use and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that LNG would be produced from NG and FG in NNA locations and transported to U.S. LNG terminals. Figure 1.S. LNG terminals 98.5 MeOH from NA plants to refueling stations 98.0 MeOH from NNA plants to refueling L.H2 liquid hydrogen LNG liquefied natural gas LPG liquefied petroleum gas M85 a mixture of 85

Argonne National Laboratory

451

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual EPRI Technical Update is a compilation of several case histories of events and activities that occurred at member fossil generating stations in 2007. The purpose of this report is to share this operating experience with other member utilities so that lessons can be learned and an opportunity provided to improve overall performance across the generation fleet.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Barrow Meteoroloigcal Station (BMET) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data.

Ritsche, MT

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Washington, D.C. -- A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles

454

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

456

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal,...

457

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Basics Hydrogen is a clean-burning fuel, and when combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, it produces heat and electricity with only water vapor as a by-product. But hydrogen...

458

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background: The photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen has drawn properties In order to develop better materials for solar energy applications, in-depth photoelectrochemical simulated solar irradiance. Hydrogen production experiments are conducted in a sealed aluminum cell

Raftery, Dan

459

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: The Hype About Hydrogen By Joseph J. Romm ReviewedJ. Romm. The Hype About Hydrogen. Washington, DC: IslandEmissions. The Hype About Hydrogen describes in detail what

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Analysis of combined hydrogen, heat, and power as a bridge to a hydrogen transition.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined hydrogen, heat, and power (CHHP) technology is envisioned as a means to providing heat and electricity, generated on-site, to large end users, such as hospitals, hotels, and distribution centers, while simultaneously producing hydrogen as a by-product. The hydrogen can be stored for later conversion to electricity, used on-site (e.g., in forklifts), or dispensed to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Argonne has developed a complex-adaptive-system model, H2CAS, to simulate how vehicles and infrastructure can evolve in a transition to hydrogen. This study applies the H2CAS model to examine how CHHP technology can be used to aid the transition to hydrogen. It does not attempt to predict the future or provide one forecast of system development. Rather, the purpose of the model is to understand how the system works. The model uses a 50- by 100-mile rectangular grid of 1-square-mile cells centered on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The major expressways are incorporated into the model, and local streets are considered to be ubiquitous, except where there are natural barriers. The model has two types of agents. Driver agents are characterized by a number of parameters: home and job locations, income, various types of 'personalities' reflective of marketing distinctions (e.g., innovators, early adopters), willingness to spend extra money on 'green' vehicles, etc. At the beginning of the simulations, almost all driver agents own conventional vehicles. They drive around the metropolitan area, commuting to and from work and traveling to various other destinations. As they do so, they observe the presence or absence of facilities selling hydrogen. If they find such facilities conveniently located along their routes, they are motivated to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle when it becomes time to replace their present vehicle. Conversely, if they find that they would be inconvenienced by having to purchase hydrogen earlier than necessary or if they become worried that they would run out of fuel before encountering a facility, their motivation to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle decreases. At vehicle purchase time, they weigh this experience, as well as other factors such as social influence by their peers, fuel cost, and capital cost of a hydrogen vehicle. Investor agents build full-service hydrogen fueling stations (HFSs) at different locations along the highway network. They base their decision to build or not build a station on their (imperfect) estimates of the sales the station would immediately generate (based on hydrogen-powered vehicle traffic past the location and other factors), as well as the growth in hydrogen sales they could expect throughout their investment horizon. The interaction between driver and investor agents provides the basis for growth in both the number of hydrogen vehicles and number of hydrogen stations. For the present report, we have added to this mix smaller, 'bare-bones' hydrogen dispensing facilities (HDFs) of the type that owners of CHHP facilities could provide to the public. The locations of these stations were chosen to match existing facilities that might reasonably incorporate CHHP plants in the future. Unlike the larger commercial stations, these facilities are built according to exogenously supplied timetables, and no attempt has been made to model the financial basis for the facilities. Rather, our objective is to understand how the presence of these additional stations might facilitate the petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. We discuss a base case in which the HDFs are not present, and then investigate the effects of introducing HDFs in various numbers; according to different timetables; with various production capacities; and with hydrogen selling at prices above, equal to, and below the commercial stations selling price. We conclude that HDFs can indeed be helpful in accelerating a petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. Placed in areas where investors might not be willing to install large for-profit HFSs, HDFs can serve as a bridge until demand for hydrogen increases to the point where l

Mahalik, M.; Stephan, C. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrogen (H2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen (H2) Hydrogen (H2) Historical Records from Ice Cores Deuterium Record from Dome C, Antarctica Continuous Measurements Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE,...

463

Hydrogen Program Overview  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: Why Hydrogen?

464

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

465

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines - Natural Gas Pipelines for Hydrogen Use #12;3 OAK embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures relevant to hydrogen gas transmission pipeline behavior as function of pressure and temperature - Effects of steel composition, microstructure

466

www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration capabilities · Control and load profile software Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power Systems · Off Power ...Powering Change #12;www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Profile Designer and manufacturer-grid renewable power · On-grid community or residential power · Grid incentives for load control · Renewable

467

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery...

468

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

469

Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. 04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. DOE Tank Safety Workshop Hydrogen Tank Safety Testing 1 POWERTECH - Hydrogen & CNG Services  Certification testing of individual high pressure components  Design Verification, Performance, End-of-Life testing of complete fuel systems  Design, construction, and operation of Hydrogen Fill Stations  Safety Studies  Standards Development 2 PRESENTATION  Discuss CNG Field Performance Data  Discuss Safety Testing of Type 4 Tanks  Current work to support Codes & Standards Development 3 Storage Tank Technologies 4 basic types of tank designs  Type 1 - all metal  Type 2 - metal liner with hoop wrapped composite  Type 3 - metal liner with fully wrapped composite  Type 4 - Plastic liner with

470

Alternative Fueled Vehicle Charging Station Credit (Connecticut...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or improvements to existing stations which allow that station to provide CNG, LNG, or LPG (propane); 2) equipment used to convert vehicles to run exclusively on one of these...

471

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2005, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers and contractors have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2006, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not discounting the...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

NGPL Louisiana station nears completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction on a 3,600-hp compressor station on the Louisiana line of Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America near Henry, La., was scheduled for completion later this month. The Louisiana line extends some 205 miles along the Gulf Coast between New Caney, Tex., and the Henry hub area. The new compressor station will be located about 44 miles west of the Henry hub. Work began on the $5.1 million expansion project in Cameron Parish, La., in May following Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) certification. By mid-September, the compressor building, service building, and meter house has been erected, final compressor inspections were under way, and gas piping tie-ins had been completed, according to NGPL. Powered by three 1,200-hp Solar Saturn gas-fired centrifugal engines, the station is designed to increase the capacity of the Louisiana line east of the Stingray pipeline system by up to 220 MMcfd. Current capacity for east bound flows is approximately 900 MMcfd.

Not Available

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Broadcast Outages for NIST Radio Station WWVB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Numerous short outages while station was undergoing maintenance and testing during daylight hours. WWVB operated at reduced power during ...

475

Initiators of coal hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initiators examined include cyclic and linear silico-organic compounds, the effects of which on the hydrogenation process are studied. The substances not only localize the active radicals before these are stabilised by hydrogen, but actually activate the destruction reaction of the coal substance and in this way generate atomic hydrogen: radical polymerization inhibitors thus convert to activators and hydrogen transfer. (8 refs.)

Krichko, A.A.; Dembovskaya, E.A.; Gorlov, E.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

477

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  | HydrOgEn & Our EnErgy FuturE U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov u.S. department of Energy |  www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future Contents Introduction ................................................... p.1 Hydrogen - An Overview ................................... p.3 Production ..................................................... p.5 Delivery ....................................................... p.15 Storage ........................................................ p.19 Application and Use ........................................ p.25 Safety, Codes and Standards ............................... p.33

478

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

479

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Enz, Glenn L. (N. Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

*Activity Station Staffing Hunting Station Atlatl (Mr. Boston, Mr. Lilly), Flint knapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Activity Station Staffing Hunting Station ­ Atlatl (Mr. Boston, Mr. Lilly), Flint knapping (Ms arrive Letchworth-Love Mounds State Park 9:10- 9:45 Red Group Hunting station: atlatl throwing, flint, flint knapping demo, skinning demo*(See back page) Yellow Group Cordage station: wrist or ankle bracelet

Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen refueling stations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

482

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2005 Annual Progress Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Printable Version 2005 Annual Progress Report IV. Production This section of the 2005 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Production Overview, Peter Devlin, Department of Energy (PDF 158 KB) A. Distributed Reforming Autothermal Cyclic Reforming Based Hydrogen Generating and Dispensing System, Ravi Kumar, GE Global Research (PDF 215 KB) Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station, David E. Guro, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (PDF 209 KB) A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biogas, Greg Tao, Materials and Systems Research Inc. (PDF 336

483

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fueling Station Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Datasets Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: Alternative Fueling Station Locator The alternative fuel station locator uses an address based search to find

484

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Dubuque generation station, Dubuque, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

Alliant Energy's Dubuque generation station is a fine example of why small does not mean insignificant in the power generation industry. This winner of the EUCG best performer award in the small plant category shows that its operating excellence towers over that of many larger and much newer coal-fired power plants. The plant has three operating units with boilers originally designed for Illinois basin coal but now Powder River Basin coal makes up 75% of the coal consumed. The boilers can also burn natural gas. 4 photos.

Peltier, R.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)  

SciTech Connect

The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Hannah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

CX-000708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Technology Laboratory Installation of publicly-accessible compressed natural gas (CNG) refueling infrastructure. The station will allow for CNG vehicles to refuel. Selected...

488

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

489

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs are important to our nation's future because they can: * Play an important role in our portfolio of sustainable transportation options * Provide a cost-competitive, appealing alternative for drivers * Reduce dependence on imported oil and diversify energy sources for transportation * Enable global economic leadership and job growth. Offering a Sustainable Transportation Option Americans have tremendous freedom to travel wherever and whenever they want. Ninety percent of travel in the United States is achieved by automobiles that refuel quickly