Sample records for hydrogen production costs

  1. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

  2. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen...

  3. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

  4. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review This independent review is the...

  5. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation...

  6. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  7. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Bauer, Hans F. (Morgantown, WV); Grimes, Robert W. (Laramie, WY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  8. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  9. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  10. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water...

  11. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

  12. DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery DOE Issues 2 Requests for Information on Low-Cost Hydrogen Production and Delivery October 29, 2014 -...

  13. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  14. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  15. Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional variation in energy and capital costs. Although we estimate substantial reductions in H{sub 2} costs over time, our cost estimates are generally higher than the cost goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) hydrogen program. The result of our analysis, in particular, demonstrates that there may be substantial variation in H{sub 2} costs between regions: as much as $2.04/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE) by the time FCVs make up one-half of all light-vehicle sales in the GYOW scenario (2035-2040) and $1.85/GGE by 2050 (excluding Alaska). Given the assumptions we have made, our analysis also shows that there could be as much as a $4.82/GGE difference in H{sub 2} cost between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas by 2050 (national average). Our national average cost estimate by 2050 is $3.68/GGE, but the average H{sub 2} cost in metropolitan areas in that year is $2.55/GGE and that in non-metropolitan areas is $7.37/GGE. For these estimates, we assume that the use of natural gas to produce H{sub 2} is phased out. This phase-out reflects the desire of DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (OHFCIT) to eliminate reliance on natural gas for H{sub 2} production. We conducted a sensitivity run in which we allowed natural gas to continue to be used through 2050 for distributed production of H{sub 2} to see what effect changing that assumption had on costs. In effect, natural gas is used for 66% of all distributed production of H{sub 2} in this run. The national average cost is reduced to $3.10/GGE, and the cost in non-metropolitan areas is reduced from $7.37/GGE to $4.90, thereby reducing the difference between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas to $2.35/GGE. Although the cost difference is reduced, it is still substantial. Regional differences are similarly reduced, but they also remain substantial. We also conducted a sensitivity run in which we cut in half our estimate of the cost of distributed production of H{sub 2} from electrolysis (our highest-cost production method). In this run, our national average cost estimate is reduced even further, to

  16. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

  17. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Production Cost

  18. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Hilton Garden Inn...

  19. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update October 18, 2012 Prepared By: Brian D. James Andrew B. Spisak...

  20. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identify particularly useful cost data and cost models thatcontaining hydrogen cost data for production, storage,Volume Validates cost data with Industry Operating Costs

  1. Hydrogen Production & Delivery Sara Dillich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). 15% solar-to-chemical energy efficiency by microalgae Biomass Gasification Hydrogen Production Cost

  2. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  3. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  4. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

  5. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen-from- Ethanol: A Distributed Production System Presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting Laurel, Maryland Tuesday,...

  6. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  7. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Components Feedstock Production Delivery Total Delivered Hydrogen Cost Biomass Central Pipeline Distribution produce hydrogen at 300 psi · Liquefaction or pipeline compression included in delivery · Delivery costsHydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25

  8. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  9. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  10. Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

  11. Hydrogen Production - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Technology Hydrogen Production - Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future...

  12. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using...

  13. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22,...

  14. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    04 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai Jonathan X.Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai Jonathan X.voltage connections) Capital costs for this equipment must

  15. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in planning a new hydrogen infrastructure: 1) the lack ofon the Costs of Hydrogen Infrastructure for Transportstudy. Studies of Hydrogen Infrastructure in China There

  16. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in planning a new hydrogen infrastructure: (1) the lack of1.3.3. Studies of hydrogen infrastructure in China Thereon the costs of hydrogen Infrastructure for transport

  17. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  18. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform Robert B. Bollinger and Timothy M. Aaron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Figure 1 below. Natural Gas Compressor Hydrogen Purification System Syngas Heat Exchanger Potable Water Feed water Pump Boiler Water Treatment Steam Generation Syngas Separator Hydrogen Natural Gas Burner the hydrogen rich syngas is produced. The syn- gas is then cooled, the condensate is removed, and sent

  19. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional...

  20. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by C.E. (Sandy) Thomas at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  1. Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, Eric W

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to ?-Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

  2. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs to estimate hydrogen pipeline costs. Davis, CA: ITS-hydrogen. The cost of hydrogen pipeline delivery de- pendshydrogen trucks, and hydrogen pipelines, were devel- oped

  3. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling stations; Cost; Shanghai; Fuel cell vehicles 1.and the delivery cost for fuel cell vehicles, however, itthus hydrogen cost therefore depend on the ?eet of fuel cell

  4. Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report documents the engineering and cost characteristics of four PEC hydrogen production systems selected by DOE to represent canonical embodiments of future systems.

  5. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  6. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 20122 DOE Hydrogen andfor Transportation

  7. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,Year 2006 UCDITSRR0604 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

  8. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs to estimate hydrogen pipeline costs. Davis, CA: ITS-hydrogen trucks, and hydrogen pipelines, were devel- opedFor large amounts of hydrogen, pipeline transmission is pre-

  9. Sustainable hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  10. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Storage Systems TIAX LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2390 Tel. 617- 498-5000 Fax 617-498-7200...

  11. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. 2004, ITS-Davis:hydrogen. The cost of hydrogen pipeline delivery depends onCosts to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. 2004, ITS-Davis:

  12. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  13. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Hydrogen Pathways: Cost,...

  14. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the delivery cost for fuel cell vehicles, however, itfueling stations, cost, Shanghai, fuel cell vehicles 1.0hydrogen cost therefore depend on the fleet of fuel cell

  15. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage &...

  16. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

  17. Techno-Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the cost of the production of hydrogen from three candidate biomass feedstocks and identify the barriers

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â??bottom-upâ? costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA?® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

  19. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropo

  20. Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future estimates of hydrogen pipelines. Construction Cost (does this mean for hydrogen pipelines? The objective of thisinto the cost of hydrogen pipelines. To this end I will

  1. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways?Scoping...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Central Methanol Methanol Forecourt Gasoline Gasoline Forecourt H 2 from ethylene or refinery Residuepitch Central The by-product source of hydrogen defined by IHIG in the...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Hydrogen Infrastructure Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Market Transformation...

  3. Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

  4. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy...

  5. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed,...

  6. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report...

  7. Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production High-Efficiency Solar Thermochemical Reactor for Hydrogen Production On July 9, 2014, in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Concentrating Solar...

  9. Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Dedicated Wind Power Plant Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind Power Plant This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable...

  10. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemical Cycle Selection and Investment Priority Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH):...

  11. Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Options Analysis Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis Presentation on hydrogen production and infrastructure options presented at the DOE Transition...

  12. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  13. A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production...

  14. Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production Technologies Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production Technologies Presentation by John...

  15. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen...

  16. Hydrogen Production & Delivery | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hydrogen Production & Delivery Hydrogen Production & Delivery "2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation H2...

  17. Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

  18. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline Feedstock activities Fuel production Fuel storage,gasoline vehicle ORNL Fuel cell vehicle DOE fuel cell target: $45/kW by 2015, $30/kW by 2020 (onboard H2 storagegasoline vehicle (Table 3) Component manufacturing cost Electric Powertrain (Motor + controller + transmission) Fuel cell system (stack + BOP) Hydrogen storage

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: cost-effective hydrogen storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cost-effective hydrogen storage Storing Hydrogen Underground Could Boost Transportation, Energy Security On February 26, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure Research...

  20. Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide...

  1. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iouri Balachov, PhD

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

  2. Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic analysis indicates that hydrogen could be produced for $3.79 per gge at an electricity cost of $0.05/kWh by the lower-cost PEM electrolyzer developed in this project, assuming high-volume production of large-scale electrolyzer systems.

  3. Author's personal copy Canada's program on nuclear hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naterer, Greg F.

    for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities al. [1]. Hydrogen is used widely by petrAuthor's personal copy Canada's program on nuclear hydrogen production and the thermochemical Cue

  4. COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Arps; K. Coulter

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past quarter, we have conducted additional characterization and permeation tests on different Pd alloy membranes including PdCuTa ternary alloy materials. We attempted to address some discrepancies between SwRI{reg_sign} and CSM relating to PdCu stoichiometry by preparing a range of PdCu membranes with compositions from {approx}58-65 at% Pd (bal. Cu). While some difficulties in cutting and sealing these thin membranes at CSM continue, some progress has been made in identifying improved membrane support materials. We have also completed an initial cost analysis for large-scale vacuum deposition and fabrication of thin Pd ally membranes and project that the process can meet DOE cost targets. Minimal progress was made in the past quarter relating to the testing of prototype membrane modules at Idatech. In the past quarter Idatech was acquired by a UK investment firm, which we believe may have impacted the ability of key technical personnel to devote sufficient time to support this effort. We are hopeful their work can be completed by the end of the calendar year.

  5. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen flow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressorhydrogen storage tanks are needed. Costs for central plant compressors

  6. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  7. Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report This report provides an overview of the...

  8. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Independent...

  9. U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

  10. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short-circuit photocurrent density of the hybrid device (measured in a 2-electrode configuration) increased significantly without assistance of any external bias, i.e. from ?1 mA/cm{sup 2} to ~5 mA/cm{sup 2}. With the copper chalcopyrite compounds, we have achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% in a coplanar configuration with 3 a-Si solar cells and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode. This material class exhibited good durability at a photocurrent density level of -4 mA/cm{sup 2} (5% STH equivalent) at a fixed potential (-0.45 VRHE). A poor band-edge alignment with the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) potential was identified as the main limitation for high STH efficiency. Three new pathways have been identified to solve this issue. First, PV driver with bandgap lower than that of amorphous silicon were investigated. Crystalline silicon was identified as possible bottom cell. Mechanical stacks made with one Si solar cell and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode were built. A 400 mV anodic shift was observed with the Si cell, leading to photocurrent density of -5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE (compared to 0 mA/cm{sup 2} at the same potential without PV driver). We also investigated the use of p-n junctions to shift CuGaSe{sub 2} flatband potential anodically. Reactively sputtered zinc oxy-sulfide thin films was evaluated as n-type buffer and deposited on CuGaSe{sub 2}. Ruthenium nanoparticles were then added as HER catalyst. A 250 mV anodic shift was observed with the p-n junction, leading to photocurrent density at 0VRHE of -1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Combining this device with a Si solar cell in a mechanical stack configuration shifted the onset potential further (+400 mV anodically), leading to photocurrent density of -7 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE. Finally, we developed wide bandgap copper chalcopyrite thin film materials. We demonstrated that Se can be substituted with S using a simple annealing step. Photocurrent densities in the 5-6 mA/cm{sub 2} range were obtained with red 2.0eV CuInGaS{sub 2} photocathodes. With the metal oxide compounds, we have demonstrated that a WO{sub 3}-based hybrid p

  11. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elec Del Cali: Del Investment Cost Delivery Cost OperatingCost Feedstock Cost Investment Cost Delivery Cost Operatingcosts Annualized investment cost, 1000$/yr Total annualized

  12. Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions Why Hydrogen Production? Hydrogen is a critical. Current methods of hydrogen storage in automobiles are either too bulky (large storage space for gas phase) or require a high input energy (cooling or pressurization systems for liquid hydrogen), making widespread use

  13. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs Annualized Investment Cost, 1000$/yr Total AnnualizedH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/yr) OperatingH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/kg) Operating

  14. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposure for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle technologies.10 gasoline hybrids or 20 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (eachwheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicle pathways

  15. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposure for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle technologies10 gasoline hybrids or 20 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (eachwheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicle pathways

  16. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogenapplies to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors. 2.4.4.vehicles. 3. Compressor: compresses hydrogen gas to achieve

  17. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogento hydrogen storage vessels and compressors. Feedstock Costvehicles 3. Compressor: compresses hydrogen gas to achieve

  18. advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production: Topics by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities the cost of the production of hydrogen from three candidate biomass feedstocks and identify the barriers First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13...

  19. User cost in oil production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

  20. Sandia Energy - Hydrogen Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergyGeothermalBehaviorHydrogen

  1. THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remain limited .... until some cost effective carbon sequestration option for distributed production production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbon fuels with minimal CO2 emissions. Relevance. It is significantly more challenging to cost effectively sequester these [distributed] smaller volume carbon emissions

  2. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Reciprocating Hydrogen Compressor Costs: (Industry)Summary of Diaphragm Hydrogen Compressor Costs (Industry)vs. delivered hydrogen, compressor type, storage pressure).

  3. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Incorporating an Advanced Low Cost Membrane Roadmap on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and...

  4. Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

  5. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storing and transporting hydrogen. Golden, CO: NREL; 1998. [V. Survey of the economics of hydrogen technologies. Golden,liquid or gaseous form. Hydrogen can be produced from a va-

  6. BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" biomass resources - potentials, limits biomass carbon cycle biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

  7. Hydrogen Production: Fundamentals and Case Study Summaries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K.; Remick, R.; Hoskin, A.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes hydrogen production fundamentals and case studies, including hydrogen to wind case studies.

  8. Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor Sang-Eun Oh,1 Prabha Iyer,1,2 Mary Ann bioreactor (MBR) for biological hydrogen production. The reactor was fed glucose (10,000 mg/L) and inoculated were used. B 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Keywords: membrane bioreactor; hydrogen production

  9. IX International Materials Research Congress: Cancun 2002 A Hybrid Multijunction Photoelectrode for Hydrogen ProductionA Hybrid Multijunction Photoelectrode for Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Hydrogen ProductionA Hybrid Multijunction Photoelectrode for Hydrogen Production Fabricated with Amorphous light H2 O2 Good Hydrogen Efficiency Long Term Chemical Stability Low Cost Materials ­ SS substrates....Bandgap engineered TiO2? SOME CHOICES: Fe2O3 Selected for Initial Hybrid Photoelectrode Development #12;6IX IMRC

  10. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kingdom; 2004. [8] Amos W. Costs of storing and transportingcon- nections). Capital costs for this equipment must bein an analysis of station costs. Total station construction

  11. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems in China, particularly for the cost of hydrogenthe capital cost for equipment imported to China. Hydrogenestate costs in Shanghai are among the highest in China. $

  12. Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

  13. ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    steps (syngas generation, shift conversion and hydrogen purification) necessary for hydrogen production for this process option. O2 H2 air N.G. + Steam Hydrogen H2-depleted syngas OTM Reactor HTM Reactor syngas Figure 1- gas. A portion of natural gas also reacts with steam to form syngas. Additional hydrogen is formed

  14. Hydrogen Production Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Production CostFact

  15. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The announcement of a hydrogen fuel initiative in the Presidents 2003 State of the Union speech substantially increased interest in the potential for hydrogen to play a major role in the nations long-term energy future. Prior to that event, DOE asked the National Research Council to examine key technical issues about the hydrogen economy to assist in the development of its hydrogen R&D program. Included in the assessment were the current state of technology; future cost estimates; CO2 emissions; distribution, storage, and end use considerations; and the DOE RD&D program. The report provides an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel in the nations future energy economy and describes a number of important challenges that must be overcome if it is to make a major energy contribution. Topics covered include the hydrogen end-use technologies, transportation, hydrogen production technologies, and transition issues for hydrogen in vehicles.

  16. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems in China, particularly for the cost of hydrogento the capital cost for equipment imported to China. 2.4.6.estate costs in Shanghai are among the highest in China and

  17. Recent trends in refinery hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitani, A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.B. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refiners are experiencing a rise in hydrogen requirements to improve product quality and process heavy sour crudes. Fuel reformulation has disrupted refinery hydrogen balance in two ways: more hydrogen is needed for hydroprocessing and less hydrogen is coproduced from catalytic naphtha reforming. The purpose of this paper is to review trends in maximizing refinery hydrogen production by modifications and alternatives to the conventional steam methane reforming, recovery from refinery off gases and {open_quote}across-the-fence{close_quote} hydrogen supply. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. System for thermochemical hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1981-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

  19. Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production This report documents the engineering and cost...

  20. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  1. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University] [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Protons MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  2. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

  3. of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed to make fuel cells efficient. Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen gas with oxygen from the air for hydrogen-powered cars in mass production facilities," says SFU chemistry professor Steve Holdcroft, who

  4. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,and compressors have small-scale economies at this size range. Liquid hydrogenhydrogen ?ow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor

  5. An Overview of Hydrogen Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Hu, Jianli; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, hydrogen is primarily used in the chemical industry, but in the near future it will become a significant fuel. There are many processes for hydrogen production. This paper reviews reforming (steam, partial oxidation, autothermal, plasma, and aqueous phase), pyrolysis, hydrogen from biomass, electrolysis and other methods for generating hydrogen from water, and hydrogen storage. In addition, desulfurization, water-gas-shift, and hydrogen purification methods are discussed. Basics of these processes are presented with a large number of references for the interested reader to learn more.

  6. On production costs in vertical differentiation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    EA 4272 On production costs in vertical differentiation models Dorothe BRECARD(*) 2009,version1-1Oct2009 #12;1 On production costs in vertical differentiation models Dorothe Brcard production cost beside a fixed cost of quality improvement in a duopoly model of vertical product

  7. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  8. WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

  9. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total installed capital cost (TIC) 1% Of TIC 25% Estimate ofcost estimates for six station types SMR 100 a Equipment capital

  10. Redirection of metabolism for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwood, Caroline S.

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is to develop and apply techniques in metabolic engineering to improve the biocatalytic potential of the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris for nitrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen gas production. R. palustris, is an ideal platform to develop as a biocatalyst for hydrogen gas production because it is an extremely versatile microbe that produces copious amounts of hydrogen by drawing on abundant natural resources of sunlight and biomass. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, such as R. palustris, generate hydrogen and ammonia during a process known as biological nitrogen fixation. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase and normally consumes nitrogen gas, ATP and electrons. The applied use of nitrogenase for hydrogen production is attractive because hydrogen is an obligatory product of this enzyme and is formed as the only product when nitrogen gas is not supplied. Our challenge is to understand the systems biology of R. palustris sufficiently well to be able to engineer cells to produce hydrogen continuously, as fast as possible and with as high a conversion efficiency as possible of light and electron donating substrates. For many experiments we started with a strain of R. palustris that produces hydrogen constitutively under all growth conditions. We then identified metabolic pathways and enzymes important for removal of electrons from electron-donating organic compounds and for their delivery to nitrogenase in whole R. palustris cells. For this we developed and applied improved techniques in 13C metabolic flux analysis. We identified reactions that are important for generating electrons for nitrogenase and that are yield-limiting for hydrogen production. We then increased hydrogen production by blocking alternative electron-utilizing metabolic pathways by mutagenesis. In addition we found that use of non-growing cells as biocatalysts for hydrogen gas production is an attractive option, because cells divert all resources away from growth and to hydrogen. Also R. palustris cells remain viable in a non-growing state for long periods of time.

  11. Assessment of methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G. [Peak Design, Evergreen, CO (United States); Blake, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Showalter, S. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. The results of this work can be used to guide future work in the application of concentrated solar energy to hydrogen production. Specifically, the objectives were to: (1) determine the cost of hydrogen produced from methods that use concentrated solar thermal energy, (2) compare these costs to those of hydrogen produced by electrolysis using photovoltaics and wind energy as the electricity source. This project had the following scope of work: (1) perform cost analysis on ambient temperature electrolysis using the 10 MWe dish-Stirling and 200 MWe power tower technologies; for each technology, sue two cases for projected costs, years 2010 and 2020 the dish-Stirling system, years 2010 and 2020 for the power tower, (2) perform cost analysis on high temperature electrolysis using the 200 MWe power tower technology and projected costs for the year 2020, and (3) identify and describe the key technical issues for high temperature thermal dissociation and the thermochemical cycles.

  12. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alternate deposition techniques and engineered nanostructures Supplier qualification, near term cost Qualification · Task 7.0: H2A Model Cost Analysis ­ Input design parameters ­ Assess impact of changes #12% 5 Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Development 06/30/13 0% 6 Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Qualification 09

  13. Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramrez Muoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

  14. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReview |Panel HydrogenM M aDesignJanuary

  15. Hydrogen Production R&D Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Hydrogen Production R&D Activities Hydrogen Production R&D Activities An important advantage to using hydrogen as an energy carrier is that it can be produced from a...

  16. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

  17. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReviewEducationHydrogen and Fuel

  18. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stephen Herring

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

  19. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Herring

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

  20. Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

  1. Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in the production of both fuel-cell quality hydrogen and ultra-clean liquid fuels (Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis), which are easier to transport and store than natural gas [6, 7]. The Fischer-Tropsch process has received significant attention in the quest to produce...:1 ratio of H2:CO which is beneficial to FischerTropsch process and methanol synthesis [4]. Also, this reaction is exothermic which can reduce the overall hydrogen production plant cost [5]. CH4 + O2 ? CO + 2 H2...

  2. From Waste to Hydrogen: An Optimal Design of Energy Production and Distribution Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yueyue

    impacts on freight volumes in both rural and urban areas. This paper focuses on the optimal design to operate for small quantities of hydrogen transported over short distances. Cryogenic or liquid tanker production, including biomass feedstock availability and costs (ORNL, 2005), the costs of producing hydrogen

  3. Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

  4. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity...

  5. Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective) Co-production of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective) FuelCell Energy Overview, Direct Fuel...

  6. Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production viaWind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Hydrogen Production via WindElectrolysis: Milestone Completion Report Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production via WindElectrolysis: Milestone Completion...

  7. High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Seven-Membered Diphosphine Ligands Containing High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using...

  8. HyPro: Modeling the Hydrogen Transition

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other options. Directed Technologies, Inc. 09 May 2007 7 Objective Cost Function Cost of Hydrogen kg at Pump Production cost + Terminal cost + Delivery cost + Dispensing...

  9. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e&Funding andMaterialPathway Cost

  10. Production of hydrogen from alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deluga, Gregg A. (St. Paul, MN); Schmidt, Lanny D. (Minneapolis, MN)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing hydrogen from ethanol or other alcohols. The alcohol, optionally in combination with water, is contacted with a catalyst comprising rhodium. The overall process is preferably carried out under autothermal conditions.

  11. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meet

  12. Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric J. Carlson

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

  13. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. Davis, ITS-Davis.production of hydrogen with pipeline distribution. Theatmosphere, and pipeline delivery of hydrogen to refueling

  14. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. Davis, ITS-Davis.production of hydrogen with pipeline distribution. Theatmosphere, and pipeline delivery of hydrogen to refueling

  15. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOEs high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  16. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantums then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel systems performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of smart tanks that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of Cool Fuel technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  17. The transition to hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and infrastructure requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Ramback, G.D.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range with emissions below one-tenth the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being considered in California as Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicles. These vehicles can also be manufactured with increased but not excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining optimized engines and other advanced components, the overall vehicle efficiency should approach 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to the 3.1 cents/km U.S. vehicle operators pay today while using conventional automobiles. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

  18. Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and research needs and next steps

  19. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  20. PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL SYSTEMS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to allow the overlap of the bandedges with the water redox potentials in the dark. Charge transfer analysis A photoelectrochemical (PEC) system combines the harvesting of solar energy with the electrolysis of water. When, the energy can be sufficient to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Depending on the type of semiconductor

  1. Development of efficient photoreactors for solar hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Cunping; Yao, Weifeng; T-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, Fl 32922-5703 (United States)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of hydrogen evolution from a photocatalytic process depends not only on the activity of a photocatalyst, but also on photoreactor design. Ideally, a photoreactor should be able to absorb the incident light, promoting photocatalytic reactions in an effective manner with minimal photonic losses. There are numerous technical challenges and cost related issues when designing a large-scale photoreactor for hydrogen production. Active stirring of the photocatalyst slurry within a photoreactor is not practical in large-scale applications due to cost related issues. Rather, the design should allow facile self-mixing of the flow field within the photoreactor. In this paper two types of photocatalytic reactor configurations are studied: a batch type design and another involving passive self-mixing of the photolyte. Results show that energy loss from a properly designed photoreactor is mainly due to reflection losses from the photoreactor window. We describe the interplay between the reaction and the photoreactor design parameters as well as effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. We found that a passive self-mixing of the photolyte is possible. Furthermore, the use of certain engineering polymer films as photoreactor window materials has the potential for substantial cost savings in large-scale applications, with minimal reduction of photon energy utilization efficiency. Eight window materials were tested and the results indicate that Aclar trademark polymer film used as the photoreactor window provides a substantial cost saving over other engineering polymers, especially with respect to fused silica glass at modest hydrogen evolution rates. (author)

  2. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. University ofPipeline network gradually expands and eventually takes over all hydrogenpipelines. These technologies compete with each other to meet an exogenously estimated hydrogen

  3. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Conclusion Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production. MgSO4 .7H2O is a required nutrient, but hydrogen production work should focus on minimizing the lag time in biological hydrogen production, by varying nutrient

  4. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  5. Method in the production of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzen, B. G.; Herrmann, W.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method in the production of hydrogen peroxide by the anthraquinone process is described, in which method anthraquinone derivatives dissolved in a working solution are subjected alternatingly to hydrogenation and oxidation. To reduce the relative moisture in the working solution to a suitable level of 20-98%, preferably 40-85%, the working solution is dried prior to hydrogenation by contacting it with a gas or a gaseous mixture, the water vapor pressure of which is below that of the working solution. Suitable gases or gas mixtures are air or exhaust gases from the oxidation stage of the anthraquinone process.

  6. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems Projected Performance and Cost Parameters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

  7. Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornish, John

    2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

  8. Method of production of pure hydrogen near room temperature from aluminum-based hydride materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Balema, Viktor P.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a cost-effective method of producing pure hydrogen gas from hydride-based solid materials. The hydride-based solid material is mechanically processed in the presence of a catalyst to obtain pure gaseous hydrogen. Unlike previous methods, hydrogen may be obtained from the solid material without heating, and without the addition of a solvent during processing. The described method of hydrogen production is useful for energy conversion and production technologies that consume pure gaseous hydrogen as a fuel.

  9. Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation) Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation) Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen...

  10. Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Presentation by Jake McKinlay, Indiana University, at the Biological Hydrogen...

  11. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current lack of hydrogen infrastructure. Hydrogen fuel isof developing hydrogen infrastructure systems. This analysisa refueling infrastructure for hydrogen vehicles: a southern

  12. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current lack of hydrogen infrastructure. Hydrogen fuel isof developing hydrogen infrastructure systems. This analysisa Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles: A Southern

  13. Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

  14. The Modular Helium Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy; K. Schultz; L. Brown; M. Fukuie

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For hydrogen production, the concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. Two concepts that make direct use of the MHR high-temperature process heat are being investigated in order to improve the efficiency and economics of hydrogen production. The first concept involves coupling the MHR to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process and is referred to as the SI-Based H2-MHR. The second concept involves coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) and is referred to as the HTE-Based H2-MHR.

  15. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN); Mattingly, Susan M. (State College, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  16. Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

  17. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClaine, Andrew W.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia) and magnesium oxide. We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

  18. Method for the continuous production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Getty, John Paul (Knoxville, TN); Orr, Mark T. (Kingsport, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

  19. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  20. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322C and 750C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  1. Bioreactor Development for Biological Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioreactor Development for Biological Hydrogen Production Edward J. Wolfrum, Andrew S. Watt, Jie and reactor pressure on the volumetric pro- ductivity of trickle bed bioreactors. The apparent rate constant research focuses on using well- defined bioreactor geometries to collect quantitative reactor performance

  2. Cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolas, E.

    1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen. The cathode comprises an active surface consisting of a metal oxide obtained by the thermal decomposition of a thermally decomposable compound of a metal chosen from amongst cobalt, iron, manganese or nickel. The cathode is particularly suitable for the electrolysis of aqueous sodium chloride solutions in cells with a permeable diaphragm.

  3. IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H2 WGS H2 operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900C Equivalent O2 Operational Experience Under High Pressure Differential SUMMARY OF ELTRON OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE SYNGAS

  4. Enterprise budget development and production cost allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Kelly Don

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the current year's crop in production, and accumulating costs for next year's crop. The production and marketing cycle will frequently overlap a calendar year accounting cycle. Caution should be expressed if adding other enterprises to the current system...ENTERPRISE BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION COST ALLOCATION A Professional Paper by Kelly Don Minear Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master...

  5. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle markethybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofof the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the

  6. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State Model of Hydrogen Infrastructure for US Urban Areas,investments for hydrogen infrastructure in the early stagesORNL) analyze hydrogen infrastructure and deployment with

  7. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

  8. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

  9. Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

  10. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  11. Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  12. Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D. M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

  13. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R&D approach, which involved the rapid down-selection of a large number of options (chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4}) to a smaller, more manageable number. The research began by conducting an extensive review of the technical and patent literature to identify all possible options. The down-selection was based on evaluation of the options against a set of metrics, and to a large extent occurred before experimentation was initiated. Given the vast amount of literature and patents that has evolved over the years, this approach helped to focus efforts and resources on the options with the highest technical and commercial probability of success. Additionally, a detailed engineering analysis methodology was developed for conducting the cost and energy-efficiency calculations. The methodology utilized a number of inputs and tools (Aspen PEA{trademark}, FCHTool, and H2A). The down-selection of chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4} identified three options that were subsequently pursued experimentally. Metal reduction of borate was investigated in Dow's laboratories, research on electrochemical routes to NaBH{sub 4} was conducted at Pennsylvania State University, and Idaho National Laboratory researchers examined various carbothermal routes for producing NaBH{sub 4} from borate. The electrochemical and carbothermal studies did not yield sufficiently positive results. However, NaBH{sub 4} was produced in high yields and purities by an aluminum-based metal reduction pathway. Solid-solid reactive milling, slurry milling, and solution-phase approaches to metal reduction were investigated, and while both reactive milling and solution-phase routes point to fully recyclable processes, the scale-up of reactive milling processes to produce NaBH{sub 4} is expected to be difficult. Alternatively, a low-cost solution-phase approach to NaBH{sub 4} has been identified that is based on conventional process unit operations and should be amenable to scale-up. Numerous advances in AB synthesis have been made in recent years to improve AB yields and purities

  14. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGraw, Jennifer

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGraw, Jennifer

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Andris R.Abele. Quantum Hydrogen Storage Systems, PresentedTIAX LLC, Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-plant (BOP), but not the hydrogen storage system. This study

  17. The Product Oriented Design and Construction (PODAC) Cost Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from one rate year to another 5.2. Product Variations 5.2.1. Modify the Cost Item cost data 5 cost data 5.3.2. Modifying labor-hour estimates, labor costs, or material costs 5.3.3. ChangingThe Product Oriented Design and Construction (PODAC) Cost Model A Proposed Procedure for Product

  18. Efficient Hydrogen Production Using Enzymes of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Escherichia coli. Primers were designed for the cloning of the target genes. The genes encoding the two NADP into the vector PCR2.1 and expressed in E. coli. Production of hydrogen by enzymes in cell-free extracts of T stream less suitable for hydrogen fuel cells (Leslie, 1997). Enzymatic Hydrogen Production Marine

  19. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

  20. Energy optimization of Hydrogen production from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    production cost 0.67 $/kg. Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Alternative fuels, Fuel cells, Water of the fabric that covered the airship. In 1950's the first practical fuel cell was presented by Francis T. Bacon. Current developments on fuel cell technology for both stationary generation of electricity

  1. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation (2012), annually updated costs analyses will be conducted for PEM fuel cell passenger buses as well to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which

  2. Production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. Task 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.L.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents results of a cooperative effort among the Florida Energy Office, NASA/Kennedy Space Center, the US Department of Energy and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). It reports on a task to evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. The resulting activities covered five years of effort funded at a total of $216,809. The results represent a successful, coordinated effort among two state agencies and two federal agencies. Results are reported on two separate investigations. The first investigation looked at the use of line focus concentrating photovoltaics coupled with single-cell electrolyzers to produce gaseous hydrogen. The concept, and its design, construction and operation, are presented. The objectives of the line focusing PV system are to reduce overall system cost under the assumptions that lenses and mirrors are cheaper to deploy than are PV cells, and that low-voltage, high-current dc electricity can efficiently power a single-cell elctrolyzer to produce hydrogen. The second investigation evaluated a base case cost of PV electrolysis hydrogen production based on present-day PV and electrolyzer costs and efficiencies. A second step analyzed the hydrogen costs based on a best prediction of where PV costs and efficiencies will be in 10 years. These results set the minimum cost standards that other renewable production technologies must meet or better.

  3. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparative Assessment of Fuel Cell Cars, Massachusettselectric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of PowerTransition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the Potential

  4. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM PHOTOLYSIS OF STEAM ADSORBED ONTO PLATINIZED SrTiO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, R.G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submitted to Nature HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM PHOTOLYSIS OFof California. LBL 11872 HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM PHOTOLYSISthe recombination of hydrogen and oxygen is a significant

  5. Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

  6. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

  7. Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis Lau

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

  8. Production of hydrogen from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schora, F. C.; Feldkirchner, H. L.; Janka, J. C.

    1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for production of hydrogen from oil shale fines by direct introduction of the oil shale fines into a fluidized bed at temperatures about 1200/sup 0/ to about 2000/sup 0/ F. to obtain rapid heating of the oil shale. The bed is fluidized by upward passage of steam and oxygen, the steam introduced in the weight ratio of about 0.1 to about 10 on the basis of the organic carbon content of the oil shale and the oxygen introduced in less than the stoichiometric quantity for complete combustion of the organic carbonaceous kerogen content of the oil shale. Embodiments are disclosed for heat recovery from the spent shale and heat recovery from the spent shale and product gas wherein the complete process and heat recovery is carried out in a single reaction vessel. The process of this invention provides high conversion of organic carbon component of oil shale and high production of hydrogen from shale fines which when used in combination with a conventional oil shale hydroconversion process results in increased overall process efficiency of greater than 15 percent.

  9. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Pennsylvania State Univeristy: Serguei Lvov, Mike Chung, Mark Fedkin, Victor Balashov, Elena, Chalkova, Nikolay Akinfiev; University of South Carolina: Carol Stork, Thomas Davis, Francis Gadala-Maria, Thomas Stanford, John Weidner; Tulane University: Victor Law, John Prindle; Lewis, ANL: Michele

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the worldâ??s hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements - around 530 oC and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and reactions going to completion without side reactions, and lower demands on materials of construction. Three university research groups from PSU, USC, and TU as well as a group from ANL have been collaborating on the development of enabling technologies for the Cu-Cl cycle, including experimental work on the Cu-Cl cycle reactions, modeling and simulation, and particularly electrochemical reaction for hydrogen production using a CuCl electrolyzer. The Consortium research was distributed over the participants and organized in the following tasks: (1) Development of CuCl electrolyzer (PSU), (2) Thermodynamic modeling of anolyte solution (PSU), (3) Proton conductive membranes for CuCl electrolysis (PSU), (4) Development of an analytical method for online analysis of copper compounds in highly concentrated aqueous solutions (USC), (5) Electrodialysis as a means for separation and purification of the streams exiting the electrolyzer in the Cu-Cl cycle (USC), (6) Development of nanostructured electrocatalysts for the Cu-Cl electrolysis (USC), (7) Cu-Cl electrolyzer modeling (USC), (8) Aspen Plus modeling of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (TU), (9) International coordination of research on the development of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (ANL). The results obtained in the project clearly demonstrate that the Cu-Cl alternative thermochemical cycle is a promising and viable technology to produce hydrogen efficiently.

  10. Hydrogen Production Pathways | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Production

  11. Hydrogen Production Processes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContamination Detectorof Energy LeakHydrogen Production

  12. NPR (New Production Reactor) capacity cost evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ORNL Cost Evaluation Technical Support Group (CETSG) has been assigned by DOE-HQ Defense Programs (DP) the task defining, obtaining, and evaluating the capital and life-cycle costs for each of the technology/proponent/site/revenue possibilities envisioned for the New Production Reactor (NPR). The first part of this exercise is largely one of accounting, since all NPR proponents use different accounting methodologies in preparing their costs. In order to address this problem of comparing ''apples and oranges,'' the proponent-provided costs must be partitioned into a framework suitable for all proponents and concepts. If this is done, major cost categories can then be compared between concepts and major cost differences identified. Since the technologies proposed for the NPR and its needed fuel and target support facilities vary considerably in level of technical and operational maturity, considerable care must be taken to evaluate the proponent-derived costs in an equitable manner. The use of cost-risk analysis along with derivation of single point or deterministic estimates allows one to take into account these very real differences in technical and operational maturity. Chapter 2 summarizes the results of this study in tabular and bar graph form. The remaining chapters discuss each generic reactor type as follows: Chapter 3, LWR concepts (SWR and WNP-1); Chapter 4, HWR concepts; Chapter 5, HTGR concept; and Chapter 6, LMR concept. Each of these chapters could be a stand-alone report. 39 refs., 36 figs., 115 tabs.

  13. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    station. H2Gens estimates for capital costs are also lowerestimates and show high variability (26%-117% of capital costs).capital costs of about $250,000. Existing hydrogen station cost analyses tend to under-estimate

  14. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Eric L. Miller (Primary Contact), Daniela Paluselli, Bjorn Marsen, Richard HPEs based on best available materials systems. Demonstrate 7.5% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency

  15. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

  16. Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

  17. Author's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    coal and gasoline [3]. Moreover, hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity, or directly as a transportation fuel [4]. Hydrogen can be generated from hydrocarbons and water resourcesAuthor's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/ methanol decomposition

  18. Maximizing Photosynthetic Efficiencies and Hydrogen Production in Microalga Cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polle, Jrgen

    1 Maximizing Photosynthetic Efficiencies and Hydrogen Production in Microalga Cultures Juergen) is expected to increase the photon use efficiency of microalgae in mass culture as it would minimize

  19. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and speaker biographies from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton"...

  20. DOE Issues Request for Information on Biological Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (RFI) seeking feedback from interested stakeholders regarding biological hydrogen production research and development (R&D) pathways, barriers, issues, and opportunities for...

  1. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B. D.; Baum, G. N.; Perez, J.; Baum, K. N.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation.

  2. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  3. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  4. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    right-of-way (ROW) and installation is assumed to significantly higher for hydrogen distribution (urban) when compared to transmission (

  5. Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

    A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best...

  6. The Least-cost Hydrogen for Southern California Zhenhong Lin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yueyue

    of hydrogen infrastructure build-up in Southern California during 2010-2060. Given an exogenous demand, the model generates temporal and spatial decisions for building a hydrogen infrastructure, in terms of when emissions, and oil dependence [1]-[3]. Although a hydrogen refueling infrastructure does not currently exist

  7. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kim, Eung S. (Ammon, ID); Sherman, Steven R. (Augusta, GA)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  8. Assessing Strategies for Fuel and Electricity Production in a California Hydrogen Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production of hydrogen, electricity and CO 2 from coal withproduction of hydrogen, electricity, and CO 2 from coal withDecarbonized hydrogen and electricity from natural gas.

  9. NEGATIVE-HYDROGEN-ION PRODUCTION BY BACKSCATTERING FROM ALKALI-METAL TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, P.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tion of Negative Hydrogen ions and Beams, Brookhaven 1977,of the Workshop on Hydrogen Recycling, Dublin, CA, October"18, 1979 NEGATIVE-HYDROGEN-ION PRODUCTION BY BACKSCATTERING

  10. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel-cell system cost estimate Fuel cell performance andsignificantly affect the cost of fuel cell stack. In aTo estimate how the costs of fuel-cell system components

  11. Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -system complexity. · Increase efficiency by: ­ directly producing high-purity hydrogen using high temperature, H2 in hot water or hot air. 100 50 Step 2: Hot fluid heats the alloy causing the hydrogen to be released Hydride Alloy 2 Hydride Alloy 3 Hydride Alloy 4 Hot Fluid Cold Fluid Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor

  12. Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nonrenewable sources such as natural gas and petroleum hydrocarbons via steam reforming. In order for hydrogen such as hydrogen, acetate, ethanol, and others. The hydrogen-acetate couple produces more ATP per mole of substrate than alcohols such as ethanol and butanol and is the energetically "preferred" bacterial fer- mentation

  13. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  14. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  15. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  16. Materials Development for Improved Efficiency of Hydrogen Production by Steam Electrolysis and Thermochemical-Electrochemical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    as potential sources of hydrogen for the "hydrogen economy". One of these hydrogen production processesMaterials Development for Improved Efficiency of Hydrogen Production by Steam Electrolysis-electrochemical hydrogen production cycle that produces hydrogen from water, also using heat from a nuclear reactor

  17. Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 10 kW and 25 kW Direct Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of 10 kW and 25 kW Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Material Handling Applications Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 10 kW and 25 kW...

  18. Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets Presentation on the Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets...

  19. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  20. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  1. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  2. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  3. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  4. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PV System Installation Years of Productive Life Cost of InverterPV System Installation Years of Productive Life Cost of InverterPV system is expected to face is for replacing the inverter.

  5. Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

  6. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  7. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  8. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar 12:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 Research Review Continued o Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt basedBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production

  9. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production of Quantum Well Type Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Type Structures...

  10. Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Robert Fletcher

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for production and cost estimation for clamshell dredge projects. There are current methods of predicting clamshell dredge production which rely on production curves and constant cycle times. This thesis calculates production estimation...

  11. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  12. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  13. Nuclear-Driven Copper-Based Hybrid Thermo/Electro Chemical Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Yehia F.; Rostkowski, Katherine H. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a worldwide need for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, hydrogen gas has become a primary focus of energy researchers as a promising substitute of nonrenewable energy sources. For instance, use of hydrogen gas in fuel cells has received special technological interest particularly from the transportation sector, which is presently dominated by fuel oil. It is not only gaseous hydrogen that is in demand, but the need for liquid hydrogen is growing as well. For example, the aerospace industry uses liquid hydrogen as fuel for space shuttles. The use of liquid hydrogen during a single space shuttle launch requires about 15,000 gallons per minute, which is equivalent to about forty-five hydrogen trailers, each with 13,000 gallons capacity. The hydrogen required to support a single Mars mission would be at least ten times that required for one space shuttle launch. In this work, we provide mass and energy balances, major equipment sizing, and costing of a hybrid CuO-CuSO{sub 4} plant with 1000 MW (30,240 kg/hr) H{sub 2} production capacity. With a 90% annual availability factor, the estimated hydrogen production rate is about 238,412 tons annually, the predicted plant efficiency is about 36%, and the estimated hydrogen production cost is about $4.0/kg (not including storage and transportation costs). In addition to hydrogen production, the proposed plant generates oxygen gas as a byproduct with an estimated flowrate of about 241,920 kg/hr (equivalent to 1,907,297 tons annually). We also propose a novel technology for separating SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} from O{sub 2} using a battery of redundant fixed-bed reactors containing CuO impregnated in porous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). This technology accommodates online regeneration of the CuO. Other practical approaches for gaseous separation are also examined including use of ceramic membranes, liquefaction, and regenerable wet scrubbing with slurried magnesium oxide or solutions of sodium salts such as sodium sulfite and sodium hydroxide. Finally, we discuss the applicability of high-temperature nuclear reactors as an ideal fit to providing thermal energy and electricity required for operating the hybrid thermochemical plant with high overall system efficiency. (authors)

  14. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macr; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On-board cost modeling Results - Gravimetric and volumetric capacity - Refueling dynamics - Discharge dynamics - Dormancy and boil-off losses - WTT efficiency - Greenhouse gas...

  16. Vacancy Announcements Posted for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office has posted two vacancy announcements for a position to serve as Program Manager for the Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program in the DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office. The closing date is October 28, 2014.

  17. THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the process efficiency. However these impurities may result in contamination of hydrogen by CO, CO2 and H2S which should be removed from the product gas using methanation and H2S scrubbing steps, respectively. 11

  18. Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form rate of 4.4 million Nm3 , the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $9.50/GJ. The production

  19. Hydrogen and Syngas Production from Biodiesel Derived Crude Glycerol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvey, Luke

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen and Syngas Production from Biodiesel Derived Crude Glycerol By Copyright 2011 Luke Grantham Silvey Submitted to the graduate degree program in the Chemical and Petroleum Program, School of Engineering and the Graduate Faculty...D ________________________________ Christopher Depcik , PhD Date Defended: December 15, 2011 ii The Thesis Committee for Luke Grantham Silvey certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: Hydrogen and Syngas Production from Biodiesel Derived Crude...

  20. USA oilgas production cost : recent changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

  1. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the damage costs of air pollution, oil use, noise, and GHGresulting from air pollution, noise, oil use and greenhouseExternalities include air pollution, noise, oil use and GHG

  2. Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)); Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an order of magnitude) less energy is required and that sunlight can be used directly. In the case of photoproduction of hydrogen, as compared to water splitting, feeding the anodic compartment of the PEC with an organic pollutant, instead of the usual supporting electrolyte, will bring about a substantial increase of the photocurrent at a given illumination. Thus, the replacement of the photo-oxidation of water by the photodegradation of organic waste will be accompanied by a gain in solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency and hence by a decrease in the cost of the photoproduced hydrogen. Taking into account the benefits and possible revenues obtainable by the waste degradation, this would seem to be a promising approach to the photoproduction of hydrogen. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is another waste effluent requiring extensive treatment, especially in petroleum refineries. The so-called Claus process is normally used to convert the H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. A sulfur recovery process developed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described briefly in Chapter 4 by Dr. C. Linkous as a typical example of the photoproduction of hydrogen in a non oxygen-evolving system. The encouraging results obtained in these investigations of photoelectrochemical hydrogen production combined with organic waste degradation, have prompted a decision to continue the work under the new IEA Hydrogen Agreement Annex 14, Photoelectrolytic Hydrogen Production.

  3. Estimated Costs for Production, Storage and Transportation of Switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs for Production, Storage and Transportation of Switchgrass File A1-22 February 2008 updates earlier production cost estimates for switchgrass. The earlier estimations were com- pleted University (ISU) Extension publication Costs of Producing Switchgrass for Biomass in South- ern Iowa, PM 1866

  4. COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS Nicolas PERRY Ass. Prof., IRCCy.Bernard@irccyn.ec-nantes.fr Abstract: In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization

  5. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    psi) High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogen2005 High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogenthe hydrogen, a hydrogen compressor, high-pressure tank

  6. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION THROUGH ELECTROLYSIS Robert J. Friedland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with traditional spring washer approaches. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610 the end of the Phase I program in December of 1999. A description of the technical performance efforts and market evaluation showed that a hydr

  7. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able associated with both the manufacture of carbon fibers themselves as well as their composites. Traditional

  8. Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department ofU.S. DepartmentCost-effectiveCosts of

  9. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department of EnergyCoreHydrogen Storage

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReview |Panel HydrogenM M aDesign |

  11. Hydrogen leak detection - low cost distributed gas sensors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReviewEducationHydrogen and Fuelasin

  12. Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  13. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melis, Anastasios; Zhang, Liping; Benemann, John R.; Forestier, Marc; Ghirardi, Maria; Seibert, Michael

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  14. Hydrogen Production - Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    consumer on a cost-per-mile-driven basis as a comparable conventional internal-combustion engine or hybrid vehicle. DOE is engaged in research and development of a variety of...

  15. One Step Hydrogen Generation Through Sorption Enhanced Reforming

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    or otherwise restricted information. Project Objective Develop compact, hydrogen production technology for large-scale applications Reduces cost of hydrogen by...

  16. Hydrogen Production Pathways | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovemberInvestigationsCommittee on EnergyMarketHollettHow itHydroVisionHydrogen

  17. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollabaugh, Charles M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bowman, Melvin G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

  18. Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

  19. The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumer productif fuel cell costs become competitive andthe hydrogen debate. Fuel cell costs are on a steep downwards state-of-the-art fuel cell stack would cost about $125 per

  20. Potential Fusion Market for Hydrogen Production Under Environmental Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konishi, Satoshi [Kyoto University (Japan)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential future hydrogen market and possible applications of fusion were analyzed. Hydrogen is expected as a major energy and fuel mediun for the future, and various processes for hydrogen production can be considered as candidates for the use of fusion energy. In order to significantly contribute to reduction of CO{sub 2} emission, fusion must be deployed in developing countries, and must substitute fossil based energy with synthetic fuel such as hydrogen. Hydrogen production processes will have to evaluated and compared from the aspects of energy efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission. Fusion can provide high temperature heat that is suitable for vapor electrolysis, thermo-chemical water decomposition and steam reforming with biomass waste. That is a possible advantage of fusion over renewables and Light water power reactor. Despite of its technical difficulty, fusion is also expected to have less limitation for siting location in the developing countries. Under environmental constraints, fusion has a chance to be a major primary energy source, and production of hydrogen enhances its contribution, while in 'business as usual', fusion will not be selected in the market. Thus if fusion is to be largely used in the future, meeting socio-economic requirements would be important.

  1. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    information" 4 Approach BASF has a low cost production process for Li ion battery cathode materials. In this project, the cathode materials developed in the laboratory will be...

  2. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 2 Awards Announced-Includes Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Phase 2 Release 1 Awards, including three Office of Science projects focusing on hydrogen production from electrolysis and hydrogen systems supporting fuel cell electric...

  3. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolley, George S

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An agent-based model of the transition to a hydrogen transportation economy explores influences on adoption of hydrogen vehicles and fueling infrastructure. Attention is given to whether significant penetration occurs and, if so, to the length of time required for it to occur. Estimates are provided of sensitivity to numerical values of model parameters and to effects of alternative market and policy scenarios. The model is applied to the Los Angeles metropolitan area In the benchmark simulation, the prices of hydrogen and non-hydrogen vehicles are comparable. Due to fuel efficiency, hydrogen vehicles have a fuel savings advantage of 9.8 cents per mile over non-hydrogen vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles account for 60% of new vehicle sales in 20 years from the initial entry of hydrogen vehicles into show rooms, going on to 86% in 40 years and reaching still higher values after that. If the fuel savings is 20.7 cents per mile for a hydrogen vehicle, penetration reaches 86% of new car sales by the 20th year. If the fuel savings is 0.5 cents per mile, market penetration reaches only 10% by the 20th year. To turn to vehicle price difference, if a hydrogen vehicle costs $2,000 less than a non-hydrogen vehicle, new car sales penetration reaches 92% by the 20th year. If a hydrogen vehicle costs $6,500 more than a non-hydrogen vehicle, market penetration is only 6% by the 20th year. Results from other sensitivity runs are presented. Policies that could affect hydrogen vehicle adoption are investigated. A tax credit for the purchase of a hydrogen vehicle of $2,500 tax credit results in 88% penetration by the 20th year, as compared with 60% in the benchmark case. If the tax credit is $6,000, penetration is 99% by the 20th year. Under a more modest approach, the tax credit would be available only for the first 10 years. Hydrogen sales penetration then reach 69% of sales by the 20th year with the $2,500 credit and 79% with the $6,000 credit. A carbon tax of $38 per metric ton is not large enough to noticeably affect sales penetration. A tax of $116 per metric ton makes centrally produced hydrogen profitable in the very first year but results in only 64% penetration by year 20 as opposed to the 60% penetration in the benchmark case. Provision of 15 seed stations publicly provided at the beginning of the simulation, in addition to the 15 existing stations in the benchmark case, gives sales penetration rates very close to the benchmark after 20 years, namely, 63% and 59% depending on where they are placed.

  4. CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Fan

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

  5. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, Harold T.

    2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

  6. Hydrogen Production Processes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Productioncan be

  7. Hydrogen Production Related Links | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Productioncan beThe

  8. Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen

  9. Hydrogen Production Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContamination Detectorof Energy LeakHydrogen

  10. Hydrogen Production: Coal Gasification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContamination Detectorof EnergyCoal Gasification Hydrogen

  11. Nanolipoprotein Particles for Hydrogen Production - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593Energy StoragePortal Hydrogen

  12. Hydrogen Leak Detection - Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContamination Detectorof Energy Leak Detection - Low-Cost

  13. Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Beth

    , Crook County Soil and Water Conservation District, Prineville, OR 97754. ABSTRACT: Harvesting trialsProduction, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus

  14. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report UCB will minimize, or truncate, the chlorophyll antenna size in green algae to maximize photobiological solar conversion efficiency and H2-production....

  15. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI pathway PSInonphotochemical PQ Dark fermentation H 2 uptake oxyhydrogen reaction photoreduction Photosynthetic H 2 pathways...

  16. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dark cycle to repair photosystems. Integration with biorefineries, which convert biomass feedstocks into one or more products, would provide a source of organic compounds for the...

  17. NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    laboratories, code officials and code organizations to bring experts together in a focused activity to develop industry, academia, national and government laboratories, code officials, code organizations, and otherNHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach Karen Miller, Vice President

  18. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Patterson; C. Park

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

  19. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  20. Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

  1. 2014 Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    volumes, investment in larger BOP, product design and sourcing for world markets, and optimization of the grid and DC stack interfaces. Dr. Krzysztof Lewinski of 3M spoke about...

  2. Production of Hydrogen for Clean and Renewable Source of Energy for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xunming; Ingler, William B, Jr.; Abraham, Martin; Castellano, Felix; Coleman, Maria; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Giolando, Dean; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya. H.; Stuart, Thomas; Vonderembse, Mark

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a two-year project that had two major components: 1) the demonstration of a PV-electrolysis system that has separate PV system and electrolysis unit and the hydrogen generated is to be used to power a fuel cell based vehicle; 2) the development of technologies for generation of hydrogen through photoelectrochemical process and bio-mass derived resources. Development under this project could lead to the achievement of DOE technical target related to PEC hydrogen production at low cost. The PEC part of the project is focused on the development of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation devices and systems using thin-film silicon based solar cells. Two approaches are taken for the development of efficient and durable photoelectrochemical cells; 1) An immersion-type photoelectrochemical cells (Task 3) where the photoelectrode is immersed in electrolyte, and 2) A substrate-type photoelectrochemical cell (Task 2) where the photoelectrode is not in direct contact with electrolyte. Four tasks are being carried out: Task 1: Design and analysis of DC voltage regulation system for direct PV-to-electrolyzer power feed Task 2: Development of advanced materials for substrate-type PEC cells Task 3: Development of advanced materials for immersion-type PEC cells Task 4: Hydrogen production through conversion of biomass-derived wastes

  3. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  4. Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warren R. U.S. interstate pipelines begin 1993 on upbeat. 66. ? True, Warren R. Current pipeline costs. Oil & GasWarren R. U.S. interstate pipelines ran more efficiently in

  5. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    Plant Production 5000 kg/day Solar Plant Module Cost (with2, which was a solar thermal plant built by the Departmentfor a continuous solar thermochemical plant was modeled and

  6. Lighting Up Enzymes for Solar Hydrogen Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have combined quantum dots, which are spherical nanoparticles that possess unique size-tunable photophysical properties, with the high substrate selectivity and fast turnover of hydrogenase enzymes to achieve light-driven hydrogen (H2) production. They found that quantum dots of cadmium telluride coated in carboxylic acids easily formed highly stable complexes with the hydrogenase and that these hybrid assemblies functioned to catalyze H2 production using the energy of sunlight.

  7. Hydrogen production during fragmented debris/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Blose, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the unlikely event that molten core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete and structural materials become the driving forces for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia Laboratories is a research effort to characterize the nature of these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as hydrogen generation, aerosol production, and fission product release that arise because of the melt/concrete interactions.

  8. Electrochemically Assisted Microbial Production of Hydrogen from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including heavy oils, naphtha, and coal. Only 4% is generated from water using electricity derived from electricity production. In a MFC, microorganisms oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons directly or by endogenously produced mediators, include a wealth of genera including Geobacter, Shewanella, Pseudomonas

  9. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

  10. Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

  11. Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)." Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)...

  12. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  13. Method and System for the Production of Hydrogen at Reduced VHTR Outlet Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility dedicated to hydrogen production, early designs are expected to be dual purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor with electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. The integrated system of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant is being investigated and this system, as it is currently envisioned, will produce hydrogen by utilizing a highly efficient VHTR with a VHTR outlet temperature of 900C to supply the necessary energy and electricity to the HTSE unit. Though the combined system may produce hydrogen and electricity with high efficiency, the choices of materials that are suitable for use at 900C are limited due to high-temperature strength, corrosion, and durability (creep) considerations. The lack of materials that are ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) code-certified at these temperatures is also a problem, and is a barrier to commercial deployment. If the current system concept can be modified to produce hydrogen with comparable efficiency at lower temperatures, then the technical barriers related to materials selection and use might be eliminated, and the integrated system may have a much greater probability of succeeding at the commercial scale. This paper describes a means to reduce the outlet temperature of the VHTR to approximately 700C while still maintaining plant high efficiency.

  14. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surrounding the hydrogen infrastructure expansion, includingM. (2003) Initiating hydrogen infrastructures: preliminaryin planning new hydrogen infrastructure: 1) identifying

  15. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen storage Hydrogen pipeline Gas meter Compressedbuilt near an existing hydrogen pipeline have the advantagetruck delivery. A hydrogen pipeline already exists between

  16. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen dispenser Hydrogen pipeline High-pressure hydrogenbuilt near an existing hydrogen pipeline have the advantagetruck delivery. A hydrogen pipeline already exists between

  17. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Other State Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Programs Regional Levelrelated to hydrogen and fuel cell tech- nologies. Otherapplications of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. They

  18. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partnership Finalizes Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, World WideCommercialization Strategy for Hydrogen Energy Technologies,Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are

  19. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell Deployment and Hydrogen Infrastructure, Worldwide Web,of deploying hydrogen infrastructure. stream of hydrogenfeasibility of a hydrogen infrastructure is enhanced by

  20. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. LipmanElectricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. Lipmanof electricity, hydrogen, and thermal energy; 2) a survey of

  1. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, rpd; Cormos, C?lin C. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Arany Janos 11, RO-400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Arany Janos 11, RO-400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H{sub 2} and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  2. The Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, William A.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.; Buckner, Melvin R.

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Sulfur-based cycles--the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) and the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS)--have emerged as the leading thermochemical water-splitting processes for producing hydrogen utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors. Numerous international efforts have been underway for several years to develop the SI Cycle, but development of the HyS Cycle has lagged. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background, current status, recent development results, and the future potential for this thermochemical process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology since 2004 to evaluate and to conduct research and development for the HyS Cycle. Process design studies and flowsheet optimization have shown that an overall plant efficiency (based on nuclear heat converted to hydrogen product, higher heating value basis) of over 50% is possible with this cycle. Economic studies indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant based on this process can be economically competitive, assuming that the key component, the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer, can be successfully developed. SRNL has recently demonstrated the use of a proton-exchange-membrane electrochemical cell to perform this function, thus holding promise for economical and efficient hydrogen production.

  3. Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non-precious-metal catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non August 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen production Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) NiMo NiW Cathode catalystMo cathode accomplished a hydrogen production rate of 2.0 m3 /day/m3 at current density of 270 A/m3 (12 A/m2

  4. Amorphous Si Thin Film Based Photocathodes with High Photovoltage for Efficient Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    thin film with TiO2 encapsulation layer is demonstrated as a highly promising and stable photo- cathode for solar hydrogen production. With platinum as prototypical cocatalyst, a photocurrent onset potential of 0 for solar hydrogen production. KEYWORDS: Water splitting, hydrogen production, photochemistry, high

  5. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production: Report to Congress Solar and Wind Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................5 1.4 Potential Capacity for Hydrogen Production from Conventional Electrolysis Using Wind and SolarSolar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production: Report to Congress Solar and Wind Technologies For Hydrogen Production Report to Congress December 2005 (ESECS EE-3060) #12;Solar and Wind Technologies

  6. Development of HyPEP, A Hydrogen Production Plant Efficiency Calculation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. H. Oh; C. B. Davis; S. R. Sherman; S. Vilim; Y. J. Lee; W. J. Lee

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy envisions the next generation very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) as a single-purpose or dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the Republic of Korea also selected VHTR for the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) Project. The report will address the evaluation of hydrogen and electricity production cycle efficiencies for such systems as the VHTR and NHDD, and the optimization of system configurations. Optimization of such complex systems as VHTR and NHDD will require a large number of calculations involving a large number of operating parameter variations and many different system configurations. The research will produce (a) the HyPEP which is specifically designed to be an easy-to-use and fast running tool for the hydrogen and electricity production evaluation with flexible system layout, (b) thermal hydraulic calculations using reference design, (c) verification and validation of numerical tools used in this study, (d) transient analyses during start-up operation and off-normal operation. This project will also produce preliminary cost estimates of the major components.

  7. Animating a cost effective character for an educational production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnevale, Luke Anthony

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ANIMATING A COST EFFECTIVE CHARACTER FOR AN EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTION A Thesis by LUKE ANTHONY CARNEVALE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences ANIMATING A COST EFFECTIVE CHARACTER FOR AN EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTION A Thesis by LUKE ANTHONY CARNEVALE Submitted to Texas A...

  8. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    of the Hydrogen Compressor .. 85results of the hydrogen compressor. The net work required toBalances of the Hydrogen Compressor Total In Out Relative

  9. DOE Working Group Meeting Renewable Hydrogen Production UsingRenewable Hydrogen Production Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-101 E-201 V-302 WASTE WATER VIRENT REACTOR SYSTEM R-100 B-201 AIR R-203 E-202 DI WATER HOT AIR in the aqueous phase and has highoperates in the aqueous phase and has high hydrogen selectivity at low temperaturehydrogen selectivity at low temperature.. ·· Impact:Impact: Sugars and sugar alcohols areSugars and sugar

  10. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

  11. Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

  12. Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathe, Mandar; Xu, Dikai; Hsieh, Tien-Lin; Simpson, James; Statnick, Robert; Tong, Andrew; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for the project titled Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture under award number FE0012136 for the performance period 10/01/2013 to 12/31/2014.This project investigates the novel Ohio State chemical looping gasification technology for high efficiency, cost efficiency coal gasification for IGCC and methanol production application. The project developed an optimized oxygen carrier composition, demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and completed cold-flow model studies. WorleyParsons completed a techno-economic analysis which showed that for a coal only feed with carbon capture, the OSU CLG technology reduced the methanol required selling price by 21%, lowered the capital costs by 28%, increased coal consumption efficiency by 14%. Further, using the Ohio State Chemical Looping Gasification technology resulted in a methanol required selling price which was lower than the reference non-capture case.

  13. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  14. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  15. Hydrogen and Primary Productivity: Inference of Biogeochemistry from Phylogeny in a Geothermal Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    113 Hydrogen and Primary Productivity: Inference of Biogeochemistry from Phylogeny in a Geothermal, unexpectedly, that hydrogen-metabolizing organisms, both known and novel, dominate these communities. Hydrogen geothermal area by gas chromatography to survey the potential distribution of hydrogen concentrations in high

  16. Time Domain Partitioning of Electricity Production Cost Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, C.; Hummon, M.; Jones, W.; Hale, E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production cost models are often used for planning by simulating power system operations over long time horizons. The simulation of a day-ahead energy market can take several weeks to compute. Tractability improvements are often made through model simplifications, such as: reductions in transmission modeling detail, relaxation of commitment variable integrality, reductions in cost modeling detail, etc. One common simplification is to partition the simulation horizon so that weekly or monthly horizons can be simulated in parallel. However, horizon partitions are often executed with overlap periods of arbitrary and sometimes zero length. We calculate the time domain persistence of historical unit commitment decisions to inform time domain partitioning of production cost models. The results are implemented using PLEXOS production cost modeling software in an HPC environment to improve the computation time of simulations while maintaining solution integrity.

  17. Overview of High-Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J. S.; O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Hartvigsen, J. J.; Petri, M. C.; Carter, J. D.; Bischoff, B. L.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last five years there has been a growing interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, particularly to augment transportation fuels and thus reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, in the long term, methane reforming is not a viable process for the large-scale hydrogen production since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen without consuming fossil fuels and without emitting greenhouse gases through the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is developing three general categories of high temperature processes for hydrogen production: thermochemical, electrolytic and hybrid thermo-electrolytic. This paper introduces the work being done in the development of high temperature electrolysis of steam. High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) is built on the technology of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which were invented over a century ago, but which have been most vigorously developed during the last twenty years. SOFCs consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce steam and electricity. Solid Oxide Electrolytic Cells (SOECs) consume electricity and steam and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the HTE research is to solve those problems unique to the electrolytic mode of operation, while building further on continuing fuel cell development. ORGANIZATION Experiments have been conducted for the last three years at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. on the operation of button cells and of progressively larger stacks of planar cells. In addition, the INL has been performing analyses of the cell-scale fluid dynamics and plant-scale flowsheets in order to determine optimum operating conditions and plant configurations. Argonne National Laboratory has been performing experiments for the development of new electrode materials, as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics and flowsheets for comparison with the work being done at the INL. ANL has also been performing diagnostic measures on components form long-duration tests at the INL and Ceramatec to determine the causes for the slow degradation in cell performance. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing high temperature porous membranes for the separation of hydrogen from the residual steam, thus avoiding the need to condense and reheat the steam. The University of Nevada at Las Vegas has been collaborating with ANL on the development of electrode and electrolyte materials and will soon begin to investigate the causes of cell degradation. HTE research also includes NERI projects at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute on the development of toughened SOEC composite seals and at the Georgia Institute of Technology on the microstructural design of SOEC materials. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS The most recent large-scale test of HTE was performed from June 28 through Sept 22, 2006 at the Ceramatec plant in Salt Lake City. The test apparatus consists of two stacks of 60 cells each in a configuration that will be used in the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) experiment during FY-07. The ILS will contain three modules of four stacks each. The Half-Module initially produced 1.2 normal m3of H2/hour and 0.65 Nm3/hr at the end of the 2040-hour continuous test.

  18. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOEDocuments

  19. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOE Fuel Cell Technologies

  20. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423Department ofChlamydomonas reinhardtii

  1. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 at IowaSecretary Chu SecretaryRemarksDepartment ofEnergy Most

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, S. V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photoanode applications in hydrogen production S. V.of sunlight into hydrogen by pho- toelectrochemical ͑PEC͒is crucial for efficient hydrogen production using the PEC

  3. The development of autocatalytic structural materials for use in the sulfur-iodine process for the production of hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miu, Kevin (Kevin K.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen offers many benefits to traditional methods of hydrogen production. As opposed to steam methane reforming - the most prevalent method of hydrogen ...

  4. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost...

  5. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vs. delivered hydrogen, compressor type, storage pressure).pump High-pressure hydrogen compressor Compressed hydrogenpipeline High-pressure hydrogen compressor Pipeline Station:

  6. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Rutter, et al. Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planningModelling of Hydrogen infrastructure for vehicle refuellingof building up a hydrogen infrastructure in Southern

  7. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S.E. , (1997) Hydrogen Infrastructure Report, p. E-5.M. (2003) Initiating hydrogen infrastructures: preliminaryin planning new hydrogen infrastructure: 1) the lack of

  8. Production of Hydrogen at the Forecourt Using Off-Peak Electricity: June 2005 (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report provides information about the production of hydrogen at the forecourt using off-peak electricity as well as the Hydrogen Off-Peak Electricity (HOPE) model.

  9. Production of Hydrogen by Superadiabatic Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide - Final Technical Report for the Period June 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachid B. Slimane; Francis S. Lau; Javad Abbasian

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop an economical process for hydrogen production, with no additional carbon dioxide emission, through the thermal decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in H{sub 2}S-rich waste streams to high-purity hydrogen and elemental sulfur. The novel feature of the process being developed is the superadiabatic combustion (SAC) of part of the H{sub 2}S in the waste stream to provide the thermal energy required for the decomposition reaction such that no additional energy is required. The program is divided into two phases. In Phase 1, detailed thermochemical and kinetic modeling of the SAC reactor with H{sub 2}S-rich fuel gas and air/enriched air feeds is undertaken to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on exit gas products and conversion efficiency, and to identify key process parameters. Preliminary modeling results are used as a basis to conduct a thorough evaluation of SAC process design options, including reactor configuration, operating conditions, and productivity-product separation schemes, with respect to potential product yields, thermal efficiency, capital and operating costs, and reliability, ultimately leading to the preparation of a design package and cost estimate for a bench-scale reactor testing system to be assembled and tested in Phase 2 of the program. A detailed parametric testing plan was also developed for process design optimization and model verification in Phase 2. During Phase 2 of this program, IGT, UIC, and industry advisors UOP and BP Amoco will validate the SAC concept through construction of the bench-scale unit and parametric testing. The computer model developed in Phase 1 will be updated with the experimental data and used in future scale-up efforts. The process design will be refined and the cost estimate updated. Market survey and assessment will continue so that a commercial demonstration project can be identified.

  10. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/GeneratorFuel Cell Deployment and Hydrogen Infrastructure, WorldwideOffice (2005), Florida Hydrogen Business Partnership,

  11. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

  12. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/Generatorliter V-10 engine and about 26 kilograms of hydrogen, stored

  13. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research." Energy, v.34,Quantum Boost, DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: FY 2012Analysis. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, Web. 22

  14. advanced hydrogen production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Websites Summary: World Hydrogen Energy Conference, June 2002, Montreal, Canada. LiBH4 (lithium tetrahydroboride) - Salt. Hydrogen Energy, 23, 1103-1108...

  15. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

  16. ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

  17. Effect of Water Transport on the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Effect of Water Transport on the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer, large-scale production of hydrogen. A key step in the process is the oxidation of sulfur dioxide determines the product sulfuric acid concentration, iii affects SO2 crossover rate, and iv serves to hydrate

  18. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Navid, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the greenhouse gas CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial traits act as the biocatalysts of the process designed to both enhance the system efficiency of CO2 fixation and the net hydrogen production rate. Additionally we applied metabolic engineering approaches guided by computational modeling for the chosen model microorganisms to enable efficient hydrogen production.

  19. Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokshin, Konstantin (Santa Fe, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

  20. On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

  1. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells Hongqiang Hu Received in revised form 13 June 2008 Accepted 17 June 2008 Published online - Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all

  2. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/ methanol decomposition using Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coal and gasoline [3]. Moreover, hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity, or directly as a transportation fuel [4]. Hydrogen can be generated from hydrocarbons and water resourcesPhotoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/ methanol decomposition using Ag/TiO2

  3. Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

  4. Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

  5. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 2 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Saur, G.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 18 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through quarter 2 of 2013.

  6. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 4 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 25 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through quarter 4 of 2013.

  7. Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen, fuel cells, and distribution..." #12;1. Hydrogen Storage 2. Hydrogen Production 3. Fuel Cell Cost barriers Assist Suppliers Independent T&E Advanced Concepts Analysis & Modeling SUPPLIERS PEM fuel cell, Stationary Fuel Cells 5,440 5,500 7,500 2,000 (+36%) HYDROGEN RESEARCH Core Research and Development 14

  8. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  9. IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

  10. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

  11. Support for Cost Analyses on Solar-Driven High Temperature Thermochemi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    near-term (2015) and longer-term (2025) cost projections for eight solar thermochemical hydrogen production reaction cycles. Support for Cost Analyses on Solar-Driven High...

  12. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? kg/day unit. hybrids or 20 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (eachand Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and

  13. Kinetics of the Reduction of Wstite by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide for the Chemical Looping Production of Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wen; Lim, Jin Yang; Saucedo, Marco A.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Scott, Stuart A.; Dennis, J. S.

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    produced could be stored, e.g. by geological sequestration, making the overall process carbon-neutral, or carbon-negative when biomass is used as fuel. In addition, the hydrogen produced during the oxidation of FexO and metallic Fe in steam can be kept... Kinetics of the reduction of wstite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the chemical looping production of hydrogen Wen Liu a,n, Jin Yang Lim b, Marco A. Saucedo a, Allan N. Hayhurst b, Stuart A. Scott a, J.S. Dennis b a Department of Engineering...

  14. HYDROGEN INITIATIVE: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TOWARD RATIONAL NANOCATALYST DESIGN FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION. Technical Report-Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlachos, Dionisios G; Buttrey, Douglas J; Lauterbach, Jochen

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this grant is to develop a rational framework for the discovery of low cost, robust, and active nano-catalysts that will enable efficient hydrogen production. Our approach will be the first demonstration of integrated multiscale model, nano-catalyst synthesis, and nanoscale characterization assisted high throughput experimentation (HTE). We will initially demonstrate our approach with ammonia decomposition on noble metal catalysts. Our research focuses on many elements of the Hydrogen Initiative in the Focus Area of Design of Catalysts at the Nanoscale. It combines high-throughput screening methods with various nanostructure synthesis protocols, advanced measurements, novel in situ and ex situ characterization techniques, and multiscale theory, modeling and simulation. This project directly addresses several of the long-term goals of the DOE/BES program. In particular, new nanoscale catalytic materials will be synthesized, characterized and modeled for the production of hydrogen from ammonia and a computational framework will be developed for efficient extraction of information from experimental data and for rational design of catalysts whose impact goes well beyond the proposed hydrogen production project. In the first year of the grant, we have carried out HTE screening using a 16 parallel microreactor coupled with an FTIR analysis system. We screened nearly twenty single metals and several bimetallic catalysts as a function of temperature, catalyst loading, inlet composition, and temperature (order of 400 experiments). We have found that Ru is the best single metal catalyst and no better catalysts were found among the library of bimetallics we have created so far. Furthermore, we have investigated promoting effects (i.e., K, Cs, and Ba) of the Ru catalyst. We have found that K is the dominant promoter of increased Ru activity. Response surface experimental design has led to substantial improvements of the Ru catalyst with promotion, especially at lower temperatures. It has been found that the promoting effect is not limited to K but extendible to some other alkaline metals. In addition, we have studied a number of synthesis variables, including the effects of support, solvent used, calcination temperature and time. It has been found that solvent and support could have an important effect on activity. Advanced characterization of the Ru/K promoted catalyst has been carried via SEM, TEM, selected-area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. It has been found that the Ru catalyst is composed of agglomerates, whereas the K-promoted catalyst of nanowhiskers with a KRu4O8 hollandite structure. Our detailed characterization studies strongly suggest for the first time a strong correlation between hollandite formation and the high activity of Ru catalyst. Future work should provide stronger evidence of this correlation and may enable us to further improve the catalyst. A number of microkinetic models for single metals have been developed and a methodology for linking models for bimetallic catalysts in a thermodynamically consistent manner has been implemented. This enables us for the first time to start exploring multi-site catalysts, using either mean-field or Monte Carlo approaches, and filling the materials gap from single crystals to supported catalysts. In addition, we are developing a multiscale model-based design of experiments methodology. This framework employs multiscale-based models combined with global search in experimental parameter space, identification of novel experimental conditions that maximize the kinetic information content, followed by statistical analysis that can guide the next iteration of experiments.

  15. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2007 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2007 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  16. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2009 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2009 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  17. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2008 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2008 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  18. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a fuel cell or hydrogen combustion engine gen-set. ByCell H 2 = hydrogen ICE = internal-combustion engine kg =

  19. Conceptual design of nuclear systems for hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohnholt, Katherine J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for hydrogen in the transportation energy sector is expected to keep growing in the coming decades; in the short term for refining heavy oils and in the long term for powering fuel cells. However, hydrogen cannot ...

  20. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peltier G, Cournac L (2005) Autotrophic and mixotrophic hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur-deprived Chla- mydomonas cells.

  1. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications: 2007 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost...

  2. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

  3. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

  4. A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles by Sbastien Prince options considered for future fuel cell vehicles. In this thesis, a model is developed to determine

  5. Enhanced Hydrogen Production in Escherichia coli Through Chemical Mutagenesis, Gene Deletion, and Transposon Mutagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garzon Sanabria, Andrea Juliana

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN ESCHERICHIA COLI THROUGH CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS, GENE DELETION, AND TRANSPOSON MUTAGENESIS A Thesis by ANDREA JULIANA GARZON SANABRIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2010 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN ESCHERICHIA COLI THROUGH CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS, GENE DELETION...

  6. Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells Priscilla Available online 24 November 2009 Keywords: MEC Electrohydrogenesis Hydrogen production Cathode Metal Nickel using a nickel powder (0.51 mm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes

  7. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  8. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  9. PRODUCTION, STORAGE AND PROPERTIES OF HYDROGEN AS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FUEL: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In the age of ever increasing energy demand, hydrogen may play a major role as fuel. Hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel, whereas neither nuclear nor solar energy can be used directly. The blends of hydrogen and ethanol have been used as alternative renewable fuels in a carbureted spark ignition engine. Hydrogen has very special properties as a transportation fuel, including a rapid burning speed, a high effective octane number, and no toxicity or ozone-forming potential. A stoichiometric hydrogenair mixture has very low minimum ignition energy of 0.02 MJ. Combustion product of hydrogen is clean, which consists of water and a little amount of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The main drawbacks of using hydrogen as a transportation fuel are huge on-board storage tanks. Hydrogen stores approximately 2.6 times more energy per unit mass than gasoline. The disadvantage is that it needs an estimated 4 times more volume than gasoline to store that energy. The production and the storage of hydrogen fuel are not yet fully standardized. The paper reviews the different production techniques as well as storage systems of hydrogen to be used as IC engine fuel. The desirable and undesirable properties of hydrogen as IC engine fuels have also been discussed.

  10. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  11. The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

  12. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct-hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light-duty automobiles. Mass...

  13. Hydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, William

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop a method, at the pilot scale, for the economical production of hydrogen from peanut shells. During the project period a pilot scale process, based on the bench scale process developed at NREL (National Renewable Energy Lab), was developed and successfully operated to produce hydrogen from peanut shells. The technoeconomic analysis of the process suggests that the production of hydrogen via this method is cost-competitive with conventional means of hydrogen production.

  14. Energy Department Announces up to $4 Million to Advance Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces up to 4 Million to Advance Low-Cost Hydrogen Production from Renewable and Low Carbon Sources Energy Department Announces up to 4 Million to Advance Low-Cost Hydrogen...

  15. Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems with pasture-feedlot manage- ment alternatives. Assess economic implications of beef production using an array character- istics of beef that may provide an alternative lean-to-fat composition for consum- ers. http

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Hydrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Hydrogen Infrastructure Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Market Transformation...

  17. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2004 Progress Report II.E.2 Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to commercialization Technical Barriers The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program Multi Optimization: Continued optimization of materials and device designs to demonstrate high

  18. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  19. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    connections) Installation Costs: 1. Engineering and Designstation works properly) 6. Contingency Operating Costs: 1.Feedstock Costs (natural gas, electricity) 2. Equipment

  20. Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. EnviRes initiated a wire transfer of funds for procurement of a pressure vessel and associated refractory lining. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

  1. alternative hydrogen production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Cecil, 1820). The use of hydrogen would also overcome some disadvantages of the steam engine Chemical Engineering Department. Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh PA 15213...

  2. Energy Department Invests $20 Million to Advance Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing technologies that can economically produce and deliver hydrogen to power fuel cells from diverse, domestic, and renewable resources can enable substantial...

  3. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J.; Callaghan, V.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent review report on the available information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kg/day of hydrogen from natural gas.

  4. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2014 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2014 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from, and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  5. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2013 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2013 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  6. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2012 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2012 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  7. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 19, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2009.

  8. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version September 11, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2009.

  9. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2010; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 29, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2010.

  10. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for...

  11. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

  12. Final LDRD report : metal oxide films, nanostructures, and heterostructures for solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronawitter, Coleman X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuels-those chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  13. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurston, Anthony

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research was to determine the best low cost method for the large scale production of the Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) layered cathode materials. The research and development focused on scaling up the licensed technology from Argonne National Laboratory in BASFs battery material pilot plant in Beachwood Ohio. Since BASF did not have experience with the large scale production of the NCM cathode materials there was a significant amount of development that was needed to support BASFs already existing research program. During the three year period BASF was able to develop and validate production processes for the NCM 111, 523 and 424 materials as well as begin development of the High Energy NCM. BASF also used this time period to provide free cathode material samples to numerous manufactures, OEMs and research companies in order to validate the ma-terials. The success of the project can be demonstrated by the construction of the production plant in Elyria Ohio and the successful operation of that facility. The benefit of the project to the public will begin to be apparent as soon as material from the production plant is being used in electric vehicles.

  14. Cost and Energy Consumption Optimization of Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System Nancypart production under flexible process routings is studiedMachining; Cost; Energy; Flexible Manufacturing INTRODUCTION

  15. Composite Data Products (CDPs) from the Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC) at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. NREL partners submit operational, maintenance, safety, and cost data to the HSDC on a regular basis. NREL's Technology Validation Team uses an internal network of servers, storage, computers, backup systems, and software to efficiently process raw data, complete quarterly analysis, and digest large amounts of time series data for data visualization. While the raw data are secured by NREL to protect commercially sensitive and proprietary information, individualized data analysis results are provided as detailed data products (DDPs) to the partners who supplied the data. Individual system, fleet, and site analysis results are aggregated into public results called composite data products (CDPs) that show the status and progress of the technology without identifying individual companies or revealing proprietary information. These CDPs are available from this NREL website: 1) Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration; 2) Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations; 3) Fuel Cell Technology Status [Edited from http://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/facilities_secure_data_center.html].

  16. System for the co-production of electricity and hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Anderson, Brian Lee (Lodi, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is a system for the co-generation of hydrogen gas and electricity, wherein the proportion of hydrogen to electricity can be adjusted from 0% to 100%. The system integrates fuel cell technology for power generation with fuel-assisted steam-electrolysis. A hydrocarbon fuel, a reformed hydrocarbon fuel, or a partially reformed hydrocarbon fuel can be fed into the system.

  17. TECHNOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF AREA II HYDROGEN PRODUCTION -PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage medium for hydrogen produced by the ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plantships [16 Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL 32922-5703, ali@fsec.ucf.edu Abstract The aim of this analysis power interface, 3) Ammonia and ammonia adducts as hydrogen energy storers for fuel cell applications

  18. Solar photoproduction of hydrogen. IEA technical report of the IEA Agreement of the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, J.R. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (CA) N6A 5B7

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Program and represents the result of subtask C, Annex 10 - Photoproduction of Hydrogen. The concept of using solar energy to drive the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen has been examined, from the standpoints of potential and ideal efficiencies, measurement of (and how to calculate) solar hydrogen production efficiencies, a survey of the state-of-the-art, and a technological assessment of various solar hydrogen options. The analysis demonstrates that the ideal limit of the conversion efficiency for 1 sun irradiance is {approximately}31% for a single photosystem scheme and {approximately}42% for a dual photosystem scheme. However, practical considerations indicate that real efficiencies will not likely exceed {approximately}10% and {approximately}16% for single and dual photosystem schemes, respectively. Four types of solar photochemical hydrogen systems have been identified: photochemical systems, semiconductor systems, photobiological systems, and hybrid and other systems. A survey of the state-of-the-art of these four types is presented. The four types (and their subtypes) have also been examined in a technological assessment, where each has been examined as to efficiency, potential for improvement, and long-term functionality. Four solar hydrogen systems have been selected as showing sufficient promise for further research and development: (1) Photovoltaic cells plus an electrolyzer; (2) Photoelectrochemical cells with one or more semiconductor electrodes; (3) Photobiological systems; and (4) Photodegradation systems. The following recommendations were presented for consideration of the IEA: (1) Define and measure solar hydrogen conversion efficiencies as the ratio of the rate of generation of Gibbs energy of dry hydrogen gas (with appropriate corrections for any bias power) to the incident solar power (solar irradiance times the irradiated area); (2) Expand support for pilot-plant studies of the PV cells plus electrolyzer option with a view to improving the overall efficiency and long-term stability of the system. Consideration should be given, at an appropriate time, to a full-scale installation as part of a solar hydrogen-based model community; (3) Accelerate support, at a more fundamental level for the development of photoelectrochemical cells, with a view to improving efficiency, long-term performance and multi-cell systems for non-biased solar water splitting; (4) Maintain and increase support for fundamental photobiological research with the aim of improving long-term stability, increasing efficiencies and engineering genetic changes to allow operation at normal solar irradiances; and (5) Initiate a research program to examine the feasibility of coupling hydrogen evolution to the photodegradation of waste or polluting organic substances.

  19. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  20. Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000,000 digesters, 2000 [14]), among other places [15,16]. These digesters operate to generate biogas, comprisingAnaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production Accepted 24 May 2013 Available online Keywords: Anaerobic digestion Ammonia Bioenergy Bioammonia Hydrogen

  1. DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announce a funding opportunity in the area of renewable hydrogen technology research and development, specifically addressing discovery and development of advanced materials systems and chemical proceesses for direct photochemical and/or thermochemical water splitting for application in the solar production of hydrogen fuel.

  2. Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture Princeton University: Tom use (transportation and heating) responsible for ~2/3 of global CO2 emissions CO2 capture energy carriers are needed: electricity and hydrogen. If CO2 sequestration is viable, fossil fuel

  3. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pipeline delivery. Clean Energy Group Other Renewable HydrogenHydrogen Cost Estimates (continued) Production Method Petroleum Coke Gasification kg/day $5.35/kg ($37.68/GJ) Central production Pipeline

  4. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    l l Hydrogen Energy Stations Ohio, and Florida. FurtherRenewable Energy Trust NJ: New Jersey BPU OH: Ohio Fuel Cellenergy technol- ogies include California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and

  5. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y d r o g e n Energy Stations New York State Energy Researchin an effort led by the New York State Energy Research andNYSERDA) (2005), New York Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, NYSERDA

  6. DOE Hydrogen Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Program A Prospectus for Biological H 2 Production The Hydrogen Economy The hydrogen economy pertains to a world fundamentally different from the one we now know. Hydrogen...

  7. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  8. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

  9. High Pressure Ethanol Reforming for Distributed Hydrogen Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by S. Ahmed and S.H.D. Lee at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  10. APPLIED GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY Enhanced hydrogen production from glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    ). Most of the hydrogen now produced globally is by the process of steam reforming and the watergas shift, the glucose glycolytic pathway to phosphoenol- pyruvate, pyruvate, acetate, ethanol, and formate via bacterial

  11. Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

  12. A Techno-Economic Assessment of Hydrogen Production by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 Resource Assessment of Biomass Feedstocks 1.1 Bagasse, Sw itch Grass, and Nut Shell Availability and Cost 1

  13. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOEDepartmentWorkshop |2024 Date:

  14. Slovakian refiner operating new hybrid hydrogen-production process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babik, A. (Chemko s.p., Strazske (Slovakia)); Kurt, J. (Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany))

    1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemko s.p. has implemented Uhde GmbH's new combined autothermal reforming (CAR) process into an existing hydrogen plant at its refinery in Strazske, Slovakia. The new technology uses a combination of steam reforming and partial oxidation processes to produce synthesis gas or hydrogen for use in refinery or petrochemical processes. The paper describes the CAR process, process development, the reactor, convective reformer, partial oxidation, and the demonstration unit.

  15. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  16. Solar Hydrogen Production Using Carbon Quantum Dots and a Molecular Nickel Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martindale, Benjamin C. M.; Hutton, Georgina A. M.; Caputo, Christine A.; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Hydrogen Production Using Carbon Quantum Dots and a Molecular Nickel Catalyst Benjamin C. M. Martindale, Georgina A. M. Hutton, Christine A. Caputo, and Erwin Reisner* Christian Doppler Laboratory for Sustainable SynGas Chemistry, Department...

  17. Optimal Simultaneous Production of Hydrogen and Liquid Fuels from Glycerol: Integrating the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    . Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Hydrogen, Alternative fuels, Diesel, Fisher Tropsch 1 Corresponding author of oil (vegetal, cooking oil or the one obtained from microalgae (Martn & Grossmann, 2012), glycerol, biodiesel production requires energy (Martn & Grossmann, 2012). Therefore, this is another incentive

  18. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Installed Capital Figure 4-21: Cost Estimates for 1,000 kg/station. H2Gens estimates for capital costs are also lowerestimates and show high variability (26%-117% of capital costs).

  19. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

  20. Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

  1. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a hydrogen economy. The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  2. Hydrogen Cryomagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in our current approach. The liquefaction of hydrogen allows also for its use in transport applications for example BMW developed a car that utilises liquid hydrogen instead of compressed gas hydrogen making the use of cryogenic hydrogen even more... efficient. 11 Figure 13. Decentralised production of hydrogen pathways for Energy and Hydrogen Cryomagnetic solutions for a hospital environment. The shaded region in the figure represents the decentralised production of hydrogen using renewable...

  3. Hydrogen Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation summarizes key challenges in financing hydrogen infrastructure and reviews analysis tools available to inform investment decisions and reduce financial risks.

  4. In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production from Arthrospira maxima Dariya Comparison of Potential Corn, Cellulose, and Aquatic Microbial Fuel Production Assuming demonstrated biomass production by Sodium substitution Nitrate elimination Hypotonic stress Conclusions Overview #12;b a

  5. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  6. FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M

    2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

  7. Chemical Engineering Journal 93 (2003) 6980 Production of COx-free hydrogen for fuel cells via step-wise hydrocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Chemical Engineering Journal 93 (2003) 69­80 Production of COx-free hydrogen for fuel cells via Abstract The stringent COx-free hydrogen requirement for the current low temperature fuel cells has motivated the development of COx-free hydro- gen production alternatives to the conventional hydrogen

  8. Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hydrogen Storage 2. Hydrogen Production 3. Fuel Cell Cost Reduction #12;Major Fuel Cell Decisions FuelOffice of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (proposed) Steve Chalk May 6, 2002 #12 DAS Associate DASIndustrial Technologies Implementation A Director Solar Energy Technologies Director

  9. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2011 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2011 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of selected agricultural coop- eratives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates

  10. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2010 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2010 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the De- partments. Thesecostsestimatesarerepresentativeofaveragecosts for farms in Iowa. Very large or small farms may have lower or higher fixed costs per acre. Due

  11. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  12. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew out of an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions [1]. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen to be produced by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting [1, 2]. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  13. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

  14. Methane Decomposition: Production of Hydrogen and Carbon Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    fuel cell vehicles; such vehicles are expected to significantly curtail the pollution from for hydrogen is to power fuel cells. Major automobile manufac- turers are currently working towards developing the transportation sector. Fuel cells, because of their modular nature, can be utilized to provide heat

  15. PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Eric Miller and Richard Rocheleau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (indium-tin-oxide), and polymer-encapsulation films deposited at the University of Hawaii. The a-Si solar these catalytic coatings, solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies of 6% to 8% were expected for the a-Si based-stacks was reduced from 1.8 V to below 1 V, making water-splitting impossible, despite predicted solar

  16. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative...

  17. Production Planning and Inventories Optimization : A Backward Approach in the Convex Storage Cost Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Production Planning and Inventories Optimization : A Backward Approach in the Convex Storage Cost : Production planning, inventory management, integro-differential backward equations. 1 #12;Introduction We, and by the cost of storage of the current inventories. Our approach of this production planning and inventory

  18. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  19. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

  20. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production activity after a sudden darklight shift. This screening utilizes the characteristics of tungsten

  1. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  2. Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

  3. Reversible Electrocatalytic Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen at Low Overpotentials by a Functional Hydrogenase Mimic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stuart E.; Yang, Jenny Y.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, Morris

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new bis(diphosphine) nickel(II) complex, [Ni(PPh2NR2)2](BF4)2, 1, (R = CH2CH2OCH3) is described. A {Delta}G{sup o} of 0.84 kcal/mol{sup -1} for hydrogen addition for this complex was calculated from the experimentally determined equilibrium constant. This complex displays reversible electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production and oxidation at low overpotentials, a characteristic most commonly associated with hydrogenase enzymes.

  4. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update February 29, 2008 Final Version Brian D. James Jeffrey A. Kalinoski...

  5. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski...

  6. mMass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update January 1, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski &...

  7. High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    market, with more than 1.3 million homes labeled. Read about this Top Innovation. Find case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate cost...

  8. Study to establish cost projections for production of redox chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, J.F.; Greco, C.C.; Rusinko, R.N.; Wadsworth, A.L. III

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

  9. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin goals.

  10. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  11. Int. J. Nuclear Hydrogen Production and Application, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2006 57 Copyright 2006 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Int. J. Nuclear Hydrogen Production and Application, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2006 57 Copyright © 2006 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Global environmental impacts of the hydrogen economy Richard Derwent* Centre, UK E-mail: dstevens@met.ed.ac.uk Abstract: Hydrogen-based energy systems appear to be an attractive

  12. The reaction of cobaloximes with hydrogen: Products and thermodynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Estes, Deven P.; Grills, David C.; Norton, Jack R.

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cobalt hydride has been proposed as an intermediate in many reactions of the Co(dmgBF?)?L? system, but its observation has proven difficult. We have observed the UVvis spectra of Co(dmgBF?)?L? (1) in CH?CN under hydrogen pressures up to 70 atm. A Co(I) compound (6), with an exchangeable proton, is eventually formed. We have determined the bond dissociation free energy and pKa of the new OH bond in 6 to be 50.5 kcal/mol and 13.4, respectively, in CH?CN, matching previous reports.

  13. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring,Hydrogen Productioncan

  14. Comparative environmental impact and efficiency assessment of selected hydrogen production methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozbilen, Ahmet, E-mail: Ahmet.Ozbilen@uoit.ca; Dincer, Ibrahim, E-mail: Ibrahim.Dincer@uoit.ca; Rosen, Marc A., E-mail: Marc.Rosen@uoit.ca

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impacts of various hydrogen production processes are evaluated and compared, considering several energy sources and using life cycle analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen produced by thermochemical water decomposition cycles are more environmentally benign options compared to conventional steam reforming of natural gas. The nuclear based four-step CuCl cycle has the lowest global warming potential (0.559 kg CO{sub 2}-eq per kg hydrogen production), mainly because it requires the lowest quantity of energy of the considered processes. The acidification potential results show that biomass gasification has the highest impact on environment, while wind based electrolysis has the lowest. The relation is also investigated between efficiency and environmental impacts. -- Highlights: Environmental performance of nuclear-based hydrogen production is investigated. The GWP and AP results are compared with various hydrogen production processes. Nuclear based 4-step CuCl cycle is found to be an environmentally benign process. Wind-based electrolysis has the lowest AP value.

  15. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

  16. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Liu

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a ??one-box? process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactor??s behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered ?90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promi

  17. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs." Research ReportHydrogen Pipelines liquid hydrogen, and hydrogen pipelines. By limiting to a

  18. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs." Research ReportHydrogen Pipelines liquid hydrogen, and hydrogen pipelines. By limiting to a

  19. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of Solar Photovoltaic Cells, Center for theconcerns is solar photovoltaic cells (PVs), which captureProduction of Solar Photovoltaic Cells Solar PV cells

  20. Production of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions in microwave-driven ion sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, D.

    1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report progress they have made in the production of negative hydrogen and deuterium atomic ions in magnetically-confined microwave-driven (2.45 GHz) ion sources. The influence of source surface material, microwave power, source gas pressure and magnetic field configuration on the resulting ion current is discussed. Results strongly suggest that, at least in the source, vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen, the precursor to atomic negative ion production, is produced via a surface mechanism suggested by Hall et al. rather than via a gas phase reaction as is generally believed to be the case in most ion sources.

  1. Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Barnes; William Liss

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

  2. Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    whether the utility's own generators should be used to produce power or purchase from outside indeStatistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails

  3. THE PHOTOCATALYZED PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM WATER ON Pt-FREE SrTi03 SINGLE CRYSTALS IN THE PRESENCE OF ALKALI HYDROXIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, F.T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capt ion__ Figure 1. Hydrogen photogeneration on a metal-NaOH at 44C. Figure 2. Hydrogen photoproduction on a metal-PHOTOCATALYZED PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM WATER ON Pt-FREE

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  5. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

  6. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy TechnologySummary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  7. Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression - Overview of commercial hydrogen liquefaction and compression and opportunities to improve efficiencies and reduce cost.

  8. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    about this Top Innovation. See an example of this Top Innovation in action. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate low-cost...

  9. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the premium value of solar PV power to 0%-20% again. Whilepower to that location. While few dispute that the direct cost of electricity from the currently available solar

  10. Cost Estimation and Production Evaluation for Hopper Dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinberger, Thomas E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging projects are expensive government funded projects that are contracted out and competitively bid upon. When planning a trailing suction hopper dredge project or bidding on the request for proposal for such a project, having an accurate cost...

  11. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high cost of power from solar photovoltaic (PV) panels hassolar panels can be more closely synchronized with system demand, but at a costcost of the solar PV installation is equivalent to purchasing each MWh over the life of the panels

  12. Biological Production of Hydrogen DOE Office of Science,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Houghton@science.doe.gov #12;Biology transforms energy in a series ofBiology transforms energy in a series University Artificial Chromosome: Minimum Genome Oligo Assembly Microalgae production facility of Cyanotech

  13. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

  14. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  15. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  16. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

  17. Potential for hydrogen production with inducible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    Raymond Surzycki*, Laurent Cournac , Gilles Peltier , and Jean-David Rochaix* *Departments of Molecular for hydrogen production. Upon addition of copper to cells pregrown in copper-deficient medium, PSII levels of these proteins, e.g., membrane proteins, may be toxic to the cells and could impair their growth. Second

  18. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  19. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    if acetate is the main soluble fermentation end product. Further conver- sion to hydrogen without additional of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation by anaerobic fermentation [24]. However, only a maximum of 3 mol of H2 can be produced per mole of glycerol

  20. Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation and electrohydrogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primarily of: acetic, lactic, succinic, and formic acids and ethanol. An additional 800 290 mL H2/gHydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation Electrolysis cell Fermentation Lignocellulose a b s t r a c t A two-stage dark-fermentation