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1

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov...

4

Production of low-cost hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed effort is to verify at the laboratory scale, the ability of the MTCI indirectly heated fluid-bed gasifier to economically produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from liquefaction by-product streams and from char produced in mild gasification processes. Specifically, the proposed effort is aimed at developing an experimental technology data base by defining the process characteristics that would be required for process integration into an overall liquefaction system. This would result in substantial decreases in the cost of hydrogen for the production of competitively priced coal-derived liquid fuels. During this quarter, shakedown tests of the reactor were completed. Subbituminous coals from Black Thunder mine and Eagle Butte mine were obtained for use in mild gasification to produce char. During the initial shakedown tests, it was determined that a new pulse combustor was needed. A pulse combustor with a large aerovalve was fabricated and tested. Three shakedown tests with limestone as the fluid-bed medium were carried out at temperature from 1450{degree}F to 1550{degree}F.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Low-cost process for hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Bauer, Hans F. (Morgantown, WV); Grimes, Robert W. (Laramie, WY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Low-cost process for hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

Ruth, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

10

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2024 Date: September 19, 2012 2024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 24, 2012 Item: Hydrogen produced and dispensed in distributed facilities at high-volume refueling stations using current technology and DOE's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 projected prices for industrial natural gas result in a hydrogen levelized cost of $4.49 per gallon-gasoline-equivalent (gge) (untaxed) including compression, storage and dispensing costs. The hydrogen production portion of this cost is $2.03/gge. In comparison, current analyses using low-cost natural gas with a price of $2.00 per MMBtu can decrease the hydrogen levelized cost to $3.68 per gge (untaxed) including

11

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-51726 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

12

Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional variation in energy and capital costs. Although we estimate substantial reductions in H{sub 2} costs over time, our cost estimates are generally higher than the cost goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) hydrogen program. The result of our analysis, in particular, demonstrates that there may be substantial variation in H{sub 2} costs between regions: as much as $2.04/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE) by the time FCVs make up one-half of all light-vehicle sales in the GYOW scenario (2035-2040) and $1.85/GGE by 2050 (excluding Alaska). Given the assumptions we have made, our analysis also shows that there could be as much as a $4.82/GGE difference in H{sub 2} cost between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas by 2050 (national average). Our national average cost estimate by 2050 is $3.68/GGE, but the average H{sub 2} cost in metropolitan areas in that year is $2.55/GGE and that in non-metropolitan areas is $7.37/GGE. For these estimates, we assume that the use of natural gas to produce H{sub 2} is phased out. This phase-out reflects the desire of DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (OHFCIT) to eliminate reliance on natural gas for H{sub 2} production. We conducted a sensitivity run in which we allowed natural gas to continue to be used through 2050 for distributed production of H{sub 2} to see what effect changing that assumption had on costs. In effect, natural gas is used for 66% of all distributed production of H{sub 2} in this run. The national average cost is reduced to $3.10/GGE, and the cost in non-metropolitan areas is reduced from $7.37/GGE to $4.90, thereby reducing the difference between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas to $2.35/GGE. Although the cost difference is reduced, it is still substantial. Regional differences are similarly reduced, but they also remain substantial. We also conducted a sensitivity run in which we cut in half our estimate of the cost of distributed production of H{sub 2} from electrolysis (our highest-cost production method). In this run, our national average cost estimate is reduced even further, to

Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional variation in energy and capital costs. Although we estimate substantial reductions in H{sub 2} costs over time, our cost estimates are generally higher than the cost goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) hydrogen program. The result of our analysis, in particular, demonstrates that there may be substantial variation in H{sub 2} costs between regions: as much as $2.04/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE) by the time FCVs make up one-half of all light-vehicle sales in the GYOW scenario (2035-2040) and $1.85/GGE by 2050 (excluding Alaska). Given the assumptions we have made, our analysis also shows that there could be as much as a $4.82/GGE difference in H{sub 2} cost between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas by 2050 (national average). Our national average cost estimate by 2050 is $3.68/GGE, but the average H{sub 2} cost in metropolitan areas in that year is $2.55/GGE and that in non-metropolitan areas is $7.37/GGE. For these estimates, we assume that the use of natural gas to produce H{sub 2} is phased out. This phase-out reflects the desire of DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (OHFCIT) to eliminate reliance on natural gas for H{sub 2} production. We conducted a sensitivity run in which we allowed natural gas to continue to be used through 2050 for distributed production of H{sub 2} to see what effect changing that assumption had on costs. In effect, natural gas is used for 66% of all distributed production of H{sub 2} in this run. The national average cost is reduced to $3.10/GGE, and the cost in non-metropolitan areas is reduced from $7.37/GGE to $4.90, thereby reducing the difference between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas to $2.35/GGE. Although the cost difference is reduced, it is still substantial. Regional differences are similarly reduced, but they also remain substantial. We also conducted a sensitivity run in which we cut in half our estimate of the cost of distributed production of H{sub 2} from electrolysis (our highest-cost production method). In this run, our national average cost es

Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Status Production Energy Efficiency % 72 70 Storage, Compression, Dispensing Efficiency Total Hydrogen Costs Hydrogen Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By 2012, develop and demonstrate distributed reforming technology for producing hydrogen from bio-oil at $3.80/kilogram (kg) purified hydrogen. By 2011, develop a prototype that incorporates the key operations: bio-oil injection, catalytic autothermal reforming, water-gas shift, and hydrogen isolation. Develop the necessary understanding of process chemistry, bio-oil compositional effects, catalyst chemistry, and deactivation and regeneration strategy to form a basis for process definition for automated distributed reforming to meet the DOE targets. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, demonstrate the process of auto-thermal reforming of bio-oil including a longterm catalyst performance, yields of hydrogen, and mass balances. Using a bench-scale reactor system, demonstrate catalytic conversion consistent with $3.80/kg hydrogen.

Richard French; Michael Penev; Rick Farmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

16

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cost Analysis of a Concentrator Photovoltaic Hydrogen Production System  

SciTech Connect

The development of efficient, renewable methods of producing hydrogen are essential for the success of the hydrogen economy. Since the feedstock for electrolysis is water, there are no harmful pollutants emitted during the use of the fuel. Furthermore, it has become evident that concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems have a number of unique attributes that could shortcut the development process, and increase the efficiency of hydrogen production to a point where economics will then drive the commercial development to mass scale.

Thompson, J. R.; McConnell, R. D.; Mosleh, M.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydrogen production plants using electrolytic cells with low cost electrodes built into pressure tanks  

SciTech Connect

Electrolytic production method of generating hydrogen gas is briefly reviewed and critical components of electrolytic hydrogen production plants are listed. These components are then discussed and recommended approaches and arrangements cited. Recommended arrangement would be operated at moderate temperatures and gas pipe line pressures. A hypothetical 150 MW Hydrogen Plant is described, including estimates of cost and performance. Comments are made in regard to several possible generating systems which might be used to power hydrogen production plants. A comprehensive energy policy is appended.

Hall, F.F.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Coal Using Preliminary Assumptions 2-15 2.5.1 Approach to Cost Estimating 2-16 2.5.2 Production Costs (Operation and Maintenance) 2-16 2.5.3 Consumables 2-17 2.5.4 Byproduct...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12001: H2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 Date: May 14, 2012 01 Date: May 14, 2012 Title: H 2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment Originator: Scott Weil, Sara Dillich, Fred Joseck, and Mark Ruth Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: December 14, 2012 Item: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the untaxed cost of hydrogen (H 2 ) (produced, delivered, and dispensed) at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a $/mile basis with competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. As established in Record 11007 [1], this cost ranges from $2.00-$4.00/gge a of H 2 (based on $2007). The threshold cost can be apportioned into its constituent H 2 production and delivery costs, which can then serve as the respective cost targets for multi-year planning of the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT)

22

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

23

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant technical progress has been made over the last decade to develop efficient processes for upgrading coal resources to distillable hydrocarbons which may be used to displace petroleum-derived fuels. While several different direct coal liquefaction routes are under investigation, each of them have in common the need for large quantities of hydrogen to convert the aromatic coal matrix to liquid products in the normal distillation range, and for hydrotreating to improve liquid product quality. In fact, it has been estimated that the production, recovery, and efficient use of hydrogen accounts for over 50 percent of the capital cost of the liquefaction facility. For this reason, improved methods for producing low-cost hydrogen are essential to the operating economics of the liquefaction process. This Final Report provides an assessment of the application of the MTCI indirect gasification technology for the production of low-cost hydrogen from coal feedstocks. The MTCI gasification technology is unique in that it overcomes many of the problems and issues associated with direct and other indirectly heated coal gasification systems. Although the MTCI technology can be utilized for producing hydrogen from almost any carbonaceous feedstock (fossil, biomass and waste), this report presents the results of an experimental program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center, to demonstrate the production of hydrogen from coal, mild gasification chars, and liquefaction bottoms.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

26

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

29

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

30

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

31

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen-from- Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting Laurel, Maryland Tuesday, November 6, 2007 H 2 Gen Innovations, Inc. Alexandria, Virginia www.h2gen.com 2 Topics * H 2 Gen Reformer System Innovation * Natural Gas Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Ethanol Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Questions from 2007 Merit Review 3 H 2 Gen Innovations' Commercial SMR * Compact, low-cost 115 kg/day natural gas reformer proven in commercial practice [13 US Patents granted] * Built-in, unique, low-cost PSA system * Unique sulfur-tolerant catalyst developed with Süd Chemie 4 DOE Program Results * Task 1- Natural Gas Reformer Scaling:

32

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government interests, a variety of vendors, and numerous utilities. Keywords: Hydrogen production, natural gas, costs Purpose Assess progress toward the 2005 DOE Hydrogen...

33

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

34

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculate: Power Law Cost Scaling Actual Single Unit Capital Cost Estimate 500 unityear production costs with progress ratios Estimate Cost Using Power Law Cost Scaling 7 The H 2...

35

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capital costs and improving efficiency have lead to substantially improved electrolysis production costs compared to DOE's H2A assessment of 2005 technology costs (forecourt...

36

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

37

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

[Production of low-cost hydrogen]. Technical progress report, October 1992--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed effort is to verify, at the laboratory scale, the ability of the MTCI indirectly heated fluid-bed gasifier to economically produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from liquefaction byproduct streams and from char produced in mild gasification processes. An important objective of the proposed effort is to provide a process data base that can be utilized by the AMOCO Corporation in evaluating the design and economics of an integrated liquefaction process which employs the MTCI gasifier for hydrogen production. The AMOCO Corporation has offered to provide this effort at no cost to MTCI or the government. Their participation in the project is an important element in verifying the economics of an indirectly heated gasifier to meet the overall program objective of reducing the cost of direct liquefaction processes. During this period, gasification tests on SRC residue were completed and testing of a preoxidized caking coal was initiated. The oxidation process substantially reduced the free-swelling index (FSI) and by recycling the carbon to the gasifier, the efficiency of the process was also increased. All of the planned testing has been completed and the system analysis initiated.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A1-46612 September 2009 Technical Report Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, NREL/TP-6A1-46612 Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, September 2009 and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Prepared under Task No. HS07.1002 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

40

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production from Renewables...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 1998 DOE Hydrogen Program Review. Keywords: Technoeconomic analysis; hydrogen production; costs; hydrogen storage; renewable Purpose To determine technical and economic...

44

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

45

Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

47

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

48

Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

Amos, W. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

50

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Impact of Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Energy Markets Project ID: 99 Principal Investigator: Harry Vidas Keywords: Hydrogen production; hydrogen supply; infrastructure; costs Purpose This project addresses the...

51

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Dispenser Delivery and Installation Cost Hydrogen Cost Natural GasNatural Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Production Volume StorageNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High -pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Economics of hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the current interest in hydrogen (H/sub 2/) centers around its potential to displace oil and gas as a fuel. The results of this study should be useful to research and development managers making funding decisions, and they should also be of interest to energy analysts, economists, and proponents of a hydrogen economy. We examined the current costs of H/sub 2/ produced by commercially available technologies (from fossil fuels and by electrolysis) and projected these costs to 2010, to set cost goals for H/sub 2/ produced via new technologies. We also examined the sensitivity of H/sub 2/ costs to varying energy price forecasts, capital costs and the required rate of return on investment, and by-product credits. We find that conventionally produced H/sub 2/ will not break into the fuel market before 2010. 23 references, 19 figures, 12 tables.

Gaines, L.L.; Wolsky, A.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

55

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

56

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

57

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

58

Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to ?-Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

Eric W. McFarland

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform Robert B. Bollinger and Timothy M. Aaron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Process Design The process used for this program will be a steam methane reformer (SMR) with a PSA. The overall goal of the program is to develop an on-site hydrogen generation system, based on steam methane re Natural Gas & Steam to Reformer Burner Stack Gases Condensate To Drain Reformer: CH4+H2O => CO+CO2+H2

60

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Electrolytic Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Principal Investigator Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Materials. Storage Respondents submitted additional needs for R&D in the area of hydrogen storage: Advanced metal alloys in order to lower the cost of hydrogen...

62

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost...

63

Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report documents the engineering and cost characteristics of four PEC hydrogen production systems selected by DOE to represent canonical embodiments of future systems.

64

FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production R&D Hydrogen Production R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts

65

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

66

Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

Ali T-Raissi

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,Year 2006 UCDITSRR0604 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Water electrolysis vs. thermochemical production of hydrogen: a parametric assessment  

SciTech Connect

A general discussion of hydrogen production by electrolytic and thermochemical processes is presented. A hydrogen production cost computation and cost sensitivity data for the various production methods are reported. (LK)

Salzano, F.J.; Braun, C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

70

Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

72

Sustainable hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

74

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 5030: Hydrogen Baseline Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kg of hydrogen) .56 Production unit energy efficiency 70% Compression electricity consumption (kWhrkg of hydrogen) 2.9 Total system energy efficiency 65% Feedstock and Utility...

75

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Photobiological Hydrogen Production from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Project ID: 110 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are

76

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Storage Systems TIAX LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2390 Tel. 617- 498-5000 Fax 617-498-7200 www.TIAXLLC.com Reference:...

77

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Production Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Model Project Summary Full Title: H2A Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis Model Project ID: 219 Principal Investigator: Todd Ramsden Brief Description: The H2A Production...

78

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices. ManyTable 3-6: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from7: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from Stations

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices. ManyTable 3-6: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 3-7: Electricity Production/ Control Cost Summary from

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

H2A Hydrogen Production Analysis Tool (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analyses Darlene Steward, NREL H2A Overview * Discounted cash flow analysis tool for production of hydrogen from various feedstocks - Inputs are; * Capital costs * Operating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5035: Cost Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Date: May 22, 2006 Title: Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas 2003 - 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Approval Date: May 22, 2006 Item...

83

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last quarter, we continued to optimize procedures for producing free-standing, defect free films using rigid silicon and glass substrates. A strong correlation was observed between sputter power and formation of defects (pinholes) in the film; i.e., lower power, and correspondingly lower deposition rate, results in a lower defect density. Films less than 1 {micro}m-thick have been successfully released from both silicon and glass substrates although the minimum thickness for pinhole-free films over a 4-inch diameter disc is still on the order of 3-4 {micro}m. Results from hydrogen permeation testing over the last quarter have shown a marked increase in membrane performance primarily due to proper alloy composition and pre-treatment procedures. As an example, the hydrogen flux at 400 C and 20 psi trans-membrane pressure, for a 5 {micro}m-thick membrane, was 120 cm{sup 3} (STP)/cm{sup 2} min. The productivity of this membrane exceeds the 2015 DOE Fossil Energy targets. Hydrogen permeability was calculated to be 2.0 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s {center_dot} cm Hg{sup 0.5}. Permeation tests were then repeated on a sibling membrane sample and the measured hydrogen flow rate at 400 C and 20 psi was 58 cm{sup 3} (STP)/min. Although lower than the flow rate of the first sample, the hydrogen flow rate increased to 175 cm{sup 3} (STP)/min after two oxidation treatments. Finally, with the attendance of John Shen and the rest of the program team members at the IdaTech facility in Bend, OR, we presented an overview of program activities. Subsequently, we prepared detailed written responses to John Shen's questions with regard to technical feasibility, maturity, scale-up and commercialization potential in comparison to competing hydrogen separation methods such as pressure swing absorption and ionic conducting membranes.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production The simplest and most common element, hydrogen is all around us, but always as a compound with other elements. To make it usable in fuel cells or otherwise provide energy, we must expend energy or modify another energy source to extract it from the fossil fuel, biomass, water, or other compound in which it is found. Nearly all hydrogen production in the United States today is by steam reformation of natural gas. This, however, releases carbon dioxide in the process and trades one relatively clean fuel for another, with associated energy loss, so it does little to meet national energy needs. Hydrogen can also be produced by electrolysis-passing an electrical current through water to break it into hydrogen and oxygen-but electrolysis is inefficient and is only as clean

85

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

Saur, G.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study  

SciTech Connect

This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

Saur, G.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â??bottom-upâ? costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA?® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

Saur, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Project ID: 207 Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Keywords: Hydrogen storage; costs Purpose The purpose of this analysis is to help guide researchers and developers toward promising R&D and commercialization pathways by evaluating the various on-board hydrogen storage technologies on a consistent basis. Performer Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140 Telephone: 617-498-6108 Email: lasher.stephen@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: Matt Hooks, TIAX, LLC; Mark Marion, TIAX, LLC; Kurtis McKenney, TIAX, LLC; Bob Rancatore, TIAX, LLC; Yong Yang, TIAX, LLC Sponsor(s) Name: Sunita Satyapal

90

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Distributed Hydrogen Production via Steam Methane Reforming Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed...

91

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project ID:...

92

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen byPhotovolta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Project ID: 132 Principal Investigator: DL Block Purpose Compare the cost of hydrogen produced using photo electric chemical systems to the cost of hydrogen...

93

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropo

94

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hydrogen and Electricity for Hydrogen and Electricity Project Summary Full Title: Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity Project ID: 274 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Brief Description: Retail capital costs for infrastructure for advanced vehicles are compared on a per mile basis. Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; electricity; costs; Performer Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov Website: http://www.nrel.gov Additional Performers: Michael Penev, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCP Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Website: http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov

95

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural residues, in the near-term time frame (~three years) and at a comparable cost to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction with high value co-products. Activated carbon can be made from agricultural residues in a two- stage process: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio-

96

Low-cost hydrogen sensors: Technology maturation progress  

SciTech Connect

The authors are developing a low-cost, solid-state hydrogen sensor to support the long-term goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program to encourage acceptance and commercialization of renewable energy-based technologies. Development of efficient production, storage, and utilization technologies brings with it the need to detect and pinpoint hydrogen leaks to protect people and equipment. The solid-state hydrogen sensor, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is potentially well-suited to meet cost and performance objectives for many of these applications. Under a cooperative research and development Agreement and license agreement, they are teaming with a private company, DCH Technology, Inc., to develop the sensor for specific market applications related to the use of hydrogen as an energy vector. This report describes the current efforts to optimize materials and sensor performance to reach the goals of low-cost fabrication and suitability for relevant application areas.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Rogers, J.E.; Lauf, R.J.; Egert, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Haberman, D.P. [DCH Technology, Inc., Sherman Oaks, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify issues, barriers, and research and development needs for biological hydrogen production to enable hydrogen production that meets cost goals. Proceedings 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Final Report Presentations Introductory Session Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

98

Market Potential of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production in Three Northeastern Utilities' Service Territories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be potentially cheaper than bottled industrial hydrogen. But in the Northeast, expensive electrolyzers, costly electricity, high interest rates, and excess hydrogen production capacity at existing plants make electrolytic hydrogen less attractive than bottled hydrogen.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Costs of Storing and Transporting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project ID: 114 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose An...

100

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economics and market potential of hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to evaluate the economics of producing hydrogen from coal and from water and to assess the market potential for this hydrogen in chemical and fuel applications. Results of this study are summarized. Current chemical applications of hydrogen in manufacturing ammonia and methanol, in refining petroleum and in specialty uses provide a base market for penetration by new hydrogen production technologies, although prospects for the use of hydrogen in fuel applications remain unclear. Electrolysis and coal gasification will be complementary, not competitive, technologies for producing hydrogen. Coal gasification plants are better suited to production of large quantities of hydrogen, while electrolyzers are better suited to the production of hydrogen for small-scale uses. Hydrogen produced through coal gasification may be economical in chemical applications (e.g., ammonia production) by the late 1990's. Development programs now underway are expected to provide new coal gasification technologies with lower first costs and higher efficiencies than current technologies. An on-site coal gasification plant supplying hydrogen in the quantities usually required in chemical applications (from 10 to 100 million cubic feet per day) will be smaller than is generally proposed for syngas plants. Growth in smaller scale specialty uses of hydrogen and improvements in the technology for electrolysis will create conditions favorable to expanded use of hydrogen produced through water electrolysis. The major constraint on use of electrolysis will be the availability of low cost electricity. Shortages of natural gas caused by declining domestic production could induce shifts to producing hydrogen through electrolysis or through coal gasification earlier in time (i.e., the late 1980's or early 1990's) than is suggested by comparative cost calculations alone.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Economics and market potential of hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

A study was undertaken to evaluate the economics of producing hydrogen from coal and from water and to assess the market potential for this hydrogen in chemical and fuel applications. Results of this study are summarized. Current chemical applications of hydrogen in manufacturing ammonia and methanol, in refining petroleum and in specialty uses provide a base market for penetration by new hydrogen production technologies, although prospects for the use of hydrogen in fuel applications remain unclear. Electrolysis and coal gasification will be complementary, not competitive, technologies for producing hydrogen. Coal gasification plants are better suited to production of large quantities of hydrogen, while electrolyzers are better suited to the production of hydrogen for small-scale uses. Hydrogen produced through coal gasification may be economical in chemical applications (e.g., ammonia production) by the late 1990's. Development programs now underway are expected to provide new coal gasification technologies with lower first costs and higher efficiencies than current technologies. An on-site coal gasification plant supplying hydrogen in the quantities usually required in chemical applications (from 10 to 100 million cubic feet per day) will be smaller than is generally proposed for syngas plants. Growth in smaller scale specialty uses of hydrogen and improvements in the technology for electrolysis will create conditions favorable to expanded use of hydrogen produced through water electrolysis. The major constraint on use of electrolysis will be the availability of low cost electricity. Shortages of natural gas caused by declining domestic production could induce shifts to producing hydrogen through electrolysis or through coal gasification earlier in time (i.e., the late 1980's or early 1990's) than is suggested by comparative cost calculations alone.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen using a steam methane reformer (SMR). The SMR is1.7 kg/h $99,000 Steam methane reformer 100 kg/day 4.2 kg/hyes yes yes a. Steam methane reformer cost, compressor cost,

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project Summary Full Title: Production of Hydrogen by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project ID: 91 Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; photovoltaic (PV) Purpose To evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. Performer Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Organization: Florida Solar Energy Center Address: 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Telephone: 321-638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu Sponsor(s) Name: Michael Ashworth Organization: Florida Energy Office Name: Neil Rossmeissl Organization: DOE/Advanced Utilities Concepts Division Name: H.T. Everett Organization: NASA/Kennedy Space Center Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

105

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents Producing Hydrogen...1 Hydrogen Production Technologies ...3 Challenges and Research Needs...4 Technology...

106

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies  

SciTech Connect

The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last quarter, we developed procedures for producing free-standing, defect free films using rigid silicon and glass substrates over areas up to 12 square inches. Since formation of contiguous Pd-Cu films in the 2-3 {micro}m-thick range is ultimately governed by the size of the particle contamination on the supporting substrate surface, we have adopted techniques utilized by the semiconductor industry to reduce and eventually eliminate particle contamination. We have found these techniques to be much more effective on rigid substrates and have made a down select decision on removal methods (a key milestone) based on these results and the performance of membranes fabricated by this technique. The path to fabricating even larger membranes is straightforward and will be demonstrated in the coming months. Hydrogen permeation tests were also conducted this quarter on as-deposited, Pd-Cu membranes, between 6-14 {micro}m-thick. In the case of a 6 {micro}m-thick film, the pure hydrogen flux at 20 psig and {approx}260 C was 36 cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2} min. This flux corresponds to a pure hydrogen permeability of 7.4 {center_dot} 10{sup -5} cm{sup 3} cm cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} cm Hg{sup -1/2} at 250 C. This value is within 20% of the pure hydrogen permeability at 250 C reported in the McKinley patent. In the case of a 14 {micro}m-thick membrane tested at 350 C, the pure hydrogen flux, measured before initiating a pinhole-size leak, was 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -5} cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s {center_dot} cm Hg{sup 0.5}. This value is considerably lower than the expected permeability of Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} materials at 400 C. To date, essentially all of the sputtered deposited Pd-Cu thin film membranes have had palladium compositions that were as much as 3% greater than the ideal 60 weight percent composition (this is a direct consequence of sputtering from a 60/40, Pd/Cu alloy target). As the concentration of Pd is increased beyond the optimum 60% value, a less desirable two-phase structure forms at the higher temperatures (in this case, above 260-280 C). As we continue development of procedures for producing thinner Pd-Cu films next quarter, we will also be optimizing alloy composition and corresponding hydrogen permeation flux as well.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Small-scale costs of hydrogen derived from ammonia. [As ammonia  

SciTech Connect

A systems study was made to assess the economic prospects for using purchased industrial ammonia as a hydrogen distribution and storage medium for users requiring 33 to 330 million std ft/sup 3/ per year (MSCFY) of hydrogen (or 0.1 to 1.0 MSCFD) at a plant capacity factor of 0.9. Projected costs to the end user were determined for the dissociated ammonia product (75 vol % hydrogen, 25 vol % nitrogen), and for ultra-high-purity hydrogen (99.999%) obtained by separation of the nitrogen. Costs were also projected for hydrogen produced by steam-reforming of natural gas, for electrolytic hydrogen, and for purchased (merchant) liquid hydrogen. The costs of ammonia and its hydrogen, and liquid hydrogen made by ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), are also listed for comparison. The latter costs from a recent study were updated to include more realistic (higher) hydrogen purification costs. All of the costs, expressed as 1980 $/MBTU in 1990, were obtained for two sets of forecast energy prices on the basis that advanced technology electrolyzers and OTEC products would be available in 1990. Results of the analysis showed that merchant liquid hydrogen was substantially higher in cost than all of the other options. Although hydrogen derived from industrial ammonia was significantly higher in cost than electrolytic hydrogen or hydrogen derived from OTEC ammonia, it can be produced using state-of-the-art technology. Possible reductions in the total cost of obtaining hydrogen via ammonia could make it lower in cost than electrolytic hydrogen. Hydrogen produced from natural gas was lowest in cost, among the land-based sources, for plant sizes exceeding 100 MSCFY. Other comparisons are provided, including the cost of ammonia made from coal. The criteria and methodology applied in the study are described. Uses of the product hydrogen are suggested along with recommendations for future work.

Strickland, G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The economics of biological methods of hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The costs to produce and utilize hydrogen are extremely high per unit of energy when compared to fossil fuel energy sources such as natural gas or gasoline. The cheapest hydrogen production approaches today are also the ...

Resnick, Richard J. (Richard Jay), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past quarter, no technical work has been completed and a ''no cost'' time extension was requested and granted to allow IdaTech time to complete task 5 relating to the testing of prototype membrane modules. The scheduled completion date is now October 31, 2007.

K. Coulter

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past quarter, no technical work has been completed and two ''no cost'' time extensions have been requested and granted to allow Idatech time to complete Task 5 relating to the testing of prototype membrane modules. The scheduled completion date of April 7, 2007 has been confirmed by Idatech.

K. Coulter

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last quarter, new procedures were developed and implemented to improve reliability and repeatability of release characteristics from the temporary substrate (i.e., silicon wafer) and to minimize through-thickness defects in a 6-inch diameter film, 3 microns in thickness. With the new procedures, we have been able to consistently produce essentially stress free films, with zero or minimal defects (less than 5) across a 6-inch diameter area. (It is important to note that for those films containing pinholes, a procedure has been developed to repair the pinholes to form a gas tight seal). The films are all within the identified tolerance range for composition (i.e., 60 {+-} 0.2 % Pd). A number of these films have subsequently been shipped to IdaTech for evaluation and integration into their test module. Colorado School of Mines continued their high temperature evaluation of 6 micron thick, sputtered Pd-Cu films. Pure hydrogen permeability increased up to 400 C while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and dropped once the temperature increased to over 450 C. Above this temperature, as confirmed by the binary phase diagram, the film transforms into either a mixed {alpha}/{beta} or pure {alpha} phase. The same trend was observed for a baseline 25 micron-thick foil (from Wilkinson) where the pure hydrogen permeability increased with temperature while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and then decreased upon transformation to the {alpha} phase.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A1-46612 September 2009 Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution...

115

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past quarter, significant progress has been made in optimize the deposition and release characteristics of ultrathin (less than 4 micron) membranes from rigid silicon substrates. Specifically, we have conducted a series of statistically designed experiments to examine the effects of plasma cleaning and compliant layer deposition conditions on the stress, release and pinhole density of membranes deposited on 4 inch and 6 inch round substrates. With this information we have progressed to the deposition and release of ultra-thin membranes from 12-inch diameter (113 sq. in.) rigid substrates, achieving a key milestone for large-area membrane fabrication. Idatech received and is beginning preparations to test the Pd alloy membranes fabricated at SwRI the previous quarter. They are currently evaluating alternate gasketing methods and support materials that will allow for effective sealing and mounting of such thin membranes. David Edlund has also recently left Idatech and Bill Pledger (Chief Engineer) has replaced him as the primary technical point of contact. At Idetech's request a small number of additional 16 sq. in, samples were provided in a 2 in. by 8 in. geometry for use in a new module design currently under development. Recent work at the Colorado School of Mines has focused on developing preconditioning methods for thin Pd alloy membranes (6 microns or less) and continuing tests of thin membranes produced at SwRI. Of particular note, a 300-hour short-term durability study was completed over a range of temperatures from 300-450 C on a foil that showed perfect hydrogen selectivity throughout the entire test. With a 20 psi driving force, pure hydrogen flow rates ranged from 500 to 700 cc/min. Calculated at DOE specified conditions, the H{sub 2} flux of this membrane exceeded the 2010 Fossil target value of 200 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.

J. Arps

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past quarter, we have conducted additional characterization and permeation tests on different Pd alloy membranes including PdCuTa ternary alloy materials. We attempted to address some discrepancies between SwRI{reg_sign} and CSM relating to PdCu stoichiometry by preparing a range of PdCu membranes with compositions from {approx}58-65 at% Pd (bal. Cu). While some difficulties in cutting and sealing these thin membranes at CSM continue, some progress has been made in identifying improved membrane support materials. We have also completed an initial cost analysis for large-scale vacuum deposition and fabrication of thin Pd ally membranes and project that the process can meet DOE cost targets. Minimal progress was made in the past quarter relating to the testing of prototype membrane modules at Idatech. In the past quarter Idatech was acquired by a UK investment firm, which we believe may have impacted the ability of key technical personnel to devote sufficient time to support this effort. We are hopeful their work can be completed by the end of the calendar year.

J. Arps; K. Coulter

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In continuation of efforts from last quarter, processing parameters, used in the formation of Pd-Cu alloy films, were being optimized in a drum (web) coater system with the goal of producing large-area, contiguous, pinhole-free films for H{sub 2} separation membranes. Since the (pre-treatment) functionality of the surface of the plastic backing material is sub-optimal, they tended to produce films in the drum coater that were either not contiguous (disseminates upon release from the polymer backing material) or contain pinholes. Alternative approaches, such as direct deposition onto thermally oxidized silicon wafers, have been attempted to yield pinhole-free films; i.e., formation of a poorly adherent Pd-Cu film on silicon will then directly release from the silicon substrate. Permeation characteristics of a 25 {micro}m-thick, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} alloy foil were conducted. After pre-treating the sample to stabilize the FCC {beta}-phase, the hydrogen permeability was determined to be 5.4 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 3} cmcm{sup -2}s{sup -1}cm Hg{sup -1/2}. Thin, 1-3 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu alloy films have been prepared on PS films and samples will be prepared and tested in the next quarter.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Liwei Xu (Primary Contact) 1 , Anke E. Abken 2 , William B. Ingler 3 , John Turner 4 1 Midwest Optoelectronics LLC (MWOE) 2801 W. Bancroft Street Mail Stop 230 Toledo, OH 43606 Phone: (419) 215-8583 Email: xu@mwoe.com 2 Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight) 3 University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (UT) 4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (NREL) DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-05GO15028 Subcontractors: * Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH * University of Toledo, Toledo, OH * National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

120

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermochemical water splitting; fuel cell vehicles Inputs: Description: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Units: kWh Models Used: GREET Version 1.7; H2A Production Model Version...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -COST ESTIMATES.

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic analysis indicates that hydrogen could be produced for $3.79 per gge at an electricity cost of $0.05/kWh by the lower-cost PEM electrolyzer developed in this project, assuming high-volume production of large-scale electrolyzer systems.

Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}) has utilized its expertise in large-area vacuum deposition methods to conduct research into the fabrication of dense, freestanding Pd-alloy membranes that are 3-5 microns thick and over 100 in{sup 2} in area. The membranes were deposited onto flexible and rigid supports that were subsequently removed and separated using novel techniques developed over the course of the project. Using these methods, the production of novel alloy compositions centered around the Pd-Cu system were developed with the objective of producing a thermally stable, nano-crystalline grain structure with the highest flux recorded as 242 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a 2 {micro}m thick Pd{sub 53}Cu{sub 47} at 400 C and 20 psig feed pressure which when extrapolated is over twice the 2010 Department of Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target. Several membranes were made with the same permeability, but with different thicknesses and these membranes were highly selective. Researchers at the Colorado School of Mines supported the effort with extensive testing of experimental membranes as well as design and modeling of novel alloy composite structures. IdaTech provided commercial bench testing and analysis of SwRI-manufactured membranes. The completed deliverables for the project include test data on the performance of experimental membranes fabricated by vacuum deposition and several Pd-alloy membranes that were supplied to IdaTech for testing.

K. Coulter

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

Iouri Balachov, PhD

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

127

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity dierences at the rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of rms with dierent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing rms. We nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across rm productivity. The evidence we nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Farias; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Table 4 Storage andHydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 4100 Hydrogen tube-trailer Compressed hydrogen storage

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

131

Fusion energy for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

135

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity announcement of the cost shared feasibility studies of nuclear energy based production of hydrogen using available technology. The objective of this activity is to select and conduct project(s) that will utilize hydrogen production equipment and nuclear energy as necessary to produce data and analysis on the economics of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants More Documents & Publications https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/E67E46185A67EBE68 Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - hDE-FOA-0000092.rtf

136

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets U.S. Energy Markets Presented to: Presented to: DOE Hydrogen Transition DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Analysis Workshop Washington DC Washington DC January 26, 2006 January 26, 2006 Prepared by: Prepared by: E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory AZ CA Project Scope Project Scope * Focus will be on competition between hydrogen production and distribution technologies with respect to hydrogen fuel demand, technology cost, regional mix, and impact on feedstock prices. * Evaluate impacts on U.S. energy markets including price

137

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

140

Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual design studies have been carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO/sub 3/ decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs. Both public and private utility financing approaches have been used to obtain hydrogen production costs of $12-14/GJ based on July 1980 dollars.

Krikorian, O.H.; Brown, L.C.

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems Hydrogen Infrastructure Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems More Documents & Publications Quadrennial...

142

Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting 11/06/2007 Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols Sugars and Sugar Alcohols * * Problem: Problem: Need Need to develop renewable to develop renewable hydrogen production technologies using hydrogen production technologies using diverse diverse feedstocks feedstocks 10 15 20 CH 4 : C 6 H 14 ln(P) * * Description: Description: The BioForming The BioForming TM TM process uses process uses aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, including glycerol and sugars. The key including glycerol and sugars. The key breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that

143

Nuclear-Renewables Energy System for Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Geoffrey Haratyk; Charles W. Forsberg

144

Technoeconomic Evaluation of Large-Scale Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale production of electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen could increase use of baseload and off-peak surplus power. To be competitive, however, water electrolysis will require low-cost electricity.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storing and transporting hydrogen. Golden, CO: NREL; 1998. [V. Survey of the economics of hydrogen technologies. Golden,liquid or gaseous form. Hydrogen can be produced from a va-

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013: Hydrogen Delivery Cost Projections - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3013 Date: September 26, 2013 3013 Date: September 26, 2013 Title: H 2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 Originator: E. Sutherland, A. Elgowainy and S. Dillich Approved by: R. Farmer and S. Satyapal Date: December 18, 2013 Item: Reported herein are past 2005 and 2011 estimates, current 2013 estimates, 2020 projected cost estimates and the 2015 and 2020 target costs for delivering and dispensing (untaxed) H 2 to 10%- 15% of vehicles within a city population of 1.2M from a centralized H 2 production plant located 100 km from the city gate. The 2011 volume cost estimates are based on the H2A Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) V2.3 projections and are employed as the basis for defining the cost and technical targets of delivery components in Table 3.2.4 in the 2012 Delivery

147

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09242008FCTT Review Sep2008.ppt 2008 TIAX LLC Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications Jayanti Sinha Stephen Lasher Yong Yang Peter...

148

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced hydrogen storage systems could also be a cost competitive alternative to pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage (CAES) under certain circumstances. Context: As...

149

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass -- Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. Hydrogen has the potential to be a clean alternative to the fossil fuels currently used in the transportation sector. This is especially true if the hydrogen is manufactured from renewable resources, primarily sunlight, wind, and biomass. Analyses have been conducted to assess the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via two thermochemical processes: (1) gasification followed by reforming of the syngas, and (2) fast pyrolysis followed by reforming of the carbohydrate fraction of the bio-oil. This study was conducted to update previous analyses of these processes in order to include recent experimental advances and any changes in direction from previous analyses. The systems examined were gasification in the Battelle/FERCO low pressure indirectly-heated gasifier followed by steam reforming, gasification in the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) high pressure direct-fired gasifier followed by steam reforming, and pyrolysis followed by coproduct separation and steam reforming. In each process, water-gas shift is used to convert the reformed gas into hydrogen, and pressure swing adsorption is used to purify the product. The delivered cost of hydrogen, as well as the plant gate hydrogen selling price, were determined. All analyses included Latin Hypercube sampling to obtain a detailed sensitivity analysis.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.; Amos, W. A.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

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3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

151

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production costs ... is to propose a minimum cost production plan to satisfy the demand...

152

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -Appendix A: Summary of Cost Estimates for 10 Station Types

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

154

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass feedstock price Units: million Btu Supporting Information: LHV Description: Electricity price Units: kWh Description: Hydrogen fill pressure Units: psi Description:...

155

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen using a steam methane reformer (SMR). The SMR isElectrolyzer Steam methane reformer Methanol reformer

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY. The ''Hydrogen Economy'' will reduce petroleum imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, current commercial hydrogen production processes use fossil fuels and releases carbon dioxide. Hydrogen produced from nuclear energy could avoid these concerns. The authors have recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-splitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen and to select one for further detailed consideration. The authors selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle, In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this paper.

SCHULTZ,KR; BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; HAMILTON,CJ

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...  

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(FCT) Program, within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy * (EERE), is developing technologies for distributed and centralized renewable production of hydrogen....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen (H2) Co-Production...  

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Integrated with Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Project Summary Full Title: Thermodynamic, Economic, and Environmental Modeling of Hydrogen (H2) Co-Production Integrated...

162

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems … Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 9017 Date: July 02, 2010 Title: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters Originators: Robert C. Bowman and Ned Stetson Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: August 10, 2010 This record summarizes the current technical assessments of hydrogen (H 2 ) storage system capacities and projected manufacturing costs for the scenario of high-volume production (i.e., 500,000 units/year) for various types of "on-board" vehicular storage systems. These analyses were performed within the Hydrogen Storage sub-program of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Item: It is important to note that all system capacities are "net useable capacities" able to be delivered to the

163

Hydrogen Production: Fundamentals and Case Study Summaries (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes hydrogen production fundamentals and case studies, including hydrogen to wind case studies.

Harrison, K.; Remick, R.; Hoskin, A.; Martin, G.

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap  

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Production Production Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Hydrogen Production Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

165

Nuclear hydrogen : an assessment of product flexibility and market viability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear energy has the potential to play an important role in the future energy system as a large-scale source of hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions. Thus far, economic studies of nuclear hydrogen tend to focus on the levelized cost of hydrogen without accounting for the risks and uncertainties that potential investors would face. We present a financial model based on real options theory to assess the profitability of different nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. The model uses Monte Carlo simulations to represent uncertainty in future hydrogen and electricity prices. It computes the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from nuclear hydrogen production plants. Moreover, the model quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production, depending on what is more profitable to sell. We use the model to analyze the market viability of four potential nuclear hydrogen technologies and conclude that flexibility in output product is likely to add significant economic value for an investor in nuclear hydrogen. This should be taken into account in the development phase of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

Botterud, A.; Yildiz, B.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps (syngas generation, shift conversion and hydrogen purification) necessary for hydrogen production for this process option. O2 H2 air N.G. + Steam Hydrogen H2-depleted syngas OTM Reactor HTM Reactor syngas Figure 1- gas. A portion of natural gas also reacts with steam to form syngas. Additional hydrogen is formed

167

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

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PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

168

Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 7:40 PM To: Gopstein, Avi (S4) Subject: Hydrogen Infrastructure Latest Advancements Attachments: Air Products Written Comments to 2011 2012 AB118 Investment Plan.pdf Follow Up Flag: Follow up Flag Status: Flagged Categories: QTR Transparency Avi, You may recall we met in DC when the McKinsey team from Germany came to discuss the EU study on hydrogen infrastructure. At that time I mention a significant advance in infrastructure that would be announced soon. Attached is our testimony to the California Energy Commission on deploying that technology. We were awarded the project to build 9 stations in southern California with the backing of

169

The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The announcement of a hydrogen fuel initiative in the Presidents 2003 State of the Union speech substantially increased interest in the potential for hydrogen to play a major role in the nations long-term energy future. Prior to that event, DOE asked the National Research Council to examine key technical issues about the hydrogen economy to assist in the development of its hydrogen R&D program. Included in the assessment were the current state of technology; future cost estimates; CO2 emissions; distribution, storage, and end use considerations; and the DOE RD&D program. The report provides an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel in the nations future energy economy and describes a number of important challenges that must be overcome if it is to make a major energy contribution. Topics covered include the hydrogen end-use technologies, transportation, hydrogen production technologies, and transition issues for hydrogen in vehicles.

Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: DOE H2A Production Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filling-station) facilities. Required input to the models includes capital and operating costs for the hydrogen production process, fuel type and use, and financial parameters...

171

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost  

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have developed two alternative strategies for detecting impurities in the hydrogen used in fuel cells. Both yield highly accurate results and use simpler, less costly equipment. As the United States gradually ...

172

System for thermochemical hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

1981-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Materials for Hydrogen Production, Separation, and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Materials in Clean Power Systems VII: Clean Coal-, Hydrogen ... and Fuel Cells: Materials for Hydrogen Production, Separation, and Storage .... Mixed Conducting Molten Salt Electrolyte for Na/NiCl2 Cell: Tannaz Javadi1;...

174

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

Greenbaum, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Infrastructure Options Analysis January 26, 2006 Brian D. James Julie Perez Peter Schmidt (703) 243 - 3383 Brian_James@DirectedTechnologies.com Directed Technologies, Inc. Page 1 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Agenda 1. Project Description and Objective 2. Team Members 3. Approach 4. Model Theory, Structure and Assumptions 5. Model Description 1. Logic 2. Features 3. Cost Components (Production, Delivery & Dispensing) 6. Los Angeles Transitional Example 7. Model Flexibility Page 2 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Team Members & Interactions Start: May 2005 (effective) End: Summer 2007 * Directed Technologies, Inc.- Prime * Sentech, Inc., Research Partner * Air Products, Industrial Gas Supplier * Advisory Board * Graham Moore, Chevron Technology Ventures

176

USE OF THE MODULAR HELIUM REACTOR FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A significant ''Hydrogen Economy'' is predicted that will reduce our dependence on petroleum imports and reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels, but contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels. The author has recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-slitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen, and to select one for further detailed consideration. They selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this report.

SCHULTZ,KR

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Middle East Production Costs - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Persian Gulf Oil Production Capacity and Development Cost Forecast (without additional development to replace production) Based on Low-Case Weighted Average

178

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the natural gas reformer station. Station 4: On-sitereforming of natural gas at the station b. MeOH 100 (case 3)cost of natural gas at the station is much lower (roughly

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam generators (SG),steam turbines(T), generators andawith the costs of modern steam turbine generator plants forSteam generators Remote maintenance equipment Turbine plant

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of Low-cost Hydrogen Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research was aimed at understanding and improving the speed and reproducibility of our resistive hydrogen sensor, along with complementary efforts in manufacturability and further design improvements. Maskworks were designed to allow for the printing and firing of multi-sensor layouts (15 per substrate) and a large batch of these sensors was produced using standard thick-film manufacturing lines. Piece-to-piece variations of both the as-made resistance and the response of these sensors to hydrogen were within acceptable tolerances, and the sensor design has now been released for commercial prototyping. Automated testing was begun in order to develop long-term performance data. Dynamic response of selected sensors was measured before and after exposures to methane, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon monoxide, in order to assess the effects of interference gases and surface poisoning. As expected, H{sub 2}S degrades the sensor somewhat, whereas CH{sub 4} and CO do not create significant interference when air is present.

Lauf, R.J.

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Materials for Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the .... and plastic deformations in the crack tip energy rate formulate.

182

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this photoelectrochemical hydrogen research project is defined by multijunction photoelectrode concepts for solar-powered water splitting, with the goal of efficient, stable, and economic operation. From an initial selection of several planar photoelectrode designs, the Hybrid Photoelectrode (HPE) has been identified as the most promising candidate technology. This photoelectrode consists of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) junction and a solid-state photovoltaic (PV) junction. Immersed in aqueous electrolyte and exposed to sunlight, these two junctions provide the necessary voltage to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The efficiency of the conversion process is determined by the performance of the PEC- and the PV-junctions and on their spectral match. Based on their stability and cost effectiveness, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and tungsten oxide (WO3) films have been studied and developed as candidate semiconductor materials for the PEC junction (photoanode). High-temperature synthesis methods, as reported for some high-performance metal oxides, have been found incompatible with multijunction device fabrication. A low-temperature reactive sputtering process has been developed instead. In the parameter space investigated so far, the optoelectronic properties of WO3 films were superior to those of Fe2O3 films, which showed high recombination of photo-generated carriers. For the PV-junction, amorphous-silicon-based multijunction devices have been studied. Tandem junctions were preferred over triple junctions for better stability and spectral matching with the PEC junction. Based on a tandem a-SiGe/a-SiGe device and a tungsten trioxide film, a prototype hybrid photoelectrode has been demonstrated at 0.7% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency. The PEC junction performance has been identified as the most critical element for higher-efficiency devices. Research into sputter-deposited tungsten trioxide films has yielded samples with higher photocurrents of up to 1.3 mA/cm2. An improved a-Si/aSi tandem device has been demonstrated that would provide a better voltage match to the recently improved WO3 films. For a hybrid photoelectrode based on these component devices the projected STH efficiency is 1.3%. For significant efficiency enhancements, metal oxide films with increased optical absorption, thus lower bandgap, are necessary. Initial experiments were successful in lowering the WO3 bandgap by nitrogen doping, from 3.0 eV to 2.1 eV. Optimizing the electronic properties of these compounds, or other reduced-bandgap materials such as Fe2O3, is the most immediate challenge. As the photocurrent levels of the PEC junction are improved, increasing attention will have to be paid to the matching PV junction.

Miller, E.L.; Marsen, B.; Paluselli, D.; Rocheleau, R.

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrogen production from microbial strains  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

185

Redirection of metabolism for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

This project is to develop and apply techniques in metabolic engineering to improve the biocatalytic potential of the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris for nitrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen gas production. R. palustris, is an ideal platform to develop as a biocatalyst for hydrogen gas production because it is an extremely versatile microbe that produces copious amounts of hydrogen by drawing on abundant natural resources of sunlight and biomass. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, such as R. palustris, generate hydrogen and ammonia during a process known as biological nitrogen fixation. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase and normally consumes nitrogen gas, ATP and electrons. The applied use of nitrogenase for hydrogen production is attractive because hydrogen is an obligatory product of this enzyme and is formed as the only product when nitrogen gas is not supplied. Our challenge is to understand the systems biology of R. palustris sufficiently well to be able to engineer cells to produce hydrogen continuously, as fast as possible and with as high a conversion efficiency as possible of light and electron donating substrates. For many experiments we started with a strain of R. palustris that produces hydrogen constitutively under all growth conditions. We then identified metabolic pathways and enzymes important for removal of electrons from electron-donating organic compounds and for their delivery to nitrogenase in whole R. palustris cells. For this we developed and applied improved techniques in 13C metabolic flux analysis. We identified reactions that are important for generating electrons for nitrogenase and that are yield-limiting for hydrogen production. We then increased hydrogen production by blocking alternative electron-utilizing metabolic pathways by mutagenesis. In addition we found that use of non-growing cells as biocatalysts for hydrogen gas production is an attractive option, because cells divert all resources away from growth and to hydrogen. Also R. palustris cells remain viable in a non-growing state for long periods of time.

Harwood, Caroline S.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Assessment of methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. The results of this work can be used to guide future work in the application of concentrated solar energy to hydrogen production. Specifically, the objectives were to: (1) determine the cost of hydrogen produced from methods that use concentrated solar thermal energy, (2) compare these costs to those of hydrogen produced by electrolysis using photovoltaics and wind energy as the electricity source. This project had the following scope of work: (1) perform cost analysis on ambient temperature electrolysis using the 10 MWe dish-Stirling and 200 MWe power tower technologies; for each technology, sue two cases for projected costs, years 2010 and 2020 the dish-Stirling system, years 2010 and 2020 for the power tower, (2) perform cost analysis on high temperature electrolysis using the 200 MWe power tower technology and projected costs for the year 2020, and (3) identify and describe the key technical issues for high temperature thermal dissociation and the thermochemical cycles.

Glatzmaier, G. [Peak Design, Evergreen, CO (United States); Blake, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Showalter, S. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Project ID: 282 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Brief Description: Analysis involves estimating energy resources required to support part of the demand generated by 100 million fuel cell electric vehicles in 2040. Performer Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-3836 Email: marc.melaina@nrel.gov Website: http://www.nrel.gov/ Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/FCTO Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Website: http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/ Period of Performance Start: October 2009 Project Description

188

Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

Ramrez Muoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Tasios Melis, UC Berkeley 24-Jan-2011 1 UCB-Melis 2 CO 2 H 2 O Photosynthesis Photons H 2 HC O 2 , Biomass Feedstock and products...

190

Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a "nonequilibrium" plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show-that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a nonequilibrium'' plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a ``nonequilibrium`` plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

198

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements

199

Ceramic Membranes for Hydrogen/Oxygen Production - Energy ...  

Hydrogen separation technology is integral to successful fossil-based hydrogen production ... a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide made by ...

200

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12021: Cost Projections...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: November 28, 2012 Item: Delivery costs associated with distributed production refueling station functions, Compression,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

202

Benefits and Costs of Hydrogen Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processor Herbaceous Biomass Woody Biomass Petroleum Natural Gas Flared Gas Natural Gas #12;Production/Compression Pathways Gaseous H2 Liquid H2 Centralized Decentralized Electricity Methanol Flared Gas Landfill Gas Are Key Steps for Gaseous H2 NA NG Recovery (97.5%) Compressed G.H2 at Refueling Stations LNG Gasification

Argonne National Laboratory

203

Survey quantifies cost of organic milk production in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this survey, production costs for California organicsuch as higher production and feed costs, lowered veterinarya comprehensive dairy cost production survey, which involves

Butler, Leslie J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cathode for electrolytic production of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A cathode for use in the electrochemical production of hydrogen and a process for making it which involves direct electrochemical cathodic action on a thermally produced adherent oxide on a nickel cathode surface are disclosed. Examples include a nickel sheet thermally oxidized in air at 600/sup 0/ C. for one hour and used directly in the production of electrolytic hydrogen and an iron sheet plasma sprayed with nickel to provide a surface containing thermal oxidation product of nickel and again used directly in the electrolytic production of hydrogen.

Hall, D.E.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Wind from Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 216 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via distributed water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

206

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 214 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via centralized water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

207

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

208

Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantums then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel systems performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of smart tanks that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of Cool Fuel technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

Mark Leavitt

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Table H1. Estimated Hydrogen Production by Business Sector Business Sector Annual Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2007, roughly 9 million metric tons per year of hydrogen was produced in the U.S. 1 in a variety of ways. This production results in about 60 million metric tons of CO2 emissions each year. Table H1 provides estimates of U.S. hydrogen production for the various business sectors. Merchant hydrogen is consumed at sites other than where it is produced. Captive hydrogen (e.g., hydrogen produced at oil refineries, ammonia, and methanol plants) is consumed at the site where it is produced. This technical support document assumes that CO2 emissions associated with captive hydrogen production facilities are included as part of the GHG emissions from the industry producing those other chemical products (e.g., ammonia, petroleum products, and methanol), and therefore this document is focused on merchant hydrogen production.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hydrogen Production from Carbohydrates: A Mini-Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Hydrogen Production from Carbohydrates: A Mini-Review Y.-H. Percival Zhang *,1,2,3 1 Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA * Tel: 540-231-7414. Fax: 540-231-7414. Email: ypzhang@vt.edu. The hydrogen economy promises a clean energy future featuring higher energy utilization ef ciency and fewer pollutants compared to liquid fuel/internal combustion engines. Hydrogen production from the enriched low-cost biomass carbohydrates would achieve nearly zero carbon emissions in a whole life cycle. In this book chapter, we present latest advances of hydrogen generation from biomass carbohydrates by chemical catalysis (e.g., gasi cation,

211

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

SciTech Connect

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessment of Natural Gas Splitting with a Concentrating Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production via thermal decomposition of methane using a solar reactor is analyzed for two different applications: (1) for a fueling station and (2) for power production. For the fueling station, the selling price of hydrogen is controlled by the high cost of hydrogen storage and compression, combined with storage limitations of the system, which prevents maximum hydrogen production. Two alternate scenarios to lower the hydrogen production cost are evaluated: (1) sending the hydrogen directly to a pipeline network and (2) adding a small electric heater, which provides heat to the solar reactor when the hydrogen supply is low. For power production, the economics of two options for the carbon produced from the solar process are evaluated: (1) selling the carbon black and (2) burning the carbon to produce more power.

Spath, P. L.; Amos, W. A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Production of hydrogen from alcohols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing hydrogen from ethanol or other alcohols. The alcohol, optionally in combination with water, is contacted with a catalyst comprising rhodium. The overall process is preferably carried out under autothermal conditions.

Deluga, Gregg A. (St. Paul, MN); Schmidt, Lanny D. (Minneapolis, MN)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

distributed production facilities have relatively low delivery costs, but the hydrogen production costs are likely to be higher-lower volume production means higher equipment...

218

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5040: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 Date: December 12, 2008 40 Date: December 12, 2008 Title: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 19, 2008 Item: The 2005 cost status for hydrogen produced from distributed water electrolysis is $5.90 / gge. Assumptions and References: The H2A analysis used to determine the projected cost of $5.88/gge (rounded up to $5.90/gge) was performed by Directed Technologies, Inc. and can be found in Record 5040a. The increase in cost compared to the 2004 analysis ($5.45/gge) is due to two assumptions changed in the model: (a) an increase in the industrial electricity price from 5¢/kWh to 5.5¢/kWh from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook, and (b) an increase in the capital cost estimate of the electrolyzer. The other assumptions in the analysis used standard values

219

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Alternate Hydrogen Production In the Alternate Production technology pathway, clean syngas from coal is converted to high-hydrogen-content liquid...

220

Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Program II.G Hydrogen Production and Delivery Biological Melis - University of California, Berkeley G G G G G Introduction The goal of the research is to generate green...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meet

222

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production January 24, 2011 Webinar Q&A Q: How do you induce hypoxic photosynthesis? I imagine you N-stress, to accumulate starch...

223

The transition to hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and infrastructure requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range with emissions below one-tenth the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being considered in California as Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicles. These vehicles can also be manufactured with increased but not excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining optimized engines and other advanced components, the overall vehicle efficiency should approach 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to the 3.1 cents/km U.S. vehicle operators pay today while using conventional automobiles. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Ramback, G.D.; Smith, J.R.

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

225

Hydrogen Production Using the Modular Helium Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-temperature characteristics of the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for the production of hydrogen using either thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Using heat from the MHR to drive a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical hydrogen process has been the subject of a DOE sponsored Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (NERI) project lead by General Atomics, with participation from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Texas A&M University. While the focus of much of the initial work was on the S-I thermochemical production of hydrogen, recent activities have also included development of a preconceptual design for an integral HTE hydrogen production plant driven by the process heat and electricity produced by a 600 MWt MHR. This paper describes RELAP5-3D analyses performed to evaluate alternative primary system cooling configurations for the MHR to minimize peak reactor vessel and core temperatures while achieving core helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900 oC to 1000 oC, needed for the efficient production of hydrogen using either the S-I thermochemical or HTE process. The cooling schemes investigated are intended to ensure peak fuel temperatures do not exceed specified limits under normal or transient upset conditions, and that reactor vessel temperatures do not exceed ASME code limits for steady-state or transient conditions using standard LWR vessel materials. Preconceptual designs for both an S-I thermochemical and HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a 600 MWt MHR at helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900 oC to 1000 oC are described and compared. An initial SAPHIRE model to evaluate the reliability, maintainablility, and availability of the S-I hydrogen production plant is also discussed, and plans for future assessments of conceptual designs for both a S-I thermochemical and HTE hydrogen production plant coupled to a 600 MWt modular helium reactor are described.

E. A. Harvego; S. M. Reza; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydrogen production using ammonia borane  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

228

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Deployment System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

routine to determine the layout of a least-cost infrastructure. Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; costs; fuel cells Purpose Initially, electrolytic H2 production...

229

Engineering aspects of hydrogen production from photosynthetic bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Certain photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), for example, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, evolve hydrogen when placed in an anaerobic environment with light and a suitable organic substrate. An engineering effort to use such bacteria for large-scale hydrogen production from sunlight is described. A system to produce 28,000 m/sup 3//day (1 x 10/sup 6/ ft/sup 3//day) of hydrogen has been designed on a conceptual level and includes hydrogen cleanup, substrate storage, and waste disposal. The most critical component in the design is the solar bacterial reactor. Several designs were developed and analyzed. A large covered pond concept appears most attractive. Cost estimates for the designs show favorable economics.

Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

231

Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOEs high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying the potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the candidate membrane performance under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit will be constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the design of this unit was completed. The unit will be capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The membranes to be tested will be in disc form with a diameter of about 3 cm. By operating at higher temperatures and higher hydrogen partial pressures, we expect to demonstrate commercially relevant hydrogen flux, 10 {approx} 50 cc/min/cm{sup 2}, from the membranes made of the perovskite type of ceramic material. The construction of the unit is planned to be completed by the end of the next reporting period.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Wind: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine the cost of using wind energy to produce hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel. This analysis assumes that a market exists for 50,000 kg of hydrogen per day produced from wind at the wind site; only production costs to the front gate are included, no delivery or dispensing costs are included. Three different scenarios are examined: near term, which represents 2005 currently available technology; mid term, which represents technological improvements and price reductions in the next 5-10 years; and long term, which is representative of the best technology gains and price reductions surmised by industry at this point, and represents the next 10-25 years.

Levene, J. I.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of efficient photoreactors for solar hydrogen production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of hydrogen evolution from a photocatalytic process depends not only on the activity of a photocatalyst, but also on photoreactor design. Ideally, a photoreactor should be able to absorb the incident light, promoting photocatalytic reactions in an effective manner with minimal photonic losses. There are numerous technical challenges and cost related issues when designing a large-scale photoreactor for hydrogen production. Active stirring of the photocatalyst slurry within a photoreactor is not practical in large-scale applications due to cost related issues. Rather, the design should allow facile self-mixing of the flow field within the photoreactor. In this paper two types of photocatalytic reactor configurations are studied: a batch type design and another involving passive self-mixing of the photolyte. Results show that energy loss from a properly designed photoreactor is mainly due to reflection losses from the photoreactor window. We describe the interplay between the reaction and the photoreactor design parameters as well as effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. We found that a passive self-mixing of the photolyte is possible. Furthermore, the use of certain engineering polymer films as photoreactor window materials has the potential for substantial cost savings in large-scale applications, with minimal reduction of photon energy utilization efficiency. Eight window materials were tested and the results indicate that Aclar trademark polymer film used as the photoreactor window provides a substantial cost saving over other engineering polymers, especially with respect to fused silica glass at modest hydrogen evolution rates. (author)

Huang, Cunping; Yao, Weifeng; T-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, Fl 32922-5703 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) & assume steam generation efficiency Subtract estimated electricity use for printing (when no pulp & paper energy use data available) Calculate the ratio of estimated energy use & BAT-based best case 256 #12 distortions, regulation and plant systems optimisation Future technologies focus on black liquor gasification

239

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and reserach needs and next steps

240

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

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241

Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for Tuesday, November 6, 2007 Location: BCS Incorporated, 8929 Stephens Road, Laurel, MD. 20723 410-997-7778 8:30 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast 9:00 DOE Targets, Tools and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI, Brian James 10:00 Research Review o Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production Systems, H2Gen, Sandy Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar

242

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

243

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station Storage Storage Cost $500/kg Natural gas feedstocknatural gas steam methane reforming (SMR) includes hydrogen production and storagefor storage, distribution or use H 2 Natural gas Figure 3

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN); Mattingly, Susan M. (State College, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Measurement of Hydrogen Production Rate Based on Dew Point Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MP-150-42237 U. S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program Measurement of Hydrogen Production Rate Based on Dew Point Temperatures National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole...

247

Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mattingly, S.M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of Low Cost Sensors for Hydrogen Safety Applications  

SciTech Connect

We are developing rugged and reliable hydrogen safety sensors that can be easily manufactured. Potential applications also require an inexpensive sensor that can be easily deployed. Automotive applications demand low cost, while personnel safety applications emphasize light-weight, battery-operated, and wearable sensors. Our current efforts involve developing and optimizing sensor materials for stability and compatibility with typical thick-film manufacturing processes. We are also tailoring the sensor design and size along with various packaging and communication schemes for optimal acceptance by end users.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Holmes, W., Jr.; Lauf, R.J.; Maxey, L.C.; Salter, C.; Walker, D.

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia) and magnesium oxide. We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Market potential of electrolytic hydrogen production in three northeastern utilities' service territories. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study develops a method for exploring the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen. The service areas of three northeastern utilities - Public Service Electric and Gas, Niagara Mohawk, and Northeast Utilities - are examined, and results reported on the effort to locate specialty hydrogen users, determine patterns of hydrogen utilization, and assess the possibility of satisfying this hydrogen demand by electrolytic hydrogen from advanced electrolyzers. Hydrogen users were sought in six major product categories: chemicals, pharmaceuticals, oils, metals, electronics and float glass. Identification of users through appropriate standard industrial classification codes served as a basis for locating possible users in each of the service areas. Mailed questionnaires sought information on hydrogen demand, characteristics of hydrogen use, present hydrogen supply costs, and factors that would influence the purchase of an electrolyzer. In the three utility service areas examined, electrolytic hydrogen can be expected to have limited success competing with merchant hydrogen. Specific hydrogen users may be found whose location with respect to the source of merchant hydrogen may put electrolytic hydrogen at an economic advantage. Reduction in electrolyzer plant costs may be necessary to expand the possibilities for electrolysis. Annual power requirements for current potential demand for electrolytic hydrogen in three utilities was estimated at 140 x 10/sup 6/ kWh, which could expand to 240 x 10/sup 6/ kWh in ten years.

Fein, E.; Edwards, K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method for the continuous production of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

Getty, John Paul (Knoxville, TN); Orr, Mark T. (Kingsport, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Nonlinear Generalized Additive Error Model of Production and Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additive Error Model of Production and Cost by Quirino ParisError Model of Production and Cost Quirino Paris* UniversityAdditive Error Model of Production and Cost I. Introduction

Paris, Quirino; Caputo, Michael R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Efficient Estimates of a Model of Production and Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of a Model of Production and Cost by Quirino ParisEstimates of a Model of Production and Cost Quirino Paris*Estimates of a Model of Production and Cost I. Introduction

Paris, Quirino; Caputo, Michael R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar-thermochemical production of hydrogen from water  

SciTech Connect

There is a widespread interest in the development of a ''hydrogen economy'' as an eventual solution to many of the problems associated with the growing energy crisis. Hydrogen is also valuable as a chemical intermediate. As fossil sources become inadequate, large scale hydrogen production must utilize energy sources such as solar energy for the decomposition of water by thermochemical cycles, electrolysis or perhaps, by a hybrid combination of these methods. The potential higher efficiency and lower cost for thermochemical methods, versus the overall electrolysis path has been rather widely recognized. The criteria for the selection of an appropriate thermochemical cycle for matching with a high temperature solar heat source are detailed. Advantages of a thermochemical cycle based on a solid sulfate decomposition that makes use of isothrmal high temperature energy is detailed and a plan for the implementation of such a cycle on a central tower solar receiver is given.

Cox, K.E.; Bowman, M.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the unit has been fully commissioned and is operational. The unit is capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. A double-seal technique has been developed and tested successfully to achieve leak-tight seal for the membranes. Initial data for a commercial Palladium-Gold membrane were obtained at temperatures to 450 C and pressures to 13 atm. Tests for the perovskite membranes are being performed and the results will be reported in the next quarter. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The results from the simulation work confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen. The presence of steam in the permeate side can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%. When the steam partial pressure is greater than 1 atm, the hydrogen flux becomes independent of the steam pressure.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermochemical production of hydrogen: reality, not myth  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis of the hybrid sulfuric acid cycle shows that a specific thermochemical process for hydrogen production from water can compete successfully with conventional and advanced electrolytic processes. A generalization to the contrary, based on computer-generated thermochemical cycles, is misleading and erroneous.

Cox, K.E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen. The cathode comprises an active surface consisting of a metal oxide obtained by the thermal decomposition of a thermally decomposable compound of a metal chosen from amongst cobalt, iron, manganese or nickel. The cathode is particularly suitable for the electrolysis of aqueous sodium chloride solutions in cells with a permeable diaphragm.

Nicolas, E.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

Synfuel (hydrogen) production from fusion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A potential use of fusion energy for the production of synthetic fuel (hydrogen) is described. The hybrid-thermochemical bismuth-sulfate cycle is used as a vehicle to assess the technological and economic merits of this potential nonelectric application of fusion power.

Krakowski, R.A.; Cox, K.E.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H2 WGS H2 operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate ­ 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900°C Equivalent O2 Operational Experience Under High Pressure Differential SUMMARY OF ELTRON OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE SYNGAS

262

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

263

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

264

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5038: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Date: May 22, 2006 8 Date: May 22, 2006 Title: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006 Originator: Patrick Davis & Steve Chalk Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Approval Date: May 22, 2006 Item : Lower the cost of hydrogen from natural gas to be competitive on a cents per mile basis with conventional gasoline vehicles. Supporting Information: The results of a 2003 economic analysis were used to estimate the cost of hydrogen produced from distributed natural gas reforming at $5 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (gge) (See U.S. DOE Record 5030: Hydrogen Baseline Cost of $5 per gge in 2003; available at http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/program_records). Since the original analysis, DOE-sponsored R&D has resulted in significant cost reductions,

265

System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322C and 750C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cost of heliostats in low volume production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study indicates that in small volumes, heliostats can be produced at an installed cost of approximately 200 $/M/sup 2/ for a 49.053 m/sup 2/ heliostat. Initial one-time costs of $10 to $15 million would be required, although part of the one-time costs are recoverable. This study provides estimated costs of heliostats that are produced in a plant operating on a continuous basis for a period of four years at a production rate of 2,500 heliostats per year. This scenario was selected somewhat arbitrarily as a scenario that could lead to heliostat market of 5,000 to 10,000 units per year.

Drumheller, K.; Williams, T. A.; Dilbeck, R. A.; Allison, G. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Chemical Looping for Combustion and Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ChemiCal looping for Combustion and ChemiCal looping for Combustion and hydrogen produCtion Objective The objective of this project is to determine the benefits of chemical looping technology used with coal to reduce CO 2 emissions. Background Chemical looping is a new method to convert coal or gasified coal to energy. In chemical looping, there is no direct contact between air and fuel. The chemical looping process utilizes oxygen from metal oxide oxygen carrier for fuel combustion, or for making hydrogen by "reducing" water. In combustion applications, the products of chemical looping are CO 2 and H 2 O. Thus, once the steam is condensed, a relatively pure stream of CO 2 is produced ready for sequestration. The production of a sequestration ready CO 2 stream does not require any additional separation units

268

Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R&D approach, which involved the rapid down-selection of a large number of options (chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4}) to a smaller, more manageable number. The research began by conducting an extensive review of the technical and patent literature to identify all possible options. The down-selection was based on evaluation of the options against a set of metrics, and to a large extent occurred before experimentation was initiated. Given the vast amount of literature and patents that has evolved over the years, this approach helped to focus efforts and resources on the options with the highest technical and commercial probability of success. Additionally, a detailed engineering analysis methodology was developed for conducting the cost and energy-efficiency calculations. The methodology utilized a number of inputs and tools (Aspen PEA{trademark}, FCHTool, and H2A). The down-selection of chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4} identified three options that were subsequently pursued experimentally. Metal reduction of borate was investigated in Dow's laboratories, research on electrochemical routes to NaBH{sub 4} was conducted at Pennsylvania State University, and Idaho National Laboratory researchers examined various carbothermal routes for producing NaBH{sub 4} from borate. The electrochemical and carbothermal studies did not yield sufficiently positive results. However, NaBH{sub 4} was produced in high yields and purities by an aluminum-based metal reduction pathway. Solid-solid reactive milling, slurry milling, and solution-phase approaches to metal reduction were investigated, and while both reactive milling and solution-phase routes point to fully recyclable processes, the scale-up of reactive milling processes to produce NaBH{sub 4} is expected to be difficult. Alternatively, a low-cost solution-phase approach to NaBH{sub 4} has been identified that is based on conventional process unit operations and should be amenable to scale-up. Numerous advances in AB synthesis have been made in recent years to improve AB yields and purities

Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

University of Central Florida

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Renewable hydrogen production by photosynthetic water splitting  

SciTech Connect

This mission-oriented research project is focused on the production of renewable hydrogen. The authors have demonstrated that certain unicellular green algae are capable of sustained simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by light-activated photosynthetic water splitting. It is the goal of this project to develop a practical chemical engineering system for the development of an economic process that can be used to produce renewable hydrogen. There are several fundamental problems that need to be solved before the application of this scientific knowledge can be applied to the development a practical process: (I) maximizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into hydrogen energy, (2) development of oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase-containing mutants, and (3) development of bioreactors that can be used in a real-world chemical engineering process. The authors are addressing each of these problems here at ORNL and in collaboration with their research colleagues at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Hawaii. This year the authors have focused on item 1 above. In particular, they have focused on the question of how many light reactions are required to split water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5012a: Well-to-Wheels Analyses for Solar and Wind Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 5012a Date: December 21, 2005 Title: Well-to-Wheels Analyses for Solar & Wind Hydrogen Production Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 6, 2006 Item: This record explains the basis for the differences between the analyses of well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions conducted via Argonne National Laboratory's GREET Model, cited in the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress, 1 and those conducted by the National Research Council, cited in the report The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs. 2 Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Argonne National

272

Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

Steward, D. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs CNG = compressed natural gas CPUC = California PublicNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High -pressure hydrogen compressor CompressedNatural gas Air Burner air blower Steam methane reformer (SMR) & pressure shift adsorption reactor (PSA) Compressed

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs CNG = compressed natural gas CPUC = California PublicNatural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen H2 Purifier High-pressure hydrogen compressor CompressedNatural gas Air Burner air blower Steam methane reformer (SMR) & pressure shift adsorption reactor (PSA) Compressed

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method of production of pure hydrogen near room temperature from ...  

The present invention provides a cost-effective method of producing pure hydrogen gas from hydride-based solid materials. The hydride-based solid material is ...

277

Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. The most cost-effective hydrogen tower design would use substantially all of its volume for hydrogen storage and be designed at its crossover pressure. An 84-m tall hydrogen tower for a 1.5-MW turbine would cost an additional $84,000 (beyond the cost of the conventional tower) and would store 950 kg of hydrogen. The resulting incremental storage cost of $88/kg is approximately 30% of that for conventional pressure vessels.

Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

Stephen Schey

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit will be constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the mechanical construction of the permeation unit was completed. Commissioning and shake down tests are being conducted. The unit is capable of operation at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The membranes to be tested will be in disc form with a diameter of about 3 cm. Operation at these high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures will demonstrate commercially relevant hydrogen flux, 10{approx}50 cc/min/cm{sup 2}, from the membranes made of the perovskite type of ceramic material. Preliminary modeling was also performed for a tubular membrane reactor within a gasifier to estimate the required membrane area for a given gasification condition. The modeling results will be used to support the conceptual design of the membrane reactor.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Mike Roberts; Francis Lau

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

282

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

283

Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Startech Hydrogen Production Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The assigned work scope includes the modification and utilization of the Plasma Converter System, Integration of a StarCell{trademark} Multistage Ceramic Membrane System (StarCell), and testing of the integrated systems towards DOE targets for gasification and membrane separation. Testing and evaluation was performed at the Startech Engineering and Demonstration Test Center in Bristol, CT. The Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) Characterize the performance of the integrated Plasma Converter and StarCell{trademark} Systems for hydrogen production and purification from abundant and inexpensive feedstocks; (2) Compare integrated hydrogen production performance to conventional technologies and DOE benchmarks; (3) Run pressure and temperature testing to baseline StarCell's performance; and (4) Determine the effect of process contaminants on the StarCell{trademark} system.

Startech Engineering Department

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Apparatus for production of hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for the production of hydrogen peroxide is described, the apparatus comprising: (A) an electrolytic cell comprising; (I) a chamber filled with an electrolyte solution; (II) an anode; (III) a cathode; (IV) means for generating a current between the anode and cathode; and (V) a barrier separating the cell into an anodic and a cathodic compartment; (B) high surface area elements carrying a surface derivatized quinone catalyst which is capable of undergoing reduction upon immersion in the cathodic compartment of the electrolytic cell; (C) means for separating the elements from the electrolytic cell upon reduction; and (D) a production chamber wherein the separated reduced elements can react with oxygen in an aqueous environment to produce hydrogen peroxide.

Wrighton, M.S.; Buchanan, R.M.; Calabrese, G.S.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Production economics for hydrogen, ammonia, and methanol during the 1980--2000 period  

SciTech Connect

Refinery hydrogen, ammonia, and methanol, the principal industrial hydrogen products, are now manufactured mainly by catalytic steam reforming of natural gas or some alternative light-hydrocarbon feed stock. Anticipated increases in the prices of hydrocarbons are expected to exceed those for coal, thus gradually increasing the incentive to use coal gasification as a source of industrial hydrogen during the 1980 to 2000 period. Although the investment in industrial hydrogen plants will exceed those for reforming by a factor of 2 or more, coal gasification will provide lower production costs (including 20%/y before tax return) for methanol manufacture in the early 1980's and for ammonia 5 years or so later. However, high costs for transporting coal to major refining centers will make it difficult to justify coal gasification for refinery hydrogen production during the 1980 to 2000 period. By the year 2000, 40 to 50% of the U.S. industrial hydrogen requirements will be provided by coal gasification thus conserving natural gas and light hydrocarbon feed stocks equivalent to about 600,000 B/D of crude oil. Electrolytic hydrogen production costs will be reduced by improved electrolysis technology such as the solid-polymer-electrolyte process. These improved processes will reduce electrolysis plant investments by a factor of 2 or more and reduce electricity requirements by about 20%. Although the production cost, including return for electrolytic hydrogen, will continue to exceed those for reforming and coal gasification, the use of electrolytic hydrogen will be attractive for many small users when the new technology is available in the early 1980's. Electrolytic hydrogen now about 0.7% of total U.S. industrial hydrogen requirements will probably increase to about 1.2% of the total by the year 2000.

Corneil, H G; Heinzelmann, F J; Nicholson, E W.S.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the holy grails of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Assessment of Fuel Cell Cars, Massachusettselectric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of PowerTransition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the Potential

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Hydrogen Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

290

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

291

The role of biomass in California's hydrogen economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility decreases the production costs through economies ofet al. , 2003). The production cost of biomass hydrogencurrent technology production cost of hydrogen at $4.63/kg

Parker, Nathan C; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Hydrogen permeation data for several perovskite membranes BCN (BaCe{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (SrCe{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar in this project. However, it is known that the cerate-based perovskite materials can react with CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the stability issue of the proton conducting perovskite materials under CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S environments was examined. Tests were conducted in the Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit for powder and disk forms of BCN and SCE. Perovskite materials doped with zirconium (Zr) are known to be resistant to CO{sub 2}. The results from the evaluation of the chemical stability for the Zr doped perovskite membranes are presented. During this reporting period, flowsheet simulation was also performed to calculate material and energy balance based on several hydrogen production processes from coal using high temperature membrane reactor (1000 C), low temperature membrane reactor (250 C), or conventional technologies. The results show that the coal to hydrogen process employing both the high temperature and the low temperature membrane reactors can increase the hydrogen production efficiency (cold gas efficiency) by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Using either high temperature or low temperature membrane reactor process also results in an increase of the cold gas efficiencies as well as the thermal efficiencies of the overall process.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Production by Fermentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Production by Fermentation H2 Production by Fermentation Project Summary Full Title: Boundary Analysis for H2 Production by Fermentation Project ID: 70 Principal Investigator: Tim Eggeman Keywords: Hydrogen production; pressure swing adsorption (PSA); glucose; costs; fermentation Performer Principal Investigator: Tim Eggeman Organization: Neoterics International Address: 2319 S. Ellis Ct. Lakewood, CO 80228 Telephone: 303-358-6390 Email: time@NeotericsInt.com Sponsor(s) Name: Roxanne Garland Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Telephone: 202-586-7260 Email: Roxanne.Garland@ee.doe.gov Name: Margaret Mann Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Telephone: 303-275-2921 Email: Margaret_mann@nrel.gov Period of Performance Start: July 2001 End: September 2004 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

294

Increasing Efficiency in Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production promises to be a renewable, clean, and efficient way of storing the sun's energy for use in hydrogen-powered fuel cells. We use p-type Ga.51In.49P semiconductor (henceforth as GaInP2) to absorb solar energy and produce a photocurrent. When the semiconductor is immersed in water, the photocurrent can break down water into hydrogen and oxygen. However, before the GaInP2 can produce hydrogen and oxygen, the conduction band and the Fermi level of the semiconductor must overlap the water redox potentials. In an unmodified system, the conduction band and Fermi level of GaInP2 do not overlap the water redox potentials. When light shines on the semiconductor, electrons build up on the surface, shifting the bandedges and Fermi level further away from overlap of the water redox potentials. We report on surface treatments with metallated porphyrins and transition metals that suppress bandedge migration and allow bandedge overlap to occur. Coating ruthenium octaethylporphyrin carbonyl (RuOEP CO) on the GaInP2 surface shifted bandedges in the positive direction by 270 mV on average, allowing the bandedges to frequently overlap the water redox potentials. Coating the GaInP2 surface with RuCl3 catalyzed charge transfer from the semiconductor to the water, lessening bandedge migration under light irradiation. Future work will focus on the long-term surface stability of these new treatments and quantitative applications of porphyrins.

Warren, S.; Turner, J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Method for producing low-cost, high volume hydrogen from hydrocarbon sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the conversion of naturally-occurring or biomass-derived lower to higher hydrocarbon (C{sub x}H{sub y},where x may vary from 1--3 and y may vary from 4--8) to low-cost, high-volume hydrogen. In one embodiment, methane, the major component of natural gas, is reacted in a single reaction zone of a mixed-conducting ceramic membrane reactor to form hydrogen via simultaneous partial oxidation and water gas shift reactions at temperatures required for thermal excitations of the mixed-conducting membranes. The hydrogen is produced by catalytically reacting the hydrocarbon with oxygen to form synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen), followed by a water gas shift (WGS) reaction with steam, wherein both reactions occur in a single reaction zone having a multi-functional catalyst or a combination of catalysts. The hydrogen is separated from other reaction products by membrane-assisted transport or by pressure-swing adsorption technique. Membrane-assisted transport may occur via proton transfer or molecular sieving mechanisms.

Bose, Arun C.; Balachandran, Uthamalinga; Kleerfisch, Mark S.; Udovich, Carl A.; Stiegel, Gary J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A continuous distribution approach for production costing  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a new approach to approximate the equivalent load duration curve (ELDC) and evaluate the production cost by using a multi-parameter distribution is presented. The parameters of this distribution can be determined from the hourly load and generating unit data. A new more efficient algorithm for determining the parameters is also introduced. The results obtained from the proposed, the Grame-Charlier and the recursive method are reported for several cases to compared the efficiency and accuracy.

Singh, C. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Kim, J.O. (Cheon-An National Coll., Chung-Nam (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sorption enhanced reaction process for production of hydrogen. Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is one of the most suitable energy sources from both technological and environmental perspectives for the next century, especially in the context of a sustainable global energy economy. The most common industrial process to produce high-purity (99.99+ mol%) hydrogen is to reform natural gas by a catalytic reaction with steam at a high temperature. Conventional steam-methane reforming (SMR) contributed to approximately 2.4 billion standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of hydrogen production in the US. By 1998, the growth of SMR-produced hydrogen in the US is expected to reach 3.4 billion SCFD, with the increased demand attributed to hydrogen`s use in reformulated gasolines required by the Clean Air Act. The goal of this work is to develop an even more efficient process for reforming steam and methane to hydrogen product than the conventional SMR process. The application of Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) technology to SMR has the potential to markedly reduce the cost of hydrogen through lower capital and energy requirements. The development of a more cost-effective route to hydrogen production based on natural gas as the primary energy source will accelerate the transition to a more hydrogen-based economy in the future. The paper describes the process, which includes a sorbent for CO{sub 2} removal, and the various tasks involved in its development.

Mayorga, S.G.; Hufton, J.R.; Sircar, S.; Gaffney, T.R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Transition Analysis - H2 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition Analysis - H2 Production and Delivery Infrastructure Project Summary Full Title: Transition Analysis of the Hydrogen Production and Delivery Infrastructure as a Complex...

300

Method of Production of Pure Hydrogen Near Room Temperature ...  

Energy Storage ... The described method of hydrogen production is useful for energy conversion and production technologies that consume pure gaseous h ...

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301

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrogen Production Via a Commercially Ready Inorganic Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the last report, we covered the experimental verification of the mathematical model we developed for WGS-MR, specifically in the aspect of CO conversion ratio, and the effect of the permeate sweep. Bench-top experimental study has been continuing in this period to verify the remaining aspects of the reactor performance, including hydrogen recovery ratio, hydrogen purity and CO contaminant level. Based upon the comparison of experimental vs simulated results in this period along with the results reported in the last period, we conclude that our mathematical model can predict reliably all aspects of the membrane reactor performance for WGS using typical coal gasifier off-gas as feed under the proposed operating condition. In addition to 250 C, the experimental study at 225 C was performed. As obtained at 250 C, the predicted values match well with the experimental results at this lower temperature. The pretreatment requirement in our proposed WGS-MR process can be streamlined to the particulate removal only. No excess water beyond the stoichiometric requirement for CO conversion is necessary; thus, power generation efficiency can be maximized. PROX will be employed as post-treatment for the elimination of trace CO. Since the CO contaminant level from our WGS-MR is projected to be 20-30 ppm, PROX can be implemented economically and reliably to deliver hydrogen with <10 ppm CO to meet the spec for PEM fuel cell. This would be a more cost effective solution than the production of on-spec hydrogen without the use of prost treatment. WGS reaction in the presence of sulfur can be accomplished with the use of the Co/MoS{sub 2} catalyst. This catalyst has been employed industrially as a sour gas shift catalyst. Our mathematical simulation on WGS-MR based upon the suggested pre- and post-treatment has demonstrated that a nearly complete CO conversion (i.e., 99+%) can be accomplished. Although conversion vs production cost may play an important role in an overall process optimization, no cost optimization has been taken into consideration presently. We estimate that {approx}90% of the hydrogen produced from the H{sub 2}+CO in the coal gasifier off-gas can be recovered via our proposed WGS-MR process. Its purity level ranges from 80 to 92% depending upon the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of 10 to 25 respectively. If the purity of 95% is required, the hydrogen recovery ratio will drop to {approx}80% level for the membrane with H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} = 25.

Paul K. T. Liu

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed to produce nothing but pure water as exhaust and clean electricity for power. At the heart of every fuel cell is an advanced plastic membrane coated with a platinum catalyst. That's where the production of electricity takes

304

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, two different types of membranes, Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) provided by the University of Florida and the University of Cincinnati, respectively were tested in the high pressure permeation unit. The SCTm membrane, with a thickness of 1.7 mm, showed the highest hydrogen permeability among the perovskite membranes tested in this project so far. The hydrogen flux measured for the SCTm membrane was close to 0.8 cc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of about 4 bar at 950 C. SEM and EDX analysis for the tested SCTm membrane showed a separate Ce-rich phase deposited along the grain boundaries in the region towards the feed side of the membrane. No such phase separation was observed towards the permeate side. Partial reduction of the SCTm perovskite material by the high pressure hydrogen, especially in the feed side of the membrane, was postulated to be the possible reason for the phase separation. Further investigation of the stability issue of the perovskite membrane is needed.

Shain Doong, Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Robers

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

High-yield hydrogen production by catalytic gasification of coal or biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification of coal or wood, catalyzed by soluble metallic cations to maximize reaction rates and hydrogen yields, offers a potential for large-scale, economical hydrogen production with near-commercial technology. With optimum reaction conditions and catalysts, product gas rich in both hydrogen and methane can be used in fuel cells to produce electricity at efficiencies nearly double those of conventional power plant. If plantation silvaculture techniques can produce wood at a raw energy cost competitive with coal, further enhancement of product gas yields may be possible, with zero net contribution of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs - Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... Abstract: We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production costs and concave holding costs. This problem is a generalization...

308

,,,,,,,,,,"Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil Production in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil Recovery ",,,"Oil Production--West Texas" ,,"Operations (10 Producing Wells)" ,,,"Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil...

309

Heliostat production evaluation and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of ths study is to provide a factory cost for the production of heliostats in terms of 1979 dollars. Factory cost is defined as the sum of all direct labor, direct material and burden expenses that are incurred in the manufacture of a heliostat, and its packaging for shipment. Transportation, installation, taxes other than plant real taxes, profit, selling expenses, and all other profit and loss items are not included. Two production volumes are considered, 25,000 heliostat units per year and 250,000 heliostat units per year. The study concluded that the factory cost to manufacture heliostats is $95.99/m/sup 2/ at 25,000 units per year and $67.95/m/sup 2/ at 250,000 units per year. The Policy Analysis Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute estimates that this implies an installed price of $122.12/m/sup 2/ at the 25,000 unit per year volume.

None

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heliostat production evaluation and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to provide a factory cost for the production of heliostats in terms of 1979 dollars. Factory cost is defined as the sum of all direct labor, direct material and burden expenses that are incurred in the manufacture of a heliostat, and its packaging for shipment. Transportation, installation, taxes other than plant real taxes, profit, selling expenses, and all other profit and loss items are not included. Two production volumes are considered, 25,000 heliostat units per year and 250,000 heliostat units per year. The study concluded that the factory cost to manufacture heliostats is $95.99/m/sup 2/ at 25,000 units per year and $67.95/m/sup 2/ at 250,000 units per year. The Policy Analysis Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute estimates that this implies an installed price of $122.12/m/sup 2/ at the 25,000 unit-per-year volume.

Britt, J. F.; Shulte, C. W.; Davey, H. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change, and noise. Oil-use costs comprise the cost of theexcept as indicated) Oil-use cost SPR Low Best High BY ROCdirect economic costs of oil dependence including wealth

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the ninth quarter of work performed under this agreement. The design of the vessel for pressure testing has been completed. The design will be finalized and purchased in the next quarter.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimate. The overall economics of hydrogen production from this new process was assessed and compared with conventional hydrogen production technologies from coal. Several proton-conducting perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) were successfully tested in a new permeation unit at temperatures between 800 and 1040 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bars. The experimental data confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing hydrogen partial pressure at the feed side. The highest hydrogen flux measured was 1.0 cc/min/cm{sup 2} (STP) for the SCTm membrane at 3 bars and 1040 C. The chemical stability of the perovskite membranes with respect to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S can be improved by doping with Zr, as demonstrated from the TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis) tests in this project. A conceptual design, using the measured hydrogen flux data and a modeling approach, for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without a substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions. Flowsheet simulations show that the coal to hydrogen process employing the proposed membrane reactor concept can increase the hydrogen production efficiency by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Preliminary economic analysis also shows a 30% cost reduction for the proposed membrane reactor process, assuming membrane materials meeting DOE's flux and cost target. Although this study shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier, placing the membrane module outside the gasifier in a closely coupled way in terms of temperature and pressure can still offer the same performance advantage. This could also avoid the complicated fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues when the membrane module is installed inside the gasifier. Future work should be focused on improving the permeability and stability for the proton-conducting membranes, testing the membranes with real syngas from a gasifier and scaling up the membrane size.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. Task 1 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents results of a cooperative effort among the Florida Energy Office, NASA/Kennedy Space Center, the US Department of Energy and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). It reports on a task to evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. The resulting activities covered five years of effort funded at a total of $216,809. The results represent a successful, coordinated effort among two state agencies and two federal agencies. Results are reported on two separate investigations. The first investigation looked at the use of line focus concentrating photovoltaics coupled with single-cell electrolyzers to produce gaseous hydrogen. The concept, and its design, construction and operation, are presented. The objectives of the line focusing PV system are to reduce overall system cost under the assumptions that lenses and mirrors are cheaper to deploy than are PV cells, and that low-voltage, high-current dc electricity can efficiently power a single-cell elctrolyzer to produce hydrogen. The second investigation evaluated a base case cost of PV electrolysis hydrogen production based on present-day PV and electrolyzer costs and efficiencies. A second step analyzed the hydrogen costs based on a best prediction of where PV costs and efficiencies will be in 10 years. These results set the minimum cost standards that other renewable production technologies must meet or better.

Block, D.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrogen  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

316

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of battery electric, hydrogen fuel cell and hybrid vehicles in a future sustainable road transport system, Energy Policy

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The unit was fully commissioned and is operational. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and tested in the new permeation unit. These membranes were fabricated by either uniaxial pressing or tape casting technique with thickness ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm. Hydrogen permeation data for the BCN perovskite membrane have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar. The highest hydrogen flux was measured at 1.6 STPcc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of 12 bar and 950 C with a membrane thickness of 0.22 mm. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The hydrogen flux predicted from the modeling results are in line with the data from the experimental measurement. The simulation also shows that the presence of steam in the permeate side or the feed side of the membrane can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids  

SciTech Connect

We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cost and Performance Comparison Of Stationary Hydrogen Fueling Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or nitrogen from air and the purification of hydrogen from sources such as catalytic reformer off gas, coke oven gas, and ethylene plant effluent gas. Pressure swing systems are based on selective adsorbent beds of hydrogen from natural gas to fuel hydrogen FCV's. Four potential reforming systems were studied: 10

322

2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that improved hydrogen evolution rates. Photo courtesy of Philip D. Weyman, J. Craig Venter Institute Bacteria break down biomass to produce hydrogen in a fermentation...

323

Nanolipoprotein Particles for Hydrogen Production - Energy ...  

Hydrogen is a renewable energy carrier that has the potential to replace fossil fuels in our economy. The majority of hydrogen produced today is from natural gas, ...

324

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

325

Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Circofer -- Low cost approach to DRI production  

SciTech Connect

Lurgi's Circofer Process for reducing fine ores with coal in a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) is a direct approach by using a widely applied and proven reactor in commercializing a state of the art technology. The technology is in response to the demand for a direct reduction process of the future by making possible: the use of low cost ore fines and inexpensive primary energy, fine coal; production of a high grade product used as feedstock by mini mills with the additional advantage of dilution of contaminants introduced by scrap; low environmental impact; and low specific investment costs due to the closed energy circuit. With the incorporation of the latest developments in CFB technology, Circofer offers excellent heat and mass transfer conditions and, consequently, improved gas and energy utilization. High gas conversions using recycle gas have a positive influence on the process economics whereby no export gas is produced. Sticking, accretion and reoxidation problems, which have plagued all previous attempts at developing direct reduction processes using fine ore and coal as a reductant, are avoided, essentially by operating with defined amounts of excess carbon and separation of the reduction and gasifying zones.

Weber, P.; Bresser, W.; Hirsch, M. (Lurgi Metallurgie GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.1 Fuel Cell System Cost Estimate We define the fuel cellto note that these cost estimates are based on a largeother studies on fuel cell cost estimates Baseline gasoline

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James, A cost comparison of fuel-cell and battery electricHowever, battery electric vehicles have lower fuel cost, usebattery-electric vehicles in terms of weight, volume, GHGs and cost,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

California Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost) California Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

330

New Mexico Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost) New Mexico Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Cost) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

331

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Automotive System Cost Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project Summary Full Title: Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project ID: 118 Principal Investigator: Sujit Das Purpose Estimate current and...

332

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting 6/2/2003 DOE DOE - - BES Sponsored Workshop on BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Production, Storage and Use Walter J. Stevens Walter J. Stevens Director Director Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop dates: May 13-15, 2003 A follow-on workshop to BESAC-sponsored workshop on "Basic Research Needs to Assure a Secure Energy Future" Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

334

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost  

Releasing the pressure in the sorbent chamber then releases the impurities into the gas phase to ... Conceptual diagram of a hydrogen-permeating enrichment

335

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport due to primary energy usage (from electricity andFor this analysis, the energy usage for liquefaction (11tent. Reducing the energy usage for hydrogen distribution

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For this analysis, the energy usage for liquefaction (11sum of the rate of energy usage of the various components ofcontent. Reducing the energy usage for hydrogen distribution

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach Karen Miller, Vice President The National Hydrogen Association 1800 M Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20036-5802 phone: 202-223-5547 fax: 202-223-5537 Background: The Mission of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) is to foster the development of hydrogen technologies and their use in commercial and industrial applications and to promote the role of hydrogen as a major energy carrier of the future. The basic long-term goals are determined by the greatest needs tempered by activities consistent with the role of the NHA as an association. Today these are: * To educate the public and policy makers on the benefits of hydrogen; * To assist in the development of necessary hydrogen codes and standards; and

338

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the seventh quarter of work performed under this agreement. We await approval from the Swedish pressure vessel board to allow us to proceed with the procurement of the vessel for super atmospheric testing. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

Forsberg, C.W.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation.

James, B. D.; Baum, G. N.; Perez, J.; Baum, K. N.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation.

343

Investigation of sustainable hydrogen production from steam biomass gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen is a by-product of the gasification process and it is environmentally friendly with respect to pollution and emission issues when it is derived from (more)

Abuadala, Abdussalam Goma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming Revised February 2001 * NRELTP-570-27637 Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

345

Renewable Hydrogen Production at Hickam Air Force Base  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production at Hickam Air Force Base November 2009 Hawaii Center for Advanced Transportation Technologies *&1; Established by the High Technology Development Corporation (a...

346

Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to study the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production. There were three reactions in this cycle: Bunsen reaction, sulfuric (more)

Dan, Huang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered by solar thermal energy for hydrogen production. TheHigh Temperature Thermal Energy Storage an Experimental21 2.5 Solar Thermal Energy and Solar

Luc, Wesley Wai

348

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture The Ohio State University (OSU) Project Number: FE0012136 Project Description The...

349

Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen Syngas Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen (H2) Syngas Production Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0012122 Project Description The research team will evaluate and...

350

Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen ...  

Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen (Supplemental to ID 1435) Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

351

Methane Decomposition: Production of Hydrogen and Carbon Filaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) is an obvious source for hydrogen. Steam reforming of methane represents the current trend for hydrogen. The process required to eliminate CO from the hydrogen produced in the steam reformer is briefly described below. The steam reformer products containing B10% CO (depending on the feedstock and conditions

Goodman, Wayne

352

Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermodynamic, economic, and environmental modeling of hydrogen (H2) co-production integrated with stationary Fuel Cell Systems (FCS).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to analyze the potential for hydrogen co-production within high-temperature stationary fuel cell systems (H2-FCS) and identify novel designs with minimum CO2 and cost. Specific objectives are to (1) develop novel H2-FCS designs that release low greenhouse gas emissions; and (2) develop novel H2-FCS designs with low hydrogen production cost.

Margalef, Pere (University of California at Irvine); Brouwer, Jack (University of California at Irvine); Colella, Whitney; Rankin, Aerel; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kim, Eung S. (Ammon, ID); Sherman, Steven R. (Augusta, GA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE Science Showcase - Hydrogen Production | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org More information Making molecular hydrogen more efficiently Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do Hydrogen and Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Animation Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Increase your Hydrogen IQ Visit the Science Showcase homepage. OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services OSTI Facebook OSTI Twitter OSTI Google+ Bookmark and Share (Link will open in a new window) Go to Videos Loading... Stop news scroll Most Visited Adopt-A-Doc DOE Data Explorer DOE Green Energy DOepatents DOE R&D Accomplishments .EDUconnections Energy Science and Technology Software Center E-print Network

357

On-site production of electrolytic hydrogen for generator cooling  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis could be cost effective over the merchant hydrogen used for generator cooling. Advanced water electrolyzers are being developed specifically for this utility application. These designs are based on solid-polymer-electrolyte and alkaline water electrolysis technologies. This paper describes the status of electrolyzer development and demonstration projects.

Mehta, B.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photo-electrolytic production of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen and oxygen are produced from water in a process involving the photodissociation of molecular bromine with radiant energy at wavelengths within the visible light region and a subsequent electrolytic dissociation of hydrogen halides.

Meyerand, R.G. Jr.; Krascella, N.L.; McMahon, D.G.

1978-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for each hydrogen production cost quote. Table 2-6: HydrogenTable 2-25: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 2-26: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for each hydrogen production cost quote. Table 2-6: HydrogenTable 2-25: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary fromTable 2-26: Electricity Production/Control Cost Summary from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current methods of hydrogen storage in automobiles are either too bulky (large storage space for gas phase) or require a high input energy (cooling or pressurization systems for liquid hydrogen), making widespread use abundance, high- energy content, and large surface area, is able to combine with water to produce hydrogen

Barthelat, Francois

362

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio- oil to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion

363

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Washington, D.C. -- A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles

364

Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BioSolarH BioSolarH 2  Autofermentative biological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria G.C. Dismukes Rutgers University Waksman Institute and Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology DOE Biohydrogen Production Workshop NREL October, 2013 -BioSolarH 2  Ghirardi et al., 2007 Tamagnini et al., 2007 Soluble NiFe hydrogenase (SH) Group 5 AH in Ralstonia eutropha H16 Schäfer et al., 2013 Formate dehydrogenase Hydrogenase Bagramyan et al., 2003 Ferredoxin Km (MV) = 16.1µM Kcat (MV) = 1242 s -1 (Francis et al., 1990) K i (O 2 ) = 1% (McIntosh et al., 2011) Km (C 2 H 2 ) = 1.8*10 -3 atms (Hallenbeck et al. 1979) Km (H 2 ) =6.1µM Kcat (H 2 ) = 238 s -1 ( Schäfer et al., 2013) K i (O 2 ) = 47.5% (Lenz et al., 2010) Km (H 2 ) =3.5µM Kcat (H 2 ) = 0.5 s -1 ( Oxygen insensitive (Schäfer et al., 2013)

365

Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biofuels production have dramatically increased costs of fertilizer, seed, and feed grains. These increased

366

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost of $2-$4/gge Capacity (kg/day) Distributed Central 100,000,000 100,000 50,000 10,000 1,000 10 Natural Gas Reforming Photo- electro- chemical Biological Water Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020 Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water (Grid) Coal Gasification (Carbon Capture)

367

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. Current pipeline costs. Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from U.S. consumers to foreign oil producers (a cost only inThus, the PS received by foreign oil producers is a real

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Optimization of Proton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

density for future scenarios of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology; estimate manufacturing cost of PEMFCs. Performer Principal Investigator: Suresh Sriramulu...

370

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per kWh produced than baseload coal, nuclear or combined-even. The model includes a baseload technology with high ?annual production cost are: Baseload (coal) Cost = $208247/M

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The energy and cost calculators below allow Federal agencies to enter their own input values (such as utility rates, hours of use) to estimate energy and cost savings for energy-efficient products....

372

NETL: News Release - Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Station Provides Transportation Fuel from Domestic Resources for Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles Washington, D.C. - A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles and equipment, lessening U.S. dependence on foreign oil. The facility will produce, compress, store and dispense hydrogen as a fuel source for vehicles that have been converted to run on hydrogen, as well as other types of ground equipment at the airport.

373

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed protonic-electronic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) were successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, a thin BCN membrane supported on a porous BCN layer was fabricated. The objective was to increase the hydrogen flux with a further reduction of the thickness of the active membrane layer. The thinnest dense layer that could be achieved in our laboratory currently was about 0.2 mm. Nevertheless, the membrane was tested in the permeation unit and showed reasonable flux compared to the previous BCN samples of the same thickness. A long term durability test was conducted for a SCTm membrane with pure hydrogen in the feed side and nitrogen in the sweep side. The pressure was 1 bar and the temperature was around 1010 C. No decline of hydrogen flux was observed after continuous running of over 250 hours. This long term test indicates that the perovskite membrane has good thermal stability under the reducing conditions of the hydrogen atmosphere. A conceptual design of the membrane reactor configuration for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier was completed. The design considered a tubular membrane module located within the freeboard area of a fluidized bed gasifier. The membrane ambipolar conductivity was based on the value calculated from the measured permeation data. A membrane thickness of 25 micron was assumed in the calculation. The GTI's gasification model combined with a membrane reactor model were used to determine the dimensions of the membrane module. It appears that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

Norman, John H. (La Jolla, CA); Russell, Jr., John L. (La Jolla, CA); Porter, II, John T. (Del Mar, CA); McCorkle, Kenneth H. (Del Mar, CA); Roemer, Thomas S. (Cardiff, CA); Sharp, Robert (Del Mar, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY SUPERADIABATIC DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the membrane systems selected, additional equipment such as knockout drums, coalescing filters, and guard beds far and modeling predictions is quite reasonable. Methane 20% H2S/ 80%N2 Air MFC MFC MFC Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610-32405 #12;MFC-3 MFC-1 MFC-2 N2 H2S O2

376

Assessing Strategies for Fuel and Electricity Production in a California Hydrogen Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of hydrogen, electricity and CO 2 from coal withproduction of hydrogen, electricity, and CO 2 from coal withDecarbonized hydrogen and electricity from natural gas.

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fermentative Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A PowerPoint presentation given as part of the 2005 Hydrogen Program Review, May 23-26, 2005, in Washington, D.C.

Maness, P. C.; Czernik, S.; Smolinski, S.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Hy-C process (thermal decomposition of natural gas): Potentially the lowest cost source of hydrogen with the least CO{sub 2} emission  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of natural gas as a natural resource and its high hydrogen content make it a prime candidate for a low cost supply of hydrogen. The thermal decomposition of natural gas by methane pyrolysis produces carbon and hydrogen. The process energy required to produce one mol of hydrogen is only 5.3% of the higher heating value of methane. The thermal efficiency for hydrogen production as a fuel without the use of carbon as a fuel, can be as high as 60%. Conventional steam reforming of methane requires 8.9% process energy per mole of hydrogen even though 4 moles of hydrogen can be produced per mole of methane, compared to 2 moles by methane pyrolysis. When considering greenhouse global gas warming, methane pyrolysis produces the least amount of CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of hydrogen and can be totally eliminated when the carbon produced is either sequestered or sold as a materials commodity, and hydrogen is used to fuel the process. Conventional steam reforming of natural gas and CO shifting produces large amounts of CO{sub 2} emissions. The energy requirement for non-fossil, solar, nuclear, and hydropower production of hydrogen, mainly through electrolysis, is much greater than that from natural gas. From the resource available energy and environmental points of view, production of hydrogen by methane pyrolysis is most attractive. The by-product carbon black, when credited as a saleable material, makes hydrogen by thermal decomposition of natural gas (the Hy-C process) potentially the lowest cost source of large amounts of hydrogen.

Steinberg, M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing natural gas stations are hydrogen production andof the agencies natural gas station. While the cost of thefor example, natural gas for stations with reformers). Costs

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis, Preliminary Results - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 E-mail: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005253 Project Start Date: September 30, 2012 Project End Date: September 29, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop cost models of carbon fiber hydrogen storage * pressure vessels. Explore the sensitivity of pressure vessel cost to design * parameters including hydrogen storage quantity, storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Labor costs may be reduced . . . Research yields size-controlling rootstocks for peach production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doyle David Ramming Production costs in peaches are highlyby UC and USDA. production costs could be substantiallyDRAFT T he annual production costs for peaches grown in

DeJong, Theodore M.; Johnson, R. Scott; Doyle, James F.; Ramming, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electrolytic production of hydrogen utilizing photovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has the potential to serve as both an energy storage means and an energy carrier in renewable energy systems. When renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power are used to produce electrical power, the output can vary depending on weather conditions. By using renewable sources to produce hydrogen, a fuel which can be stored and transported, a reliable and continuously available energy supply with a predictable long-term average output is created. Electrolysis is one method of converting renewable energy into hydrogen fuel. In this experiment we examine the use of an electrolyzer based on polymer-electrolyte membrane technology to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is vented to the atmosphere and the hydrogen is stored in a small pressure vessel.

Daugherty, M.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration

385

Production cost models with regard to liberalised electricity markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book makes a contribution to the formulation and implementation of production cost models for the modelling of liberalized electricity markets by addressing issues associated (more)

Martinez Diaz, David Jos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost $2,458, or $11.1/kWh. Carbon fiber was the major costrange of $10-$17/kWh and carbon fiber contributes about 65%

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Ionically Conducting Membranes for Hydrogen Production and Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND SEPARATION Presented by Tony Sammells Eltron Research Inc. Boulder, Colorado www.eltronresearch.com Presented at DOE Hydrogen Separations Workshop Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. TO BE DISCUSSED * Membranes for Hydrogen Production - Compositions - Feedstocks - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles * Membranes for Hydrogen Separation - Compositions - Ex Situ vs. In Situ WGS - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles ELTRON RESEARCH INC. OVERALL SCHEME FOR CONVERTING FEEDSTOCK TO HYDROGEN WITH SIMULTANEOUS CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H 2 WGS H 2 O CO 2 /H 2 1618afs.dsf H 2 CO 2 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. INCENTIVES FOR OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR

388

NETL: News Release - NETL Building Hydrogen Production and Dispensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 NETL Building Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility at Yeager Airport Morgantown, WV- The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced its plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production-and-dispensing facility at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. According to U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., "This project is a great example of the wonderful potential of coal. Coal can produce hydrogen fuel, which can greatly reduce greenhouse gases and our need to import foreign oil. Coal is abundant and remarkably versatile - particularly hydrogen produced from coal through gasification or coal-based power used to split water that provides a secure source of hydrogen fuel that will compete with imported petroleum. I am very pleased to be involved in helping this new hydrogen facility in West Virginia become a reality."

389

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process for the production of hydrogen from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electrolytic cells for hydrogen gas production  

SciTech Connect

An electrolytic cell bank is described comprising two end plate electrodes, a plurality of intermediate electrodes, a plurality of dielectric separators spaced between the electrodes to form electrolytic cell chambers, a plurality of gas separator diaphragms, alkaline electrolyte, manifolds for allowing off-gas withdrawal of hydrogen and oxygen and means for back-pressuring the exterior walls of each end plate to counter-balance pressures developed within the electrolytic cell chambers. The cell bank is utilized to convert water into its constituent gases of oxygen and hydrogen, and the cell bank is sufficiently large to commercially produce hydrogen at pressures equal to the pressures utilized in commercial gas transmission lines.

Hall, F.F.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Multi-Area Power System Reliability and Production Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-area power system operation can reduce costs without jeopardizing service reliability, but the interconnection of systems requires new means for estimating costs and reliability. This report describes methods for evaluating production costs and power system reliability in multi-area power systems.

1990-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

?\tDuring the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to the production of gaseous hydrogen with carbonous materials in the presence of steam by the steam-carbon reaction, and more particularly to such generation of hydrogen by rapidly comminuting coal in the presence of high-temperature steam.

Paulson, L.E.

1986-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

Collins, Jack L (Knoxville, TN); Dole, Leslie R (Knoxville, TN); Ferrada, Juan J (Knoxville, TN); Forsberg, Charles W (Oak Ridge, TN); Haire, Marvin J (Oak Ridge, TN); Hunt, Rodney D (Oak Ridge, TN); Lewis Jr., Benjamin E (Knoxville, TN); Wymer, Raymond G (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macr; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

Charles V Park

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12014: Current U.S. Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12014 Date: June 18, 2012 12014 Date: June 18, 2012 Title: Current U.S. Hydrogen Production Originator: Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: June 26, 2012 Item: The United States currently produces about 9 million metric tons of hydrogen per year, enough to power approximately ~36-41 million FCEVs. References/Calculations:  "...9 million metric tons of hydrogen per year" The United States produces about 9 million metric tons per year for the captive and merchant markets. U.S. Hydrogen Production By Merchant & Captive Types 2009-2016 (Thousand Metric Tons) 1 Source: MarketsandMarkets, GLOBAL HYDROGEN GENERATION MARKET BY MERCHANT & CAPTIVE TYPE, DISTRIBUTED & CENTRALIZED GENERATION, APPLICATION & TECHNOLOGY - TRENDS &

404

DEVELOPMENT OF A PRODUCTION COST ESTIMATION FRAMEWORK TO SUPPORT PRODUCT FAMILY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main task of a product family designer is to decide the right components/design variables to share among products to maintain economies of scale with minimum sacrifice in the performance of each product in the family. The decisions are usually based on several criteria, but production cost is of primary concern. Estimating the production cost of a family of products involves both estimating the production cost of each product in the family and the costs incurred by common and variant components/design variables in the family. To estimate these costs consistently and accurately, we propose a production cost estimation framework to support product family design based on Activity-Based Costing (ABC) that consists of three stages: (1) allocation, (2) estimation, and (3) analysis. In the allocation stage, the production activities and resources needed to produce the entire products in a family are identified and classified with an activity table, a resource table, and a production flow. To help allocate product data for production, a product family structure is represented by a hierarchical classification of products that form the product family. In the estimation stage, production costs are estimated with cost estimation methods selected based on the type of information available. In the analysis stage,

Jaeil Park; Timothy W. Simpson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sources H2A Calculations *Cost escalation *Plant scaling *Financial calculations *Cash flow calculations and levelized cost of hydrogen NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY...

406

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost dependent on pipeline length and diameter against thedescribe with only the pipeline length and diameter. Labordescribed by the pipeline diameter and length alone. In some

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Anode depolarizers in electrolytic hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory manages an extensive program in the areas of hydrogen and energy storage potentials. As part of an ongoing portfolio analysis of projects, the prospects for applications for anode depolarizers are presented. The system requirements are outlined, and economic criteria are developed. It is concluded that moderate incentives exist for successful development. Research and Development priorities are formulated.

Beller, M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Electrolytic production of hydrogen. [from carbonaceous materials  

SciTech Connect

A cyclic electrolytic process is claimed for the manufacture of hydrogen from carbonaceous material such as coal, agricultural wastes and garbage to produce commercial hydrogen. An alakli metal sulfate is reduced to an alkali metal sulfide by reaction of the sulfate and carbonaceous fuel at an elevated temperature. The sulfide and impurities derived from the fuel are digested with an aqueous solution to dissolve the sulfide and separate out the impurities. The solution of the alkali sulfide is added to electrolytic cells in which an electric current is utilized to generate hydrogen at the cathode while oxidizing the sulfide substantially to sulfate at the anode. The cell electrolyte temperature is greater than 150/sup 0/C and less than 350/sup 0/C. Under these conditions the polarization problem encountered in hydrogen/oxygen cells is substantially avoided. The alkali sulfate is then separated from the electrolyte stream exiting from the electrolytic cells, reduced again by burning with fuel and recycled to the electrolytic cell.

Spitzer, R.

1978-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. [Chemistry of experimentally valid cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantages of hydrogen as a medium for energy storage, energy transmission and possible large-scale use as a non-polluting fuel have led to the concept of a ''hydrogen economy.'' However, even if this does not fully materialize, accelerating requirements for hydrogen demonstrate that efficient, low cost methods for production based on non-fossil heat sources will become extremely valuable. Theoretical advantages for thermochemical production methods have led to the publication of many conceptual cycles prior to experimental testing and to efficiency and cost estimates based on assumed data for non-verified processes. Finally, however, laboratories in several countries have published details of cycles that have been demonstrated by experimental studies. The chemistry of experimentally valid cycles is discussed in some detail. Thermochemical criteria for efficient cycles are also presented. It seems probable that the development of low-cost processes must be the result of experiments not yet performed. However, valid cycles have been demonstrated in a variety of chemical systems and one may hope that an efficient low-cost process will be developed. Some cost estimates have finally been made on valid cycles, although mostly on assumed conditions. At the present time, such studies are most useful for guiding process improvement, and also to develop methodology for process evaluation.

Bowman, M.G.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Welfare and Profit Maximization with Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Auctions are a central problem in Algorithmic Mechanism Design: pricing and allocating goods to buyers with complex preferences in order to maximize some desired objective (e.g., social welfare, revenue, or profit). The problem has been well-studied in the case of limited supply (one copy of each item), and in the case of digital goods (the seller can produce additional copies at no cost). Yet in the case of resources---oil, labor, computing cycles, etc.---neither of these abstractions is just right: additional supplies of these resources can be found, but at increasing difficulty (marginal cost) as resources are depleted. In this work, we initiate the study of the algorithmic mechanism design problem of combinatorial pricing under increasing marginal cost. The goal is to sell these goods to buyers with unknown and arbitrary combinatorial valuation functions to maximize either the social welfare, or the seller's profit; specifically we focus on the setting of \\emph{posted item prices} with buyer...

Blum, Avrim; Mansour, Yishay; Sharma, Ankit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Synergistic Hydrogen Production in a Biorefinery via Bioelectrochemical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells are devices that use biocatalysis and electrolysis for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Biorefinery process streams contain fermentation by products and inhibitors which accumulate in the process stream if the water is recycled. These molecules also affect biomass to biofuel yields if not removed from the recycle water. The presence of sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furfural, vanillic acid and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde has been shown to reduce fermentation yields. In this work, we calculate the potential for hydrogen production using microbial electrolysis cells from these molecules as substrates. Conversion of these substrates to electricity is demonstrated in microbial fuel cells and will also be presented.

Borole, A. P.; Hamilton, C. Y.; Schell, D. J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound  

SciTech Connect

An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

McAdams, R.K.

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Hydrogen: Production and marketing. Proceedings of the Symposium, Honolulu, Hawaii, April 2-6, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The studies included in this volume provide an overview of hydrogen research and development and examine the problems of industrial technology and economics of hydrogen production, commercial distribution and safety, the potential of advanced hydrogen technologies, and applications. Papers are presented on the hydrogen production from partial oxidation of residual fuel oil, coal gasification for hydrogen manufacture, production and application of electrolytic hydrogen, and hydrogen from fuel desulfurization.

Smith, W.N. (General Electric Co., Philadelphia, Pa.); Santangelo, J.G. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pa.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no representation of biomass supply curve in the model. Anthe Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-supply options. Both onsite and central production technologies including biomass

Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clamshell dredges are used around the United States for both navigational and environmental dredging projects. Clamshell dredges are extremely mobile and can excavate sediment over a wide range of depths. The object of this thesis is to develop a methodology for production and cost estimation for clamshell dredge projects. There are current methods of predicting clamshell dredge production which rely on production curves and constant cycle times. This thesis calculates production estimation by predicting cycle time which is the time required to complete one dredge cycle. By varying the cycle time according to site characteristics production can be predicted. A second important component to predicting clamshell dredge production is bucket fill factor. This is the percent of the bucket that will fill with sediment depending on the type of soil being excavated. Using cycle time as the basis for production calculation a spreadsheet has been created to simplify the calculation of production and project cost. The production calculation also factors in soil type and region of the United States. The spreadsheet is capable of operating with basic site characteristics, or with details about the dredge, bucket size, and region. Once the production is calculated the project cost can be determined. First the project length is found by dividing the total amount of sediment that is to be excavated by the production rate. Once the project length is calculated the remainder of the project cost can be found. The methods discussed in this thesis were used to calculate project cost for 5 different projects. The results were then compared to estimates by the government and the actual cost of the project. The government estimates were an average of 39% higher than the actual project cost. The method discussed in this thesis was only 6% higher than the actual cost.

Adair, Robert Fletcher

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjustments in 1991. Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 23, 1992; 90,begin 1993 on upbeat. Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 22, 1993; 91,Current pipeline costs. Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21, 1994;

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Warren R. U.S. interstate pipelines begin 1993 on upbeat. 66. ? True, Warren R. Current pipeline costs. Oil & GasWarren R. U.S. interstate pipelines ran more efficiently in

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

Hollabaugh, Charles M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bowman, Melvin G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation from fuel gas or synthesis gas at temperatures 400-500 C. The membrane chosen for this purpose consists of a dense silica layer coated on a porous support by chemical vapor depositrion (CVD). The support used during the reporting period was zeolite silicalite grown on macroporous alumina tubes. Chemical vapor deposition was carried out using alternating exposure of the support to silicon tetrachloride (SiCl{sub 4}) and water vapor at 400-500 C. Under these conditions it takes about twenty-five reaction cycles to narrow down the pores of the zeolite support sufficiently for separation of hydrogen from other gases. The membranes were characterized by gas adsorption for pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and EDAX for elemental composition. The permeance of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} was measured in the temperature range 100-250 C. At 150 C, the H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} permeance ratio was in the range 100-200 at a hydrogen permeance of 5-10x10{sup -8} mol/m{sub 2}-s-Pa.

George R. Gavalas

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind to Hydrogen Project: Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Todd Ramsden, Kevin Harrison, Darlene Steward November 16, 2009 NREL/PR-560-47432 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Wind2H2 RD&D Project * The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with Xcel Energy and DOE has designed, operates, and continues to perform testing on the wind-to-hydrogen (Wind2H2) project at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder * The Wind2H2 project integrates wind turbines, PV arrays and electrolyzers to produce from renewable energy

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421

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

424

Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an order of magnitude) less energy is required and that sunlight can be used directly. In the case of photoproduction of hydrogen, as compared to water splitting, feeding the anodic compartment of the PEC with an organic pollutant, instead of the usual supporting electrolyte, will bring about a substantial increase of the photocurrent at a given illumination. Thus, the replacement of the photo-oxidation of water by the photodegradation of organic waste will be accompanied by a gain in solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency and hence by a decrease in the cost of the photoproduced hydrogen. Taking into account the benefits and possible revenues obtainable by the waste degradation, this would seem to be a promising approach to the photoproduction of hydrogen. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is another waste effluent requiring extensive treatment, especially in petroleum refineries. The so-called Claus process is normally used to convert the H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. A sulfur recovery process developed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described briefly in Chapter 4 by Dr. C. Linkous as a typical example of the photoproduction of hydrogen in a non oxygen-evolving system. The encouraging results obtained in these investigations of photoelectrochemical hydrogen production combined with organic waste degradation, have prompted a decision to continue the work under the new IEA Hydrogen Agreement Annex 14, Photoelectrolytic Hydrogen Production.

Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)); Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Estimates of Production Cost Variance Using Chronological Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts of production costs are key inputs in the operational planning decisions of electric power utilities. This report describes the effects of uncertainty in annual load variation and uncertainty in generation availability on the variance of cost in an electrical power system.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Trends in oil production costs in the Middle East, elsewhere  

SciTech Connect

This article focuses on the costs of oil production in the major areas of the world, including OPEC and non-OPEC countries. The question of production costs has become even more important since 1986, when the Saudis unilaterally undercut the oil price. Shaikh Yamani slashed oil prices in 1986 with three clearly articulated objectives: (1) to reduce conservation; (2) to stimulate global economic growth; and (3) to discourage non-OPEC energy supplies of all kinds. Here the authors address the last of those strategic objectives -- squeezing out non-OPEC oil -- by comparing oil production costs around the world. The analysis is framed with respect to five questions: How great is the variation in full costs of production within OPEC itself Are the costs of OPEC and non-OPEC producers radically different Are there producing areas today that are cost-constrained, meaning where E P activity is limited by high costs in relation to expected prices Has the Saudi market share strategy been successful in curbing non-OPEC oil development Is it probably, as is often bruited, that lack of capital for new E P projects might constrain future oil production, especially in the OPEC states

Stauffer, T.R. (Stauffer, (Thomas R.), Washington, DC (United States))

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae  

SciTech Connect

An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An agent-based model of the transition to a hydrogen transportation economy explores influences on adoption of hydrogen vehicles and fueling infrastructure. Attention is given to whether significant penetration occurs and, if so, to the length of time required for it to occur. Estimates are provided of sensitivity to numerical values of model parameters and to effects of alternative market and policy scenarios. The model is applied to the Los Angeles metropolitan area In the benchmark simulation, the prices of hydrogen and non-hydrogen vehicles are comparable. Due to fuel efficiency, hydrogen vehicles have a fuel savings advantage of 9.8 cents per mile over non-hydrogen vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles account for 60% of new vehicle sales in 20 years from the initial entry of hydrogen vehicles into show rooms, going on to 86% in 40 years and reaching still higher values after that. If the fuel savings is 20.7 cents per mile for a hydrogen vehicle, penetration reaches 86% of new car sales by the 20th year. If the fuel savings is 0.5 cents per mile, market penetration reaches only 10% by the 20th year. To turn to vehicle price difference, if a hydrogen vehicle costs $2,000 less than a non-hydrogen vehicle, new car sales penetration reaches 92% by the 20th year. If a hydrogen vehicle costs $6,500 more than a non-hydrogen vehicle, market penetration is only 6% by the 20th year. Results from other sensitivity runs are presented. Policies that could affect hydrogen vehicle adoption are investigated. A tax credit for the purchase of a hydrogen vehicle of $2,500 tax credit results in 88% penetration by the 20th year, as compared with 60% in the benchmark case. If the tax credit is $6,000, penetration is 99% by the 20th year. Under a more modest approach, the tax credit would be available only for the first 10 years. Hydrogen sales penetration then reach 69% of sales by the 20th year with the $2,500 credit and 79% with the $6,000 credit. A carbon tax of $38 per metric ton is not large enough to noticeably affect sales penetration. A tax of $116 per metric ton makes centrally produced hydrogen profitable in the very first year but results in only 64% penetration by year 20 as opposed to the 60% penetration in the benchmark case. Provision of 15 seed stations publicly provided at the beginning of the simulation, in addition to the 15 existing stations in the benchmark case, gives sales penetration rates very close to the benchmark after 20 years, namely, 63% and 59% depending on where they are placed.

Tolley, George S

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative. The most practical method of determining the cost is through the use of a computer program, based on the capability of personal computers to manipulate large amounts of data and perform difficult calculations without error. Development of such a program requires both theoretical and practical knowledge of the dredging process. There are several existing cost estimation and production estimation programs in use in the dredging industry today. Several different algorithms to estimate production have been developed over the years, and there are some non-proprietary production programs. However, the majority of both cost and production estimation programs are proprietary and therefore not available to those apart from the individual company. Therefore, the need exists for a program of this type which can be made available to the general public. This report discusses the development of a new generalized cost and production estimation program. Both slurry transport theory and centrifugal pump theory are incorporated into the production component of the program. This is necessary to obtain an accurate production estimate in the absence of a great deal of data for a specific dredge. Practical knowledge of costs associated with the dredging process is applied in the cost estimation component. The gram is written in the Quattropro(version6.01)spread sheet formatand may be used in conjunction with Microsoft Windows version 3.1 or Windows95. The acronym CSDCEP has been given to the program, which stands for Cutter detailing the operation of the program is available. The cost estimate results produced by CSDCEP were compared with actual data and government cost estimates for twenty one completed projects. The average difference between the estimate and the actual costs was twenty four percent. CSDCEP is a generalized cost estimating program that yields a good approximation of the final dredging cost.

Miertschin, Michael Wayne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Date: August 17, 2011 2 Date: August 17, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011 Update to: Record 10004 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 7, 2011 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2011 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $49/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2011, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) 2 updated the 2010 Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) cost analysis of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems, based on 2011 technology and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year [1]. Results from the analysis were communicated to the DOE

433

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8002: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007  

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02 Date: October 31, 2008 02 Date: October 31, 2008 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007 Update to: Record 5005 Originator: Nancy Garland and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: April 3, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $94/kW for 2007 technology in 2007 dollars ($82/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2007, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2006 cost analyses of direct hydrogen, 80-kW, PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2007 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2].

434

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009  

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2 Date: October 7, 2009 2 Date: October 7, 2009 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009 Update to: Record 8019 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 7, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $61/kW for 2009 technology in 2009 dollars ($51/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2009, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2008 cost analyses of 80-kW direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2009 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. DTI and TIAX use Design for Manufacturing and Assembly