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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

3

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

SciTech Connect

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel...

5

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This independent review report assesses the 2009 state-of-the-art and 2020 projected capital cost, energy efficiency, and levelized cost for hydrogen production from biomass via gasification.

6

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of hydrogen production using low-cost natural gas.

7

Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development  

SciTech Connect

H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

9

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2024 Date: September 19, 2012 2024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 24, 2012 Item: Hydrogen produced and dispensed in distributed facilities at high-volume refueling stations using current technology and DOE's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 projected prices for industrial natural gas result in a hydrogen levelized cost of $4.49 per gallon-gasoline-equivalent (gge) (untaxed) including compression, storage and dispensing costs. The hydrogen production portion of this cost is $2.03/gge. In comparison, current analyses using low-cost natural gas with a price of $2.00 per MMBtu can decrease the hydrogen levelized cost to $3.68 per gge (untaxed) including

10

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-51726 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

11

Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Bloom Energy is testing the potential to produce low-cost hydrogen and electricity simultaneously from natural gas.

12

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review  

SciTech Connect

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis National Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE Hydrogen Systems Integration Office. For central production, the hydrogen cost is at the plant gate of an electrolysis facility with a capacity

14

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pieces of hardware: 1. Hydrogen production equipment (e.g.when evaluating hydrogen production costs. Many analyses inrespect to size and hydrogen production method. These costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cost Analysis of a Concentrator Photovoltaic Hydrogen Production System  

SciTech Connect

The development of efficient, renewable methods of producing hydrogen are essential for the success of the hydrogen economy. Since the feedstock for electrolysis is water, there are no harmful pollutants emitted during the use of the fuel. Furthermore, it has become evident that concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems have a number of unique attributes that could shortcut the development process, and increase the efficiency of hydrogen production to a point where economics will then drive the commercial development to mass scale.

Thompson, J. R.; McConnell, R. D.; Mosleh, M.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The US DOE's FCTO has issued two RFIs seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders about hydrogen production and hydrogen delivery RD&D activities aimed at developing technologies that can ultimately produce and deliver low-cost hydrogen.

17

DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on the RD&D needs for enabling low-cost, effective hydrogen production from all types of water electrolysis systems, both centralized and forecourt. Based on the results of these...

18

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12001: H2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 Date: May 14, 2012 01 Date: May 14, 2012 Title: H 2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment Originator: Scott Weil, Sara Dillich, Fred Joseck, and Mark Ruth Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: December 14, 2012 Item: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the untaxed cost of hydrogen (H 2 ) (produced, delivered, and dispensed) at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a $/mile basis with competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. As established in Record 11007 [1], this cost ranges from $2.00-$4.00/gge a of H 2 (based on $2007). The threshold cost can be apportioned into its constituent H 2 production and delivery costs, which can then serve as the respective cost targets for multi-year planning of the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT)

19

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An analysis was performed to estimate the costs associated with storing and transporting hydrogen. These costs can be added to a hydrogen production cost to determine the total delivered cost of hydrogen.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report of levelized cost in 2005 US dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

23

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

24

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform Robert B. Bollinger and Timothy M. Aaron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform Robert B. Bollinger and Timothy M. Aaron Praxair, Inc. P.O. Box 44 Tonawanda, NY 14151 Phone: 716-879-2000 Abstract Praxair is in the initial phases of developing. Praxair has as partners in this program, Boothroyd-Dewhurst Inc. (BDI) and Diversified Manufacturing Inc

25

Hydrogen Production- Current Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future clean energy economy. Hydrogen production technologies fall into three general...

26

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen-from- Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting Laurel, Maryland Tuesday, November 6, 2007 H 2 Gen Innovations, Inc. Alexandria, Virginia www.h2gen.com 2 Topics * H 2 Gen Reformer System Innovation * Natural Gas Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Ethanol Reformer - Key performance metrics - Summary unique H2A inputs * Questions from 2007 Merit Review 3 H 2 Gen Innovations' Commercial SMR * Compact, low-cost 115 kg/day natural gas reformer proven in commercial practice [13 US Patents granted] * Built-in, unique, low-cost PSA system * Unique sulfur-tolerant catalyst developed with SĂŒd Chemie 4 DOE Program Results * Task 1- Natural Gas Reformer Scaling:

27

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors. Feedstock CostHydrogen Production Equipment Purifier Storage System Compressor Dispenser Additional Equipment Installation Costshydrogen equipment costs. Meyers [2] provides an in depth analyses of reformer, compressor, and storage equipment costs.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

29

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production .pieces of hardware: 1. Hydrogen production equipment (e.g.when evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL’s photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

31

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

32

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A1-46612 September 2009 Technical Report Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, NREL/TP-6A1-46612 Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, September 2009 and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Prepared under Task No. HS07.1002 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

33

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

34

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

35

Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and...

37

Hydrogen Production - Current Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Current Technology Hydrogen Production - Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future...

38

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Cost adjusted to 2007 dollars, accurate to two significant figures. Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research Home Projects Fuel Cells Hydrogen Production & Delivery...

39

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pieces of hardware: 1. Hydrogen production equipment (e.g.Hydrogen Production..when evaluating hydrogen production costs and sales prices.

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

12024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the lowest cost hydrogen production method, supplying aroundcommon method of industrial and refinery hydrogen production

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22,...

43

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel CellCost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation - Compressed Hydrogen and PEM

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

www.praxair.com Low Cost Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.praxair.com Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform Cooperative Agreement: DE-FC36-01GO11004 Timothy M. Aaron Team Praxair - Tonawanda, NY Boothroyd-Dewhurst - Wakefield, RI Diversified Manufacturing (Hot Components Only) Praxair HGS Comparison 1/4 Capacity 1/6 Physical Plant Size Lower H2 Cost

45

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen production equipment Puri?er Storage system Compressor Dispenser Additional equipment Installation costshydrogen storage vessels and compressors. 2.4.4. Feedstock costhydrogen equipment costs. Meyers [2] pro- vides an in depth analyses of reformer, compressor, and storage equipment costs.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

47

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

48

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization Genevieve Saur, Todd Ramsden Prepared under...

49

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas This program record...

50

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achieving low CoE for hydrogen production. Although other WEfor competitive hydrogen production, such advanced targetsElectricity and Hydrogen Fuel Production from Multi-Unit

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

52

DEVELOPMENT OF LOW COST SENSORS FOR HYDROGEN SAFETY APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, storage, and utilization technologies brings with it the need to detect and pinpoint hydrogen materials and fabrication methods, which have obvious cost advantages. The response to hydrogenDEVELOPMENT OF LOW COST SENSORS FOR HYDROGEN SAFETY APPLICATIONS Barbara S. Hoffheins, L. Curt

53

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the sixth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. This 2012 update will cover current status technology updates since the 2011 report, as well as introduce a 2012 bus system analysis considered alongside the automotive system.

54

Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report documents the engineering and cost characteristics of four PEC hydrogen production systems selected by DOE to represent canonical embodiments of future systems.

55

FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production R&D Hydrogen Production R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts

56

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

57

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11]. One method for hydrogen production is a water-splittingof various methods of hydrogen production, the Department ofOne method of reducing the cost of hydrogen production is to

Luc, Wesley Wai

58

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

59

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pieces of hardware: 1. Hydrogen production equipment (e.g.existing industrial hydrogen production capacity might alsotons/yr of existing hydrogen production and 3,600 tons/yr of

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Solar Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The common methods of hydrogen production impose many concerns regarding the decline in...2...emission, and ecological impacts. Subsequently, all the downstream industries that consume hydrogen involve the aforem...

Ibrahim Dincer; Anand S. Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

62

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis Costs of storing and transporting hydrogen A comprehensive comparison of fuel options for fuel cell vehicles

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Presentation by Stephen Lasher on cost analysis of hydrogen storage systems....

64

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehiclesthe societal cost of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles with modelsand running costs) than hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in 2030.

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hydrogen Energy System and Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is being considered as a synthetic fuel ... . This paper contains an overview of the hydrogen production methods, those being commercially available today as well...

F. Barbir; T. N. Veziro?lu

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hydrogen Production from Thermocatalytic Hydrogen Sulfide Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data on hydrogen production from hydrogen sulfide decomposition over various solid catalysts at ... The possibilities given by surface modification by vacuum methods (electron beam evaporation and ma...

O. K. Alexeeva

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sustainable Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Today, hydrogen is mainly produced from natural gas via steam methane reforming, and although this process can sustain an initial...operating, or maintenance costs are included in the calculation. HHV, higher heating value. System efficiencies of commercial electrolyzers...

John A. Turner

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

69

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Photobiological Hydrogen Production from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Project ID: 110 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are

70

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION THROUGH ELECTROLYSIS Robert J. Friedland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION THROUGH ELECTROLYSIS Robert J. Friedland A. John Speranza Proton Energy Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE). Proton's goal is to drive the cost of PEM electrolysis to levels of $600 per years of the cost reduction efforts for the HOGEN 40 hydrogen generator on this program are in line

71

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In 2004, DOE has selected TIAX to evaluate the lifecycle cost and WTW energy use and GHG emissions of various hydrogen storage options. Water Electrolyzer Water Electrolyzer...

72

Cost Containment and Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Containment and Productivity Faculty Assembly Presentation January 22, 2013 Arthur G. Ramicone, CFO David N. DeJong, Vice Provost, Academic Planning and Resources Management #12;Cost Containment Resources to Enhance the Student Experience · Reduce the Cost and Complexity of Administrative Operations

Jiang, Huiqiang

73

Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As hydrogen appears to be a potential solution for a carbon-free society, its production plays a critical role in showing how well it fulfills the criteria of being environmentally benign and sustainable. Of c...

Ibrahim Dincer; Anand S. Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercially available hydrogen production methods such as steam reforming of natural gas, ... process that are based on fossil hydrocarbons and methods in the stage of development, like thermolysis ... radiolysi...

Y. Yürüm

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Bacterial Fermentative Hydrogen Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Melanie Mormile, Missouri University of Science and Technology, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

76

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a ĂąÂ?Â?bottom-upĂąÂ? costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMAĂ?Âź software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production The simplest and most common element, hydrogen is all around us, but always as a compound with other elements. To make it usable in fuel cells or otherwise provide energy, we must expend energy or modify another energy source to extract it from the fossil fuel, biomass, water, or other compound in which it is found. Nearly all hydrogen production in the United States today is by steam reformation of natural gas. This, however, releases carbon dioxide in the process and trades one relatively clean fuel for another, with associated energy loss, so it does little to meet national energy needs. Hydrogen can also be produced by electrolysis-passing an electrical current through water to break it into hydrogen and oxygen-but electrolysis is inefficient and is only as clean

78

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on hydrogen production and infrastructure options presented at the DOE Transition Workshop.

79

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Project ID: 207 Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Keywords: Hydrogen storage; costs Purpose The purpose of this analysis is to help guide researchers and developers toward promising R&D and commercialization pathways by evaluating the various on-board hydrogen storage technologies on a consistent basis. Performer Principal Investigator: Stephen Lasher Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140 Telephone: 617-498-6108 Email: lasher.stephen@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: Matt Hooks, TIAX, LLC; Mark Marion, TIAX, LLC; Kurtis McKenney, TIAX, LLC; Bob Rancatore, TIAX, LLC; Yong Yang, TIAX, LLC Sponsor(s) Name: Sunita Satyapal

80

Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

Saur, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydrogen Production Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Production Fact Sheet Hydrogen Production Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen production. Hydrogen Production More Documents &...

82

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural residues, in the near-term time frame (~three years) and at a comparable cost to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction with high value co-products. Activated carbon can be made from agricultural residues in a two- stage process: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio-

83

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hydrogen and Electricity for Hydrogen and Electricity Project Summary Full Title: Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity Project ID: 274 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Brief Description: Retail capital costs for infrastructure for advanced vehicles are compared on a per mile basis. Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; electricity; costs; Performer Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov Website: http://www.nrel.gov Additional Performers: Michael Penev, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCP Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Website: http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov

84

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen ?ow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.hydrogen storage tanks are needed. Costs for central plant compressors

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify issues, barriers, and research and development needs for biological hydrogen production to enable hydrogen production that meets cost goals. Proceedings 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Final Report Presentations Introductory Session Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

86

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed,...

89

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen flow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration ERR Estimated Recoverable Reserves FCEV fuel cell electric vehicle GHG greenhouse gas GW gigawatt GWh gigawatt-hour GWdt gigawatt-days thermal H2A Hydrogen...

91

Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production Praxair Praxair SNL TIAX · Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for H2

92

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project Summary Full Title: Production of Hydrogen by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project ID: 91 Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; photovoltaic (PV) Purpose To evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. Performer Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Organization: Florida Solar Energy Center Address: 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Telephone: 321-638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu Sponsor(s) Name: Michael Ashworth Organization: Florida Energy Office Name: Neil Rossmeissl Organization: DOE/Advanced Utilities Concepts Division Name: H.T. Everett Organization: NASA/Kennedy Space Center Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

93

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

94

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Plant Heat Exchangers Turbines Electrolyzer Pumps and Compressors NaCl Storage Separators Thermochemical Reactors + Chemical Absorber Figure 6.2: Equipment Cost

Luc, Wesley Wai

95

The economics of biological methods of hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The costs to produce and utilize hydrogen are extremely high per unit of energy when compared to fossil fuel energy sources such as natural gas or gasoline. The cheapest hydrogen production approaches today are also the ...

Resnick, Richard J. (Richard Jay), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low-cost fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detector  

SciTech Connect

The ability to detect hydrogen gas leaks economically and with inherent safety is an important technology that could facilitate commercial acceptance of hydrogen fuel in various applications. In particular, hydrogen fueled passenger vehicles will require hydrogen leak detectors to signal the activation of safety devices such as shutoff valves, ventilating fans, alarms, etc. Such detectors may be required in several locations within a vehicle--wherever a leak could pose a safety hazard. It is therefore important that the detectors be very economical. This paper reports progress on the development of low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detectors intended to meet the needs of a hydrogen-fueled passenger vehicle. In the design, the presence of hydrogen in air is sensed by a thin-film coating at the end of a polymer optical fiber. When the coating reacts reversibly with the hydrogen, its optical properties are changed. Light from a central electro-optic control unit is projected down the optical fiber where it is reflected from the sensor coating back to central optical detectors. A change in the reflected intensity indicates the presence of hydrogen. The fiber-optic detector offers inherent safety by removing all electrical power from the leak sites and offers reduced signal processing problems by minimizing electromagnetic interference. Critical detector performance requirements include high selectivity, response speed and durability as well as potential for low-cost production.

Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Hishmeh, G.; Ciszek, P.; Lee, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

To overcome the issue of pinhole (defect) formation in membrane films over large areas, a process was developed and implemented for producing 6-12 {micro}m-thick, Pd-Cu alloy films on thermally oxidized silicon wafer substrates. The processing parameters on silicon are such that adhesion is poor and as-deposited Pd-Cu alloy films easily release from the oxidized silicon surface. Hydrogen permeation tests were conducted on 9 and 12 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu alloy films and the hydrogen flux for 9 and 12 {micro}m-thick films were 16.8 and 8 cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min respectively. The hydrogen permeability (corrected using data in McKinnley patent) of the 9 {micro}m-thick membrane is 7.4 {center_dot} 10{sup -5} cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s {center_dot} cm Hg{sup 0.5} at 350 C and compares very well to permeability reported by McKinnley for a 62.5% Pd membrane; this permeability is {approx}56% of the value reported for a Pd-Cu alloy membrane with optimum 60% Pd composition. Using XRD, we confirmed the presence of a two-phase, {alpha}/{beta}, structure and that the composition of our membrane was slightly higher than the optimum composition. We are making adjustments to the compositions of the Pd-Cu alloy target in order to produce films next quarter that match the ideal Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} composition.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

During the last quarter, new procedures were developed and implemented to improve reliability and repeatability of release characteristics from the temporary substrate (i.e., silicon wafer) and to minimize through-thickness defects in a 6-inch diameter film, 3 microns in thickness. With the new procedures, we have been able to consistently produce essentially stress free films, with zero or minimal defects (less than 5) across a 6-inch diameter area. (It is important to note that for those films containing pinholes, a procedure has been developed to repair the pinholes to form a gas tight seal). The films are all within the identified tolerance range for composition (i.e., 60 {+-} 0.2 % Pd). A number of these films have subsequently been shipped to IdaTech for evaluation and integration into their test module. Colorado School of Mines continued their high temperature evaluation of 6 micron thick, sputtered Pd-Cu films. Pure hydrogen permeability increased up to 400 C while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and dropped once the temperature increased to over 450 C. Above this temperature, as confirmed by the binary phase diagram, the film transforms into either a mixed {alpha}/{beta} or pure {alpha} phase. The same trend was observed for a baseline 25 micron-thick foil (from Wilkinson) where the pure hydrogen permeability increased with temperature while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and then decreased upon transformation to the {alpha} phase.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Technology available for licensing: Two alternative strategies for detecting impurities in the hydrogen used in fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

102

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

In the past quarter, significant progress has been made in optimize the deposition and release characteristics of ultrathin (less than 4 micron) membranes from rigid silicon substrates. Specifically, we have conducted a series of statistically designed experiments to examine the effects of plasma cleaning and compliant layer deposition conditions on the stress, release and pinhole density of membranes deposited on 4 inch and 6 inch round substrates. With this information we have progressed to the deposition and release of ultra-thin membranes from 12-inch diameter (113 sq. in.) rigid substrates, achieving a key milestone for large-area membrane fabrication. Idatech received and is beginning preparations to test the Pd alloy membranes fabricated at SwRI the previous quarter. They are currently evaluating alternate gasketing methods and support materials that will allow for effective sealing and mounting of such thin membranes. David Edlund has also recently left Idatech and Bill Pledger (Chief Engineer) has replaced him as the primary technical point of contact. At Idetech's request a small number of additional 16 sq. in, samples were provided in a 2 in. by 8 in. geometry for use in a new module design currently under development. Recent work at the Colorado School of Mines has focused on developing preconditioning methods for thin Pd alloy membranes (6 microns or less) and continuing tests of thin membranes produced at SwRI. Of particular note, a 300-hour short-term durability study was completed over a range of temperatures from 300-450 C on a foil that showed perfect hydrogen selectivity throughout the entire test. With a 20 psi driving force, pure hydrogen flow rates ranged from 500 to 700 cc/min. Calculated at DOE specified conditions, the H{sub 2} flux of this membrane exceeded the 2010 Fossil target value of 200 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.

J. Arps

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50% of daily production H 2 gas storage costs (separate fromNatural gas is currently the lowest cost hydrogen productioncosts are calculated for each station. On-site natural gas steam reformers The hydrogen production

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a central hydrogen production plant to a single point)atm at the central hydrogen production plant. The trailer isemissions at the hydrogen production plant, as well. This is

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a central hydrogen production plant to a single point)atm at the central hydrogen production plant. The trailer isemissions at the hydrogen production plant, as well. This is

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost estimation for direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell systems.

107

An overview of hydrogen gas production from solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen production plays a very important role in the development of hydrogen economy. Hydrogen gas production through solar energy which is abundant, clean and renewable is one of the promising hydrogen production approaches. This article overviews the available technologies for hydrogen generation using solar energy as main source. Photochemical, electrochemical and thermochemical processes for producing hydrogen with solar energy are analyzed from a technological environmental and economical point of view. It is concluded that developments of improved processes for hydrogen production via solar resource are likely to continue in order to reach competitive hydrogen production costs. Hybrid thermochemical processes where hydrocarbons are exclusively used as chemical reactants for the production of syngas and the concentrated solar radiation is used as a heat source represent one of the most promising alternatives: they combine conventional and renewable energy representing a proper transition towards a solar hydrogen economy.

Simon Koumi Ngoh; Donatien Njomo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Liwei Xu (Primary Contact) 1 , Anke E. Abken 2 , William B. Ingler 3 , John Turner 4 1 Midwest Optoelectronics LLC (MWOE) 2801 W. Bancroft Street Mail Stop 230 Toledo, OH 43606 Phone: (419) 215-8583 Email: xu@mwoe.com 2 Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight) 3 University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (UT) 4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (NREL) DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-05GO15028 Subcontractors: * Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH * University of Toledo, Toledo, OH * National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

109

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research  

SciTech Connect

In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

Iouri Balachov, PhD

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Microalgal Cultures, DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2010 Annual Progress Report Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures, DOE Hydrogen...

111

Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide...

112

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Advancing the science of fuel...

113

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

114

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence · Approach · Implementation · Results · Discussion Process · Summary #12;3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal $) EIA Annual Energy Outlook, 2005 Ratio of FCV fuel economy to evolved gasoline ICE 2.40 NRC H2 Economy Liquid Distribution $0.28 $1.06 $2.54 $3.88 Central Wind Electrolysis Pipeline Distribution $0.01 $6

115

Hydrogen Production & Delivery  

Energy Savers (EERE)

* Address key materials needs for P&D: Membranes, Catalysts, PEC Devices, Reactors, and Tanks Hydrogen from Coal * Complete laboratory-scale development of separation and...

116

Hydrogen Production & Delivery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation H2 and Fuel Cells Plenary "

117

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

118

Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}) has utilized its expertise in large-area vacuum deposition methods to conduct research into the fabrication of dense, freestanding Pd-alloy membranes that are 3-5 microns thick and over 100 in{sup 2} in area. The membranes were deposited onto flexible and rigid supports that were subsequently removed and separated using novel techniques developed over the course of the project. Using these methods, the production of novel alloy compositions centered around the Pd-Cu system were developed with the objective of producing a thermally stable, nano-crystalline grain structure with the highest flux recorded as 242 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a 2 {micro}m thick Pd{sub 53}Cu{sub 47} at 400 C and 20 psig feed pressure which when extrapolated is over twice the 2010 Department of Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target. Several membranes were made with the same permeability, but with different thicknesses and these membranes were highly selective. Researchers at the Colorado School of Mines supported the effort with extensive testing of experimental membranes as well as design and modeling of novel alloy composite structures. IdaTech provided commercial bench testing and analysis of SwRI-manufactured membranes. The completed deliverables for the project include test data on the performance of experimental membranes fabricated by vacuum deposition and several Pd-alloy membranes that were supplied to IdaTech for testing.

K. Coulter

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high-pressure stationary hydrogen storage tanks. The storagehigh-pressure gaseous hydrogen storage containers, and atrailer Compressed hydrogen storage High-pressure hydrogen

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Reciprocating Hydrogen Compressor Costs: (Industry)of Diaphragm Hydrogen Compressor Costs (Industry) Capacity (kWh/kg includes compressor) Capital Costs Hydrogen Equipment

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Green methods for hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses environmentally benign and sustainable, as green, methods for hydrogen production and categorizes them based on the driving sources and applications. Some potential sources are electrical, thermal, biochemical, photonic, electro-thermal, photo-thermal, photo-electric, photo-biochemical, and thermal-biochemical. Such forms of energy can be derived from renewable sources, nuclear energy and from energy recovery processes for hydrogen production purposes. These processes are analyzed and assessed for comparison purposes. Various case studies are presented to highlight the importance of green hydrogen production methods and systems for practical applications.

Ibrahim Dincer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

125

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Independent...

126

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short-circuit photocurrent density of the hybrid device (measured in a 2-electrode configuration) increased significantly without assistance of any external bias, i.e. from ?1 mA/cm{sup 2} to ~5 mA/cm{sup 2}. With the copper chalcopyrite compounds, we have achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% in a coplanar configuration with 3 a-Si solar cells and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode. This material class exhibited good durability at a photocurrent density level of -4 mA/cm{sup 2} (“5% STH” equivalent) at a fixed potential (-0.45 VRHE). A poor band-edge alignment with the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) potential was identified as the main limitation for high STH efficiency. Three new pathways have been identified to solve this issue. First, PV driver with bandgap lower than that of amorphous silicon were investigated. Crystalline silicon was identified as possible bottom cell. Mechanical stacks made with one Si solar cell and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode were built. A 400 mV anodic shift was observed with the Si cell, leading to photocurrent density of -5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE (compared to 0 mA/cm{sup 2} at the same potential without PV driver). We also investigated the use of p-n junctions to shift CuGaSe{sub 2} flatband potential anodically. Reactively sputtered zinc oxy-sulfide thin films was evaluated as n-type buffer and deposited on CuGaSe{sub 2}. Ruthenium nanoparticles were then added as HER catalyst. A 250 mV anodic shift was observed with the p-n junction, leading to photocurrent density at 0VRHE of -1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Combining this device with a Si solar cell in a mechanical stack configuration shifted the onset potential further (+400 mV anodically), leading to photocurrent density of -7 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE. Finally, we developed wide bandgap copper chalcopyrite thin film materials. We demonstrated that Se can be substituted with S using a simple annealing step. Photocurrent densities in the 5-6 mA/cm{sub 2} range were obtained with red 2.0eV CuInGaS{sub 2} photocathodes. With the metal oxide compounds, we have demonstrated that a WO{sub 3}-based hybrid p

Hu, Jian

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity announcement of the cost shared feasibility studies of nuclear energy based production of hydrogen using available technology. The objective of this activity is to select and conduct project(s) that will utilize hydrogen production equipment and nuclear energy as necessary to produce data and analysis on the economics of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants More Documents & Publications https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/E67E46185A67EBE68 Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - hDE-FOA-0000092.rtf

128

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets U.S. Energy Markets Presented to: Presented to: DOE Hydrogen Transition DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Analysis Workshop Washington DC Washington DC January 26, 2006 January 26, 2006 Prepared by: Prepared by: E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory AZ CA Project Scope Project Scope * Focus will be on competition between hydrogen production and distribution technologies with respect to hydrogen fuel demand, technology cost, regional mix, and impact on feedstock prices. * Evaluate impacts on U.S. energy markets including price

129

Hydrogen Production from Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy is potentially the most abundant renewable energy resource available to us and hydrogen production from solar energy is considered to be ... ultimate solution for sustainable energy. The various methods

Engin Ture

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

10 - Thermochemical production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The growing interest in hydrogen as a chemical reactant and energy carrier requires evaluation of all possible conversion processes for its production. This chapter analyses the different processes currently used for hydrogen production, together with the most promising approaches currently under development. Among the latter are thermochemical water-splitting cycles powered by renewable (sustainable) energy sources. A simplified description of the basic thermodynamic aspects of this process is presented, and some examples are presented.

A. Giaconia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station Withthe hydrogen costs from the HSCM for electrolysis stations

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting 11/06/2007 Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols Sugars and Sugar Alcohols * * Problem: Problem: Need Need to develop renewable to develop renewable hydrogen production technologies using hydrogen production technologies using diverse diverse feedstocks feedstocks 10 15 20 CH 4 : C 6 H 14 ln(P) * * Description: Description: The BioForming The BioForming TM TM process uses process uses aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, including glycerol and sugars. The key including glycerol and sugars. The key breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that

133

PHOTOCATALYTIC AND PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION ON STRONTIUM TITANATE SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION ON STRONTIUM TITANATE SINGLE CRYSTALS F.HYDROGEN PRODUCTION ON STRONTIUM TITANATE SINGLE CRYSTALS

Wagner, F.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

8 - Photocatalytic production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The photocatalytic production of hydrogen represents a fascinating way to convert and store solar energy as chemical energy, in the form of renewable hydrogen, the ideal fuel for the future. Hydrogen can be produced either by direct water splitting or by photo-reforming of organics in either liquid or gas phase. Both methods are reviewed in this chapter. Starting with a brief historical background, the most recent achievements in the field of photocatalytic hydrogen production are discussed, concerning both the development of innovative materials able to exploit a larger portion of the solar spectrum compared to traditional photocatalytic materials, and the different set-ups and devices which have been developed and tested.

G.L. Chiarello; E. Selli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Compact and Efficient Steam Methane Reformer for Hydrogen Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A small-scale steam-methane reforming system for localized, distributed production of hydrogen offers improved performance and lower cost by integrating the following technologies developed at the… (more)

Quon, Willard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

137

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013: Hydrogen Delivery Cost Projections - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3013 Date: September 26, 2013 3013 Date: September 26, 2013 Title: H 2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 Originator: E. Sutherland, A. Elgowainy and S. Dillich Approved by: R. Farmer and S. Satyapal Date: December 18, 2013 Item: Reported herein are past 2005 and 2011 estimates, current 2013 estimates, 2020 projected cost estimates and the 2015 and 2020 target costs for delivering and dispensing (untaxed) H 2 to 10%- 15% of vehicles within a city population of 1.2M from a centralized H 2 production plant located 100 km from the city gate. The 2011 volume cost estimates are based on the H2A Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) V2.3 projections and are employed as the basis for defining the cost and technical targets of delivery components in Table 3.2.4 in the 2012 Delivery

138

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel-cell vehicles in 2030. This comparative analysis, based on costfuel cell or hydrogen ICE) and all-electric vehicles. According to the analysis, the societal cost

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicle -$1,612 No engine Vehicle retail cost to consumercosts, for hydrogen FCVs and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...

142

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

143

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

144

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Record 11007 from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate the hydrogen threshold cost of $2.00 to $4.00 per gasoline gallon equivalent.

146

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered by solar thermal energy for hydrogen production. TheHydrogen Production by Concentrated Solar Energy,” Energy,for hydrogen production driven by solar thermal energy is a

Luc, Wesley Wai

148

COMBINATORIAL DISCOVERY OF PHOTOCATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the development of economical and environmentally benign hydrogen production methods and reliable storage systemsCOMBINATORIAL DISCOVERY OF PHOTOCATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Theodore Mill, Albert Hirschon materials rapidly with appropriate band- gaps and screen them for efficient hydrogen production. The goal

149

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems … Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 9017 Date: July 02, 2010 Title: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters Originators: Robert C. Bowman and Ned Stetson Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: August 10, 2010 This record summarizes the current technical assessments of hydrogen (H 2 ) storage system capacities and projected manufacturing costs for the scenario of high-volume production (i.e., 500,000 units/year) for various types of "on-board" vehicular storage systems. These analyses were performed within the Hydrogen Storage sub-program of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Item: It is important to note that all system capacities are "net useable capacities" able to be delivered to the

150

Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotligh...

151

Hydrogen production via carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production and to improve upon… (more)

Bollineni, Shilpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

kshpmarketreadinessjoseck.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: National Academy of Sciences March 2011 Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near...

153

Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Hydrogen Production Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

154

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station WithAnalysis: Electrolysis, 30 kg/day, grid Hydrogen Cost ($/kg)the hydrogen costs from the HSCM for electrolysis stations

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-7: Booster Compressor Costs 3.5 Hydrogen PurificationkWh/kg includes compressor) Capital Costs Hydrogen EquipmentHydrogen Equipment Purifier Storage System Compressor Dispenser Additional Equipment Installation Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Technical and Economic Assessment of Regional Hydrogen Transition Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system spatial layouts for hydrogen production and deliveryWe estimate costs for hydrogen production, delivery anda hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

Ogden, Joan; Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROGEN AND SULFUR PRODUCTION FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE WASTES? John B.L. Harkness and Richard D. Doctor, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne. IL ABSTRACT A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma... to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show-that. typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology. BACKGROUND In 1987, Argonne staff found the first...

Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

158

Air Products Hydrogen Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Kiczek,Edward F. [KICZEKEF@airproducts.com] Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 7:40 PM To: Gopstein, Avi (S4) Subject: Hydrogen Infrastructure Latest Advancements Attachments: Air Products Written Comments to 2011 2012 AB118 Investment Plan.pdf Follow Up Flag: Follow up Flag Status: Flagged Categories: QTR Transparency Avi, You may recall we met in DC when the McKinsey team from Germany came to discuss the EU study on hydrogen infrastructure. At that time I mention a significant advance in infrastructure that would be announced soon. Attached is our testimony to the California Energy Commission on deploying that technology. We were awarded the project to build 9 stations in southern California with the backing of

159

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

160

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University] [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University] [Penn State University

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

station” is one method of hydrogen production at small andstation” is one method of hydrogen production at small and

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) held a Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop on March 20–21, 2013, in Argonne, Illinois....

163

Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed limited acceptance in the automotive industry due to high costs to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model

165

Cutting Biofuel Production Costs | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cutting Biofuel Production Costs Working to use sunlight to convert biomass to biofuels, researchers have found a pathway toward reducing the energy costs associated with making...

166

System for thermochemical hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

1981-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vendors (e.g. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. , Stuartin- cluding Chevron and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. ,$/hr km $/liter with air products representative, February

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Infrastructure Options Analysis January 26, 2006 Brian D. James Julie Perez Peter Schmidt (703) 243 - 3383 Brian_James@DirectedTechnologies.com Directed Technologies, Inc. Page 1 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Agenda 1. Project Description and Objective 2. Team Members 3. Approach 4. Model Theory, Structure and Assumptions 5. Model Description 1. Logic 2. Features 3. Cost Components (Production, Delivery & Dispensing) 6. Los Angeles Transitional Example 7. Model Flexibility Page 2 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Team Members & Interactions Start: May 2005 (effective) End: Summer 2007 * Directed Technologies, Inc.- Prime * Sentech, Inc., Research Partner * Air Products, Industrial Gas Supplier * Advisory Board * Graham Moore, Chevron Technology Ventures

169

Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stations and vendors (e.g. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc,including Chevron and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. , asDiesel a. Verified with Air Products representative, Feb

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate ­ 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900°C Equivalent O2IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND SEPARATION Presented by Tony Sammells for Hydrogen Production ­ Compositions ­ Feedstocks ­ Performance ­ Key Technical Hurdles · Membranes

173

Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

174

Hydrogen (H2) Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Eric Hegg, Michigan State University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

175

Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. bioh2workshoppeters.pdf More Documents &...

176

Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OnSite High Temperature Electrolysis for Efficient Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy, Jim O'Brien, Idaho National Laboratory Reversible Solid Oxide Electrolysis, Randy...

177

An Overview of Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Currently, hydrogen is primarily used in the chemical industry, but in the near future it will become a significant fuel. There are many processes for hydrogen production. This paper reviews reforming (steam, partial oxidation, autothermal, plasma, and aqueous phase), pyrolysis, hydrogen from biomass, electrolysis and other methods for generating hydrogen from water, and hydrogen storage. In addition, desulfurization, water-gas-shift, and hydrogen purification methods are discussed. Basics of these processes are presented with a large number of references for the interested reader to learn more.

Holladay, Jamie D.; Hu, Jianli; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Exergetic assessment of solar hydrogen production methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a sustainable fuel option and one of the potential solutions for the current energy and environmental problems. Its eco-friendly production is really crucial for better environment and sustainable development. In this paper, various types of hydrogen production methods namely solar thermal (high temperature and low temperature), photovoltaic, photoelecrtolysis, biophotolysis etc are discussed. A brief study of various hydrogen production processes have been carried out. Various solar-based hydrogen production processes are assessed and compared for their merits and demerits in terms of exergy efficiency and sustainability factor. For a case study the exergy efficiency of hydrogen production process and the hydrogen system is discussed in terms of sustainability.

Anand S. Joshi; Ibrahim Dincer; Bale V. Reddy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydrogen production from microbial strains  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Exploring Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Sugar and Sugar Alcohols to Reduce Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

New aqueous phase reforming process uses liquid feedstocks to produce energy from hydrogen with reduced costs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications.

182

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

driver in the cost of hydrogen via electrolysis. Operationelectrolysis to compete economically with fossil- based hydrogen production, low cost

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

184

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production Project ID: 282 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Brief Description: Analysis involves estimating energy resources required to support part of the demand generated by 100 million fuel cell electric vehicles in 2040. Performer Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-3836 Email: marc.melaina@nrel.gov Website: http://www.nrel.gov/ Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/FCTO Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Website: http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/ Period of Performance Start: October 2009 Project Description

185

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

186

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

Ramírez Muńoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements

191

Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Titanium Alloy Production Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Production titaniumalloyproduction.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Cost Titanium Propulsion Applications Low Cost...

192

Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

Stephen Herring

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

194

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 214 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via centralized water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

195

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Wind from Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 216 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via distributed water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

196

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Ruth Cox, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

197

Enzymatic Hydrogen Production:? Conversion of Renewable Resources for Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enzymatic Hydrogen Production:? Conversion of Renewable Resources for Energy Production ... Steam-exploded aspen wood containing 60% cellulose was a gift from Michael Himmel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado. ... The previous data demonstrate that the two primary components of renewable sources of energy such as biomassglucose and xyloseare capable of oxidiation by GDH, resulting in hydrogen production if hydrogenase is present. ...

Jonathan Woodward; Kimberley A. Cordray; Robert J. Edmonston; Maria Blanco-Rivera; Susan M. Mattingly; Barbara R. Evans

1999-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hydrogen Production from Carbohydrates: A Mini-Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Hydrogen Production from Carbohydrates: A Mini-Review Y.-H. Percival Zhang *,1,2,3 1 Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA * Tel: 540-231-7414. Fax: 540-231-7414. Email: ypzhang@vt.edu. The hydrogen economy promises a clean energy future featuring higher energy utilization ef ciency and fewer pollutants compared to liquid fuel/internal combustion engines. Hydrogen production from the enriched low-cost biomass carbohydrates would achieve nearly zero carbon emissions in a whole life cycle. In this book chapter, we present latest advances of hydrogen generation from biomass carbohydrates by chemical catalysis (e.g., gasi cation,

199

Author's personal copy Hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. However, this method (40% headspace) has been shown to result in reduced hydrogen gas productionAuthor's personal copy Hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and megaplasmid September 2009 Available online 21 October 2009 Keywords: Fermentative hydrogen production Clostridium

200

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

Mark Leavitt

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

204

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass Pyrolysis/Steam Reforming K. Magrini/Objective Develop and demonstrate technology to produce hydrogen from biomass at $2.90/kg plant gate price based Bio-oil aqueous fraction CO H2 CO2 H2O Trap grease Waste plastics textiles Co-processing Pyrolysis

205

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 addresses the following technical barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells Photoelectrodes ." #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 2

206

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5040: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 Date: December 12, 2008 40 Date: December 12, 2008 Title: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 19, 2008 Item: The 2005 cost status for hydrogen produced from distributed water electrolysis is $5.90 / gge. Assumptions and References: The H2A analysis used to determine the projected cost of $5.88/gge (rounded up to $5.90/gge) was performed by Directed Technologies, Inc. and can be found in Record 5040a. The increase in cost compared to the 2004 analysis ($5.45/gge) is due to two assumptions changed in the model: (a) an increase in the industrial electricity price from 5Âą/kWh to 5.5Âą/kWh from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook, and (b) an increase in the capital cost estimate of the electrolyzer. The other assumptions in the analysis used standard values

207

Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Matthew Posewitz, Colorado School of Mines, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

208

Hydrogen Fuel Production by Transgenic Microalgae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the state-of-art in the field of green algal H2-production and examines physiological and genetic engineering approaches by which to improve the hydrogen metabolism characteristics of thes...

Anastasios Melis; Michael Seibert…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

inputs for zero carbon footprint - PEM technology can be integrated with solar and wind power Cost competitive with current commercial delivered hydrogen costs - Currently...

210

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

211

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

212

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Production

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

214

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydroxide LCOE levelized cost of energy LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas MP mass production MYPP Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan NaS...

216

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems – Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

217

Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for Tuesday, November 6, 2007 Location: BCS Incorporated, 8929 Stephens Road, Laurel, MD. 20723 410-997-7778 8:30 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast 9:00 DOE Targets, Tools and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI, Brian James 10:00 Research Review o Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production Systems, H2Gen, Sandy Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar

218

Efficient Hydrogen Production Using Enzymes of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initiated on a novel method for practical implementation of enzymes for production of hydrogen Methods of Hydrogen Production The currently used commercial methods for the production of hydrogen are inadequate for utilization of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation and electricity production. These methods

219

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and research needs and next steps

220

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Four products from Escherichia coli pseudogenes increase hydrogen production q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article history: Received 26 August 2013 Available online 8 September 2013 Keywords: Biohydrogen hydrogen deficiency in minimal media which suggested that the role of YlcE is associated with cell growth, and production of hydrogen as a renewable fuel is important as a means to address the problems associated

Wood, Thomas K.

222

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

223

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Conclusion ·Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production. ·MgSO4 .7H2O is a required nutrient, but hydrogen production work should focus on minimizing the lag time in biological hydrogen production, by varying nutrient

Barthelat, Francois

224

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Energy-Efficient Products Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Estimate energy and cost savings for energy- and water-efficient product...

225

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended ... maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium ...

Bo Hu; Shulin Chen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended ... maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium ...

Bo Hu; Shulin Chen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating Costs Purifier Electricity costs (energy + demand)Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle markethybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofof the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

233

System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

235

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5038: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Date: May 22, 2006 8 Date: May 22, 2006 Title: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006 Originator: Patrick Davis & Steve Chalk Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Approval Date: May 22, 2006 Item : Lower the cost of hydrogen from natural gas to be competitive on a cents per mile basis with conventional gasoline vehicles. Supporting Information: The results of a 2003 economic analysis were used to estimate the cost of hydrogen produced from distributed natural gas reforming at $5 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (gge) (See U.S. DOE Record 5030: Hydrogen Baseline Cost of $5 per gge in 2003; available at http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/program_records). Since the original analysis, DOE-sponsored R&D has resulted in significant cost reductions,

236

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5012a: Well-to-Wheels Analyses for Solar and Wind Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 5012a Date: December 21, 2005 Title: Well-to-Wheels Analyses for Solar & Wind Hydrogen Production Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 6, 2006 Item: This record explains the basis for the differences between the analyses of well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions conducted via Argonne National Laboratory's GREET Model, cited in the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress, 1 and those conducted by the National Research Council, cited in the report The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs. 2 Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Argonne National

237

Chemical Looping for Combustion and Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ChemiCal looping for Combustion and ChemiCal looping for Combustion and hydrogen produCtion Objective The objective of this project is to determine the benefits of chemical looping technology used with coal to reduce CO 2 emissions. Background Chemical looping is a new method to convert coal or gasified coal to energy. In chemical looping, there is no direct contact between air and fuel. The chemical looping process utilizes oxygen from metal oxide oxygen carrier for fuel combustion, or for making hydrogen by "reducing" water. In combustion applications, the products of chemical looping are CO 2 and H 2 O. Thus, once the steam is condensed, a relatively pure stream of CO 2 is produced ready for sequestration. The production of a sequestration ready CO 2 stream does not require any additional separation units

238

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple...

239

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders -...

240

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels AgencyCompany...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improvements and optimisation of water electrolysis for hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Hydrogen as an important energy carrier has wide applications and great potentials. With ever increasing energy costs and concerns with climate change associated… (more)

Zeng, Kai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the cost of hydrogen production, distribution, and use.accelerate R&D of zero-emission hydrogen production methods.Renewable hydrogen production is a key area for focused

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

Steward, D. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

246

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionGas Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost ($/kWh) Productioncost data from a variety of sources for electrolysis and natural gas reformation technologies. Capacity and production

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fuel cell main- tenance and stack refurbishment costs.fuel cell stack to “internally reform” input fuel into hydrogen (obviating the need for a separate reformer system and reducing costs),

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

250

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials  

SciTech Connect

Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

APPLIED GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY Enhanced hydrogen production from glucose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Das and Vezirolu 2001). Use of biological methods of hydrogen production should significantly reduceAPPLIED GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY Enhanced hydrogen production from glucose of the metabolically engineered strains, BW25113 hyaB hybC hycA fdoG frdC ldhA aceE, increased hydrogen production 4

Wood, Thomas K.

252

Roles of cocatalysts in semiconductor-based photocatalytic hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cocatalyst|hydrogen production|water splitting...Photocatalytic hydrogen generation...promising way for H2 production. For water splitting...solid-state reaction method [12]. Y2O3...versus normal hydrogen electrode, negative...of CdS for H2 production could be increased...hydrothermal method through loading...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Hydrogen Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

254

Michelangelo Network recommendations on nuclear hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Michelangelo Network (MICANET) was started within the 5th EURATOM Framework Programme (FP5) with the objective to elaborate a general European R&D strategy for the further development of the nuclear industry in the short, medium, and long term. To broaden the application range of nuclear power beyond dedicated electricity generation, the network proposed an orientation for future EURATOM R&D programmes including new industrial aspects of nuclear energy, such as combined heat and power and, particularly, the production of hydrogen or other fuels as a link to CO2-free energy sources. MICANET is acting as the European counterpart and partner to the Generation IV International Forum. The MICANET project ended in November 2005. Goals achieved related to nuclear hydrogen production and other non-electrical nuclear applications are outlined in this paper.

Karl Verfondern; Werner Von Lensa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Startech Hydrogen Production Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The assigned work scope includes the modification and utilization of the Plasma Converter System, Integration of a StarCell{trademark} Multistage Ceramic Membrane System (StarCell), and testing of the integrated systems towards DOE targets for gasification and membrane separation. Testing and evaluation was performed at the Startech Engineering and Demonstration Test Center in Bristol, CT. The Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) Characterize the performance of the integrated Plasma Converter and StarCell{trademark} Systems for hydrogen production and purification from abundant and inexpensive feedstocks; (2) Compare integrated hydrogen production performance to conventional technologies and DOE benchmarks; (3) Run pressure and temperature testing to baseline StarCell's performance; and (4) Determine the effect of process contaminants on the StarCell{trademark} system.

Startech Engineering Department

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McGraw, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

258

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Hydrogen permeation data for several perovskite membranes BCN (BaCe{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (SrCe{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar in this project. However, it is known that the cerate-based perovskite materials can react with CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the stability issue of the proton conducting perovskite materials under CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S environments was examined. Tests were conducted in the Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit for powder and disk forms of BCN and SCE. Perovskite materials doped with zirconium (Zr) are known to be resistant to CO{sub 2}. The results from the evaluation of the chemical stability for the Zr doped perovskite membranes are presented. During this reporting period, flowsheet simulation was also performed to calculate material and energy balance based on several hydrogen production processes from coal using high temperature membrane reactor (1000 C), low temperature membrane reactor (250 C), or conventional technologies. The results show that the coal to hydrogen process employing both the high temperature and the low temperature membrane reactors can increase the hydrogen production efficiency (cold gas efficiency) by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Using either high temperature or low temperature membrane reactor process also results in an increase of the cold gas efficiencies as well as the thermal efficiencies of the overall process.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cost of heliostats in low volume production  

SciTech Connect

This study indicates that in small volumes, heliostats can be produced at an installed cost of approximately 200 $/M/sup 2/ for a 49.053 m/sup 2/ heliostat. Initial one-time costs of $10 to $15 million would be required, although part of the one-time costs are recoverable. This study provides estimated costs of heliostats that are produced in a plant operating on a continuous basis for a period of four years at a production rate of 2,500 heliostats per year. This scenario was selected somewhat arbitrarily as a scenario that could lead to heliostat market of 5,000 to 10,000 units per year.

Drumheller, K.; Williams, T. A.; Dilbeck, R. A.; Allison, G. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enterprise budget development and production cost allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allocation Examples for an Agricultural Manufacturing Company. . . . . . . Professionally Suggested Allocation Methods Concerning Allocation Base . 32 40 Conclusion Appendix Sources 44 Abstract Producers need to establish production costs for each... profitability is more important than enterprise profitability. The purpose of enterprise budgets should be as management support tools for the entire operation, not just individual enterprises. ALLOCATION EXAMPLES FOR AN AGRICULTURAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY...

Minear, Kelly Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production and Utilization Laboratory ABSTRACT Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of methods

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Andris R.Abele. Quantum Hydrogen Storage Systems, PresentedTIAX LLC, Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-plant (BOP), but not the hydrogen storage system. This study

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop held March 20-21, 2013, at Argonne National Laboratory.

265

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department announced more than $7 million for projects that will help bring cost-effective, advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies online faster.

266

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Production by Fermentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Production by Fermentation H2 Production by Fermentation Project Summary Full Title: Boundary Analysis for H2 Production by Fermentation Project ID: 70 Principal Investigator: Tim Eggeman Keywords: Hydrogen production; pressure swing adsorption (PSA); glucose; costs; fermentation Performer Principal Investigator: Tim Eggeman Organization: Neoterics International Address: 2319 S. Ellis Ct. Lakewood, CO 80228 Telephone: 303-358-6390 Email: time@NeotericsInt.com Sponsor(s) Name: Roxanne Garland Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Telephone: 202-586-7260 Email: Roxanne.Garland@ee.doe.gov Name: Margaret Mann Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Telephone: 303-275-2921 Email: Margaret_mann@nrel.gov Period of Performance Start: July 2001 End: September 2004 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

267

The dimensions of the policy debate over transportation energy: The case of hydrogen in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mental costs of hydrogen production from fossil fuels.supportive of hydrogen production from renewable sources areNatural gas provider Hydrogen production/supply Frequency

Collantes, Gustavo O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The dimensions of the policy debate over transportation energy: The case of hydrogen in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas provider Hydrogen production/supply Frequencyan oil company Hydrogen production/ dispensing equipmentCO 2 emissions from hydrogen production The external costs

Collantes, Gustavo Oscar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs to estimates for onsite hydrogen production from natural gas,cost estimates with those for onsite hydrogen production from natural gas.cost natural gas is available, steam methane reforming might be the preferred method of hydrogen production,

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs to estimates for onsite hydrogen production from natural gas,cost estimates with those for onsite hydrogen production from natural gas.cost natural gas is available, steam methane reforming might be the preferred method of hydrogen production,

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electrochemical treatment of human waste coupled with molecular hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a hydrogen fuel cell. Herein, we report on the efficacy of a laboratory-scale wastewater electrolysis cell an electrolysis cell for on-site wastewater treatment coupled with molecular hydrogen production for useElectrochemical treatment of human waste coupled with molecular hydrogen production Kangwoo Cho

Heaton, Thomas H.

273

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimate. The overall economics of hydrogen production from this new process was assessed and compared with conventional hydrogen production technologies from coal. Several proton-conducting perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) were successfully tested in a new permeation unit at temperatures between 800 and 1040 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bars. The experimental data confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing hydrogen partial pressure at the feed side. The highest hydrogen flux measured was 1.0 cc/min/cm{sup 2} (STP) for the SCTm membrane at 3 bars and 1040 C. The chemical stability of the perovskite membranes with respect to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S can be improved by doping with Zr, as demonstrated from the TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis) tests in this project. A conceptual design, using the measured hydrogen flux data and a modeling approach, for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without a substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions. Flowsheet simulations show that the coal to hydrogen process employing the proposed membrane reactor concept can increase the hydrogen production efficiency by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Preliminary economic analysis also shows a 30% cost reduction for the proposed membrane reactor process, assuming membrane materials meeting DOE's flux and cost target. Although this study shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier, placing the membrane module outside the gasifier in a closely coupled way in terms of temperature and pressure can still offer the same performance advantage. This could also avoid the complicated fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues when the membrane module is installed inside the gasifier. Future work should be focused on improving the permeability and stability for the proton-conducting membranes, testing the membranes with real syngas from a gasifier and scaling up the membrane size.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while liquefaction electricity costs ($/kg) are independent0.10/kg while higher electricity costs ($0.075 vs $0.05/kWh)the cost of electricity and the cost of storage lead to

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Production of hydrogen from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process for production of hydrogen from oil shale fines by direct introduction of the oil shale fines into a fluidized bed at temperatures about 1200/sup 0/ to about 2000/sup 0/ F. to obtain rapid heating of the oil shale. The bed is fluidized by upward passage of steam and oxygen, the steam introduced in the weight ratio of about 0.1 to about 10 on the basis of the organic carbon content of the oil shale and the oxygen introduced in less than the stoichiometric quantity for complete combustion of the organic carbonaceous kerogen content of the oil shale. Embodiments are disclosed for heat recovery from the spent shale and heat recovery from the spent shale and product gas wherein the complete process and heat recovery is carried out in a single reaction vessel. The process of this invention provides high conversion of organic carbon component of oil shale and high production of hydrogen from shale fines which when used in combination with a conventional oil shale hydroconversion process results in increased overall process efficiency of greater than 15 percent.

Schora, F. C.; Feldkirchner, H. L.; Janka, J. C.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

276

Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hydrogen Production R&D Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D Activities Hydrogen Production R&D Activities An important advantage to using hydrogen as an energy carrier is that it can be produced from a variety of abundant and domestic...

278

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- EV) Use BASF's existing assets and low cost production process. Validate that cost and quality targets are met via coin cells, pouch cells and 18650 cells. ...

279

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

280

2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is accepted as the practical maximum hydrogen yield from fermentation and actual hydrogen conversions are often even less. Other disadvantages mentioned were the impurity of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production 2. Hydrogen Storage 3. Hydrogen Compression vi 4.Table 2-13: Liquid Hydrogen Storage System Costs fromTable 2-1 4: Gaseou s Hydrogen Storage System Costs from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production 2. Hydrogen Storage 3. Hydrogen Compression vi 4.Table 2-13: Liquid Hydrogen Storage System Costs fromTable 2-1 4: Gaseou s Hydrogen Storage System Costs from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gate”) Cost Estimates Production Method Natural Gas SteamHydrogen Cost Estimates Production Method Natural Gas SteamCost Estimates (continued) Production Method Natural Gas

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon fuel cell stack performance, catalyst cost, stackin 2025, the fuel cell system cost (stack and BOP) is aboutaffect the cost of fuel cell stack. In a recent report by

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting 6/2/2003 DOE DOE - - BES Sponsored Workshop on BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Production, Storage and Use Walter J. Stevens Walter J. Stevens Director Director Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop dates: May 13-15, 2003 A follow-on workshop to BESAC-sponsored workshop on "Basic Research Needs to Assure a Secure Energy Future" Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

286

Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...00/0 Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic...Continuous photosynthetic production ofhydrogen by Rhodospirillum...dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen...processing specific organic wastes could be...in large-scale production ofhydrogen together...organisms that can use solar energy offer several...

Hans Zürrer; Reinhard Bachofen

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Silo Construction Costs and Silage Production Practices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the average annual cost per ton of storage ranged from $1.65 for the 100-ton size to $1: for those of 200-ton capacity. On farms with crops yielding 12 tons of silage per acre, a crew of five men, two tractors and tl trucks harvested 8 acres per day when... filling trench silos. However, a crew of eight men and fp tractors was required to put a similar yield in an upright silo. With crops yielding only 4 tons of silage per acre, a crew of four men, two trucks and two trac'. averaged putting the production...

Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs)

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach Karen Miller, Vice President The National Hydrogen Association 1800 M Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20036-5802 phone: 202-223-5547 fax: 202-223-5537 Background: The Mission of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) is to foster the development of hydrogen technologies and their use in commercial and industrial applications and to promote the role of hydrogen as a major energy carrier of the future. The basic long-term goals are determined by the greatest needs tempered by activities consistent with the role of the NHA as an association. Today these are: * To educate the public and policy makers on the benefits of hydrogen; * To assist in the development of necessary hydrogen codes and standards; and

289

The use of advanced steam reforming technology for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The demand for supplementary hydrogen production in refineries is growing significantly world-wide as environmental legislation concerning cleaner gasoline and diesel fuels is introduced. The main manufacturing method is by steam reforming. The process has been developed both to reduce the capital cost and increase efficiency, reliability and ease of operation. ICI Katalco`s Leading Concept Hydrogen or LCH process continues this process of improvement by replacing the conventional fired steam reformer with a type of heat exchange reformer known as the Gas Heated Reformer or GHR. The GHR was first used in the Leading Concept Ammonia process, LCA at ICI`s manufacturing site at Severnside, England and commissioned in 1988 and later in the Leading Concept Methanol (LCM) process for methanol at Melbourne, Australia and commissioned in 1994. The development of the LCH process follows on from both LCA and LCM processes. This paper describes the development and use of the GHR in steam reforming, and shows how the GHR can be used in LCH. A comparison between the LCH process and a conventional hydrogen plant is given, showing the benefits of the LCH process in certain circumstances.

Abbishaw, J.B.; Cromarty, B.J. [ICI Katalco, Billingham (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing including fossil fuel use global warming and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end?users particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN?IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs HTR VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on Giner and Proton Presentation slides and speaker biographies from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane...

292

Energy Department Invests $20 Million to Advance Hydrogen Production...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

fuel cell hydrogen energy station in Fountain Valley, California. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals. Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell...

293

Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation.

294

Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by John Peters, Montana State University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

295

Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells: Current Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells, February 2, 2011.

296

Mesoporous electrodes for hydrogen production | Center for Bio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center News Research Highlights Center Research News Media about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Mesoporous electrodes for hydrogen production 24 Oct 2012...

297

THERMODYNAMIC EVALUATION OF PROCESSES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM CARBONACEOUS FUEL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research work presents the thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production using steam methane reforming process at different conditions. The model is developed using HSC 4.1… (more)

Kaini, Bhanu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production techonologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003.

299

Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FuelCell Energy Overview, Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) Technology Status, Hydrogen Co-production Technology, Benefits and Status, Strategic Input

300

Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Author's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and gasoline [3]. Moreover, hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity, or directly as a transportation fuel [4]. Hydrogen can be generated from hydrocarbons and water resourcesAuthor's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/ methanol decomposition

Wood, Thomas K.

302

Methane Decomposition: Production of Hydrogen and Carbon Filaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hydrogen is to power fuel cells. Major automobile manufac- turers are currently working towards developing ppm in the preferential oxidation reactor (PROX). The hydrogen can be introduced in the fuel cell only for the performance of PEM fuel cells.6 Other conventional process of hydrogen production such as partial oxidation

Goodman, Wayne

303

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011.

305

Hydrogen Leak Detection – Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the April 3, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar "America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies".

306

DOE Science Showcase - Hydrogen Production | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org More information Making molecular hydrogen more efficiently Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do Hydrogen and Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Animation Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Increase your Hydrogen IQ Visit the Science Showcase homepage. OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services OSTI Facebook OSTI Twitter OSTI Google+ Bookmark and Share (Link will open in a new window) Go to Videos Loading... Stop news scroll Most Visited Adopt-A-Doc DOE Data Explorer DOE Green Energy DOepatents DOE R&D Accomplishments .EDUconnections Energy Science and Technology Software Center E-print Network

307

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Hydrogen Program Review, Air Products and Chemicals Inc.data and information. Air Products and Chemicals BOC BP Calstations and vendors (e.g. Air Products, Stuart, H2Gen). All

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Comparative assessment of hydrogen production methods from renewable and non-renewable sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, we present a comparative environmental impact assessment of possible hydrogen production methods from renewable and non-renewable sources with a special emphasis on their application in Turkey. It is aimed to study and compare the performances of hydrogen production methods and assess their economic, social and environmental impacts, The methods considered in this study are natural gas steam reforming, coal gasification, water electrolysis via wind and solar energies, biomass gasification, thermochemical water splitting with a Cu–Cl and S–I cycles, and high temperature electrolysis. Environmental impacts (global warming potential, GWP and acidification potential, AP), production costs, energy and exergy efficiencies of these eight methods are compared. Furthermore, the relationship between plant capacity and hydrogen production capital cost is studied. The social cost of carbon concept is used to present the relations between environmental impacts and economic factors. The results indicate that thermochemical water splitting with the Cu–Cl and S–I cycles become more environmentally benign than the other traditional methods in terms of emissions. The options with wind, solar and high temperature electrolysis also provide environmentally attractive results. Electrolysis methods are found to be least attractive when production costs are considered. Therefore, increasing the efficiencies and hence decreasing the costs of hydrogen production from solar and wind electrolysis bring them forefront as potential options. The energy and exergy efficiency comparison study indicates the advantages of biomass gasification over other methods. Overall rankings show that thermochemical Cu–Cl and S–I cycles are primarily promising candidates to produce hydrogen in an environmentally benign and cost-effective way.

Canan Acar; Ibrahim Dincer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Washington, D.C. -- A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles

311

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10,000-psi tank cost $2,458, or $11.1/kWh. Carbon fiber wastank cost is in the range of $10-$17/kWh and carbon fiber

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis G. Saur and C. Ainscough Technical Report NRELTP-5600-52640 December 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of...

313

Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Parametric study of solar hydrogen production from saline water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study the electrolysis of water for the production of hydrogen. A number of parameters, including salinity, voltage, current density and quantity of electricity, were investigated, and their effect on hydrogen production using a modified simple Hoffman electrolysis cell is reported.

S.M. El-Haggar; M. Khalil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BioSolarH BioSolarH 2  Autofermentative biological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria G.C. Dismukes Rutgers University Waksman Institute and Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology DOE Biohydrogen Production Workshop NREL October, 2013 -BioSolarH 2  Ghirardi et al., 2007 Tamagnini et al., 2007 Soluble NiFe hydrogenase (SH) Group 5 AH in Ralstonia eutropha H16 SchĂ€fer et al., 2013 Formate dehydrogenase Hydrogenase Bagramyan et al., 2003 Ferredoxin Km (MV) = 16.1”M Kcat (MV) = 1242 s -1 (Francis et al., 1990) K i (O 2 ) = 1% (McIntosh et al., 2011) Km (C 2 H 2 ) = 1.8*10 -3 atms (Hallenbeck et al. 1979) Km (H 2 ) =6.1”M Kcat (H 2 ) = 238 s -1 ( SchĂ€fer et al., 2013) K i (O 2 ) = 47.5% (Lenz et al., 2010) Km (H 2 ) =3.5”M Kcat (H 2 ) = 0.5 s -1 ( Oxygen insensitive (SchĂ€fer et al., 2013)

316

Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research  

SciTech Connect

The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost of $2-$4/gge Capacity (kg/day) Distributed Central 100,000,000 100,000 50,000 10,000 1,000 10 Natural Gas Reforming Photo- electro- chemical Biological Water Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020 Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water (Grid) Coal Gasification (Carbon Capture)

318

Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Alga Mastigocladus laminosus: Effects of Nitrogen, Temperature, and Inhibition of Photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production of hydrogen by solar radiation was also demonstrated...low-cost culture and H2 collector system, as well as...using specially designed collectors, the heat captured...heat. Thus, the total solar energy conversion efficiency...at a 650 angle to the horizontal and facing southwest...

Kazuhisa Miyamoto; Patrick C. Hallenbeck; John R. Benemann

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wt.%), and hydrogen, nitrogen and carbon content per ASTM specifications using the new hydro- gen sintering and controlled phase transformation technology (HSPT) (2014). *...

320

Hydrogen Cryomagnetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% cryogenics (inc. MRI) 29% pressurisation and purging 11%controlled atmospheres (inc. breathing) 6% 4     Figure 5. Simplified price-cost, supply-demand relationship that is central to the helium market model developed during the Helium Resources... of hydrogen large amounts of hydrogen must be available for liquefaction. This poses problems for the production of liquid hydrogen via intermittent wind energy and via microwave plasma reactors that are not scalable as a result of low hydrogen production...

Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen production, while in other regions electrolysis using off-peak hydropower might give the lowest hydrogen production cost. (hydrogen truck delivery, onsite production from natural gas, onsite electrolysis, and pipeline delivery. Costs

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen production, while in other regions electrolysis using off-peak hydropower might give the lowest hydrogen production cost. (hydrogen truck delivery, onsite production from natural gas, onsite electrolysis, and pipeline delivery. Costs

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NETL: News Release - Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Station Provides Transportation Fuel from Domestic Resources for Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles Washington, D.C. - A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles and equipment, lessening U.S. dependence on foreign oil. The facility will produce, compress, store and dispense hydrogen as a fuel source for vehicles that have been converted to run on hydrogen, as well as other types of ground equipment at the airport.

324

Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biofuels production have dramatically increased costs of fertilizer, seed, and feed grains. These increased

325

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method simplifies the relationship between storage, hydrogen demand, and hydrogen productionhydrogen production, it allows for more meaningful cost comparisons between production methods

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method simplifies the relationship between storage, hydrogen demand, and hydrogen productionhydrogen production, it allows for more meaningful cost comparisons between production methods

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system cost model, and oil security metrics model (OSMM).the Energy Security Benefits of Reduced U.S. Oil Imports,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the chemical and physical transformations occurring in materials used to convert solar energy into hydrogen and develop and test novel reactor concepts at relevant scales....

329

Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis, Preliminary Results - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 E-mail: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005253 Project Start Date: September 30, 2012 Project End Date: September 29, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop cost models of carbon fiber hydrogen storage * pressure vessels. Explore the sensitivity of pressure vessel cost to design * parameters including hydrogen storage quantity, storage

330

A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rüsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen production comes naturally to ocean microbe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a multitasker — it can not only photosynthesize, but can also produce large amounts of hydrogen, opening up a potential way to make the gas cheaply for fuel. The single ... to make the gas cheaply for fuel. The single-celled cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 can make hydrogen in air, Himadri Pakrasi of Washington University in St Louis, Missouri, and his ...

Katharine Sanderson

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

NETL: News Release - NETL Building Hydrogen Production and Dispensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 NETL Building Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility at Yeager Airport Morgantown, WV- The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced its plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production-and-dispensing facility at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. According to U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., "This project is a great example of the wonderful potential of coal. Coal can produce hydrogen fuel, which can greatly reduce greenhouse gases and our need to import foreign oil. Coal is abundant and remarkably versatile - particularly hydrogen produced from coal through gasification or coal-based power used to split water that provides a secure source of hydrogen fuel that will compete with imported petroleum. I am very pleased to be involved in helping this new hydrogen facility in West Virginia become a reality."

335

Ionically Conducting Membranes for Hydrogen Production and Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND SEPARATION Presented by Tony Sammells Eltron Research Inc. Boulder, Colorado www.eltronresearch.com Presented at DOE Hydrogen Separations Workshop Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. TO BE DISCUSSED * Membranes for Hydrogen Production - Compositions - Feedstocks - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles * Membranes for Hydrogen Separation - Compositions - Ex Situ vs. In Situ WGS - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles ELTRON RESEARCH INC. OVERALL SCHEME FOR CONVERTING FEEDSTOCK TO HYDROGEN WITH SIMULTANEOUS CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H 2 WGS H 2 O CO 2 /H 2 1618afs.dsf H 2 CO 2 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. INCENTIVES FOR OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR

336

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets Presentation on the Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets...

337

Production of Large Amounts of Hydrogen Peroxide by Human Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spectrophotometric method. Mouse fibroblasts...metastasis. Production of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide...sources of hydrogen peroxide production in these...MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell Lines...modified method of Ding and...width. 794 PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE...

Ted P. Szatrowski and Carl F. Nathan

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hydroxyl Radical Production and Human DNA Damage Induced by Ferric Nitrilotriacetate and Hydrogen Peroxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to radical production by using...NTA plus hydrogen peroxide...MATERIALS AND METHODS Materials...described method (17, 18...hydroxyl radical production from hydrogen peroxide...Hydroxyl Radical Production from Hydrogen Peroxide...trapping methods were used...

Sumiko Inoue and Shosuke Kawanishi

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Process for the production of hydrogen from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways—Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002—July 22, 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A report showing a comparative scooping economic analysis of 19 pathways for producing, handling, distributing, and dispensing hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle applications.

342

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total oil increase in oil prices. demand; thus, we assume6), which results from oil price changes, is a real cost toanalysis when we use low-oil-price case and high-oil-price

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Role prioritization of hydrogen production technologies for promoting hydrogen economy in the current state of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogen production technologies play an important role in the hydrogen economy of China. However, the roles of different technologies played in promoting the development of hydrogen economy are different. The role prioritization of various hydrogen production technologies is of vital importance for the stakeholders/decision-makers to plan the development of hydrogen economy in China and to allocate the finite R&D budget reasonably. In this study, DPSIR framework was firstly used to identify the key factors concerning the priorities of various hydrogen production technologies; then, a fuzzy group decision-making method by incorporating fuzzy AHP and fuzzy TOPSIS was proposed to prioritize the roles of different technologies. The proposed method is capable of allowing multiple groups of stakeholders/decision-makers to participate in the decision-making and addressing problems with uncertainty and imprecise information. The prioritization results by using the proposed method demonstrated that the technologies of coal gasification with CO2 capture and storage and hydropower-based water electrolysis were regarded as the two most important hydrogen production pathways for promoting the development of hydrogen economy in China among the five assessed technologies.

Jingzheng Ren; Suzhao Gao; Shiyu Tan; Lichun Dong; Antonio Scipioni; Anna Mazzi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

6 - Hydrogen production by water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: An electrolyzer combines an oxidation and a reduction reaction, driven by electricity, to produce separate streams of hydrogen gas and oxygen gas by a process called electrolysis. The hydrogen contains a portion of the electrical energy, and it can be used to generate electricity in a fuel cell by a process that is the reverse of electrolysis. If water electrolysis is driven by renewable electricity, it can be used in fuel-cell electric vehicles to displace petroleum, increase vehicle efficiency, and reduce the environmental impact of vehicles. The fundamental aspects of electrolytic hydrogen and its use as energy carrier are discussed.

N.A. Kelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materials Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe giant magnetocaloric material...

347

PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EERE-funded PNNL projects are improving performance and decreasing production costs of hydrogen fuel and fuel cell technologies.

348

Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect

The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrating dark and light bio-hydrogen production strategies: towards the hydrogen economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biological methods of hydrogen production are preferable to chemical methods because of the possibility to use sunlight,...2...and organic wastes as substrates for environmentally benign conversions, under modera...

Mark D. Redwood; Marion Paterson-Beedle…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Experimental Study of Solar Hydrogen Production Performance by Water Electrolysis in the South of Algeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current environment problems require the uses of clean process and durable sources in industrial activities. Hydrogen, produced by water electrolysis, represents high clean energy source. In this process, a high electrical energy rate is needed which led to costly product. In order to remedy this issue, the uses of renewable energies are required. In this work, an experimental study of solar hydrogen production system by alkaline water electrolysis in Ouargla (Algeria) city is presented. The alkaline water electrolysis, with different NaOH concentrations, is feed by photovoltaic panels. The system is tested at different input conditions of voltages and currents. Effects of temperature and NaOH electrolyte concentration on hydrogen production are examined

N. Chennouf; N. Settou; B. Negrou; K. Bouziane; B. Dokkar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Jake McKinlay, Indiana University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

352

Photo-induced hydrogen production in a helical peptide incorporating...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo-induced hydrogen production in a helical peptide incorporating a FeFe hydrogenase active site mimic Authors: Roy, A., Madden, C., and Ghirlanda, G. Title: Photo-induced...

353

Vacancy Announcements Posted for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office has posted two vacancy announcements for a position to serve as Program Manager for the Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program in the DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office. The closing date is October 28, 2014.

354

Highly Active Steam Reforming Catalyst for Hydrogen and Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toyo Engineering Corporation developed a steam reforming catalyst, which is four times as active as conventional catalysts, for hydrogen and syngas production from light natural gas. The catalyst has...3 plant. B...

Toru Numaguchi

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Refueling Stations SMR station Pipeline Station SMR Module Cost (HGM-1000) SMR Module Output 600 kg/day Compressor Base Cost (

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12014: Current U.S. Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12014 Date: June 18, 2012 12014 Date: June 18, 2012 Title: Current U.S. Hydrogen Production Originator: Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: June 26, 2012 Item: The United States currently produces about 9 million metric tons of hydrogen per year, enough to power approximately ~36-41 million FCEVs. References/Calculations:  "...9 million metric tons of hydrogen per year" The United States produces about 9 million metric tons per year for the captive and merchant markets. U.S. Hydrogen Production By Merchant & Captive Types 2009-2016 (Thousand Metric Tons) 1 Source: MarketsandMarkets, GLOBAL HYDROGEN GENERATION MARKET BY MERCHANT & CAPTIVE TYPE, DISTRIBUTED & CENTRALIZED GENERATION, APPLICATION & TECHNOLOGY - TRENDS &

357

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed the technology for bio- oil to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion-Tech, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has demonstrated the production of hydrogen from biomass at a flow ratio of 1.5:1 was used as a carrier gas and also as a reactant in the reformer. The test

358

NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

Charles V Park

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development, Production and Implementation of Low Cost Rubber Bearings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations and the results discussed in this chapter are related to development, production and implementation of low cost rubber isolators. In addition to production of isolators, one of the main objecti...

Mihail Garevski

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics ­ Dormancy and boil-off losses ­ WTT efficiency ­ Greenhouse gas emissions ­ Storage system cost In-tank heat exchanger 4000-psi pressure vessel rating #12;4 System Analysis of Physical Storage compressive stresses introduced by autofrettage, pre and postproof load distribution between liner and CF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Process Intensification in Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process Intensification in Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Derived Syngas ... A “one-box” process has been proposed and studied in order to economically produce pure hydrogen from biomass-derived syngas in the presence of its common impurities through the use of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. ... (1) Hydrogen burns cleanly and produces more energy on a per mass basis than any other fuel; if widely adopted for both mobile and stationary power generation, it would reduce the emissions of pollutants typically associated with power production, and would potentially diminish the prospect of global warming. ...

Mitra Abdollahi; Jiang Yu; Hyun Tae Hwang; Paul K. T. Liu; Richard Ciora; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect

High purity hydrogen is commercially produced from syngas by the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) in high and low temperature shift reactors using iron oxide and copper catalysts respectively. However, the WGSR is thermodynamically limited at high temperatures towards hydrogen production necessitating excess steam addition and catalytic operation. In the calcium looping process, the equilibrium limited WGSR is driven forward by the incessant removal of CO{sub 2} by-product through the carbonation of calcium oxide. At high pressures, this process obviates the need for a catalyst and excess steam requirement, thereby removing the costs related to the procurement and deactivation of the catalyst and steam generation. Thermodynamic analysis for the combined WGS and carbonation reaction was conducted. The combined WGS and carbonation reaction was investigated at varying pressures, temperatures and S/C ratios using a bench scale reactor system. It was found that the purity of hydrogen increases with the increase in pressure and at a pressure of 300 psig, almost 100% hydrogen is produced. It was also found that at high pressures, high purity hydrogen can be produced using stoichiometric quantities of steam. On comparing the catalytic and non catalytic modes of operation in the presence of calcium oxide, it was found that there was no difference in the purity of hydrogen produced at elevated pressures. Multicyclic reaction and regeneration experiments were also conducted and it was found that the purity of hydrogen remains almost constant after a few cycles.

Shwetha Ramkumar; Mahesh Iyer; Danny Wong; Himanshu Gupta; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Lhih Fan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass — Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil.

364

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

Dessouky, Maged

365

Effect of different gas releasing methods on anaerobic fermentative hydrogen production in batch cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decreasing hydrogen partial pressure can not only increase the activity of the hydrogen enzyme but also decrease the products inhibition, so it is an appropriate method to enhance the fermentative hydrogen production

Sheng Chang; Jianzheng Li; Feng Liu; Ze Yu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Shah and Raymond F. Drnevich Praxair, Inc. P.O. Box 44 Tonawanda, NY 14151 Abstract Praxair has on oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). This system has a potential process option, both the OTM and the HTM were integrated into a single unit such that various processing

367

Engineering a Synthetic Dual-Organism System for Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...promising renewable energy source as pressure...but they are also energy intensive and therefore...due to its use of renewable biomass or sunlight as its primary energy source. Hydrogen...due to the current cost of its chemical synthesis...

Zeev Waks; Pamela A. Silver

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind to Hydrogen Project: Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Todd Ramsden, Kevin Harrison, Darlene Steward November 16, 2009 NREL/PR-560-47432 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Wind2H2 RD&D Project * The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with Xcel Energy and DOE has designed, operates, and continues to perform testing on the wind-to-hydrogen (Wind2H2) project at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder * The Wind2H2 project integrates wind turbines, PV arrays and electrolyzers to produce from renewable energy

369

Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

Hollabaugh, Charles M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bowman, Melvin G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

371

Coupling a hydrogen production process to a nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Work is currently underway to define a pre-conceptual design of a hydrogen production plant. The reference case is a VHTR dedicated to hydrogen production using the sulphur-iodine process. The chemical part of the plant is based on a very detailed flow-sheet where all components are listed. Considering the volume and flow-rates of the circulating products, a detailed image of the chemical plant is drawn with several shops in parallel. A coupling circuit using gases was also studied with two intermediate heat exchangers at very high temperature. A specific heat transfer circuit is added inside the chemical part to distribute heat at the correct temperature. Optimisation of this circuit should lead to an increase in the overall efficiency of the process. Finally a methodology is proposed for the safety of the hydrogen production plant.

Pascal Anzieu; Patrick Aujollet; Dominique Barbier; Anne Bassi; Frederic Bertrand; Alain Le Duigou; Jean Leybros; Gilles Rodriguez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Life cycle assessment of various hydrogen production methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) is reported for five methods of hydrogen production, namely steam reforming of natural gas, coal gasification, water electrolysis via wind and solar electrolysis, and thermochemical water splitting with a Cu–Cl cycle. Carbon dioxide equivalent emissions and energy equivalents of each method are quantified and compared. A case study is presented for a hydrogen fueling station in Toronto, Canada, and nearby hydrogen resources close to the fueling station. In terms of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, thermochemical water splitting with the Cu–Cl cycle is found to be advantageous over the other methods, followed by wind and solar electrolysis. In terms of hydrogen production capacities, natural gas steam reforming, coal gasification and thermochemical water splitting with the Cu–Cl cycle methods are found to be advantageous over the renewable energy methods.

E. Cetinkaya; I. Dincer; G.F. Naterer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Synthetic Nitrogen Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost for making hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas depends primarily on the cost of natural gas. Several sources estimate the hydrogen production cost, excluding capital charges (in US$ per million BT...

Gary R. Maxwell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report I. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-9 3. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production, Praxair, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . II-14 4. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform, Praxair Inc

375

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

376

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind electrolysis- derived hydrogen would cost about $7–11Hydrogen Production Method: Electrolysis via photovoltaic system Location: East Amwell, New Jersey Production Capacity: Sized for Residential Home Total Project Cost:Hydrogen Production Method: Electrolysis via renewable grid electricity Location: Burlington, Vermont Production Capacity: 12 kg of hydrogen per day Total Project Cost:

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Welfare and Profit Maximization with Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Auctions are a central problem in Algorithmic Mechanism Design: pricing and allocating goods to buyers with complex preferences in order to maximize some desired objective (e.g., social welfare, revenue, or profit). The problem has been well-studied in the case of limited supply (one copy of each item), and in the case of digital goods (the seller can produce additional copies at no cost). Yet in the case of resources---oil, labor, computing cycles, etc.---neither of these abstractions is just right: additional supplies of these resources can be found, but at increasing difficulty (marginal cost) as resources are depleted. In this work, we initiate the study of the algorithmic mechanism design problem of combinatorial pricing under increasing marginal cost. The goal is to sell these goods to buyers with unknown and arbitrary combinatorial valuation functions to maximize either the social welfare, or the seller's profit; specifically we focus on the setting of \\emph{posted item prices} with buyer...

Blum, Avrim; Mansour, Yishay; Sharma, Ankit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production ..... solution with the largest j value such that sj?1 = 0 and st > 0 for t = j,...,n.

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Discovery of Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

This project for DOE was designed to address these materials-related issues through a combination of high-throughput screening of semiconductor candidates and theoretical modeling of nanostructures. High-throughput screening is an effective and economical way to examine a large number of candidates and identify those worthy of further study. Unfortunately, in the course of this project, we discovered no semiconductor candidates that can meet the DOE’s stringent requirements for an economically feasible photoelectrochemical process. However, some of our results indicated that several systems may have potential if further optimized. In particular, the published theoretical modeling work indicates that core-shell nanorod structures, if properly engineered, have the potential to overcome the shortfalls of current semiconductors. Although the synthesis of the designed core-shell nanorod structures proved to be beyond the current capabilities of our laboratories, recent advances in the synthesis of core-shell nanorod structures imply that the designed structures can be synthesized. SRI is confident that once these materials are made they will validate our models and lead to economical and environmentally friendly hydrogen from sunlight and water. The high-throughput photolysis analysis module developed at SRI will also have utility in applications such as identifying catalysts for photo-assisted chemical detoxification, as well as non-photolytic applications such as hydrogen storage, which can take advantage of the ability of the analysis module to monitor pressure over time.

D. Brent MacQueen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Date: October 7, 2009 2 Date: October 7, 2009 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009 Update to: Record 8019 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 7, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $61/kW for 2009 technology in 2009 dollars ($51/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2009, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2008 cost analyses of 80-kW direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2009 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. DTI and TIAX use Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

382

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Date: August 17, 2011 2 Date: August 17, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011 Update to: Record 10004 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 7, 2011 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2011 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $49/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2011, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) 2 updated the 2010 Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) cost analysis of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems, based on 2011 technology and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year [1]. Results from the analysis were communicated to the DOE

383

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8002: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: October 31, 2008 02 Date: October 31, 2008 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007 Update to: Record 5005 Originator: Nancy Garland and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: April 3, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $94/kW for 2007 technology in 2007 dollars ($82/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2007, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2006 cost analyses of direct hydrogen, 80-kW, PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2007 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2].

384

Economic Cost Analysis of Biodiesel Production: Case in Soybean Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Combustion of petroleum diesel is a major source for emitting greenhouse gas (GHG). ... An economic analysis model using ASPEN PLUS software suggested that the production costs of soapstock and soybean oil biodiesel would be approximately 0.41 and 0.53 USD L?1, respectively, a 25% reduction relative to the estimated cost of biodiesel produced from soybean oil. ... The use of waste cooking oil to produce biodiesel reduced the raw material cost. ...

Yii-Der You; Je-Lueng Shie; Ching-Yuan Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Huang; Cheng-Yu Pai; Yue-Hwa Yu; Chungfang Ho Chang

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Received 472K * FY10 Funding Expected 890K Barriers * Reduce the production cost of Cathode Material * Meet PHEV battery requirements for a 40 mile all-electric range *...

386

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

387

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

388

Solar-Powered Production of Molecular Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the present time, the majority of industrial-scale hydrogen is produced by steam?methane reformation (SMR), even though the high-temperature conversion of methane to hydrogen results in the concomitant production of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... 7-9 The PV arrays are used to convert solar light to electricity in order to power alkaline (e.g., 27% KOH at pH 14.7) electrolyzers for producing hydrogen gas. ... Narayanan et al. describe a DC-powered hybrid system that drives a methanol fuel cell in reverse,10 while Soler et al. report on a solar-powered photo-Fenton process that produces hydrogen noncatalytically under severe conditions with a limited number of organic substrates. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Wonyong Choi; Oleh Weres; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Transition to Hydrogen Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project Summary Full Title: A Smooth Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project ID: 87 Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Brief Description: This project contrasts the options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Keywords: Infrastructure; costs; hydrogen production Purpose The case for hydrogen-powered transportation requires an assessment of present and prospective methods for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen. This project examines one potential pathway: on-site production of hydrogen to fuel light-duty vehicles. Performer Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

391

Ultrastructural Localization of Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Ligninolytic Phanerochaete chrysosporium Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that H202 production activity...MATERIALS AND METHODS Organism...OF H.O. PRODUCTION IN P. CHRYSOSPORIUM...reaction, hydrogen peroxide...1972. Production of extracellular hydrogen peroxide...cytochemical methods for en...

Larry J. Forney; C. A. Reddy; H. Stuart Pankratz

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Techno-economic assessment of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) for upgrading bitumen from oil sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the techno-economic viability of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada, for the servicing of the oil sands bitumen upgrading industry. Hydrogen production for bitumen upgrading is predominantly achieved via steam methane reforming (SMR); which involves significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with considerable feedstock (natural gas) cost volatility. UCG is a formidable candidate for cost-competitive environmentally sustainable hydrogen production; given its negligible feedstock cost, the enormity of deep coal reserves in Western Canada and the favourable CO2 sequestration characteristics of potential UCG sites in the Western Canadian sedimentary basin (WCSB). Techno-economic models were developed for UCG and SMR with and without CCS, to estimate the cost of hydrogen production including delivery to a bitumen upgrader. In this paper, at base case conditions, a 5% internal rate of return (IRR) differential between UCG and SMR was considered so as to account for the increased investment risk associated with UCG. The cost of UCG hydrogen production without CCS is estimated to be $1.78/kg of H2. With CCS, this increases to range of $2.11–$2.70/kg of H2, depending on the distance of the site for CO2 sequestration from the UCG plant. The SMR hydrogen production cost without CCS is estimated to be $1.73/kg of H2. In similar fashion to UCG, this rises to a range of $2.14 to $2.41/kg of H2 with the consideration of CCS. Lastly, for hydrogen production without CCS, UCG has a superior cost competitiveness in comparison to SMR for an IRR differential less than 4.6%. This competitive threshold rises to 5.4% for hydrogen production with CCS.

Babatunde Olateju; Amit Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Potential feedstock supply and costs for biodiesel production  

SciTech Connect

Without considering technology constraints, tallows and waste greases have definite potential as feedstocks for the production of biodiesel in the United States. These materials are less expensive than most oils produced from oilseed crops such as soybeans, sunflowers, canola and rapeseed. At current crude petroleum prices, biodiesel derived from any of these materials will be more expensive than diesel derived from petroleum. However, when compared to other clean burning alternate fuels, recent data suggest biodiesel blends produced from any of these feedstocks may be the lowest total cost alternative fuel in certain areas of the United States. Economic feasibility analyses were performed to investigate the cost of producing biodiesel ($/gallon) subject to variances in feedstock cost, by-product credit (glycerol and meal) and capital costs. Cost of production per gallon of esterified biodiesel from soybean, sunflower, tallow and yellow grease ranged from $0.96 to $3.39 subject to feedstock and chemical costs, by-product credit and system capital cost.

Nelson, R.G. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Howell, S.A. [MARC-IV, Bucyrus, KS (United States); Weber, J.A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrogen (H2) Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs Eric L. Hegg Michigan State University Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Bioresour. Technol. 2011, 102, 8589-8604 Major Challenges to H 2 Photoproduction Biological Challenges * Poor efficiency of H 2 production * Poor heterologous expression of H 2 -forming enzymes * Low quantum yields * Competition for reducing equivalents; poor electron coupling * Sensitivity of H 2 -forming enzymes to O 2 M. Ghirardi, Abstract #1751, Honolulu PRiME 2012 Technical Challenges * Mixture of H 2 and O 2 ; H 2 separation and storage * CO 2 addition and overall reactor design Overcoming Low Efficiency: Improving ET * Eliminate or down-regulate pathways competing for ele * Production of organic acids * Formation of NADPH/carbon fixation

395

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

396

Time Domain Partitioning of Electricity Production Cost Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Production cost models are often used for planning by simulating power system operations over long time horizons. The simulation of a day-ahead energy market can take several weeks to compute. Tractability improvements are often made through model simplifications, such as: reductions in transmission modeling detail, relaxation of commitment variable integrality, reductions in cost modeling detail, etc. One common simplification is to partition the simulation horizon so that weekly or monthly horizons can be simulated in parallel. However, horizon partitions are often executed with overlap periods of arbitrary and sometimes zero length. We calculate the time domain persistence of historical unit commitment decisions to inform time domain partitioning of production cost models. The results are implemented using PLEXOS production cost modeling software in an HPC environment to improve the computation time of simulations while maintaining solution integrity.

Barrows, C.; Hummon, M.; Jones, W.; Hale, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Bio-hydrogen production from renewable organic wastes  

SciTech Connect

Methane fermentation has been in practice over a century for the stabilization of high strength organic waste/wastewater. Although methanogenesis is a well established process and methane--the end-product of methanogenesis is a useful energy source; it is a low value end product with relatively less energy content (about 56 kJ energy/g CH{sub 4}). Besides, methane and its combustion by-product are powerful greenhouse gases, and responsible for global climate change. So there is a pressing need to explore alternative environmental technologies that not only stabilize the waste/wastewater but also generate benign high value end products. From this perspective, anaerobic bioconversion of organic wastes to hydrogen gas is an attractive option that achieves both goals. From energy security stand point, generation of hydrogen energy from renewable organic waste/wastewater could substitute non-renewable fossil fuels, over two-third of which is imported from politically unstable countries. Thus, biological hydrogen production from renewable organic waste through dark fermentation represents a critically important area of bioenergy production. This study evaluated both process engineering and microbial physiology of biohydrogen production.

Shihwu Sung

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was removed, producing 2200 mg/L of cells and 500 mL/h of biogas. When operated in MBR mode, the solids. This SRT increased the overall glucose utilization (98%), the biogas production rate (640 m,800 F 600 mg/L) both increased. However, the biogas produc- tion decreased (310 F 40 m

399

Syngas and hydrogen production in a volumetric radiant burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of syngas is the most energy demanding and metal consuming stage in the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons (GH's) into value-added products. Its complexity restrains many practical applications of chemical processing of GH's, especially for low scale of operation. The paper describes new compact and highly productive generator of syngas and hydrogen based on the combustion of GH's in volumetric permeable matrixes with locked IR radiation that can serve as a solution of this problem. It is shown that such simple devices can provide a highly efficient methane conversion into syngas and thus facilitate the utilization of low-capacity sources of GH's for economically feasible low scale syngas and hydrogen production from various local hydrocarbon sources.

V.S. Arutyunov; V.M. Shmelev; M. Yu Sinev; O.V. Shapovalova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2- FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS N. Muradov Florida Solar Energy Center 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, Florida 32922 tel. 321-638-1448, fax. 321-638-1010, muradov (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO2 byproducts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Production in a Single Chamber Microbial Electrolysis Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) at greater yields than fermentation and at greater energy efficiencies than water electrolysis. It has been to produce water. A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) operates in a manner similar to an MFC exceptHydrogen Production in a Single Chamber Microbial Electrolysis Cell Lacking a Membrane D O U G L

402

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production January 24, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production January 24, 2011 Webinar Q&A Q: How do you induce hypoxic photosynthesis? I imagine you N-stress, to accumulate starch first? A to bring photosynthesis to a level lower than that of respiration. Since then, a number of labs

403

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus, and bucking using a chainsaw and skidding logs with a rubber-tired grapple skidder and a mechanical system

Dodson, Beth

404

Lighting Up Enzymes for Solar Hydrogen Production (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have combined quantum dots, which are spherical nanoparticles that possess unique size-tunable photophysical properties, with the high substrate selectivity and fast turnover of hydrogenase enzymes to achieve light-driven hydrogen (H2) production. They found that quantum dots of cadmium telluride coated in carboxylic acids easily formed highly stable complexes with the hydrogenase and that these hybrid assemblies functioned to catalyze H2 production using the energy of sunlight.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

406

Thermophilic hydrogen production from starch wastewater using two-phase sequencing batch fermentation coupled with UASB methanogenic effluent recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of thermophilic hydrogenesis coupled with mesophilic methanogenesis in which the effluent was recycled to the hydrogen reactor for starch wastewater treatment. With this system, the hydrogen production rate and yield were 3.45 ± 0.25 L H2/(L·d) and 5.79 ± 0.41 mmol H2/g \\{CODadded\\} respectively, and thus higher than the values of the control group without methanogenic effluent recycling. In addition, relatively higher contents of acetate and butyrate were obtained in the hydrogen reactor with recirculation. The methane reactors were operated with the effluent from the hydrogen reactor, and methane yield was stabilized at 0.21–0.23 L/g \\{CODremoval\\} in both. Analysis of the microbial communities further showed that methanogenic effluent recirculation enriched microbial communities in the hydrogen reactor. Two species of bacteria effective in hydrogenesis, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, dominated during hydrogen production, whereas archaea belonging to Euryarchaeota were detected and cultured in the methane reactor. The recycled effluent supplied alkaline substrates for the hydrogen producing bacteria. Alkali balance calculations showed that the amount of added alkali was reduced by 88%. This amount, required for hydrogen production from starch wastewater, was contributed by alkali in the methanogenic effluent, (2225 ± 140 mg CaCO3/L), resulting in lower operational costs.

Li Xie; Nanshi Dong; Lei Wang; Qi Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiencies of hydrogen fuel cells in converting hydrogen to electricity. The development of advancedHydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells Hongqiang Hu., Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrol- ysis cells, Water Research (2008

Tullos, Desiree

408

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the US DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, on held January 17, 2013.

409

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Production and use of electrolytic hydrogen in Ecuador towards a low carbon economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a pre-feasibility study of producing and using electrolytic hydrogen in Ecuador as part of a strategy towards a low carbon economy. Hydrogen could be produced using hydropower either alone or combined with other renewable energy sources. For this study, we analyzed two scenarios of energy availability based on data from the largest hydroelectric power plant in the country. The first scenario assumes that an amount of water equivalent to 30% of that spilled in 2011 could be used to generate additional electricity. Thus, an additional amount of energy equivalent to 5% of the energy produced in 2011 could be available. The second scenario doubles this amount of energy. Economic analysis showed that to obtain low-cost hydrogen (3.00 US$/kg) it is necessary to operate the electrolysis plants 24 h/day, using low-cost electricity (30 US$/MWh). A continuous supply of energy could be possible when new hydroelectric utilities start operating or by integrating hydropower with solar and wind. Three possibilities for using hydrogen are discussed: 1) production of ammonia as a raw material for nitrogenous fertilizers, 2) hydro-treating heavy oils and bio-oils in oil refineries, and 3) as an energy storage medium to offset natural instability and unpredictability of renewables.

Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Gustavo Riveros-Godoy; Santiago Torres-Contreras; Tsai Garcia-Perez; Esteban Albornoz-Vintimilla

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective) Pinakin Patel FuelCell Energy, Inc. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Fuel Cell Seminar 2008 Phoenix, AZ October 27, 2008 reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Presentation Outline * FuelCell Energy Overview * Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) Technology Status * Hydrogen Co-production Technology, Benefits and Status * Strategic Input for the DOE Workshop FCE Overview * Leading fuel cell developer for over 30 years - MCFC, SOFC, PAFC and PEM (up to 2 MW size products) - Over 230 million kWh of clean power produced world-wide (>60 installations) - Renewable fuels: over two dozen sites with ADG fuel - Ultra-clean technology: CARB-2007 certified Danbury, CT * Highly innovative approach to fuel cell development

412

Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions  

SciTech Connect

The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

415

Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable energy to be transported via hydrogen to a demand center for transportation use.

416

Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Alga Mastigocladus laminosus: Effects of Nitrogen, Temperature, and Inhibition of Photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production of hydrogen by solar radiation was also...production of hydrogen by solar radiation was also...Although there are both advantages and disadvantages to this approach...Thus, the total solar energy conversion efficiency...

Kazuhisa Miyamoto; Patrick C. Hallenbeck; John R. Benemann

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative hydrogen production Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of countries have quite a substantial production of hydrogen, among these are Germany and the USA... . In the Nordic countries most of the production of hydrogen is...

418

A Conjecture on 180° Production of High Energy Hydrogen Isotopes from Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of 1 1igh energy hydrogen isotopes in the reac...func- tion. The production cross sections of the hydrogen isotopes are well...Assuming the production cross section of...the above mentioned method, we find it tend......

Fumiyo Uchiyama

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Physiology and Biotechnology Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production...system for the bioconversion of solar energy. Our experimental system was based...agar and alginate. Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production...

Mercedes Roncel; José A. Navarro; Miguel A. De la Rosa

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effect of gamma interferon on hydrogen peroxide production by cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increase in hydrogen peroxide production and only in...assayed by the method of Pick and...Immunol. Methods 38:161-170...superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by macrophages...Immunol. Methods 46:211-226...

A K Sharp; D K Banerjee

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record #: 13010 Date: June 11, 2013 Title: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost Originators: Scott McWhorter and Grace Ordaz Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 17, 2013 Item: This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive applications when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units per year. The current projected performance and cost of these systems are presented in Table 1 against the DOE Hydrogen Storage System targets. These analyses were performed in support of the Hydrogen Storage

422

Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11, 2011 Potential market area for fuel cells (or other power plants). Defined by peak power vs. cost per unit power capacity (W vs. $/kW) for typical applications currently satisfied by legacy technologies. Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Less difficult Less difficult (smaller units) (cost tolerant market) Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Range of application size and specific cost that all can be commercially satisfied

423

Overview of hydrogen production research in the Clean Energy Research Laboratory (CERL) at UOIT  

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Abstract This paper discusses new hydrogen production methods that have been actively investigated both theoretically and experimentally at UOIT and some recent findings through experimental measurements and analysis. A major cluster of activities at UOIT has developed novel hydrogen production systems from electrolysis to thermochemical cycles and from integrated cycles to solar-light based hydrogen production processes. The results confirm that both thermochemical cycles and photochemical processes offer promising potential for sustainable hydrogen production.

I. Dincer; G.F. Naterer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Aminoguanidine inhibits aortic hydrogen peroxide production, VSMC NOX activity and hypercontractility in diabetic mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen peroxide production Aortic H 2 O 2 was detected specifically using an Amplex Red Assay (details see Methods

Oak, Jeong-Ho; Youn, Ji-Youn; Cai, Hua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production via Wind/Electrolysis: Milestone Completion Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes the results of a lifecycle assessment of a renewable hydrogen production process employing wind/electrolysis.

426

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water ... Energy Fuels, 2009, 23 (12), ...

Jason W. Picou; Jonathan E. Wenzel; H. Brian Lanterman; Sunggyu Lee

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressor Compressed hydrogen storage Figure 2: High-compressor Compressed hydrogen storage Clean Energy Group lduction, and a hydrogen compression, storage, and Energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Polygeneration-IGCC concepts for the production of hydrogen rich fuels based on lignite  

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This paper presents three IGCC-power plant concepts for central production of a hydrogen-rich fuel (methanol, hydrogen, synthetic natural gas â?? SNG) from lignite. Each concept contains a CO2-separation, which produces a sequestration-ready CO2-rich stream. Thus, CO2-emissions caused by use of lignite are considerably reduced. Furthermore, the produced low-carbon fuels are converted in decentralised Combined Heat and Power Plants (CHPP). CHPP leads to high efficiencies of fuel utilisation between 54 and 62%, which exceed the efficiencies of single power generation. Regarding to the CO2-emissions of a natural gas fired CHPP, heat and power can be generated by lignite as clean as by natural gas. The specific CO2-emissions are even much lower in the case of hydrogen production. Costs for the centrally produced methanol and hydrogen are with 29 and 19 EUR/MWh(LHV) already within an economic range. Synthetic natural gas can be produced for 23 EUR/MWh(LHV).

Bernd Meyer; Katrin Ogriseck

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Anthracycline Antibiotic-stimulated Superoxide, Hydrogen Peroxide, and Hydroxyl Radical Production by NADH Dehydrogenase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ani nand hydrogen peroxide production by NADH dehydrogenase...MATERIALS AND METHODS Materials...Superoxide production by NADH dehydrogenase...with the hydrogen ion concentration...Materials and Methods." The paired...ani nand hydrogen peroxide...elicit methane production from DMSO...Materials and Methods." In these...

James H. Doroshow

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Short Communication High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these methods so far shown sufficient promise for economical production of hydrogen (Miyake et al., 1999; WoodShort Communication High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved

431

A HYBRID ADSORBENT-MEMBRANE REACTOR (HAMR) SYSTEM FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen production for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells for various mobile and stationaryA HYBRID ADSORBENT-MEMBRANE REACTOR (HAMR) SYSTEM FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION A. Harale, H. Hwang, P recently our focus has been on new HAMR systems for hydrogen production, of potential interest to pure

Southern California, University of

432

Electron Source in Photoinduced Hydrogen Production on Pt-Supported TiO2 Particles  

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Electron Source in Photoinduced Hydrogen Production on Pt-Supported TiO2 Particles ... Comment on “Electron Source in Photoinduced Hydrogen Production on Pt-Supported TiO2 Particles” ... Comment on “Electron Source in Photoinduced Hydrogen Production on Pt-Supported TiO2 Particles” ...

Toshiyuki Abe; Eiji Suzuki; Kentaro Nagoshi; Kohichi Miyashita; Masao Kaneko:

2000-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60-46674 60-46674 September 2009 Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production March 27, 2008 - August 31, 2009 B.D. James, G.N. Baum, J. Perez, and K.N. Baum Directed Technologies, Inc. Arlington, Virginia National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-46674 September 2009 Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production March 27, 2008 - August 31, 2009 B.D. James, G.N. Baum, J. Perez, and K.N. Baum

434

Fuzzy Delphi method for evaluating hydrogen production technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to establish an evaluation model for selecting the most appropriate technology for development in Taiwan, based on 14 evaluation criteria. Due to the inherent uncertainty and imprecision associated with the mapping of decision makers’ perception to crisp values, linguistic variables are used to assess the weights of the criteria and the ratings of each technology with respect to each criterion. The criteria weights and technology ratings are collected through a seven-point linguistic scale using a Delphi questionnaire. The linguistic scores are then converted into fuzzy numbers, and a consensus of the decision makers’ opinions on weights and ratings is mathematically derived using fuzzy Delphi methodology. We have used the model to evaluate seven different hydrogen production technologies. The results indicate that hydrogen production via electrolysis by wind power and that via electrolysis by photovoltaic electricity are the two technologies that should be chosen for further development.

Pao-Long Chang; Chiung-Wen Hsu; Po-Chien Chang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adequate on-board hydrogen storage is essential, and remainsjustify their costs. Hydrogen storage remains an importantto 10,000 psi, liquid hydrogen storage, and other solid and

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparative Environmental Impact Evaluation of Hydrogen Production Methods from Renewable and Nonrenewable Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, a comparative environmental impact study of possible hydrogen production methods from renewable and nonrenewable sources is undertaken ... potential, GWP and acidification potential, AP), production

Canan Acar; Ibrahim Dincer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The development of autocatalytic structural materials for use in the sulfur-iodine process for the production of hydrogen .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen offers many benefits to traditional methods of hydrogen production. As opposed to steam methane reforming -… (more)

Miu, Kevin (Kevin K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen from Solar via Light- Assisted High-TemperatureHydrogen from Solar via Light-Assisted High-Temperature

Luc, Wesley Wai

439

Impact of solar energy cost on water production cost of seawater desalination plants in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many countries in North Africa and the Middle East are experiencing localized water shortages and are now using desalination technologies with either reverse osmosis (RO) or thermal desalination to overcome part of this shortage. Desalination is performed using electricity, mostly generated from fossil fuels with associated greenhouse gas emissions. Increased fuel prices and concern over climate change are causing a push to shift to alternative sources of energy, such as solar energy, since solar radiation is abundant in this region all year round. This paper presents unit production costs and energy costs for 21 RO desalination plants in the region. An equation is proposed to estimate the unit production costs of RO desalination plants as a function of plant capacity, price of energy and specific energy consumption. This equation is used to calculate unit production costs for desalinated water using photovoltaic (PV) solar energy based on current and future PV module prices. Multiple PV cells are connected together to form a module or a panel. Unit production costs of desalination plants using solar energy are compared with conventionally generated electricity considering different prices for electricity. The paper presents prices for both PV and solar thermal energy. The paper discusses at which electricity price solar energy can be considered economical to be used for RO desalination; this is independent of RO plant capacity. For countries with electricity prices of 0.09 US$/kWh, solar-generated electricity (using PV) can be competitive starting from 2 US$/Wp (Wp is the number of Watts output under standard conditions of sunlight). For Egypt (price of 0.06 US$/kWh), solar-generated electricity starts to be competitive from 1 US$/Wp. Solar energy is not cost competitive at the moment (at a current module price for PV systems including installation of 8 US$/Wp), but advances in the technology will continue to drive the prices down, whilst penalties on usage of fossil fuel will increase electricity costs from conventional non-renewable sources. Solar thermal is cheaper (at a current price of 0.06 US$/kWh) than PV; however, PV is more appropriate for Egypt (for the time being) as it is more applicable to the smaller RO plant sizes found in Egypt (up to 5 MW; 10,000–15,000 m3/d product water capacity). We would expect that there will be a shift towards more centralized RO plants (larger size) in Egypt, to tackle the increasing water shortage, and this would then favor the adoption of solar thermal energy in the near future.

A. Lamei; P. van der Zaag; E. von Münch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

RTO heat recovery system decreases production costs and provides payback  

SciTech Connect

Application of a heat recovery system to an existing regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) was considered, tested, and selected for decreasing production costs at a pressure sensitive tape manufacturing facility. Heat recovery systems on RTO's are less common than those on other thermal oxidizers (e.g., recuperative) because RTO's, by the nature of the technology, usually provide high thermal efficiencies (without the application of external heat recovery systems). In this case, the production processes were integrated with the emission controls by applying an external heat recovery system and by optimizing the design and operation of the existing drying and cure ovens, RTO system, and ductwork collection system. Integration of these systems provides an estimated annual production cost savings of over $400,000 and a simplified capital investment payback of less than 2 years, excluding possible savings from improved dryer operations. These additional process benefits include more consistent and simplified control of seasonal dryer performance and possibly production throughput increases. The production costs savings are realized by substituting excess RTO heat for a portion of the infrared (IR) electrical heat input to the dryers/ovens. This will be accomplished by preheating the supply air to the oven zones with the excess RTO heat (i.e., heat at the RTO exceeding auto-thermal conditions). Several technologies, including direct air-to-air, indirect air-to-air, hot oil-to-air, waste heat boiler (steam-to-air) were evaluated for transferring the excess RTO heat (hot gas) to the ovens. A waste heat boiler was selected to transfer the excess RTO heat to the ovens because this technology provided the most economical, reliable, and feasible operation. Full-scale production test trials on the coating lines were performed and confirmed the IR electrical costs could be reduced up to 70%.

Lundquist, P.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900șC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 ”m thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Overview of High-Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

Over the last five years there has been a growing interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, particularly to augment transportation fuels and thus reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, in the long term, methane reforming is not a viable process for the large-scale hydrogen production since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen without consuming fossil fuels and without emitting greenhouse gases through the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is developing three general categories of high temperature processes for hydrogen production: thermochemical, electrolytic and hybrid thermo-electrolytic. This paper introduces the work being done in the development of high temperature electrolysis of steam. High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) is built on the technology of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which were invented over a century ago, but which have been most vigorously developed during the last twenty years. SOFCs consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce steam and electricity. Solid Oxide Electrolytic Cells (SOECs) consume electricity and steam and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the HTE research is to solve those problems unique to the electrolytic mode of operation, while building further on continuing fuel cell development. ORGANIZATION Experiments have been conducted for the last three years at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. on the operation of button cells and of progressively larger stacks of planar cells. In addition, the INL has been performing analyses of the cell-scale fluid dynamics and plant-scale flowsheets in order to determine optimum operating conditions and plant configurations. Argonne National Laboratory has been performing experiments for the development of new electrode materials, as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics and flowsheets for comparison with the work being done at the INL. ANL has also been performing diagnostic measures on components form long-duration tests at the INL and Ceramatec to determine the causes for the slow degradation in cell performance. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing high temperature porous membranes for the separation of hydrogen from the residual steam, thus avoiding the need to condense and reheat the steam. The University of Nevada at Las Vegas has been collaborating with ANL on the development of electrode and electrolyte materials and will soon begin to investigate the causes of cell degradation. HTE research also includes NERI projects at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute on the development of toughened SOEC composite seals and at the Georgia Institute of Technology on the microstructural design of SOEC materials. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS The most recent large-scale test of HTE was performed from June 28 through Sept 22, 2006 at the Ceramatec plant in Salt Lake City. The test apparatus consists of two stacks of 60 cells each in a configuration that will be used in the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) experiment during FY-07. The ILS will contain three modules of four stacks each. The “Half-Module” initially produced 1.2 normal m3of H2/hour and 0.65 Nm3/hr at the end of the 2040-hour continuous test.

Herring, J. S.; O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Hartvigsen, J. J.; Petri, M. C.; Carter, J. D.; Bischoff, B. L.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Arun Madan MVSystems, Incorporated (MVS) 500 Corporate Circle, Suite L Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 271-9907 Email: ArunMadan@aol.com or amadan@mvsystemsinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-07GO17105, A00 Subcontractor: University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH), Honolulu, HI Project Start Date: September 1, 2007 Project End Date: December 31, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Work closely with the DOE Working Group on * Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production for optimizing PEC materials and devices. Develop new PEC film materials compatible with high- *

444

Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Donna Heimiller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Understand the hydrogen production requirements for a * future demand scenario Estimate low-carbon energy resources required to meet * the future scenario demand Compare resource requirements to current consumption * and projected future consumption Determine resource availability geographically and on a *

445

An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Hydrogen An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources Preprint J.I. Levene, M.K. Mann, R. Margolis, and A. Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared for ISES 2005 Solar World Congress Orlando, Florida August 6-12, 2005 Conference Paper NREL/CP-560-37612 September 2005 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

446

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

447

Electrolysis: Technology and Infrastructure Options Today, electrolysis systems supply 4% of the world's hydrogen. Although electrolysis can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economics, but electrolysis will only be cost-competitive with gasoline or other hydrogen production methods-cost, production methods, namely large centralized steam methane reformers. However, electrolysis is gaining ground produce hydrogen at a cost of $4-$6. Reducing system capital cost will help to improve hydrogen production

448

Enhanced Hydrogen and 1,3-Propanediol Production From Glycerol by Fermentation Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Enhanced Hydrogen and 1,3-Propanediol Production From Glycerol by Fermentation Using Mixed value products, such as hydrogen gas and 1,3-propanediol (PD), was examined using anaerobic fermentation for hydrogen produc- tion over other methods, such as electrolytic or thermo- chemical processes

449

Rapid hydrogen production from water using aluminum nanoclusters: A quantum molecular dynamics simulation study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid hydrogen production from water using aluminum nanoclusters: A quantum molecular dynamics Available online 31 December 2013 Keywords: Hydrogen production Water Aluminum nanoclusters Quantum molecular dynamics simulation It is hoped that a hydrogen-on-demand generator may one day start with just

Southern California, University of

450

Assessment of a new integrated solar energy system for hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a novel integrated system that combines photocatalysis, photovoltaics, thermal engine and chemical energy storage for better solar energy harvesting is assessed using energy and exergy methods. The system generates hydrogen and sulfur from sulfurous waters specific to chemical and petrochemical industries. The solar light is split into three spectra using optical surfaces covered with selected dielectric coatings: (i) the high energy spectrum, consisting of photons with wavelengths shorter than ?500 nm, is used to generate hydrogen from water photolysis, (ii) the middle spectrum with wavelengths between ?500 nm and ?800 nm is used to generate electricity with photovoltaic (PV) arrays and (iii) the long wave spectrum of low energy photons with wavelengths longer than ?800 nm is used to generate electricity with a thermally driven Rankine engine (RE). The electricity generated by PV and RE is employed to generate additional hydrogen by electrolysis and to drive auxiliary devices within the system. A model is developed based on conservation equations and transport equations applied for each essential component of the system. The model allows for assessment of system performance and the comparison with other solar hydrogen production systems. A case study for an oil sands exploitation area where sulfurous aqueous wastes and hydrogen demand exist – Calgary (Alberta) – is presented. A solar tower configuration is selected as the best choice for a large scale system with 500 MW light harvesting heliostat field. Hourly predictions of system output are obtained. The devised system requires 5526 acres of land for the solar field and produces 41.4 t hydrogen per day. If a conventional solar tower would be used instead which generates power and is coupled to a water electrolysis system the hydrogen production is lower, namely 28.7 t/day. An economic scenario is considered by assuming that the co-produced sulfur and hydrogen are both valorized on the market for 25 years with a levelized price of 1.65 $/kg out of which 10% represents operation and maintenance costs. It is shown that the system is feasible provided that the required equity investment of capital is inferior to M$ 500.

C. Zamfirescu; I. Dincer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Production of Hydrogen Peroxide by Murine Epidermal Keratinocytes following Treatment with the Tumor Promoter 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measurement of hydrogen peroxide production at the 10...biochemical methods for ROI detection...intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels...A sensitive method for the estimation of hydrogen peroxide in...nism: the production of Superoxide...

Fredika M. Robertson; Andrew J. Beavis; Tatiana M. Oberyszyn; Sean M. O'Connell; Anthea Dokidos; Debra L. Laskin; Jeffrey D. Laskin; and John J. Reiners, Jr.

1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

453

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 1: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project ID: 78 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; costs; methanol; hydrogen fueling Purpose As the DOE considers both direct hydrogen and reformer-based fuel cell vehicles, it is vital to have a clear perspective of the relative infrastructure costs to supply each prospective fuel (gasoline, methanol, or hydrogen). Consequently, this analysis compares these infrastructure costs as well as the cost to remove sulfur from gasoline (as will most likely be required for use in fuel cell systems) and the cost implications for several hydrogen tank filling options. This analysis supports Analysis

454

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production on InP Nanowire Arrays with Molybdenum Sulfide Electrocatalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production on InP Nanowire Arrays with Molybdenum Sulfide Electrocatalysts ... Several semiconductor nanowire systems, synthesized by different methods, have been investigated by photoelectrochemistry. ... power available from the hydrogen produced and the power supplied by an external source. ...

Lu Gao; Yingchao Cui; Jia Wang; Alessandro Cavalli; Anthony Standing; Thuy T. T. Vu; Marcel A. Verheijen; Jos E. M. Haverkort; Erik P. A. M. Bakkers; Peter H. L. Notten

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Simple Method To Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Simple Method To Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar ... In the experimental protocol described here, it has been demonstrated that the common sugar glucose can be used to produce hydrogen using two enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase. ...

Ian Hurley; Natalie Hershlag; Jonathan Woodward

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

An integrated cost model for production scheduling and perfect maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production scheduling deals with scheduling production jobs on a machine (single or multiple) in order to optimise a specific objective such as total weighted completion times or total weighted tardiness. The assumption that machines are always available for processing jobs is generally used in the production scheduling literature. In reality, machines often are unavailable due to preventive maintenance activities or machine failure. Production scheduling and preventive maintenance planning are interrelated, but are most often treated separately. This interdependency seems to be overlooked in the literature. This work integrates, simultaneously, the decisions of preventive maintenance and job order sequencing for a single machine. The objective is to find the job order sequence and maintenance decisions that would minimise the expected cost.

Laith A. Hadidi; Umar M. Al-Turki; M. Abdur Rahim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

460

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research." Energy, v.34,Quantum Boost,” DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: FY 2012Analysis. ” DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, Web. 22

Luc, Wesley Wai

462

Wind Energy and Production of Hydrogen and Electricity -- Opportunities for Renewable Hydrogen: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of options for wind/hydrogen/electricity systems at both central and distributed scales provides insight into opportunities for renewable hydrogen.

Levene, J.; Kroposki, B.; Sverdrup, G.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2007 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2007 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Mark Paster, Roxanne Garland, Arlene Anderson, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 242 KB) A. Distributed Production from Natural Gas Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform, Tim Aaron, Praxair, Inc. (PDF 399 KB) Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development, Franklin D. Lomax, H2Gen Innovations, Inc. (PDF 309 KB) Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System, Satish Tamhankar, The BOC Group, Inc. (PDF 123 KB)

465

Natural Gas Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production (Million Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 188,075 143,004 154,503 169,465 183,051 2008-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 5,149 4,178 3,346 4,815 6,313 2008-2012 Midwest (PADD 2) 37,044 36,936 45,452 44,623 46,640 2008-2012 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 80,291 41,049 43,170 50,968 62,829 2008-2012 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 12,747 11,904 12,047 12,896 12,595 2008-2012 West Coast (PADD 5) 52,844 48,937 50,488 56,163 54,674 2008-2012 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

466

ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hydrogen Technical Publications | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scenarios-This document reports the levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of the seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution...

468

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California,”The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic ElectricityThe Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy cost and optimal entanglement production in harmonic chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate nonequilibrium entanglement generation in a chain of harmonic oscillators with time-dependent linear coupling. We use optimal control theory to determine the coupling modulation that leads to maximum logarithmic negativity for a pair of opposite oscillators, and show that it corresponds to a synchronization of the eigenmodes of the chain. We further analytically relate the maximum attainable entanglement to the irreversible work done to produce it. We find that the energy cost of optimal entanglement production scales exponentially with the amount of entanglement.

Fernando Galve and Eric Lutz

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Energy Department Invests $20 Million to Advance Hydrogen Production and Delivery Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $20 million for ten new research and development projects that will advance hydrogen production and delivery technologies.

473

Webinar: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording and text version of the webinar, “Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3),” originally presented on February 8, 2012.

474

Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the February 8, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)".

475

Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Brian James, Strategic Analysis Inc., at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

476

Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton" on May 23, 2011.

477

Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 4 of 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report includes 25 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through quarter 4 of 2013.

Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

479

Performance of Sulfur Tolerant Reforming Catalysts for Production of Hydrogen from Jet Fuel Simulants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2 operated by fuel cells. Unfortunately, the lack of infrastructure, such as a network of hydrogen refueling of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which poisons the anode in the fuel cell stack, leading to low SOFC efficiencyPerformance of Sulfur Tolerant Reforming Catalysts for Production of Hydrogen from Jet Fuel

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

480

U.S. Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost) U.S. Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen production costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

482

On Methods for the Large-Scale Production of Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Off-peak power would give sufficiently cheap hydrogen with classical electrolyzers. Emerging technology could produce it at between $0.85 and $2.90 (106 Btu)-1 for electricity costs (bulk purchase) between 2 and ...

J. O’M. Bockris

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Feasibility of Hydrogen Production from Micro Hydropower Projects in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current energy crisis in Nepal clearly indicates that the future energy-demand cannot be met by traditional energy-sources. Community-based micro-hydropower operations are considered to be one of the most feasible options for energy development. However, the power plant capacity factor remains very low due to limited commercial and business opportunities. Generation of hydrogen (H2) from the unutilized power could eradicate this problem. This new energy carrier is clean, can save foreign currency and increases the energy-security. The aim of this study is to determine the potential of H2 production from excess energy of a micro-hydro project in rural Nepal using “HOMER ” from NREL.

M. S. Zaman; A. B. Chhetri; M. S. Tango

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Study of hydrogen production system by using PV solar energy and PEM electrolyser in Algeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel can be produced by using solar electric energy from photovoltaic (PV) modules for the electrolysis of water without emitting carbon dioxide or requiring fossil fuels. In this paper, an assessment of the technical potential for producing hydrogen from the PV/proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyser system is investigated. The present study estimates the amount of hydrogen produced by this system in six locations using hourly global solar irradiations on horizontal plane and ambient temperature. The system studied in this work is composed of 60 W PV module connected with a commercial 50 W PEM electrolyser via DC/DC converter equipped with a maximum power point tracking. The primary objective is to develop a mathematical model of hydrogen production system, including PV module and PEM electrolyser to analyze the system performance. The secondary aim is to compare the system performance in terms of hydrogen production at seven locations situated in different regions of Algeria. The amount of hydrogen produced is estimated at seven locations situated in different regions. In terms of hydrogen production, the results show that the southern region of Algeria (Adrar, Ghardaia, Bechar and Tamanrasset) is found to have the relatively highest hydrogen production. The total annual production of hydrogen is estimated to be around 20–29 m3 at these sites. The hydrogen production at various sites has been found to vary according to the solar radiation.

Djamila Ghribi; Abdellah Khelifa; Said Diaf; Maïouf Belhamel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Study of the thermochemistry for oxygen production for a solar sulfur-ammonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Concentrated Solar Energy,” Energy,solar thermal energy to power a cost effective water splitting cycle for hydrogen production.Solar Energy Engineering, v.129, 2007, p. 184-189 [14] Garbman, G.H. , “Hydrogen Production

Wang, Mimi Kai Wai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen dispenser Water Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Enhanced Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid by Formate Hydrogen Lyase-Overexpressing Escherichia coli Strains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the projected decrease in fossil fuel reserves on the one hand and improvements in hydrogen fuel cell technology on the other (3). A wide range of applications of hydrogen, from cars to small devices, is anticipated...

Akihito Yoshida; Taku Nishimura; Hideo Kawaguchi; Masayuki Inui; Hideaki Yukawa

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Kinetics of the Reduction of Wüstite by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide for the Chemical Looping Production of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced could be stored, e.g. by geological sequestration, making the overall process “carbon-neutral”, or “carbon-negative” when biomass is used as fuel. In addition, the hydrogen produced during the oxidation of FexO and metallic Fe in steam can be kept... Kinetics of the reduction of wüstite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the chemical looping production of hydrogen Wen Liu a,n, Jin Yang Lim b, Marco A. Saucedo a, Allan N. Hayhurst b, Stuart A. Scott a, J.S. Dennis b a Department of Engineering...

Liu, Wen; Lim, Jin Yang; Saucedo, Marco A.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Scott, Stuart A.; Dennis, J. S.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

492

Conceptual design of nuclear systems for hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand for hydrogen in the transportation energy sector is expected to keep growing in the coming decades; in the short term for refining heavy oils and in the long term for powering fuel cells. However, hydrogen cannot ...

Hohnholt, Katherine J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen, fuel cells, and distribution..." #12;1. Hydrogen Storage 2. Hydrogen Production 3. Fuel Cell Cost Energy & Water Appropriations #12;FY 2002 Budget = $47.425M Transportation Fuel Cell Stack Subsystem Rossmeissl Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

494

A summary of the Third Information Exchange Meeting on the nuclear production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has organised three international exchange meetings on hydrogen production through nuclear power. The most recent meeting was held in October 2005 in Oarai, Japan, and was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The two-and-a-half-day conference covered a full range of topics related to the nuclear production of hydrogen. Presentations were made and discussions were held on the economic prospects of a hydrogen economy and nuclear power's potential role in it, global research and development activities related to hydrogen production technologies, the coupling of hydrogen production facilities to nuclear heat sources, and basic and applied science supporting nuclear hydrogen generation. The meeting presentations are available at: http://www.nea.fr/html/science/hydro/iem3/.

Mark C. Petri; Ryutaro Hino; Isao Yamagishi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

repairs than the an pipe length. After the equipment and pipeline costs are determined, the overhead costs are then taken to be 9 percent of the total daily costs of equipment and pipeline. Several cells are left open where additional specific costs can... repairs than the an pipe length. After the equipment and pipeline costs are determined, the overhead costs are then taken to be 9 percent of the total daily costs of equipment and pipeline. Several cells are left open where additional specific costs can...

Miertschin, Michael Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Hydrogen production from the reaction of solvated electrons with benzene in water-ammonia mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Product analysis data for the reaction of the ammoniated electron with benzene-water mixtures in liquid ammonia show that the dominant product is evolved hydrogen and not 1,4-cyclohexadiene.

Dewald, R.R.; Jones, S.R.; Schwartz, B.S.

1980-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

497

Design Aspects of Hybrid Adsorbent?Membrane Reactors for Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design Aspects of Hybrid Adsorbent?Membrane Reactors for Hydrogen Production ... For hydrogen to replace fossil fuels as the fuel of choice for mobile applications, it will require the creation of a production and delivery infrastructure equivalent to those that currently exist for fossil fuels. ...

Babak Fayyaz; Aadesh Harale; Byoung-Gi Park; Paul K. T. Liu; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

498

A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles by SĂ©bastien Prince options considered for future fuel cell vehicles. In this thesis, a model is developed to determine

Victoria, University of

499

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Table of Contents; DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2008 Annual Progress Report  

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8 Annual Progress Report 8 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program Table of Contents I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 II.A Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 II.A.1 H 2 Gen Innovations, Inc: Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23