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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

J. Francfort (INEEL)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

APS ALternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System Dimitri Hochard James Francfort July 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-05-00502 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Monitoring System Dimitri Hochard a James Francfort b July 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office

3

APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the plant capacity factor has been increasing, with a recent one-month high of 49%. If a plant capacity factor of 70% can be achieved with the present equipment, the cost of electricity would drop to $2.39 per kg of hydrogen. In this report, the power conversion (76.7%), cell stack (53.1%), and reverse osmosis system (7.14%) efficiencies are also calculated, as is the water cost per kg of hydrogen produced ($0.10 per kg). The monitoring system has identified several areas having the potential to lower costs, including using an reverse osmosis system with a higher efficiency, improving the electrolysis power conversion efficiency, and using air cooling to replace some or all chiller cooling. These activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory for the AVTA, which is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

5

hydrogen pilot plant, H2ICE vehicle testing INL alternative energy vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Vehicle Testing, & INL Alternative Energy Vehicles (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INL/CON-05-00694 AVTA Presentation Outline * Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design and Operations * Hydrogen internal combustion engine vehicle testing * Oil bypass filter system evaluation * Diesel engine idling testing * INL alternative fuel infrastructure * INL alternative fuel fleet * WWW information APS Alternative Fuel (Alt-Fuel) Pilot Plant - Partners * Arizona Public Service (APS) * Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * Idaho National Laboratory (INL) * Started operations - 2002 Alt-Fuel Pilot Plant & Vehicle Testing - Objectives * Evaluate the safety & reliability of operating ICE

6

Carbon Fiber Pilot Plant and Research Facilities | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pilot Plant and Research Facilities Carbon Fiber Pilot Plant and Research Facilities 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

7

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

9

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

10

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

12

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant HIAR-WIPP-2011-09-07 November 26, 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007...

13

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

14

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment May 2012 This Needs Assessment for former Waste Isolation Pilot Plant production workers...

15

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation...

16

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Isolation Pilot Plant Update Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update More Documents & Publications TRUPACT-III Quick Facts "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery...

17

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Overview of WIPP presented by Dr. Dave Moody. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

18

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

19

Advanced Gasifier Pilot Plant Concept Definition  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from definition of a preferred commercial-scale advanced gasifier configuration and concept definition for a gasification pilot plant incorporating those preferred technologies. The preferred commercial gasifier configuration was established based on Cost Of Electricity estimates for an IGCC. Based on the gasifier configuration trade study results, a compact plug flow gasifier, with a dry solids pump, rapid-mix injector, CMC liner insert and partial quench system was selected as the preferred configuration. Preliminary systems analysis results indicate that this configuration could provide cost of product savings for electricity and hydrogen ranging from 15%-20% relative to existing gasifier technologies. This cost of product improvement draws upon the efficiency of the dry feed, rapid mix injector technology, low capital cost compact gasifier, and >99% gasifier availability due to long life injector and gasifier liner, with short replacement time. A pilot plant concept incorporating the technologies associated with the preferred configuration was defined, along with cost and schedule estimates for design, installation, and test operations. It was estimated that a 16,300 kg/day (18 TPD) pilot plant gasifier incorporating the advanced gasification technology and demonstrating 1,000 hours of hot-fire operation could be accomplished over a period of 33 months with a budget of $25.6 M.

Steve Fusselman; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations The mission of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site is to provide permanent, underground disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes (wastes that also have hazardous chemical components). TRU waste consists of clothing, tools, and debris left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. TRU waste is contaminated with small amounts of plutonium and other TRU radioactive elements. Over the next 35 years, WIPP is expected to receive approximately 175,000 cubic meters of waste from various DOE sites. Enforcement September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter, Washington TRU Solutions - September 8, 2006

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

22

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Metal Products, Inc - October 28, 2004 More enforcement documents Oversight Reports April 22, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013...

23

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

December 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan for Operating Diesel Equipment with Available Underground Airflows. The Office of Nuclear Safety and...

24

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

December, 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Conduct of Maintenance Recovery Plan The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the U.S. Department...

25

Sandia National Laboratories: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationWaste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident Investigation Analysis Support Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident Investigation Analysis...

26

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 December 24,...

27

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DENVER, CO DENVER, CO WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES O.W. EATON MANAGER, EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OPENING OF NEW ROUTES COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 102 579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL 102-579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL ACT OF 1992 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 *MERRTT 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 MERRTT *INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *MEDICAL EXAMINER DISPATCHER (BETA) *DISPATCHER (BETA) RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR FOR FOR FOR HOSPITAL PERSONNEL HOSPITAL PERSONNEL Based on FEMA Course G-346 iNTRODUCTION 4 Hazardous Materials Accidents Part 1 WIPP EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EXERCISES CONDUCTED E ercise Location Date Exercise Location Date TRANSAX 90 Colorado Springs, Colorado November 8, 1990 1

28

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Enforcement Letter issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 8, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, related to Radiological Uptakes at the Mobile Visual Examination and Repackaging Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, December 22, 2005 (EA-2005-08) - Washington TRU Solutions, LLC - Press Release, December 22, 2005 Enforcement Letter issued to Diversified Metal Products, Inc. related to Transportainer Fabrication Deficiencies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, October 28, 2004

29

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant April 22, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities November 28, 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant September 28, 2011 Independent Activity Report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [HIAR-WIPP-2011-09-07] October 2, 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at

30

A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key Science Needs for a Technically Sound MFE Pilot Plant Design Integrated Plasma Material Interface Plant Design? (2) Integrated Plasma-Materials Interface · High heat and particle flux and fluence · What seconds in 2028. The MFE Program Needs to Move Faster Implications Building a Component Test Facility

31

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant – December 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan for Operating Diesel Equipment with Available Underground Airflows

32

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant — Heliostat Evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sandia is responsible for evaluating the heliostats at the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant in Barstow, California...

C. L. Mavis; J. J. Bartel

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS-0026: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management prepared this EIS for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

34

Mastering the pilot domestic binary combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented from mastering the pilot binary combined-cycle plants of Type PGU-450T (installed at...

Yu. A. Radin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

Magrini, Kim

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Independent Activity Report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013 Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project - November 2011...

38

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Better Plants Water Pilot- Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) is expanding the Better Buildings Challenge to help partners demonstrate successful approaches to saving water and decrease their utility bills. The commercial and industrial sectors account for more than 25 percent of the withdrawals from public water supplies and many organizations in these sectors may have savings opportunities of 20 to 40%. The efficient use of water resources results in lower operating costs, a more reliable water supply, and improved water quality. Additionally, because energy is required to transport and treat water, saving water also saves energy. Through this pilot, DOE will work with a small, diverse group of Better Buildings Challenge Partners to expand their resource management strategies to include water in addition to energy, set water savings goals, track progress and showcase solutions.

40

Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Enforcement Documents - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter, Washington TRU Solutions - September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies associated with the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter Non-Destructive Assay System Refurbishment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 28, 2004 Enforcement Letter, Diversified Metal Products, Inc - October 28, 2004 Issued to Diversified Metal Products, Inc. related to Transportainer Fabrication Deficiencies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 30, 2004 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington TRU Solutions, LLC - EA-2004-08 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington TRU Solutions, LLC,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

42

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Recovery Plan provides a safe and compliant approach to resuming operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the repository for disposal of the nation’s defense transuranic (TRU) waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to resuming operations by the first quarter of calendar year 2016, and this Recovery Plan outlines the Department’s approach to meet that schedule while prioritizing safety, health, and environmental protection.

43

Better Plants Supply Chain Pilot – Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with Better Plants Partners to improve energy efficiency throughout their supply chains. Around 40 to 60 percent of a manufacturing company’s energy and carbon footprint can reside upstream in its supply chain—from raw materials, transport, and packaging to the energy consumed in manufacturing processes—but this number can be as high as 80 percent. Coordinating energy management practices between companies and their supply chains has the potential to significantly improve industrial energy productivity and reduce the amount of energy embedded in manufactured products. Through this Supply Chain Pilot, DOE will work with a select group of Better Plants Partners to extend the benefits of energy efficiency to their suppliers. Partners will leverage existing Better Plants Program resources and encourage suppliers to collectively set, track, and meet energy savings goals.

44

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) preparedness for severe natural phenomena...

45

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP WIPP Transportation Security Gregory M. Sahd Security Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy Contact Information Gregory M. Sahd Security Operations Carlsbad Field Office * U.S. Department of Energy 575.234.8117 * Greg.Sahd@wipp.ws WIPP Transportation "...The (WIPP transportation) system is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the U.S...." - National Academy of Sciences, WIPP Panel Hanford Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Argonne National Laboratory - East Nevada Test Site Argonne National Laboratory - West Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CBFO Manager Senior Management

46

Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented.

Akgunduz, N. [Dept. of Energy Fernald Field Office, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H. [Fluor Daniel Fernald, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1997-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hydrogen Pilot Project Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Wind Farm Project Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydrogen Pilot Project Wind Farm Facility Hydrogen Pilot Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Idaho Synthetic Fuels Developer Idaho Synthetic Fuels Location South of Boise ID Coordinates 43.5141°, -116.088° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5141,"lon":-116.088,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Topical Report Prepared Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Ross Edward Dugas, M capture using monoethanolamine (MEA). MEA is an appropriate choice for a baseline study since

Rochelle, Gary T.

50

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007 December 2007 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight inspected the emergency management program at DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) from July through September 2007. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This 2007 inspection found that despite isolated areas of program improvement since 2002, WIPP's level of emergency preparedness has largely declined over a period marked by a dramatic increase in the pace of waste receipt and storage activities at the site.

51

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - August 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - August Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - August 2000 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - August 2000 August 2000 Emergency Management Program Review at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Management Oversight, within the Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance, conducted a review of the emergency management program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in May 2000. The primary purpose of this review was twofold: to assess selected emergency management system elements that focus on WIPP's readiness to protect site personnel and the public from the consequences of onsite events that may result in the release of hazardous materials; and to evaluate the site's ability to provide appropriate information or

52

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant Pasadena Chemical Corp Pilot Plant - TX 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PASADENA CHEMICAL CORP., PILOT PLANT (TX.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. Mobil Mining and Minerals TX.01-2 TX.01-1 Location: Pasadena , Texas TX.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 TX.01-1 Site Operations: Process development studies and pilot plant testing of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid during the mid-1950s. TX.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority TX.01-1 TX.01-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Natural Uranium TX.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes TX.01-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PASADENA CHEMICAL CORP., PILOT PLANT

53

Independent Activity Report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September 2011 Independent Activity Report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - September 2011 September 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [HIAR-WIPP-2011-09-07] The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the nuclear facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, NM, on September 7, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and identify specific activities that HSS can perform to carry out its

54

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. The results of this review indicate that, overall, CBFO and WTS have

55

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since February Incidents Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since...

56

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report- August 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

58

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - 019  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - 019 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - 019 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (019) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, or WIPP, is the world¿s first underground repository licensed to safely and permanently dispose of transuranic radioactive waste left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. Transuranic waste consists primarily of clothing, tools, rags, and other disposable items contaminated with small amounts of radioactive elements, mostly plutonium. After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP began operations on March 26, 1999. Located in the remote

59

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November 2012 November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) preparedness for severe natural phenomena events (NPEs). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case of a severe NPE. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - November 2012

60

DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives EPA Recertification | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives EPA Recertification Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives EPA Recertification DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives EPA Recertification March 29, 2006 - 9:42am Addthis CARLSBAD, NM - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office today reached a significant milestone when its Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recertified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This decision indicates that after a thorough evaluation of the physical state and performance of the facility, the WIPP meets EPA regulatory requirements for facilities that dispose of transuranic waste. The waste facility recertification process occurs every five years and is directed by Congress in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA). "EPA's recertification reinforces the important mission of WIPP to safely

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design of a Pilot Plant Fluidized Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the design principles for a biomass fluidized bed gasifier pilot plant. The fluidized bed gasifier has a nominal capacity of 400 kg ... most important parameters for the performance of the gasifier

K. Maniatis; V. Vassilatos; S. Kyritsis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

US Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant New Mexico Statute 24-16 Sections 1-4 Compliance Policy DOEWIPP-11-3480 Revision 0 September 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy...

63

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil-fuel intake canals for withdrawing marine waters;Some marine supplies and water are available. Bunker fuels.marine ecosystem effects caused by Pilot Plant operation are associated with the seawater discharge and approximately fossil-fuel

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant — Heliostat Evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the 10 MWe Solar Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California, the beam characterization system (BCS) has been upgraded and a sunshape measurement system has been added. Heliostat mirror cleanliness h...

C. L. Mavis

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

66

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume II, August 2002 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume II, August 2002 The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This volume discusses the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program. The results of the review of the WIPP environment, safety, and

68

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga Three HalfPACT transportation packages on a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck are parked inside the exhibit hall at the 2013 Waste Management Conference. WIPP featured the exhibit as part of outreach to visitors at the annual gathering in Phoenix. Three HalfPACT transportation packages on a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck are parked inside the exhibit hall at the 2013 Waste

69

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REDUCTION PILOT PLANT (WV.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: International Nickel Company WV.01-1 Location: Cole Street at Alterizer Ave. , Huntington , West Virginia WV.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 WV.01-1 Site Operations: Manufactured powdered Nickel for use at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants and Nickel plated a small quantity of Uranium slugs. WV.01-2 WV.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantities of radioactive material used on the site. Potential for residual radioactive material from AEC operations conducted at the site considered remote - confirmed by radiological survey. WV.01-1 WV.01-3

71

MHK Technologies/European Pico Pilot Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Pico Pilot Plant European Pico Pilot Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage European Pico Pilot Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Centre Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OWC Pico Power Plant Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description A bottom mounted shoreline oscillating water column structure equipped with a horizontal axis Wells turbine generator set and a guide vane stator installed on each side of the rotor Control options are facilitated by a relief valve presently a slow acting valve with plans to substitute a fast acting mechanism in the wave chamber

72

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant Overview. Part II: A Utility Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar One Pilot Plant has been connected to ... to evaluate the plant’s performance as a utility generation resource.

J. N. Reeves

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP-2011-09-07 WIPP-2011-09-07 Site: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Dates of Activity : 09/07/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the nuclear facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, NM, on September 7, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

75

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a shadowing oversight activity to review the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) oversight of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Independent Oversight activity was performed by HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations personnel shadowing the CBFO's review of the WIPP operating contractor's Work Control Improvement Plan implementation and effectiveness review, and CBFO's annual review of the contractor's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), specifically

76

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Lights, Camera, Action! In May 2013, an INDIGO FILMS production crew prepares for an interview with EM's Carlsbad Field Office Chief Scientist Roger Nelson. INDIGO FILMS is producing a segment on WIPP for a program that highlights interesting, non-public locations that should air on the Travel Channel this fall. Lights, Camera, Action! In May 2013, an INDIGO FILMS production crew prepares for an interview with EM's Carlsbad Field Office Chief Scientist Roger Nelson. INDIGO FILMS is producing a segment on WIPP for a program that highlights interesting, non-public locations that should air on the Travel Channel this fall.

77

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Lights, Camera, Action! In May 2013, an INDIGO FILMS production crew prepares for an interview with EM's Carlsbad Field Office Chief Scientist Roger Nelson. INDIGO FILMS is producing a segment on WIPP for a program that highlights interesting, non-public locations that should air on the Travel Channel this fall. Lights, Camera, Action! In May 2013, an INDIGO FILMS production crew prepares for an interview with EM's Carlsbad Field Office Chief Scientist Roger Nelson. INDIGO FILMS is producing a segment on WIPP for a program that highlights interesting, non-public locations that should air on the Travel Channel this fall. A group of Texas A&M University nuclear engineering students shows enthusiasm for WIPP’s underground operations in May 2013.

78

MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioSTREAM Pilot Plant BioSTREAM Pilot Plant < MHK Projects(Redirected from MHK Projects/bioSTREAM Pilot Plant) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-39.9872,"lon":148.051,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

80

Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP-2011-09-07 WIPP-2011-09-07 Site: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Dates of Activity : 09/07/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the nuclear facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, NM, on September 7, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

82

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

83

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: WIPP Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

84

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted as required to: submitted as required to: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prices available from (615) 576-8401 Additional information about this document may be obtained by calling (800) 336-9477. Copies may be obtained by contacting the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Processing and final preparation of this report was performed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Management and Operating Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-01AL66444. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report DOE/WIPP 04-2225 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to safely and permanently dispose

85

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

86

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 2. Preliminary pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design of a solar water desalination pilot plant is presented. Pilot plant drawings and process descriptions are provided. Use of solar and wind energy are discussed. Testing, performance and cost of the pilot plant are studied. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Management Plan DOE/WIPP-93...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Management Plan DOEWIPP-93-004 Reprint 01082013 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Management Plan DOEWIPP-93-004 2 This page intentionally left...

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Corn-to-Ethanol Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant The Illinois Ethanol Research Advisory Board manages and operates the

90

Emergency Management Program Review at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Emergency Management Program Review at the May 2000 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 4 2.0 RESULTS ......................................................................................... 6 Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments .................................. 6 Program Plans, Procedures, and Responder Performance ........ 9 Training, Drills, and Exercises ..................................................... 13 Emergency Public Information and Offsite Response Interfaces ....................................................................................... 15 Feedback and Continuous Improvement Process

91

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

92

Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed.

Francke, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Saeb, S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Catalytic Partial Oxidation Pilot Plant Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Corporation, 585 North Dairy Ashford Street, Houston, Texas 77079 ... This is accomplished in this study with a new reactor system named the catalytic hot oxygen reactor (CHOR). ... Studying the integration of the reactor with the rest of the plant and developing detailed process economics in parallel with the system development are necessary. ...

Vasilis Papavassiliou; Perry Pacouloute; KT Wu; Raymont Drnevich; Dionisios Vlachos; John Hemmings; Leo Bonnel

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reproduced directly from the best possible copy. It is reproduced directly from the best possible copy. It is available to DOE and DOE contractors from the following address: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prices available from (615) 576-8401 Available to the public from the National Technical Information Services United States Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 Processing and final preparation of this report was performed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Management and Operating Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-01AL66444. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report DOE/WIPP 03-2225 iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We appreciate the reviews by Harold Johnson and Dr. E. B. Nuckols of the United

97

MHK Projects/bioWAVE Pilot Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bioWAVE Pilot Plant bioWAVE Pilot Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.8197,"lon":144.964,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioSTREAM Pilot Plant BioSTREAM Pilot Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-39.9872,"lon":148.051,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

U.S. Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

WIPP Community Relations Plan Web Page Click Here Current Solicitations Current Contracts Carlsbad Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the NationalTransuranic (TRU) Program. The office's mission is to provide safe, compliant, and efficient characterization, transportation, and disposal of defense-related TRU waste. Its vision is to enable a nuclear future for our country by providing safe and environmentally responsible waste management. Overview Overview opening screen The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, or WIPP, safely disposes of the nation's defense-related transuranic radioactive waste. Located in the Chihuahuan Desert, outside Carlsbad, N.M., WIPP began disposal operations in March 1999.

100

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines December 23, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. The clothing drive’s organizers — Margaret Gee (left), Yolanda Navarrete (center) and Dana Dorr — hold up some of the donated coats before providing them to Carlsbad area schools. Gee is with CBFO and Navarrete and Dorr are with Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP). NWP's Yolanda Salmon, another drive organizer, is not pictured.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- March 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

102

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- February 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic pilot plant Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate, Summary: conflicting. The Erie wastewater treatment plant sludge incinerator flue gas contains arsenic but pilot tests......

104

Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Independent Oversight Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

105

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE)Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 1999 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during calendar year 1999. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 1999, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment. Radionuclide concentrations in the environment surrounding WIPP were not statistically higher in 1999 than in 1998.

Roy B. Evans, Ph.D.; Randall C. Morris, Ph.D.; Timothy D. Reynolds, Ph.D.; Ronald W. Warren; Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions, Inc.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC; Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hot water geothermal development: opportunities and pilot plant results  

SciTech Connect

It has been projected that up to 11,000 MW of geothermal electric capacity may be on line in the United States by the year 2000. The majority of this capacity will come from hot water geothermal plants, as dry steam resources are limited. Currently, no commercial hot water geothermal capacity exists in the U.S., although, substantial capacity does exist in other countries. Large hot, high temperature resources exist in Southern California's Imperial Valley. Early research work has led to the technical success of a 10 MW unit at Brawley, and to the construction of second generation pilot unit at the Salton Sea resource.

Crane, G.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

None

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hydrologic studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to provide a general overview of hydrologic conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by describing several key hydrologic studies that have been carried out as part of the site characterization program over the last 20 years. The paper is composed of three parts: background information about general objectives of the WIPP project; information about the geologic and hydrologic setting of the facility; and information about three aspects of the hydrologic system that are important to understanding the long-term performance of the WIPP facility. For additional detailed information, the reader is referred to the references cited in the text.

Davies, P.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program  

SciTech Connect

The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation`s transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

Mewhinney, J.A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Pilot-Plant Gasification of Olive Stone: a Technical Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of pilot-plant gasification tests carried out at atmospheric pressure and temperatures within the range of 700?820 °C in order to assess the technical viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called “orujillo”, a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ... Atmospheric air gasification of biomass/waste in a bubbling-fluidized-bed (BFB) reactor is an attractive simple process to convert a solid material to a gaseous fuel. ... Their different characteristics (mainly volatile and ash content) affect the plant operation because of the energy content and the ash fusibility, but both types were gasified efficiently and the problems found were similar. ...

A. Gómez-Barea; R. Arjona; P. Ollero

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Scaleup of Structured Packing from Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design bases for a distillation train. The actual pilot plant testing involved a different structured packing type and blocked out operations to simulate a large number of theoretical stages. The pilot plant results verified the thermodynamic data... high efficiency per unit height of this structured packing and its excellent sc~leup characteristics. To pilot the large number of theoretical stages, it was decided to divide the column into two sections and run each section in a blocked out...

Berven, O. J.; Ulowetz, M. A.

117

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Plant Heat Exchangers Turbines Electrolyzer Pumps and Compressors NaCl Storage Separators Thermochemical Reactors + Chemical Absorber Figure 6.2: Equipment Cost

Luc, Wesley Wai

118

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for New Hydrogen Power Plant November 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has signed a cooperative agreement with Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA) to build and demonstrate a hydrogen-powered electric generating facility, complete with carbon capture and storage, in Kern County, Calif. The new plant is a step toward commercialization of a clean technology that enables use of our country's vast fossil energy resources while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. HECA, which is owned by Hydrogen Energy International, BP Alternative Energy, and Rio Tinto, plans to construct an advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant that will produce power by

119

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Worker Screening Construction Worker Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: WIPP Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

120

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Electronic FOIA Request Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request (FOIA) Request (FOIA) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Electronic FOIA Request Form To make an Electronic FOIA request, please provide the information below. Failure to enter accurate and complete information may render your FOIA request impossible to fulfill. Requests submitted under the Privacy Act must be signed and, therefore, cannot be submitted on this form. Name: Organization: Address: Phone: FAX: Email: Reasonable Describe Records Describe the specific record(s) you seek with sufficient detail that a knowledgeable official of the activity may locate the record with a reasonable amount of effort. Such detail should include: dates, titles, file designations, and offices to be searched. Since most DOE records are not retained permanently, the more information that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The DOE has mandated in DOE Order 5400.1 that its operations will be conducted in an environmentally safe manner. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with DOE Order 5400.1 and will conduct its operations in a manner that ensures the safety of the environment and the public. This document outlines how the WIPP will protect and preserve groundwater within and surrounding the WIPP facility. Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. The WIPP groundwater surveillance program is designed to determine statistically if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will be determined and appropriate corrective action initiated.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) test phase plan: Performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing the disposition of transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from nuclear weapons production activities of the United States. These wastes are currently stored nationwide at several of the DOE's waste generating/storage sites. The goal is to eliminate interim waste storage and achieve environmentally and institutionally acceptable permanent disposal of these TRU wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being considered as a disposal facility for these TRU wastes. This document describes the first of the following two major programs planned for the Test Phase of WIPP: Performance Assessment -- determination of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system in accordance with the requirements of the EPA Standard; and Operations Demonstration -- evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP underground facility. 120 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: An International Center of Excellence  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is responsible for the successful management of transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) in the United States. TRUW is a long-lived radioactive waste/material (LLRM). CBFO's responsibilities includes the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is a deep geologic repository for the safe disposal of U.S. defense-related TRUW and is located 42 kilometers (km) east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP is the only deep-geological disposal site for LLRM that is operating in the world today. CBFO also manages the National Transuranic Waste Program (NTP), which oversees TRU waste management from generation to disposal. As of February 2003, approximately 1500 shipments of waste have been safely transported to the WIPP, which has been operating since March 1999.

Matthews, Mark

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, National Transuranic Program Have Banner Year in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Since WIPP became operational in March 1999, it has surpassed receiving 11,000 shipments, which traveled over 14 million safe loaded miles over the nation’s highways through WIPP’s transportation program — equal to about 29 trips around the moon. WIPP has permanently disposed of more than 89,000 cubic meters of TRU waste — enough to fill more than 35 Olympic-size swimming pools. In 2013, WIPP is on course in support of the Los Alamos National Laboratory framework agreement with the State of New Mexico for complete removal of the above ground TRU waste stored at Area G by June 30, 2014. WIPP has cleaned 22 sites of legacy TRU waste.

128

TF Inner Leg Space Allocation for Pilot Plant Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

A critical design feature of any tokamak is the space taken up by the inner leg of the toroidal field (TF) coil. The radial build needed for the TF inner leg, along with shield thickness , size of the central solenoid and plasma minor radius set the major radius of the machine. The cost of the tokamak core roughly scales with the cube of the major radius. Small reductions in the TF build can have a big impact on the overall cost of the reactor. The cross section of the TF inner leg must structurally support the centering force and that portion of the vertical separating force that is not supported by the outer structures. In this paper, the TF inner leg equatorial plane cross sections are considered. Out-of- Plane (OOP) forces must also be supported, but these are largest away from the equatorial plane, in the inner upper and lower corners and outboard sections of the TF coil. OOP forces are taken by structures that are not closely coupled with the radial build of the central column at the equatorial plane. The "Vertical Access AT Pilot Plant" currently under consideration at PPPL is used as a starting point for the structural, field and current requirements. Other TF structural concepts are considered. Most are drawn from existing designs such as ITER's circular conduits in radial plates bearing on a heavy nose section, and TPX's square conduits in a case, Each of these concepts can rely on full wedging, or partial wedging. Vaulted TF coils are considered as are those with some component of bucking against a central solenoid or bucking post. With the expectation that the pilot plant will be a steady state machine, a static stress criteria is used for all the concepts. The coils are assumed to be superconducting, with the superconductor not contributing to the structural strength. Limit analysis is employed to assess the degree of conservatism in the static criteria as it is applied to a linear elastic stress analysis. TF concepts, and in particular the PPPL AT PILOT plate concept are evaluated based on amount of space needed for structure and the amount of space left for superconductor.

Peter H. Titus and Ali Zolfaghari

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant A pilot-scale conversion plant for researchers, industry partners, and stakeholders to test a variety of biochemical conversion processes and technologies. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. In the biochemical conversion pilot plant, NREL's engineers and scientists focus on all aspects of the efficiency and cost reduction of biochemical conversion processes. Our capabilities accommodate research from bench-scale to pilot-scale (up to one ton per day). NREL's biochemical conversion pilot plant is located in the Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF). Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL/PIX 20248

130

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity announcement of the cost shared feasibility studies of nuclear energy based production of hydrogen using available technology. The objective of this activity is to select and conduct project(s) that will utilize hydrogen production equipment and nuclear energy as necessary to produce data and analysis on the economics of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants More Documents & Publications https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/E67E46185A67EBE68 Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - hDE-FOA-0000092.rtf

131

DOE/WIPP-10-2225 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP-10-2225 WIPP-10-2225 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009 Errata U.S. Department of Energy September 2010 2 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009 DOE/WIPP-10-2225 3 2009 Annual Site Environmental Report To our readers: This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009 presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize site environmental management performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS), significant environmental programs, and accomplishments including progress toward the

132

Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate , Gary T. Rochelle1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHGT-8 1 Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate Eric Chen1 , Gary pilot for CO2 capture was successfully operated using potassium carbonate promoted with piperazine, potassium carbonate, piperazine Introduction Several amine-promoted potassium carbonate solvents have been

Rochelle, Gary T.

133

Institute for Renewable Energy Ltd Preparation of a pilot biogas CHP plant integrated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Renewable Energy Ltd Poland 1 Preparation of a pilot biogas CHP plant integrated on the preparation phase for a pilot investment in Koczala, Northern Poland, relating to an agricultural biogas CHP production and utilisation of agricultural biogas the project focused on BAT obtainable from various European

134

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first receipt of waste in March 1999 through the end of 2008, 57,873 m3 of TRU waste had been disposed of at the WIPP facility.

Washington Regulatory and Enviromnetal Services

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing including fossil fuel use global warming and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end?users particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN?IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs HTR VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE/WIPP-11-2225 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11-2225 11-2225 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 U.S. Department of Energy September 2011 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 DOE/WIPP-11-2225 2 This page intentionally left blank Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 DOE/WIPP-11-2225 3 2010 Annual Site Environmental Report To our readers: This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize site environmental management performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight the WIPP Environmental

137

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

138

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Secretary Mark Whitney today visited the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., where he became the first non-WIPP employee to tour the underground facility...

140

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Summary of scientific investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The scientific issues concerning disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations have received 40 years of attention since the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) first addressed this issue in the mid-50s. For the last 21 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have directed site specific studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper will focus primarily on the WIPP scientific studies now in their concluding stages, the major scientific controversies regarding the site, and some of the surprises encountered during the course of these scientific investigations. The WIPP project`s present understanding of the scientific processes involved continues to support the site as a satisfactory, safe location for the disposal of defense-related transuranic waste and one which will be shown to be in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. Compliance will be evaluated by incorporating data from these experiments into Performance Assessment (PA) models developed to describe the physical and chemical processes that could occur at the WIPP during the next 10,000 years under a variety of scenarios. The resulting compliance document is scheduled to be presented to the EPA in October 1996 and all relevant information from scientific studies will be included in this application and the supporting analyses. Studies supporting this compliance application conclude the major period of scientific investigation for the WIPP. Further studies will be of a ``confirmatory`` and monitoring nature.

Weart, W.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m{sup 2} of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR {section}268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal.

HOWARD,BRYAN A.; CRAWFORD,M.B.; GALSON,D.A.; MARIETTA,MELVIN G.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. §§6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. §§300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. §§2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. §§9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP-03-3230 WIPP-03-3230 Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 2003 United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico DOE/WIPP 03-3230 ii DOE/WIPP 03-3230 iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................... viii 1. Introduction.................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview .................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Historical Perspective .............................................................................. 1 1.2.1 Evolution of the Groundwater-Monitoring Well Network

148

MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Korea East West Power Co LTD Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description The tidal current power plant uses current energy that can be differentiated from a typical tidal power plant using marine energy The latter confines water in a dam and when released it gets processed in a turbine to produce electric power The tidal current power plant on the other hand does not need a dam thus concerns of social dislocations and degradation of ecosystems primarily endangering marine life can be avoided

149

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrogen Crack Growth Resistance of Thermal Power Plant Material Collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of electrolytical hydrogenation on fracture toughness, corrosion crack-growth resistance and fracture micromechanisms of operated 12Cr1MoV steel of thermal power plant superheater collector has been studied. Compact tension specimens were cut from perforated surface of thermal power plant superheater collector dismounted after 178,500 hours of operation. Corrosion crack-growth resistance under tension of previously hydrogenated compact specimens with fatigue cracks was studied. Due to the increased concentration of hydrogen in solution an additional buffer was being created that prevents hydrogen leakage from the specimen through the fracture surface during the experiment. The hydrogenation causes the significant decrease of critical stress intensity factor Kc, during the experiment in 0.1 N NaOH solution as compared with critical stress intensity factor K of non-hydrogenation 12Cr1MoV steel obtained by the 5% secant line method and in comparison with critical stress intensity factor Kc, determined through the J-integral. The areas of ductile crack growth in hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated specimens were found to have similar material fracture micromechanisms with dimples creation of different shape and size. But on the ductile crack growth area in hydrogenated specimens material intergranular fracture mechanisms were found caused by the hydrogen embrittlement which are similar to areas without ridges with the products corrosion traces.

V. Iasnii; P. Maruschak; O. Yasniy; Y. Lapusta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Vitrification of plutonium at Rocky Flats the argument for a pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

Current plans for stabilizing and storing the plutonium at Rocky Flats Plant fail to put the material in a form suitable for disposition and resistant to proliferation. Vitrification should be considered as an alternate technology. The vitrification should begin with a small-scale pilot plant.

Moore, L. [Rocky Mountain Peace Center, Boulder, CO (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Enterprise Assessments- Operational Awareness Record of the Observation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Horizon-14 Exercise- January 2015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operational Awareness Record of the Observation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Horizon-14 Exercise (EA-WIPP-2014-12-08)

156

AIR DISPERSION MODELING AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

One concern at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides or hazardous chemicals that can become airborne at the facility and reach the Exclusive Use Area boundary as the result of a release from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) or from the underground during waste emplacement operations. The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), WIPP RCRA Permit, and WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessments include air dispersion calculations to address this issue. Meteorological conditions at the WIPP facility will dictate direction, speed, and dilution of a contaminant plume of respirable material due to chronic releases or during an accident. Due to the paucity of meteorological information at the WIPP site prior to September 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) reports had to rely largely on unqualified climatic data from the site and neighboring Carlsbad, which is situated approximately 40 km (26 miles) to the west of the site. This report examines the validity of the DOE air dispersion calculations using new meteorological data measured and collected at the WIPP site since September 1996. The air dispersion calculations in this report include both chronic and acute releases. Chronic release calculations were conducted with the EPA-approved code, CAP88PC and the calculations showed that in order for a violation of 40 CFR61 (NESHAPS) to occur, approximately 15 mCi/yr of 239Pu would have to be released from the exhaust stack or from the WHB. This is an extremely high value. Hence, it is unlikely that NESHAPS would be violated. A site-specific air dispersion coefficient was evaluated for comparison with that used in acute dose calculations. The calculations presented in Section 3.2 and 3.3 show that one could expect a slightly less dispersive plume (larger air dispersion coefficient) given greater confidence in the meteorological data, i.e. 95% worst case meteorological conditions. Calculations show that dispersion will decrease slightly if a more stable wind class is assumed, where very little vertical mixing occurs. It is recommended that previous reports which used fixed values for calculating the air dispersion coefficient be updated to reflect the new meteorological data, such as the WIPP Safety Analysis Report and the WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment. It is also recommended that uncertainty be incorporated into the calculations so that a more meaningful assessment of risk during accidents can be achieved.

Rucker, D.F.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Dynamic Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment Tool - 12490  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment (PA) methodology comprises a toolbox used to demonstrate regulatory compliance of the repository after facility closure. The PA framework rests upon an extensive suite of computational codes. In some cases, significant alteration of code inputs is a tedious and difficult task. Due to the nature of the application for which they are used, PA codes used in support of WIPP regulatory compliance demonstration must satisfy stringent quality assurance requirements. Consequently, many of the coding practices used during original code development are still implemented today. A more efficient workflow configuration has the potential to alleviate difficulties associated with extensive code input modifications. Here, this potential is assessed via an implementation of a more flexible scientific workflow system for a subset of the codes used in WIPP PA. The scientific workflow approach taken here for a dynamic PA system enables users from disparate backgrounds to dramatically shorten the time between hypothesis and analysis by decreasing the amount of a priori knowledge, from a range of disciplines, needed to execute the code. Having smaller iteration times allows for more ideas to be tested and explored, which leads to safer and more optimized systems. Note that these high-level, dynamic tools are intended only for initial scoping studies on the personal computer of a researcher. Full, regulatory compliance calculations may occur only within a qualified computing environment. However, the WIPP PA tools here may guide future research and indicate regions of the analysis space that are worth further study. This next generation of PA software provides the ability to perform scoping investigations of repository performance quickly and easily, and has an accessible and useful interface to a variety of users, such as fuel cycle systems designers, domain experts such as repository modelers, and policy makers. The purview of this project allows for many opportunities for future work. Foremost among these is the desire to implement the full BRAGFLO suite within the workflow. This will entail porting or wrapping Genmesh, Matset, LHS, and ICSet within Python. Moreover, unifying the two GUIs into a single driver application would be a natural next step. Once the BRAGFLO suite is completed, other portions of WIPP PA could be implemented with corresponding and inter-operable work-flows. Likely first candidates for this are those codes that are similarly computationally intensive, such as the one used to generate complementary cumulative distribution functions used to demonstrate regulatory compliance (code CCDFGF). (authors)

Scopatz, Anthony M.; March, Jonathan; Weckesser, Warren; Jones, Eric [Enthought Inc, Austin, Texas, 78701 (United States); Lee, Moo; Camphouse, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

Barton, Tom

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results  

SciTech Connect

This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

Novak, C.F. [ed.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimizing the design of a hydrogen engine with pilot diesel fuel ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diesel engine was converted to dual-fuel hydrogen operation, ignition being started by a 'pilot' quantity of diesel fuel but with 65 to 90% of the energy being supplied as hydrogen. With later injection timing, use of delayed port admission of the gas, and a modified combustion chamber, thermal efficiencies were achieved nearly 15% greater than those for diesel as the sole fuel. A 'solid' water injection technique was used to curb knock under full load conditions when the power output equalled or exceeded that of a similar diesel engine. The indicator diagrams under these conditions closely approach those of the Otto cycle. The development was assisted by computer simulation using a novel self-ignition and flame propagation model. The very fast burning rates obtained with stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures show combustion to occur within 5 degrees of crank rotation yet Otto cycle thermal efficiency was not achieved. However, greenhouse gases are shown to be reduced by more than 80%, nitrogen oxides by up to 70%, and exhaust smoke by nearly 80%.

S.M. Lambe; H.C. Watson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Monograph Series, No. 4: 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant heliostat field aimpoint improvements  

SciTech Connect

New early morning and late afternoon heliostat aimpoints have been developed for the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. These new heliostat aimpoints increase the fraction of the total receiver incident solar energy on selected panels to reduce the early morning start-up time and extend the late afternoon operating time, compared to those in current use at the Pilot Plant. Preliminary results from tests using the new morning start-up aimpoint file indicates that the winter start-up time was reduced by 30 to 45 minutes.

Baker, A.F.; Atwood, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program, Phase I: Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program Phase I: Needs Assessment Presented to the Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support, Office of Health, Safety, and Security U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by Queens College, City University of New York United Steelworkers Original Draft: August 22, 2011 Updated Version: May 1, 2012 Table of Contents Summary.............................................................................3 I. Background on the Former Worker Program................................4 II. History of the WIPP Facility......................................................4 III. Scope of this Report.................................................................7 IV. Exposure Characterization........................................................8

164

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2012 - 12049  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a deep geologic repository for safe disposal of long-lived transuranic radioactive waste related to the nation's defense, is completing its 12. year of operations. WIPP's mission includes coordination of all Department of Energy (DOE) sites to prepare, package and characterize transuranic (TRU) waste for final shipment and emplacement in WIPP. Five of the 10 disposal panels planned have been filled and sealed from ventilation. Additional small quantity sites have been de-inventoried by consolidating their waste through the certified characterization line at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). New emplacement methods for RH waste in shielded containers are being considered for disposal by WIPP's regulatory authorities. A new large Type B shipping package, was added to the WIPP transportation fleet, and facility modifications to the WIPP waste unloading and emplacement processes for large containers were completed in 2011. Shipments from the Savannah River site in these new large rectangular packages began in August 2011. Licensing efforts are proceeding for a new criticality control over-pack container that will allow almost twice the fissile content to be shipped than previously. This will reduce the number and cost of shipments of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) declared as waste. Modifications to WIPP regulatory requirements for the disposal footprint and disposal unit closure systems are in progress. These, and other developments, make for exciting times at WIPP. This paper provides an up-to-date look at the many aspects of America's only deep geologic long-lived radioactive waste repository, which is completing its 12. year of operations. A record year of safe and compliant shipments to WIPP tops the list of accomplishments in 2011. Four more small quantity sites were de-inventoried by consolidating their waste through the certified characterization line at INL in 2011. A new Type B shipping package, the TRUPACT-III has been added to the transportation fleet, and large waste boxes are being shipped from SRS without the need for repackaging. New emplacement methods for remote-handled waste in shielded containers are undergoing regulatory review. WIPP plans to license a new criticality control payload container that will allow almost twice the fissile content to be shipped than previously, thereby reducing the number and cost of shipments of SNM declared as waste. Other regulatory modifications planned in 2012 include approval of a design change that would replace the disposal concept for panels 9 and 10 from using the common access drifts (the 'mains') with a new footprint south of panels 4 and 5. DOE also plans to change the panel closure design set forth in its certification by EPA and the HWFP by the NMED. The panel closure design change will be a rule making under EPA's procedures and a class 3 permit modification request under NMED procedures. Plans for achieving 90% of legacy TRU waste retrieval and emplacement in WIPP by 2015 have been developed. Key to the success of this so-called 90/15 plan is adequate funding, both for WIPP operations, as well as for TRU retrieval programs at the generator sites. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A.; Ziemianski, Edward J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter work was continued on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes under a variety of conditions. Membrane permeation was tested up to 100 hours at constant pressure, temperature, and flow rates. In addition, design parameters were completed for a scale-up hydrogen separation demonstration unit. Evaluation of microstructure and effect of hydrogen exposure on BCY/Ni cermet mechanical properties was initiated. The fabrication of new cermets containing high permeability metals is reported and progress in the preparation of sulfur resistant catalysts is discussed. Finally, a report entitled ''Criteria for Incorporating Eltron's Hydrogen Separation Membranes into Vision 21 IGCC Systems and FutureGen Plants'' was completed.

Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Jim Fisher; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology....................................................................................................................................

167

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology....................................................................................................................................

168

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.  

SciTech Connect

Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 1 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity

Cañizares, Claudio A.

170

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

SciTech Connect

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Chemical-Looping Combustion with Fuel Oil in a 10 kW Pilot Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-Looping Combustion with Fuel Oil in a 10 kW Pilot Plant ... The unit is based on interconnected fluidized beds and is similar to the design originally presented by Lyngfelt et al.(12) In the riser section there is a fast-fluidized regime, whereas in the loop-seals and the fuel reactor there is a bubbling regime. ... Energy Combust. ...

Patrick Moldenhauer; Magnus Rydén; Tobias Mattisson; Ali Hoteit; Aqil Jamal; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

DOE Awards Small Business Contract for Support to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order to Southwestern Public Service Company, of Amarillo, TX to supply on a daily basis the required quantity of electric energy required for the customer’s operation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities pursuant to the terms of the areawide contract.

175

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Project progress report for month ending October 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is intended to serve as a nuclear waste repository for those defense transuranic wastes, both remote handled and contact handled, which requires deep geologic disposal, and to provide a separate underground facility for in-situ experiments with various waste forms. Activities in the design, technical support, and scientific program of WIPP are summarized in this report. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Project progress report for month ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is intended to serve as a nuclear waste repository for those defense transuranic wastes and to provide a separate underground facility for in-situ experiments. This document summarizes activities in the WIPP design, technical support, and scientific program for this month.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since February Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

CARLBAD, N.M. – EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney today visited the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., where he became the first non-WIPP employee to tour the underground facility since a truck fire and unrelated radiological release temporarily closed the facility in February.

178

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

SciTech Connect

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Conclusions after eleven years of studying brine at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was established to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in the United States. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. WIPP performance assessment activities raised the concern that the brine could cause anoxic corrosion of metal in the waste storage drums and waste inventory, potentially producing large quantities of hydrogen gas, which would affect the long-term performance of Thee repository. Th WIPP Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program was developed to investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences. The WIPP is excavated in the Salado Formation, which is bedded salt of Permian age. The sediments exposed in the excavations consist of clear halite and polyhalitic halite, halite containing clay, thin clay seams, and interbedded anhydrite layers. The clear halite beds contain little brine and are effectively impermeable. The clay within the salt and in the clay seams contains brine that is released to the excavations, although virtually all of the brine release occurs within the first few years of mining. Consequently, by the time the waste storage rooms at the WIPP are filled and sealed, most of the brine that can be derived from the clay will have evaporated. These is no observed evidence from the WIPP excavations that brine will seep into the working from the anhydrite beds. It has been postulated, however, that brine could seep through the underlying anhydrite Marker Bed 139 (MB139). Recently acquired data on the hydrologic properties of MB139 show that, even if flow through the anhydrite occurs, the brine released to the storage rooms could only corrode a small percentage of the susceptible metal in the repository.

Deal, D.E. [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bills, R.A. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Update on Vattenfall’s 30 \\{MWth\\} oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vattenfall is presently taking an experimental large-scale pilot test facility into operation for the detailed investigation of the oxyfuel firing process. The plant is located southeast of Berlin in Germany in the vicinity of the existing lignite-fired power plant Schwarze Pumpe. The oxyfuel pilot plant consists of a single 30MWth, top-mounted, PF burner and the subsequent flue gas cleaning equipment, electrostatic precipitator, wet flue gas desulpherization and the flue gas condenser. In addition to these components, a CO2 separation plant is placed downstream of the flue gas condenser to produce liquid CO2. A cryogenic air separation unit located at the site will supply gaseous oxygen with a minimum purity of 99,5% needed for the combustion. The burner is designed for both pre-dried lignite and bituminous coal which will be tested in a later phase. The construction started in January 2007 and the first major test phase is planned to start in November 2008. The liquid CO2 is planned to be used for test injections to qualify the Altmark gas field in Germany as a storage site for CO2 for up-coming carbon capture and storage projects and to investigate opportunities for enhanced gas recovery. This paper will present some background information and describe the planned measurements. Initial experiences from the commissioning of the pilot plant will be presented.

Lars Strömberg; Göran Lindgren; Jürgen Jacoby; Rainer Giering; Marie Anheden; Uwe Burchhardt; Hubertus Altmann; Frank Kluger; Georg-Nikolaus Stamatelopoulos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrogen storage for mixed wind–nuclear power plants in the context of a Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel methodology for the economic evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind–nuclear power plant considering some new aspects such as residual heat and oxygen utilization is applied in this work. This analysis is completed in the context of a Hydrogen Economy and competitive electricity markets. The simulation of the operation of a combined nuclear–wind–hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity, the selling of excess hydrogen and oxygen, and the selling of heat are optimized to maximize profit to the energy producer. The simulation is performed in two phases: in a pre-dispatch phase, the system model is optimized to obtain optimal hydrogen charge levels for the given operational horizons. In the second phase, a real-time dispatch is carried out on an hourly basis to optimize the operation of the system as to maximize profits, following the hydrogen storage levels of the pre-dispatch phase. Based on the operation planning and dispatch results, an economic evaluation is performed to determine the feasibility of the proposed scheme for investment purposes; this evaluation is based on calculations of modified internal rates of return and net present values for a realistic scenario. The results of the present studies demonstrate the feasibility of a hydrogen storage and production system with oxygen and heat utilization for existent nuclear and wind power generation facilities.

Gregor Taljan; Michael Fowler; Claudio Cañizares; Gregor Verbi?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydrogen plant expansion using oxygen secondary reforming  

SciTech Connect

As crude oil feedstocks become heavier and more sour, the H/sub 2/ demands of a refinery increase. Heavier sour crudes require more H/sub 2/ for hydrodesulfurization, hydrocracking and hydrotreating to produce the lighter, high quality products currently in demand. In most cases, this additional H/sub 2/ requirement is satisfied by the generation of on purpose H/sub 2/. The on purpose H/sub 2/ demand is typically satisfied by steam methane reforming (SMR). The conventional SMR process, utilizing shift, CO/sub 2/ removal, and methanation for H/sub 2/ purification, can produce 90 to 98% pure H/sub 2/ at 150 to 400 psig at an energy efficiency of 410 Btu (HHV)/SCF H/sub 2/. An SMR process employing shift and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) for H/sub 2/ purification can produce H/sub 2/ at a purity up to 99.999% and an energy efficiency of 390 Btu (HHV)/SCF H/sub 2/. Two options available for satisfying an increased on purpose H/sub 2/ demand are the addition of a new SMR plant and the debottlenecking of an existing SMR. A new SMR plant is the most capital-intensive means of expanding H/sub 2/ capacity.

Snyder, G.D.; Wang, S.I.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherOffice of Solar Power Applications. Division of Ocean Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherpower from the temperature differential between warm surface and cold deep-ocean

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or nuclear-powered plants use intake canals for withdrawing marineSome marine supplies and water are available. Uunker fuels.marine supplies are available at Key West. Gasoline and diesel fuel

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 Media Contact: Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 i For immediate release Magnum Minerals to Buy WIPP Salt CARLSBAD, N.M., December 21, 2009- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has worked out an agreement to sell 300,000 tons of run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to Magnum Minerals LLC of Hereford, Texas. As part of the agreement, the Carlsbad Soil and Water Conservation District (CSWCD) will sign and administer the contract with Magnum Minerals, allowing proceeds to remain in southeast New Mexico. In 2008, DOE management and operating contractor, Washington TRU Solutions, issued

189

Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Contractors at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Contractors at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad, N.M., August 21, 2000 -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of Tri-State Motor Transit Co. (TSMT) and CAST Transportation, Inc. (CAST) to transport radioactive transuranic waste from DOE generator sites throughout the United States to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. Following a request for proposals issued on January 14, 2000, DOE determined that TSMT and CAST submitted the most advantageous offer to the government to transport transuranic waste to WIPP. TSMT, based in Joplin, MO, is a nationwide carrier with experience hauling hazardous and radiological shipments for DOE. CAST, based in Henderson, CO, is the current carrier

190

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery - the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant; Biomass Program (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

great ideas into viable solutions great ideas into viable solutions requires the ability to test theories under real world conditions. Few companies have the resources to build pilot-scale processing plants to test their ideas. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) helps by sharing its world-class equipment and expertise with industry and other research organizations through a variety of contractual arrangements. At the NREL campus in Golden, Colo., researchers use state-of-the-art laboratories to develop and improve the technologies that convert biomass to fuels, chemicals, and materials. One of the most important tools available to biomass researchers is the Biochemical Pilot Plant housed in the Alternative Fuels User Facility (AFUF). In this facility,

191

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect

This is the 1989 Site Environmental Report (SER) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a government owned and contractor-operated facility. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the WIPP is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. This report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at the WIPP during calendar year 1989. The WIPP facility will not receive waste until all concerns affecting opening the WIPP are addressed to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Energy. Therefore, this report describes the status of the preoperational activities of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance (RES) program, which are outlined in the Radiological Baseline Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTSD-TME-057). 72 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Decoupled catalytic hydrogen evolution from a molecular metal oxide redox mediator in water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electacta.2007.11.027 37 Gahleitner G. , Hydrogen from renewable electricity: An international review of power-to-gas pilot plants for stationary applications . Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 38 , 2039 – 2061 ( 2013 ). 10.1016/j.ijhydene...

Benjamin Rausch; Mark D. Symes; Greig Chisholm; Leroy Cronin

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 2

194

Sensitivity studies for gas release from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

Sensitivity studies have been conducted for the gas release from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) using the TOUGH2 computer code with performance measures of peak repository pressure and gas migration distance at 1000 years. The effect of formation permeabilities including impermeable halite, two-phase characteristic curves including different models and residual saturations, and other variations was studied to determine their impact on the performance of the WIPP repository. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Webb, S.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EIS-0026-S: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management prepared this statement to update the environmental record established during preparation of DOE/EIS-0026, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, by evaluating the environmental impacts associated with new information, new circumstances, and modifications to the actions evaluated in DOE/EIS-0026 that were proposed in light of the new information.

196

Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect

Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hydrogen Separation Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. By appropriately changing the catalysts coupled with the membrane, essentially the same system can be used to facilitate alkane dehydrogenation and coupling, aromatics processing, and hydrogen sulfide decomposition.

Roark, Shane E.; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004 axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna Germany. Since its installation this turbine has gathered more than 16 000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

Klaus Ohlig; Stefan Bischoff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered by solar thermal energy for hydrogen production. TheHydrogen Production by Concentrated Solar Energy,” Energy,for hydrogen production driven by solar thermal energy is a

Luc, Wesley Wai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen from Solar via Light- Assisted High-TemperatureHydrogen from Solar via Light-Assisted High-Temperature

Luc, Wesley Wai

202

Extended Operations of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Pilot-Scale Compact Reformer Year 6 - Activity 3.2 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect

U.S. and global demand for hydrogen is large and growing for use in the production of chemicals, materials, foods, pharmaceuticals, and fuels (including some low-carbon biofuels). Conventional hydrogen production technologies are expensive, have sizeable space requirements, and are large carbon dioxide emitters. A novel sorbent-based hydrogen production technology is being developed and advanced toward field demonstration that promises smaller size, greater efficiency, lower costs, and reduced to no net carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional hydrogen production technology. Development efforts at the pilot scale have addressed materials compatibility, hot-gas filtration, and high-temperature solids transport and metering, among other issues, and have provided the basis for a preliminary process design with associated economics. The process was able to achieve a 93% hydrogen purity on a purge gasfree basis directly out of the pilot unit prior to downstream purification.

Almlie, Jay

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study  

SciTech Connect

Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

NGNP-HPS SHAW-HPA-000 NGNP Hydrogen Plant Alternatives Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy DRL Design Readiness Level EDI Electro-Deionization FUS Feed and Utility Systems HAD Hydroiodic Acid Decomposition HHV High Heating Value HPAS Hydrogen Plant...

206

Perspective of the Science Advisor to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1975 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was asked by the predecessor to the Department of Energy to assume responsibility for the scientific programs necessary to assure the safe and satisfactory development of a geologic repository in the salt beds of southeast New Mexico. Sandia has continued in the role of Science Advisor to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to the present time. This paper will share the perspectives developed over the past 25 years as the project was brought to fruition with successful certification by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on May 13, 1998 and commencement of operations on April 26, 1999.

WEART,WENDELL D.

1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Preliminary pilot plant design for the production of protein base chemicals and fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suitable for inoc- ulating the b1ological processing units, are discussed. Basic processing units required in the pilot plant are specified. Units suggested as capable of meeting these spec1f1cat1ons include a 1000-11ter mixing tank, a 130-liter... inoculation tank and two 800- 11ter fermentation tanks. Centr1fuges are spec1fied as units for preconcentration of biological solid products. Final drying or other final protein recovery units are not specif1ed. It is recom- mended that these choices...

Dharia, Vijay Kalaram

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

FNS Presentation - Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicles Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Operations Federal Network for Sustainability Idaho Falls, Idaho - July 2006 Jim Francfort INL/CON-06-11569 Presentation Outline * Background & Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design & operations * Fuel Dispensing * Hydrogen & HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * Briefly, other AVTA Activities * WWW Information 2 AVTA Background & Goal * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) & the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

211

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11]. One method for hydrogen production is a water-splittingof various methods of hydrogen production, the Department ofOne method of reducing the cost of hydrogen production is to

Luc, Wesley Wai

212

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research." Energy, v.34,Quantum Boost,” DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: FY 2012Analysis. ” DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, Web. 22

Luc, Wesley Wai

213

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Biodiesel production from vegetable oil and waste animal fats in a pilot plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, corn oil as vegetable oil, chicken fat and fleshing oil as animal fats were used to produce methyl ester in a biodiesel pilot plant. The FFA level of the corn oil was below 1% while those of animal fats were too high to produce biodiesel via base catalyst. Therefore, it was needed to perform pretreatment reaction for the animal fats. For this aim, sulfuric acid was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol in the pretreatment reactions. After reducing the FFA level of the animal fats to less than 1%, the transesterification reaction was completed with alkaline catalyst. Due to low FFA content of corn oil, it was directly subjected to transesterification. Potassium hydroxide was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol for transesterification reactions. The fuel properties of methyl esters produced in the biodiesel pilot plant were characterized and compared to EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. According to the results, ester yield values of animal fat methyl esters were slightly lower than that of the corn oil methyl ester (COME). The production cost of COME was higher than those of animal fat methyl esters due to being high cost biodiesel feedstock. The fuel properties of produced methyl esters were close to each other. Especially, the sulfur content and cold flow properties of the COME were lower than those of animal fat methyl esters. The measured fuel properties of all produced methyl esters met ASTM D6751 (S500) biodiesel fuel standards.

Ertan Alptekin; Mustafa Canakci; Huseyin Sanli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier DOE Hydrogen Program Contractors biomass #12;Approach Outline Gasifier Pilot Plant· Develop subsystems for the hydrogen production system and pyrolysis occur simultaneously in a single reactor · Exothermic combustion provides heat · Endothermic

216

Accident Investigation of the February 5, 2014, Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Accident Prevention Investigation Board was appointed to investigate a fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant that occurred on February 5, 2014. An aged EIMCO 985-T15 salt haul truck (dump truck) caught fire in an underground mine.

217

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (July 2007)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 MEMORANDUM FOR: JAMES A. RISPOLI ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT THROUGH: DR. INES TRIAY CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: DR. DAVID C. MOODY MANAGER CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE SUBJECT: 2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant DO E Order 451.1 B Change 1 requires you to track and report annually to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, progress made in implementing and the effectiveness ofmitigation action plans prepared pursuant to the Department's National Environmental Policy Act implementing regulations until mitigation is complete. The 2007 annual report for the WIPP site is attached. In order to avoid duplicating reporting requirements, this mitigation action report does not specifically

219

Enforcement Letter ELWIPP090706, September 8, 2006 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 8, 2006 September 8, 2006 Mr. Richard D. Raaz President and General Manager Washington TRU Solutions, LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, NM 88221-2078 Subject: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Enforcement Letter Dear Mr. Raaz: The Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the deficiencies described in Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) report NTS-CBFO-WIPP-WIPP-2006-0001. Our evaluation included review of the investigation/causal analysis and discussion with you and other site personnel during an informal conference held on August 1, 2006. The subject NTS report described Quality Assurance (QA) deficiencies associated with the refurbishment of the Super High-Efficiency Neutron Counter (SuperHENC) non-destructive assay system. The SuperHENC had been acquired as excess material

220

Technical basis for external dosimetry at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

The WIPP External Dosimetry Program, administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division, for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides external dosimetry support services for operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site. These operations include the receipt, experimentation with, storage, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This document describes the technical basis for the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program. The purposes of this document are to: (1) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is in compliance with all regulatory requirements, (2) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is derived from a sound technical base, (3) serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel, and (4) aid in identifying and planning for future needs. The external radiation exposure fields are those that are documented in the WIPP Final Safety Analysis Report.

Bradley, E.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wu, C.F.; Goff, T.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Identification and evaluation of appropriate backfills for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

A backfill system has been designed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) which will control the chemical environment of the post-closure repository to a domain where the actinide solubility is within its lowest region. The actinide solubility is highly dependent on the chemical species which constitute the fluid, the resulting pH of the fluid, and the oxidation state of the actinide which is stable under the specific conditions. The use of magnesium oxide (MgO) has the backfill material not only controls the pH of the expected fluids, but also effectively removes carbonate from the system, which has a significant impact on actinide solubility. The backfill selection process, emplacement system design, and confirmatory experimental results are presented.

Bynum, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Stockman, C.; Papenguth, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Characterization of subjective uncertainty in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the possible disruptions that could occur at the WIPP over the 10,000 yr regulatory period specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 191,40 CFR 194) and subjective uncertainty arising from an inability to uniquely characterize many of the inputs required in the 1996 WIPP PA. The characterization of subjective uncertainty is discussed, including assignment of distributions, uncertain variables selected for inclusion in analysis, correlation control, sample size, statistical confidence on mean complementary cumulative distribution functions, generation of Latin hypercube samples, sensitivity analysis techniques, and scenarios involving stochastic and subjective uncertainty.

HELTON,JON CRAIG; MARTELL,MARY-ALENA; TIERNEY,MARTIN S.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

223

Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental management assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Assessment was conducted by EH-24 from July 19 through July 30, 1993 to advise the Secretary of Energy of the adequacy of management systems established at WIPP to ensure the protection of the environment and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. The mission of WIPP is to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the management and operating contractors. This assessment revealed that WIPP`s environmental safety and health programs are satisfactory, and that all levels of the Waste Isolation Division (WID) management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers  

SciTech Connect

Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90  

SciTech Connect

The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP`s disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Business Administration & Economics Div.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. (IT Corporation (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, ceramic, cermet (ceramic/metal), and thin film membranes were prepared, characterized, and evaluated for H{sub 2} transport. For selected ceramic membrane compositions an optimum range for transition metal doping was identified, and it was determined that highest proton conductivity occurred for two-phase ceramic materials. Furthermore, a relationship between transition metal dopant atomic number and conductivity was observed. Ambipolar conductivities of {approx}6 x 10{sup -3} S/cm were achieved for these materials, and {approx} 1-mm thick membranes generated H{sub 2} transport rates as high as 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Cermet membranes during this quarter were found to have a maximum conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm, which occurred at a metal phase contact of 36 vol.%. Homogeneous dense thin films were successfully prepared by tape casting and spin coating; however, there remains an unacceptably high difference in shrinkage rates between the film and support, which led to membrane instability. Further improvements in high pressure membrane seals also were achieved during this quarter, and a maximum pressure of 100 psig was attained. CoorsTek optimized many of the processing variables relevant to manufacturing scale production of ceramic H{sub 2} transport membranes, and SCI used their expertise to deposit a range of catalysts compositions onto ceramic membrane surfaces. Finally, MTI compiled relevant information regarding Vision 21 fossil fuel plant operation parameters, which will be used as a starting point for assessing the economics of incorporating a H{sub 2} separation unit.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wastewater recycling in laundries—From pilot to large-scale plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new, innovative wastewater recycling process for industrial laundries has been developed through cooperation between Textil-Service Klingelmeyer (a medium-size laundry in Darmstadt, Germany) and the University of Applied Sciences in Karlsruhe, Germany. The project “Laundry Innovative Wastewater Recycling Technology—LIWATEC” was sponsored by the European Community in its LIFE-Environment programme. The purpose of the LIWATEC project was to design and start up a new, innovative, integrated process using membrane technology for wastewater reuse on a large scale in the Klingelmeyer laundry. The large scale plant was designed for wastewater treatment capacity of 200 m3/day. This integrated process has been successfully tested for 5 years in the form of two pilot plants at the laundry in Darmstadt and at the University of Karlsruhe (capacities: 10 m3/day and wastewater can be reused. Moreover, it is an easy-handling and cost-efficient wastewater recycling process that could be adapted to different types of laundries due to its modular structure.

Jan Hoinkis; Volker Panten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process powered by solar thermal energy for hydrogen21 2.5 Solar Thermal Energy and Solarproduction driven by solar thermal energy is a promising

Luc, Wesley Wai

239

Report to Congress on the Use of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant to Develop and Demonstrate Transparency Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Use of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant to Develop and Demonstrate Transparency Technologies Introduction This report describes the Department of Energy's plan for evaluating the use of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository system to develop transparency technologies. This report fulfills the requirement of Senate Report 106-50 on the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 for the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a plan to establish a nuclear waste disposal demonstration test bed facility. Congressional Request In Report 106-50 the Senate Armed Services Committee directed DOE to develop a plan to establish a demonstration and training program using the WIPP repository system as a test bed facility to develop transparent monitoring technologies for waste storage

240

DOE/WIPP 02-3196 - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization, March 19, 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-3196 2-3196 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization (40 CFR § 761.75[c]) March 19, 2002 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization DOE/WIPP 02-3196 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 LOCATION OF THE DISPOSAL FACILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.0 DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DISPOSAL FACILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ENGINEERING REPORT ON TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.0 SAMPLING AND MONITORING EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES AVAILABLE 6 6.0 EXPECTED WASTE VOLUMES OF PCB/TRU WASTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7.0 GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF WASTE MATERIALS OTHER THAN PCBS . . . . 8 8.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY OPERATIONS PLAN

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

4 - Hydrogen production in conventional, bio-based and nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: A hydrogen economy advent cannot be based on the current processes and plants, but will need to take advantage of distributed generation systems and to exploit the potential of hydrogen generation in synergy with large electricity or heat generation plants, provided their CO2 emissions are intrinsically low or are abated by means of carbon capture and/or sequestration (CCS) systems. This chapter will focus on real carbon-based energy process appliances and new business cases. A section is also devoted to CCS technologies. Finally, the simultaneous production of hydrogen and power from nuclear plants will be reviewed from a technical point of view, and its future potential impact on the hydrogen economy will be evaluated.

D. Fino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radioactive and nonradioactive waste intended for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the handling of plutonium in research on or production of US nuclear weapons will be disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper describes the physical and radiological properties of the TRU waste that will be deposited in the WIPP. This geologic repository will accommodate up to 175,564 m{sup 3} of TRU waste, corresponding to 168,485 m{sup 3} of contact-handled (CH-) TRU waste and 7,079 m{sup 3} of remote-handled (RH-) TRU waste. Approximately 35% of the TRU waste is currently packaged and stored (i.e., legacy) waste, with the remainder of the waste to be packaged or generated and packaged in activities before the year 2033, the closure time for the repository. These wastes were produced at 27 US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the course of generating defense nuclear materials. The radionuclide and nonradionuclide inventories for the TRU wastes described in this paper were used in the 1996 WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) performance assessment calculations by Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM).

SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; DREZ,P.E.; RATH,JONATHAN S.; TRELLUE,H.R.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report, for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires DOE facilities, that conduct environmental protection programs, to annually prepare a Site Environmental Report (SER). The purpose of the SER is to provide an abstract of environmental assessments conducted in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit. The content of this SER is not restricted to a synopsis of the required data, in addition, information pertaining to new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1995 calendar year are also included. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). The EMP provides inclusive guidelines implemented to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater. air, soil, and biotic matrices are monitored for an array of radiological and nonradiological factors. The baseline radiological surveillance program encompasses a broader geographic area that includes nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Most elements of nonradiological assessments are conducted within the geographic vicinity of the WIPP site.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt  

SciTech Connect

Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Treatment of effluents from wool dyeing process by photo-Fenton at solar pilot plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The decolourization and mineralization of simulated wastewaters from wool dyeing tanks were investigated by Fenton and photo-Fenton processes. Yellow, red and blue dyebaths with azo-type and anthraquinone dyes and additives were selected as colored effluents. Photo-Fenton reaction was much more efficient than the respective dark reaction under identical experimental conditions. The effect of H2O2 and Fe(II) dosage and fractional or initial addition of these reagents on the photo-mineralization processes were studied and the optimal conditions found. Experiments at a pilot plant based on compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) confirmed that, under optimal conditions, 100% of color removal was obtained requiring low accumulated energy. No toxic effects on marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri were observed at the end of photo-Fenton treatment for all studied effluents. High concentrations of sodium acetate are used as additive in the wool dying process. HPLC and TOC analysis of the effluents after photo-Fenton process confirmed that the remaining organic carbon is due to the presence of acetates. The obtained results showed the feasibility of photo-Fenton process to achieve suitable water qualities for internal reuse.

M.J. Hernández-Rodríguez; C. Fernández-Rodríguez; J.M. Doña-Rodríguez; O.M. González-Díaz; D. Zerbani; J. Pérez Peña

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Annotated bibliography of paleoclimate studies relevant to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A selective, partially annotated bibliography on paleoclimate literature (through 1984) presents the various interpretations of the nature of past climate in New Mexico and adjacent areas in the Southwest. Groundwater flow and concomitant dissolution of evaporites in the Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico, the geologic setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, has occurred since Permian deposition and may be continuing at some places in the basin. An understanding of patterns of past rainfall may contribute to an understanding of the history of groundwater flow and evaporite dissolution at and near the WIPP site and may help to predict the relative magnitudes of groundwater flow and evaporite dissolution to be expected during the required period of repository performance. Although most references in this list are annotated and pertain to paleoclimate in the vicinity of New Mexico, other references have been included that (1) place the Southwest in the context of world climatic change, (2) pertain to principles and methods of collecting climatic data for past geologic time, and (3) complement such a collection of references because of their historic interest. 35 refs.

Bachman, G.O. (Bachman (George O.), Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Geologic and Hydrogeologic Setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a mined repository constructed by the US Department of Energy for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes generated since 1970 by activities related to national defense. The WIPP is located 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in bedded salt (primarily halite) of the Late Permian (approximately 255 million years old) Salado Formation 655 m below the land surface. Characterization of the site began in the mid-1970s. Construction of the underground disposal facilities began in the early 1980s, and the facility received final certification from the US Environmental Protection Agency in May 1998. Disposal operations are planned to begin following receipt of a final permit from the State of New Mexico and resolution of legal issues. Like other proposed geologic repositories for radioactive waste, the WIPP relies on a combination of engineered and natural barriers to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Engineered barriers at the WIPP, including the seals that will be emplaced in the access shafts when the facility is decommissioned, are discussed in the context of facility design elsewhere in this volume. Physical properties of the natural barriers that contribute to the isolation of radionuclides are discussed here in the context of the physiographic, geologic, and hydrogeologic setting of the site.

Swift, P.N.; Corbet, T.F.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 2, Technical basis  

SciTech Connect

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume, Volume 2, contains the technical basis for the 1992 PA. Specifically, it describes the conceptual basis for consequence modeling and the PA methodology, including the selection of scenarios for analysis, the determination of scenario probabilities, and the estimation of scenario consequences using a Monte Carlo technique and a linked system of computational models. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume I contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses related to the preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191B. Volume 5 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance. Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

Rechard, R.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geochemistry of Salado Formation brines recovered from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository  

SciTech Connect

Intergranular brines recovered from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) have major- and trace-element compositions that reflect seawater evaporation and diagenetic processes. Brines obtained from repository drill holes are heterogenous with respect to composition, but their compositional fields are distinct from those obtained from fluid inclusions in WIPP halite. The heterogeneity of brine compositions within the drill-hole population indicates a lack of mixing and fluid homogenization within the salt at the repository level. Compositional differences between intergranular (drill hole) and intragranular (fluid inclusions) brines is attributed to isolation of the latter from diagenetic fluids that were produced from dehydration reactions involving gypsum and clay minerals. Modeling of brine-rock equilibria indicates that equilibration with evaporite minerals controls the concentrations of major elements in the brine. Drill-hole brines are in equilibrium with the observed repository minerals halite, anhydrite, magnesite, polyhalite and quartz. The equilibrium model supports the derivation of drill-hole brines from near-field fluid, rather than large-scale vertical migration of fluids from the overlying Rustler or underlying Castile Formations. 13 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Abitz, R.; Myers, J.; Drez, P.; Deal, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Summary of and observations about WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) Facility horizon flow measurements through 1986  

SciTech Connect

Numerous gas flow measurements have been made at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Facility horizon from 1984 through 1986. Almost all tests have been constant-pressure or pressure-decay tests from single boreholes drilled in the underground excavations. Results indicate that beyond about 2 m from an excavation, both halite and interbeds (anhydrite and clay layers) allowed very low gas flows, and calculated permeabilities are below 1 microdarcy. In regions within 2 m of an excavation very high flow rates were measured in the interbeds immediately above and below an excavation when the test hole was drilled from near the center of the excavation. Further, measured flow rates increase with the width of the excavation. The halite also permits substantially greater gas flow within about 1 m of the excavations. Limited tracer measurements reveal that flow paths in both the halite and interbeds in the near field region are significantly larger than those in the presumed undisturbed condition. The gas flow measurements are consistent with the development of a (perhaps partially-saturated) dilatant zone (increased porosity) around the excavations. Considerable uncertainty is associated with permeabilities calculated from these flow measurements, due to unknowns of rock saturation, entry pressure effects, flow homogeneity, etc.

Stormont, J.C.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Basic data report for drillhole WIPP 11 (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

Seismic reflection data from petroleum industry sources showed anomalous reflectors in the Castile Formation over a small area about 3 miles north of the center of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Additional corroborative seismic reflection data were collected as part of WIPP investigations, and WIPP 11 was drilled to investigate the anomaly. WIPP 11 was drilled near the northwest corner of Section 9, T.22.S., R.31E. it penetrated, in descending order, sand dune deposits and the Gatuna Formation (29'), Santa Rosa Sandstone (132'), Dewey Lake Red Beds (502'), Rustler Formation (288'), Salado Formation (1379'), and most of the Castile Formation (1240'). Beds within the lower part of the Salado, and the upper anhydrite of the Castile, are thinner than normal; these beds are displaced upward structurally by the upper Castile halite which is highly thickened (about 968'). The lowest halite is thin (51') and the basal anhydrite was not completely penetrated. Subsequent seismic and borehole data has shown WIPP 11 to be in a structural complex now identified as the disturbed zone. The WIPP is a demonstration facility for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste from defense programs. The WIPP will also provide a research facility to investigate the interactions between bedded salt and high level waste, though there are no plans at this time to dispose of high level waste or spent fuel at WIPP.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Basic data report for drillholes at the H-11 complex (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

Drillholes H-11b1, H-11b2, and H-11b3 were drilled from August to December 1983 for site characterization and hydrologic studies of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Upper Permian Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. In October 1984, the three wells were subjected to a series of pumping tests designed to develop the wells, provide information on hydraulic communication between the wells, provide hydraulic properties information, and to obtain water samples for quality of water measurements. Based on these tests, it was determined that this location would provide an excellent pad to conduct a convergent-flow non-sorbing tracer test in the Culebra dolomite. In 1988, a fourth hole (H-11b4) was drilled at this complex to provide a tracer-injection hole for the H-11 convergent-flow tracer test and to provide an additional point at which the hydraulic response of the Culebra H-11 multipad pumping test could be monitored. A suite of geophysical logs was run on the drillholes and was used to identify different lithologies and aided in interpretation of the hydraulic tests. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Mercer, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Snyder, R.P. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Solar energy storage by salinity gradient solar pond: Pilot plant construction and gradient control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental solar pond pilot plant was constructed in Solvay-Martorell, facilities, Catalonia (NE part of the Iberian Peninsula) to capture and store solar energy. The body of the pond is a cylindrical reinforced concrete tank, 3 m height, 8 m diameter and total area of 50 m2. Salinity and thermal gradient were properly established by using the salinity distribution methodology. The gradient in the pond was maintained by feeding salt (NaCl) through a cylindrical salt charger to the bottom at a height of 80 cm from the pond floor. Continuous surface washing using tap water supply maintained the salinity of the top convective layer at a low level and compensate loses by evaporation. An acidification method by addition of \\{HCl\\} at different heights was used to control the clarity of the pond. The salinity gradient was fully established on 30 September 2009 and has been maintained until the date. After winter time (February 2010), the pond warms up and the temperature increased continuously until it reached its maximum (55 °C) in August 2010. The salinity gradient observed great stability after one year of continuous control and maintenance and under different weather conditions.

César Valderrama; Oriol Gibert; Jordina Arcal; Pau Solano; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Enric Larrotcha; José Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Background monitoring of air toxics at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico, has been constructed as a permanent repository for containerized solid or solidified transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. The repository is constructed in a massive salt bed formation, 2,150 feet below the surface. The WIPP has been granted a No-Migration Variance by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) according to the requirements of 40 CFR 268.6. As part of the variance, a detailed air monitoring program has been developed for the facility. The purpose of the program is to detect airborne releases of hazardous constituents at the earliest practicable time. Routine background monitoring for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been performed at WIPP for the last two years. The monitoring program routinely quantifies airborne concentrations of five VOCs in the ventilation airstream of the underground facility, using Compendium Method TO-14. This paper describes the monitoring program in-place at the facility and presents a summary of the monitoring results for the last two years.

Frank-Supka, L.; Wu, C.F.; Lopez, R.H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.; Zimmer, R.A. [Harding Lawson Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Blending mining and nuclear industries at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) traditional procedures for underground mining activities have been significantly altered in order to assure underground safety and project adherence to numerous regulatory requirements. Innovative techniques have been developed for WIPP underground procedures, mining equipment, and operating environments. The mining emphasis at WIPP is upon the quality of the excavation, not (as in conventional mines) on the production of ore. The WIPP is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) project that is located 30 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where the nation's first underground engineered nuclear repository is being constructed. The WIPP site was selected because of its location amidst a 607 meter thick salt bed, which provides a remarkably stable rock formation for the permanent storage of nuclear waste. The underground facility is located 655 meters below the earth's surface, in the Salado formation, which comprises two-hundred million year old halites with minor amounts of clay and anhydrites. When completed, the WIPP underground facility will consist of two components: approximately 81 square kilometers of experimental areas, and approximately 405 square kilometers of repository. 3 figs.

Walls, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Conceptual structure of performance assessments conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. In support of this project, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an ongoing performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP. The ordered triple representation for risk proposed by Kaplan and Garrick is used to provide a clear conceptual structure for this PA. This presentation describes how the preceding representation provides a basis in the WIPP PA for (1) the definition of scenarios and the calculation of scenario probabilities and consequences, (2) the separation of subjective and stochastic uncertainties, (3) the construction of the complementary cumulative distribution functions required in comparisons with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (i.e., 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B), and (4) the performance of uncertainty and sensitivity studies. Results obtained in a preliminary PA for the WIPP completed in December of 1991 are used for illustration.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance with 40 CFR 191B, December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper describes the 1992 preliminary comparison with Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), which regulates long-term releases of radioactive waste. Results of the 1992 PA are preliminary, and cannot be used to determine compliance or noncompliance with EPA regulations because portions of the modeling system and data base are incomplete. Results are consistent, however, with those of previous iterations of PA, and the SNL WIPP PA Department has high confidence that compliance with 40 CFR 191B can be demonstrated. Comparison of predicted radiation doses from the disposal system also gives high confidence that the disposal system is safe for long-term isolation.

Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Incorporating long-term climate change in performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico for the disposal of transuranic wastes generated by defense programs. Applicable regulations (40 CFR 191) require the DOE to evaluate disposal-system performance for 10,000 yr. Climatic changes may affect performance by altering groundwater flow. Paleoclimatic data from southeastern New Mexico and the surrounding area indicate that the wettest and coolest Quaternary climate at the site can be represented by that at the last glacial maximum, when mean annual precipitation was approximately twice that of the present. The hottest and driest climates have been similar to that of the present. The regularity of global glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene confirms that the climate of the last glacial maximum is suitable for use as a cooler and wetter bound for variability during the next 10,000 yr. Climate variability is incorporated into groundwater-flow modeling for WIPP PA by causing hydraulic head in a portion of the model-domain boundary to rise to the ground surface with hypothetical increases in precipitation during the next 10,000 yr. Variability in modeled disposal-system performance introduced by allowing had values to vary over this range is insignificant compared to variability resulting from other causes, including incomplete understanding of transport processes. Preliminary performance assessments suggest that climate variability will not affect regulatory compliance.

Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Economy, K. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Rudeen, D.K. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Performance Assessment in Support of the 1996 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual and computational structure of a performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is described. Important parts of thk structure are @ maintenance of a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertain, with stochastic uncefinty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 Y regulatory period fiat applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from `the imprecision with which many of the quantities rquired in tie `hdysis are known, (ii) use of Latin hypercttbe sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncefirtty, (iii) use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncetinty, and OV) efficient use of tie necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to SUPPOII the analysis. The WIPP is under development by the U.S. Department of Ener~ (DOE) for the geologic (i.e., deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, with the indicated PA supporting a ~Compliance Certification Application (CCA) by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996 for tie necessary certifications for the WIPP to begin operation. If certified, the WIPP will be the first operational faciliv in tie United States for the geologic disposal of ra&oactive waste.

Anderson, D.R.; Basabilvazo, G.; Helton, J.C.; Jow, H.-N.; Marietta, M.G.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis in Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic (deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. This development has been supported by a sequence of performance assessments (PAs) carried out by Sandla National Laboratories (SNL) to assess what is known about the WIPP and to provide .tidance for future DOE research and development activities. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures based on Latin hypercube sampling and regression techniques play an important role in these PAs by providing an assessment of the uncertainty in important analysis outcomes and identi~ing the sources of thk uncertainty. Performance assessments for the WIPP are conceptually and computational] y interesting due to regulatory requirements to assess and display the effects of both stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, where stochastic uncertainty arises from the possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 yr regulatory period associated with the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arises from an inability to unambi-aously characterize the many models and associated parameters required in a PA for the WIPP. The interplay between uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis, stochastic uncertainty and subjective uncertainty are discussed and illustrated in the context of a recent PA carried out by SNL to support an application by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the certification of the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste.

Helton, J.C.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Annual site environmental monitoring report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Calendar year 1985  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Site Environmental Monitoring Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP project is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes generated by the defense activities of the U.S. Government. The report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP during Calendar Year 1985, including: a description of the WIPP project and its mission; a description of the local environment, including demographics; a summary of environmental program information, including an update on the status of environmental permits and compliance activities; a presentation of the findings of the Radiological Baseline Program (RBP), which is a program to characterize radionuclide activities in the environment around the WIPP site; and a summary of findings of the Ecological Monitoring Program (EMP), which examines non-radiological impacts of WIPP construction on the surrounding ecosystem. The WIPP facility is under construction, and will not receive radioactive wastes before October 1988. Therefore, this report describes the status of preoperational (as opposed to operational) environmental activities. 29 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs.

Reith, C.; Prince, K.; Fischer, T.; Rodriguez, A.; Uhland, D.; Winstanley, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

History of geophysical studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A variety of geophysical methods including the spectrum of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic and potential field techniques have supported characterization, monitoring and experimental studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The geophysical studies have provided significant understanding of the nature of site deformation, tectonics and stability. Geophysical methods have delineated possible brine reservoirs beneath the underground facility and have defined the disturbed rock zone that forms around underground excavations. The role of geophysics in the WIPP project has evolved with the project. The early uses were for site characterization to satisfy site selection criteria or factors. As the regulatory framework for WIPP grew since 1980, the geophysics program supported experimental and field programs such as Salado hydrogeology and underground room systems and excavations. In summary, the major types of issues that geophysical studies addressed for WIPP are: Site Characterization; Castile Brine Reservoirs; Rustler/Dewey Lake Hydrogeology; Salado Hydrogeology; and Excavation Effects. The nature of geophysics programs for WIPP has been to support investigation rather than being the principal investigation itself. The geophysics program has been used to define conceptual models (e.g., the Disturbed Rock Zone-DRZ) or to test conceptual models (e.g., high transmissivity zones in the Rustler Formation). The geophysics program primarily supported larger characterization and experimental programs. Funding was not available for the complete documentation and interpretation. Therefore, a great deal of the geophysics survey information resides in contractor reports.

Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

Computational implementation of a systems prioritization methodology for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A preliminary example  

SciTech Connect

A systems prioritization methodology (SPM) is under development to provide guidance to the US DOE on experimental programs and design modifications to be supported in the development of a successful licensing application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. The purpose of the SPM is to determine the probabilities that the implementation of different combinations of experimental programs and design modifications, referred to as activity sets, will lead to compliance. Appropriate tradeoffs between compliance probability, implementation cost and implementation time can then be made in the selection of the activity set to be supported in the development of a licensing application. Descriptions are given for the conceptual structure of the SPM and the manner in which this structure determines the computational implementation of an example SPM application. Due to the sophisticated structure of the SPM and the computational demands of many of its components, the overall computational structure must be organized carefully to provide the compliance probabilities for the large number of activity sets under consideration at an acceptable computational cost. Conceptually, the determination of each compliance probability is equivalent to a large numerical integration problem. 96 refs., 31 figs., 36 tabs.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). WIPP Performance Assessments Departments; Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Software quality assurance in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeast New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic waste generated by DOE defense-related activities. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), in its role as scientific advisor to the DOE, is responsible for evaluating the long-term performance of the WIPP. This risk-based Performance Assessment (PA) is accomplished in part through the use of numerous scientific modeling codes, which rely for some of their inputs on data gathered during characterization of the site. The PA is subject to formal requirements set forth in federal regulations. In particular, the components of the calculation fall under the configuration management and software quality assurance aegis of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) requirements. This paper describes SNL's implementation of the NQA requirements regarding software quality assurance (SQA). The description of the implementation of SQA for a PA calculation addresses not only the interpretation of the NQA requirements, it also discusses roles, deliverables, and the resources necessary for effective implementation. Finally, examples are given which illustrate the effectiveness of SNL's SQA program, followed by a detailed discussion of lessons learned.

FROEHLICH,GARY K.; OGDEN,HARVEY C.; BYLE,KATHLEEN A.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Draft forecast of the final report for the comparison to 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy is planning to dispose of transuranic wastes, which have been generated by defense programs, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The WIPP Project will assess compliance with the requirements of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. This report forecasts the planned 1992 document, Comparison to 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). 130 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.; Gomez, L.S.; Rechard, R.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

M. J. Russell

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, mixed proton/electron conductivity and hydrogen transport was measured as a function of metal phase content for a range of ceramic/metal (cermet) compositions. It was found that optimum performance occurred at 44 wt.% metal content for all compositions tested. Although each cermet appeared to have a continuous metal phase, it is believed that hydrogen transport increased with increasing metal content partially due to beneficial surface catalyst characteristics resulting from the metal phase. Beyond 44 wt.% there was a reduction in hydrogen transport most likely due to dilution of the proton conducting ceramic phase. Hydrogen separation rates for 1-mm thick cermet membranes were in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which corresponded to ambipolar conductivities between 1 x 10{sup -3} and 8 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Similar results were obtained for multiphase ceramic membranes comprised of a proton-conducting perovskite and electron conducting metal oxide. These multi-phase ceramic membranes showed only a slight improvement in hydrogen transport upon addition of a metal phase. The highest hydrogen separation rates observed this quarter were for a cermet membrane containing a hydrogen transport metal. A 1-mm thick membrane of this material achieved a hydrogen separation rate of 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at only 700 C, which increased to 0.6 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Alexandra Z. LaGuardia; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Semi-pilot scale test for production of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from different wastes by means of a gasification and smelting process with oxygen multi-blowing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Europe, most wastes are deposited in landfills, but a European Council directive has called for a 30% reduction of the landfill amount. Though the cement industry commonly burns waste as an alternative fuel together with fossil fuel (so-called waste co-incineration), it is necessary to reconsider this co-incineration from the viewpoints of sustainable development and cement quality. Gasification and smelting processes (GSPs) for waste can convert waste to slag and fuel gas, which can be used by the energy sector and industry, so these processes are desirable in that they provide wide social benefit. Considering its low environmental impact and good economic performance, a GSP that uses a one-process furnace and oxygen multi-blowing was tested on a semi-pilot scale (1.7 tons/day) to convert different wastes (municipal waste, plastic waste and refuse of polyvinyl chloride with a chlorine content of 48%) to slag and hydrogen-rich fuel gas. The results show that the techniques applied in this test increase the quality of the produced fuel gas, strictly control pollutants, and prolong the life of the plant. Furthermore, the tested GSP has the potential to be linked with a hydrogen-based system through its production of hydrogen-rich fuel gas.

R. Kikuchi; H. Sato; Y. Matsukura; T. Yamamoto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tritium Movement and Accumulation in the NGNP System Interface and Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect

Tritium movement and accumulation in a Next Generation Nuclear Plant with a hydrogen plant using a high temperature electrolysis process and a thermochemical water splitting sulfur iodine process are estimated by the numerical code THYTAN as a function of design, operational, and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in process chemicals in the hydrogen plant of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the high temperature electrolysis process are slightly higher than the drinking water limit defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the limit in the effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area of a nuclear plant as defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, these concentrations can be reduced to within the limits through use of some designs and modified operations. Tritium concentrations in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the Sulfur-Iodine Process are significantly higher as calculated and are affected by parameters with large uncertainties (i.e., tritium permeability of the process heat exchanger, the hydrogen concentration in the heat transfer and process fluids, the equilibrium constant of the isotope exchange reaction between HT and H2SO4). These parameters, including tritium generation and the release rate in the reactor core, should be more accurately estimated in the near future to improve the calculations for the NGNP using the Sulfur-Iodine Process. Decreasing the tritium permeation through the heat exchanger between the primary and secondary circuits may be an an effective measure for decreasing tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, the hydrogen plant, and the tertiary coolant.

Hirofumi Ohashi; Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2004 - June 2005, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports quarterly to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after early excavations of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005. It is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information on WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the Geomechanical Monitoring Program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5 and 6 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the two main portions of the WIPP underground (the access drifts and the waste disposal area). Chapter 7 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which include fracture mapping and borehole observations. Chapter 8 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements. Chapter 9 lists the references and bibliography.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Continuous Improvement and the Safety Case for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geologic Repository - 13467  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a geologic repository 2150 feet (650 m) below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert near Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP permanently disposes of transuranic waste from national defense programs. Every five years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submits an application to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to request regulatory-compliance re-certification of the facility for another five years. Every ten years, DOE submits an application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for the renewal of its hazardous waste disposal permit. The content of the applications made by DOE to the EPA for re-certification, and to the NMED for permit-renewal, reflect any optimization changes made to the facility, with regulatory concurrence if warranted by the nature of the change. DOE points to such changes as evidence for its having taken seriously its 'continuous improvement' operations and management philosophy. Another opportunity for continuous improvement is to look at any delta that may exist between the re-certification and re-permitting cases for system safety and the consensus advice on the nature and content of a safety case as being developed and published by the Nuclear Energy Agency's Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) expert group. DOE at WIPP, with the aid of its Science Advisor and teammate, Sandia National Laboratories, is in the process of discerning what can be done, in a reasonably paced and cost-conscious manner, to continually improve the case for repository safety that is being made to the two primary regulators on a recurring basis. This paper will discuss some aspects of that delta and potential paths forward to addressing them. (authors)

Van Luik, Abraham; Patterson, Russell; Nelson, Roger [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Leigh, Christi [Sandia National Laboratories Carlsbad Operations, 4100 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Carlsbad Operations, 4100 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

In its most recent report on the annual probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the annual failure rate is calculated to be 1.3E({minus}7)(1/yr), rounded off from 1.32E({minus}7). A calculation by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) produces a result that is about 4% higher, namely 1.37E({minus}7)(1/yr). The difference is due to a minor error in the US Department of Energy (DOE) calculations in the Westinghouse 1996 report. WIPP`s hoist safety relies on a braking system consisting of a number of components including two crucial valves. The failure rate of the system needs to be recalculated periodically to accommodate new information on component failure, changes in maintenance and inspection schedules, occasional incidents such as a hoist traveling out-of-control, either up or down, and changes in the design of the brake system. This report examines DOE`s last two reports on the redesigned waste hoist system. In its calculations, the DOE has accepted one EEG recommendation and is using more current information about the component failures rates, the Nonelectronic Parts Reliability Data (NPRD). However, the DOE calculations fail to include the data uncertainties which are described in detail in the NPRD reports. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommended that a system evaluation include mean estimates of component failure rates and take into account the potential uncertainties that exist so that an estimate can be made on the confidence level to be ascribed to the quantitative results. EEG has made this suggestion previously and the DOE has indicated why it does not accept the NRC recommendation. Hence, this EEG report illustrates the importance of including data uncertainty using a simple statistical example.

Greenfield, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sargent, T.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)]|[Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Annual water quality data report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth Annual Water Quality Data Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP project is operated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes generated by the defense activities of the United States Government. This report presents water quality data collected from January 1988 through December 1988 from 16 designated pre-operational (WIPP facility) monitoring wells, two additional wells, and 10 privately-owned wells in the vicinity of the WIPP. Additionally, water samples were collected from the Air Intake Shaft during shaft construction activities at the WIPP. This report lists pertinent information regarding the monitoring wells sampled, sampling zone, dates pumped, and types of samples collected during 1988. Comparative data from previous samplings of all wells can be found in Uhland and Randall (1986), Uhland et al. (1987), Randall et al. (1988), as well as in this report. The data reported by the Water Quality Sampling Program in this and previous reports indicate that serial sampling is a very useful tool in determining sample representativeness from wells in the WIPP vicinity. Serial sample field chemistry data are demonstrated to be highly accurate and precise as indicated by the excellent overall average percent spike recovery values and low RPD values reported for the sampling events. Serial sample field chemistry data and laboratory water quality parameter analyses gathered by the WQSP since January 1985 are the foundation for a pre-operational water quality baseline at the WIPP. 32 refs., 66 figs., 96 tabs.

Lyon, M.L. (International Technology Corp., Torrance, CA (USA)) [International Technology Corp., Torrance, CA (USA)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A Success Story with International Cooperation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) administers and operates the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which hosts a deep geologic repository for safe disposal of U.S. defense-related TRU waste and is located 42 kilometers (km) east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. CBFO also manages the National Transuranic Waste Program (NTP), which oversees TRU waste management from generation to disposal. The WIPP began receiving waste in March 1999. In some areas of broad international interest, the CBFO has developed a leading expertise through its 25-year WIPP repository and TRU waste characterization activities. In addition to participating in relevant and beneficial experiments, the CBFO will provide the international community convenient access to this information by sponsoring and hosting symposia and workshops on relevant topics and by participation in international waste management organizations and topical meetings. In recognition of the successes at WIPP, the Inter national Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has designated WIPP as an International Center of Excellence and part of IAEA's Network of Centers of Excellence. The IAEA will foster cooperative training in and demonstration of waste disposal technologies in underground research facilities (URFs).such as WIPP. The CBFO, supported by its Science Advisor, has agreed to exchange scientific information with eight foreign radioactive waste management organizations, and three more national radioactive waste management and disposal organizations have expressed interest in similar agreements. These activities result in the cost-effective acquisition of scientific information in support of increased WIPP facility operational and post-closure assurance and reliability. It also demonstrates the CBFO's intent and resolve to honor international commitments and obligations.

Matthews, M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Basic data report: borehole WIPP-12 deepening. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Borehole WIPP-12 was originally drilled in 1978 as an exploratory borehole to characterize the geology of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Eddy County, New Mexico. WIPP-12 was reentered and deepened in late 1981. WIPP-12 is located in Section 17, T22S, R31E, just outside the limit of Zone II, approximately one mile north of the exploratory shaft site. The deepening of WIPP-12 was undertaken for several reasons: to investigate the presence of an anticlinal or domal structure and thickening of halite indicated by surface seismic reflection surveys conducted in the area; to determine the nature and extent of deformation in the Castile Formation, in a location adjacent to the zone of anomalous seismic reflections found north of the well location (''Disturbed Zone''); and to characterize any fluid-bearing zones encountered in the Castile Formation while drilling. Field operations related to deepening of the borehole began November 16, 1981 and were completed January 1, 1982. The borehole was deepened through the Castile Formation to a total depth of 3927.5 ft by coring. Pressurized brine was encountered on November 22, 1981 at a depth of about 3016 ft. The brine reservoir is apparently related to a system of near-vertical fractures of unknown extent observed in Anhydrite III. The Halite I member is about 200 ft thicker than observed in undisturbed areas in the vicinity of WIPP (for example, Borehole DOE-1). Small-scale lithologic features such as folding of anhydrite stringers in halite and halite lineation appear to confirm the presence of a structural disturbance at this location. This Basic Data Report includes geologic information gathered during WIPP-12 deepening.

Black, S.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This qualitative hazard evaluation systematically assessed potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Postulated accidents included the spontaneous ignition of a waste drum, puncture of a waste drum by a forklift, dropping of a waste drum from a forklift, and simultaneous dropping of seven drums during a crane failure. The descriptions and estimated frequencies of occurrence for these accidents were developed by the Hazard and Operability Study for CH TRU Waste Handling System (WCAP 14312). The estimated materials at risk, damage ratios, airborne release fractions and respirable fractions for these accidents were taken from the 1995 Safety Analysis Report (SAR) update and from the DOE handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities (DOE-HDBK-3010-94). A Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the range of worker exposures that could result from each accident. Guidelines for evaluating the adequacy of defense-in-depth for worker protection at WIPP were adopted from a scheme presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in its publication on Protection from Potential Exposure: A Conceptual Framework (ICRP Publication 64). Probabilities of exposures greater than 5, 50, and 300 rem were less than 10{sup -2}, 10{sup -4}, and 10{sup -6} per year, respectively. In conformance with the guidance of DOE standard 3009-94, Appendix A (draft), we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposure under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, as well as members of the public and the environment.

Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farrell, R.F. [Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- Volume II, August 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This volume discusses the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program. The results of the review of the WIPP environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs are discussed in Volume I of this report, and the combined results are discussed in a summary report. The results of this review indicate that, overall, CBFO and WTS have effectively addressed nearly all of the weaknesses identified during the May 2000 OA emergency management review. Furthermore, as a consequence of that effort, CBFO and WTS have implemented a hazardous material emergency management program that, with few exceptions, meets Departmental expectations for providing a system that protects responders, site workers, and the public in the event of an emergency at WIPP. Section 2 of this volume provides an overall discussion of the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program, including positive aspects, findings, and other items requiring management attention. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of CBFO and WTS management of the emergency management program. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team composition. Appendix B identifies the findings that require corrective action and follow-up. Appendices C- F detail the results of the reviews of individual emergency management program elements.

282

1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

History of geophysical studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A variety of geophysical methods including the spectrum of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic and potential field techniques have used support characterization, monitoring and experimental studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The geophysical studies have provided significant understanding of the nature of site deformation, tectonics and stability. Geophysical methods have delineated possible brine reservoirs beneath the underground facility and have defined the disturbed rock zone that forms around underground excavations. The role of geophysics in the WIPP project has evolved with the project. The early uses were for site characterization to satisfy site selection criteria or factors. As the regulatory framework for WIPP grew since 1980, the geophysics program was focused on support of experimental and field programs such as Salado hydrogeology and underground room systems and excavations. In summary, the major types of issues that geophysical studies addressed for WIPP are: Issue 1: Site Characterization; Issue 2: Castile Brine Reservoirs; Issue 3: Rustler /Dewey Lake Hydrogeology; Issue 4: Salado Hydrogeology; and Issue 5: Excavation Effects. The nature of geophysics program for WIPP has been to support investigation rather than being the principal investigation itself. The geophysics program has been used to define conceptual models (e.g., the Disturbed Rock Zone-DRZ) or to test conceptual models (e.g., high transmissivity zones in the Rustler Formation). An effect of being a support program is that as new project priorities arose the funding for the geophysics program was limited and withdrawn. An outcome is that much of the geophysics survey information resides in contractor reports since final interpretation reports were not funded.

Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

An appraisal of the 1992 preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has reviewed the WIPP 1992 Performance Assessment (Sandia WIPP Performance Assessment Department, 1992). Although this performance assessment was released after the October 1992 passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579), the work preceded the Act. For individual and ground-water protection, calculations have been done for 1000 years post closure, whereas the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191) issued in 1993 require calculations for 10,000 years. The 1992 Performance Assessment continues to assimilate improved understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the site, and evolving conceptual models of natural barriers. Progress has been made towards assessing WIPP`s compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191). The 1992 Performance Assessment has addressed several items of major concern to EEG, outlined in the July 1992 review of the 1991 performance assessment (Neill et al., 1992). In particular, the authors are pleased that some key results in this performance assessment deal with sensitivity of the calculated complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDF) to alterative conceptual models proposed by EEG -- that flow in the Culebra be treated as single-porosity fracture-flow; with no sorption retardation unless substantiated by experimental data.

Lee, W.W.L.; Chaturvedi, L.; Silva, M.K.; Weiner, R.; Neill, R.H. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Audit of selected aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant cost structure, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development facility intended to demonstrate that transuranic waste from the Government`s defense activities can be safely disposed of in a deep geologic formation. The Fiscal Year 1994 budget for WIPP is about $185 million and includes funding for the operation of WIPP and for experiments being done by other DOE facilities. DOE`s current plan is for WIPP to begin receiving transuranic waste in June 1998. This audit was requested by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management because two recent reports, one issues by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), were critical of the staffing and cost-effectiveness of WIPP, and because of recent mission changes at WIPP. The audit team consisted of representatives from the DOE, auditors from the OIG, and technical specialists hired by the OIG to assist in the audit. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether WIPP was appropriately staffed to meet programmatic requirements in the most cost-effective manner. The Secretary of Energy expected DOE facilities to benchmark their performance against other facilities to strive for best in class status, and the Westinghouse management and operating contract for WIPP required the facility to be operated in a cost-effective manner. However, the authors determined that Westinghouse did not use benchmarks and that WIPP could be managed more cost-effectively, with fewer personnel, while maintaining its current level of excellence. They concluded that the WIPP staffing level could be significantly reduced with a decrease in costs at WIPP of about $11.4 million per year.

Not Available

1994-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

286

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this final quarter of the no cost extension several planar membranes of a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase were prepared and permeability testing was performed.

Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, it was demonstrated that increasing the transition metal loading in a model perovskite composition resulted in an increase in hydrogen flux. Improved flux corresponded to the emergence of additional phases in the ceramic membrane, and highest flux was achieved for a composite consisting of pseudo-cubic and rhombohedral perovskite phases. A 0.9-mm thick membrane of this material generated a hydrogen flux in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which was approximately 35 times greater than analogs with lower transition metal levels. The dopant level and crystal structure also correlated with membrane density and coefficient of thermal expansion, but did not appear to affect grain size or shape. Additionally, preliminary ceramic-metal (cermet) composite membranes demonstrated a 10-fold increase in flux relative to analogous membranes composed of only the ceramic component. The hydrogen flux for these cermet samples corresponded to a conductivity of {approx} 10{sup -3} S/cm, which was consistent with the predicted proton conductivity of the ceramic phase. Increasing the sweep gas flow rate in test reactors was found to significantly increase hydrogen flux, as well as apparent material conductivity for all samples tested. Adding humidity to the feed gas stream produced a small increase in hydrogen flux. However, the catalyst on ceramic membrane surfaces did not affect flux, which suggested that the process was membrane-diffusion limited. Representative samples and fabrication processes were evaluated on the basis of manufacturing practicality. it was determined that optimum membrane densification occurs over a very narrow temperature range for the subject ceramics. Additionally, calcination temperatures currently employed result in powders that are difficult mill and screen. These issues must be addressed to improve large-scale fabricability.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard A. Mackay; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Tim R. Armstrong; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize hydrogen permeation without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, a composite metal membrane based on an inexpensive hydrogen permeable metal achieved permeation rates in excess of 25 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary attempts to incorporate this metal into a cermet were successful, and a thick cermet membrane (0.83 mm) with 40 vol.% metal phase achieved a permeation rate of nearly 0.4 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Increasing the metal phase content and decreasing membrane thickness should significantly increase permeation, while maintaining the benefits derived from cermets. Two-phase ceramic/ceramic composite membranes had low hydrogen permeability, likely due to interdiffusion of constituents between the phases. However, these materials did demonstrate high resistance to corrosion, and might be good candidates for other composite membranes. Temperature-programmed reduction measurements indicated that model cermet materials absorbed 2.5 times as much hydrogen than the pure ceramic analogs. This characteristic, in addition to higher electron conductivity, likely explains the relatively high permeation for these cermets. Incorporation of catalysts with ceramics and cermets increased hydrogen uptake by 800 to more than 900%. Finally, new high-pressure seals were developed for cermet membranes that maintained a pressure differential of 250 psi. This result indicated that the approach for high-pressure seal development could be adapted for a range of compositions. Other items discussed in this report include mechanical testing, new proton conducting ceramics, supported thin films, and alkane to olefin conversion.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart R. Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

MBM fuel feeding system design and evaluation for FBG pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 1-5 g/s fuel feeding system for pilot scale FBG was designed, built and tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple conveying stages improve pressure balancing, flow control and stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary conveyor stage reduced output irregularity from 47% to 15%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic air sparging effective in dealing with poor flow ability of MBM powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic injection port plugs with char at gasification temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: A biomass fuel feeding system has been designed, constructed and evaluated for a fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) pilot plant at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada). The system was designed for meat and bone meal (MBM) to be injected into the gasifier at a mass flow-rate range of 1-5 g/s. The designed system consists of two stages of screw conveyors, including a metering stage which controlled the flow-rate of fuel, a rotary airlock and an injection conveyor stage, which delivered that fuel at a consistent rate to the FBG. The rotary airlock which was placed between these conveyors, proved unable to maintain a pressure seal, thus the entire conveying system was sealed and pressurized. A pneumatic injection nozzle was also fabricated, tested and fitted to the end of the injection conveyor for direct injection and dispersal into the fluidized bed. The 150 mm metering screw conveyor was shown to effectively control the mass output rate of the system, across a fuel output range of 1-25 g/s, while the addition of the 50 mm injection screw conveyor reduced the irregularity (error) of the system output rate from 47% to 15%. Although material plugging was found to be an issue in the inlet hopper to the injection conveyor, the addition of air sparging ports and a system to pulse air into those ports was found to successfully eliminate this issue. The addition of the pneumatic injection nozzle reduced the output irregularity further to 13%, with an air supply of 50 slpm as the minimum air supply to drive this injector. After commissioning of this final system to the FBG reactor, the injection nozzle was found to plug with char however, and was subsequently removed from the system. Final operation of the reactor continues satisfactorily with the two screw conveyors operating at matching pressure with the fluidized bed, with the output rate of the system estimated based on system characteristic equations, and confirmed by static weight measurements made before and after testing. The error rate by this method is reported to be approximately 10%, which is slightly better than the estimated error rate of 15% for the conveyor system. The reliability of this measurement prediction method relies upon the relative consistency of the physical properties of MBM with respect to its bulk density and feeding characteristics.

Campbell, William A., E-mail: bill.campbell@usask.ca [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada) and Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Fonstad, Terry [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Pugsley, Todd [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Gerspacher, Regan [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 2 of 3: Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the mineralogy, porosity, and permeability results from the Marker Bed 139 anhydrite specimens evaluated by RE/SPEC, Inc. for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

Howarth, S.M.; Christian-Frear, T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

Butcher, B.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Performance assessment in support of the 1996 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A decision analysis perspective  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic disposal of transuranic waste. The primary regulatory requirements (i.e., 40 CFR 191 and 40 CFR 194) placed on the WIPP by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) involve a complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) for normalized radionuclide releases to the accessible environment. The interpretation and use of this CCDF from a decision analysis perspective is discussed and illustrated with results from the 1996 performance assessment for the WIPP, which was carried out to support a compliance certification application by the DOE to the EPA for the WIPP.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R.; Jow, H.N.; Marietta, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basabilvazo, G. [Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Report of biological investigations at the Los Medanos Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area of New Mexico during FY 1978  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is considering the construction of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, NM. This location is approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, NM. Biological studies during FY 1978 were concentrated within a 5-mi radius of drill hole ERDA 9. Additional study areas have been established at other sites in the vicinity, e.g., the Gnome site, the salt lakes and several stations along the Pecos River southward from Carlsbad, NM, to the dam at Red Bluff Reservoir in Texas. The precise locations of all study areas are presented and their biology discussed.

Best, T.L.; Neuhauser, S. (eds.)

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Basic Data Report for Drillholes on the H-19 Hydropad (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant--WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

Seven holes were drilled and wells (H-19b0, H-19b2, H-19b3, H-19b4, H-19b5, H-19b6, and H-19b7) were constructed on the H-19 hydropad to conduct field activities in support of the Culebra Transport Program. These wells were drilled and completed on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site during February to September 1995. An eighth hole, H-19b1, was drilled but had to be abandoned before the target depth was reached because of adverse hole conditions. The geologic units penetrated at the H-19 location include surficial deposits of Holocene age, rocks from the Dockum Group of Upper Triassic age, the Dewey Lake Redbeds, and Rustler Formation of the Permian age. The Rustler Formation has been further divided into five informal members which include the Forty-niner Member, Magenta Member, Tamarisk Member, Culebra Dolomite Member, and an unnamed lower member. The Rustler Formation, particularly the Culebra Dolomite Member, is considered critical for hydrologic site characterization. The Culebra is the most transmissive saturated unit above the WIPP repository and, as such, is considered to be the most likely pathway for radionuclide transport to the accessible environment in the unlikely event the repository is breached. Seven cores from the Culebra were recovered during drilling activities at the H-19 hydropad and detailed descriptions of these cores were made. On the basis of geologic descriptions, four hydrostratigraphic units were identified in the Culebra cores and were correlated with the mapping units from the WFP air intake shaft. The entire length of H-19b1 was cored and was described in detail. During coring of H-19b1, moisture was encountered in the upper part of the Dewey Lake Redbeds. A 41-ft-thick section of this core was selected for detailed description to qualify the geologic conditions related to perched water in the upper Dewey Lake. In addition to cuttings and core, a suite of geophysical logs run on the drillholes was used to identify and correlate different lithologies among the seven wells.

Mercer, J.W.; Cole, D.L.; Holt, R.M.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Advantages of the shielded containers at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal operations currently employ two different disposal methods: one for Contact Handled (CH) waste and another for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations on the floor of each disposal room. In contrast, RH waste is packaged into a single type of canister and emplaced in pre-drilled holes in the walls of disposal rooms. Emplacement of the RH waste in the walls must proceed in advance of CH waste emplacement and therefore poses logistical constraints, in addition to the loss of valuable disposal capacity. To improve operational efficiency and disposal capacity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed a shielded container for certain RH waste streams. RH waste with relatively low gammaemitting activity would be packaged in lead-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste and emplaced in WIPP among the stacks of CH waste containers on the floor of a disposal room. RH waste with high gamma-emitting activity would continue to be emplaced in the boreholes along the walls. The new RH container is similar to the nominal 208-liter (55-gallon) drum, however it includes about 2.5 cm (1 in) of lead, sandwiched between thick steel sheets. Furthermore, the top and bottom are made of thick plate steel to strengthening the package to meet transportation requirements. This robust configuration provides an overpack for materials that otherwise would be RH waste. This paper describes the container and the regulatory approach used to meet the requirements imposed by regulations that apply to WIPP. This includes a Performance Assessment used to evaluate WIPP's long-term performance and the DOE's approach to gain approval for the transportation of shielded containers. This paper also describes estimates of the DOE's RH transuranic waste inventory that may be packaged and emplaced in shielded containers. Finally, the paper includes a discussion of how the DOE proposes to track the waste packaged into shielded containers against the RH waste inventory and how this will comply with the regulated volume.

Nelson, Roger A. (U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM); Dunagan, Sean C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microbial gas generation under expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository conditions  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository was investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosics (various types of paper) and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, neoprene, hypalon, and leaded hypalon) was examined. The rate of gas production from cellulose biodegradation in inundated samples incubated for 1,228 days at 30 C was biphasic, with an initial rapid rate up to approximately 600 days incubation, followed by a slower rate. The rate of total gas production in anaerobic samples containing mixed inoculum was as follows: 0.002 mL/g cellulose/day without nutrients; 0.004 mL/g cellulose/day with nutrients; and 0.01 mL/g cellulose/day in the presence of excess nitrate. Carbon dioxide production proceeded at a rate of 0.009 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples without nutrients, 0.05 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of nutrients, and 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day with excess nitrate. Adding nutrients and excess nitrate stimulated denitrification, as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sub 2}O in the headspace (200 {micro}mol/g cellulose). The addition of the potential backfill bentonite increased the rate of CO{sub 2} production to 0.3 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples with excess nitrate. Analysis of the solution showed that lactic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids were produced due to cellulose degradation. Samples incubated under anaerobic humid conditions for 415 days produced CO{sub 2} at a rate of 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the absence of nutrients, and 1 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of bentonite and nutrients. There was no evidence of biodegradation of electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Giles, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Scenarios for multi?unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is presented an extended summary for a paper describing: a) the motivation of the inertial fusion in general and particularly for the production of the hydrogen fuel powering low?emission vehicles b) the general requirements for fusion electric plants c) a comparative economic analysis concerning the design of drivers and target chambers. (AIP)

B. Grant Logan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Texas Propane Vehicle Pilot Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Texas Propane Vehicle Pilot Project Texas Propane Vehicle Pilot Project 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

304

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Software/firmware design specification for 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Collector Subsystem Software/Firmware Design Specification exists as a stand-alone document to provide a complete description of the software and firmware employed for the operation of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant Collector Subsystem. The software/firmware systems have the capability to allow operator control of up to 2048 heliostats in the operation of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant at Barstow, California. This function includes the capability of operator-commanded mode control, graphic displays, status displays, alarm generation, system redundancy and interfaces to the Operational Control System (OCS), the Data Acquisition System (DAS), and the Beam Characterization System (BCS) through the OCS. The operational commands will provide for the following: (a) safe beam movement whenever automatic beam movement is required; (b) single and multiple heliostat addressing; (c) emergency heliostat movement for high-wind conditions and receiver problems; and (d) recovery for full or partial power-loss conditions. The control hardware consists of a host computer, the Heliostat Array Controller (HAC), interfaced to a group of communication controllers, the Heliostat Field Controllers (HFCs), communicating with individual processors, the Heliostat Controllers (HCs), which monitor and command a single heliostat. The system consists of two HACs and 64 HFCs with up to 32 HCs per HFC.

Ladewig, T.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Experimental and theoretical analysis of a nondispersive solvent extraction pilot plant for the removal of Cr(VI) from a galvanic process wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

The scale-up of a chemical process from the results obtained in a laboratory scale involves a high degree of uncertainty. Experimental tests in pilot plants are therefore necessary in order to decrease that uncertainty. When the processes are not simple, these experimental tests should be supplemented by simulation studies which are a highly useful tool in the analysis of a chemical plant. A nondispersive solvent extraction (NDSX) plant includes two processes, extraction and stripping, coupled by an organic phase. Because of this fact, the variables of the system are interrelated, making the prediction of the behavior of the whole system difficult. Because of this complexity, in this work, the behavior of a NDSX pilot plant has been experimentally and theoretically analyzed. The removal and recovery of chromium(VI) from wastewaters of a galvanic process have been used as a case study for the simulation and experimental analysis of the NDSX process. The mathematical model consists of nonlinear partial differential equations which are solved using the process simulator gPROMS. Once the suitability of the proposed model and parameters for the description of removal and concentration of Cr(VI) in the NDSX pilot plant was checked, the simulation was used to perform a sensitivity analysis to operating variables such as flow rates, volumes, total carrier concentration, and initial complex species concentration. The theoretically predicted behavior was checked with some experimental results, and a satisfactory performance of the pilot plant was achieved.

Alonso, A.I.; Galan, B.; Gonzalez, M.; Ortiz, I. [Univ. de Cantabria, Santander (Spain). Dept. Quimica] [Univ. de Cantabria, Santander (Spain). Dept. Quimica

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen energy is a clean or inexhaustible energy like renewable energy and nuclear energy. Today’s energy supply has a considerable impact on the environment. Hydrogen energy is a promising alternative solut...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet compositions did not show any reaction with carbon monoxide, but a thick layer of carbon formed on the membrane surface. The most significant technical accomplishment this quarter was a new high-pressure seal composition. This material maintained a pressure differential across the membrane of {approx} 280 psi at 800 C, and is still in operation.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration batch, which included 5%, 50%, and 95% dose likelihood, and the sensitivity of each assumption to the calculated doses. As one would intuitively expect, the doses from the probabilistic assessment for most scenarios were found to be much less than the deterministic assessment. The lower dose of the probabilistic assessment can be attributed to a ''smearing'' of values from the high and low end of the PDF spectrum of the various input parameters. The analysis also found a potential weakness in the deterministic analysis used in the SAR, a detail on drum loading was not taken into consideration. Waste emplacement operations thus far have handled drums from each shipment as a single unit, i.e. drums from each shipment are kept together. Shipments typically come from a single waste stream, and therefore the curie loading of each drum can be considered nearly identical to that of its neighbor. Calculations show that if there are large numbers of drums used in the accident scenario assessment, e.g. 28 drums in the waste hoist failure scenario (CH5), then the probabilistic dose assessment calculations will diverge from the deterministically determined doses. As it is currently calculated, the deterministic dose assessment assumes one drum loaded to the maximum allowable (80 PE-Ci), and the remaining are 10% of the maximum. The effective average of drum curie content is therefore less in the deterministic assessment than the probabilistic assessment for a large number of drums. EEG recommends that the WIPP SAR calculations be revisited and updated to include a probabilistic safety assessment.

Rucker, D.F.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Shipping Remote Handled Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An Operational Experience  

SciTech Connect

On January 18, 2007, the first ever shipment of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) waste left the gate at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), headed toward the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal, thus concluding one of the most stressful, yet rewarding, periods the authors have ever experienced. The race began in earnest on October 16, 2006, with signature of the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary's Final Order, ruling that the '..draft permit as changed is hereby approved in its entirety.' This established the effective date of the approved permit as November 16, 2006. The permit modification was a consolidation of several Class 3 modification requests, one of which included incorporation of RH TRU requirements and another of which incorporated the requirements of Section 311 of Public Law 108-137. The obvious goal was to complete the first shipment by November 17. While many had anticipated its approval, the time had finally come to actually implement, and time seemed to be the main item lacking. At that point, even the most aggressive schedule that could be seriously documented showed a first ship date in March 2007. Even though planning for this eventuality had started in May 2005 with the arrival of the current Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) contractor (and even before that), there were many facility and system modifications to complete, startup authorizations to fulfill, and many regulatory audits and approvals to obtain before the first drum could be loaded. Through the dedicated efforts of the ICP workers, the partnership with Department of Energy (DOE) - Idaho, the coordinated integration with the Central Characterization Project (CCP), the flexibility and understanding of the regulatory community, and the added encouragement of DOE - Carlsbad Field Office and at Headquarters, the first RH TRU canister was loaded on December 22, 2006. Following final regulatory approval on January 17, 2007, the historic event finally occurred the following day. While some of the success of this endeavor can be attributed to the sheer will and determination of the individuals involved, the fact that it was established and managed as a separate sub-project under the ICP, accounts for a majority of the success. Utilizing a structured project management approach, including development of, and management to, a performance baseline, allowed for timely decision making and the flexibility to adapt to changing conditions as the various aspects of the project matured. This paper provides some insight into how this was achieved, in a relatively short time, and provides an overview of the experience of start-up of a new retrieval, characterization, loading, and transportation operation in the midst of an aggressive cleanup project. Additionally, as one might expect, everything within the project did not go as planned, which provides a great opportunity to discuss some lessons learned. Finally, the first shipment was just the beginning. There are 224 additional shipments scheduled. In keeping with the theme of WM 2008, Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, this paper will address the future opportunities and challenges of RH TRU waste management at the INL. (authors)

Anderson, S.; Bradford, J.; Clements, T.; Crisp, D.; Sherick, M. [CH2M-WG Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); D'Amico, E. [Washington TRU Solutions, Denver, CO (United States); Lattin, W. [United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, K. [United States Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Michael Schwartz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant Total Capital Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cost analysis of the 10MWe Solar One Thermal Central Receiver Plant near Barstow, California, ... is presented to help predict costs of future solar thermal central receiver plants. In this paper, the Solar One...

H. F. Norris

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants  

SciTech Connect

ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) and its partners, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, LLC and Praxair, Inc. are developing composite membranes for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is pursuing a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into module fabrication designs; combining functionally-graded materials, monolithic module concept and thermal spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows for the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing techniques with low costs. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, are being assessed. This will result in an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed ICCM hydrogen separation approach for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of such plants. Of particular importance is that the proposed technology also results in a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows for the facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner.

Schwartz, Michael

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

An analysis of salt and moisture deposition on the air sampling probes in the exhaust shaft of the waste isolation pilot plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to determine the source of moist salt formations on air sampling , probes at the top of the exhaust shaft used in ventilating the waste repository at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). An earlier study by Texas A&M Univ...

Weaver, Gregg Shelton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of the processes used to access the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, HIgh-LEvel and transuranic radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191).

Rechard, R.P.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Revision of the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 56 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices 1 In addition to more significant quantities of PCB-contaminated waste already at the Hanford site, DOE transferred a small amount of TRU waste with PCBs (4 cubic meters) from the Energy Technology Engineering Site in California to Hanford in December 2002 for characterization, repackaging, and storage pending shipment to WIPP. 67 FR 56989 (Sept. 6, 2002). At that time, DOE designated that particular waste for disposal at WIPP in accordance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Revision to record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy

322

A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)  

SciTech Connect

This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

Powers, D.W. [Powers (Dennis W.), Anthony, TX (United States); Martin, M.L. [International Technology, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Data quality assurance controls through the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management System  

SciTech Connect

Assurance of data quality for the in situ tests fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is of critical importance. These tests supply the information for development and verification of the technology required for construction of a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The tests are some of the largest ever fielded in an underground facility. To assure that the extensive output generated by the tests is compatible with the high standards of quality required, a major project task was undertaken for the acquisition, control, and preservation of the all the associated in situ test databases, with the principal emphasis on the very large thermal/structural in situ tests. In order to accomplish this task the WIPP In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management (WISDAAM) System was put into place. The system provides for quality control of the test databases and certified test data throughout the duration of the tests. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Munson, D.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ball, J.R. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Jones, R.L. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Summary of the systems prioritization method (SPM) as a decision-aiding tool for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In March 1994, the Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) implemented a performance-based planning method to assist in programmatic prioritization within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project with respect to applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) long-term performance requirements stated in 40 CFR 191.13(a) and 40 CFR 268.6. This method, the Systems Prioritization Method (SPM), was designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to: (1) identify programmatic options (activities) and their costs and durations; (2) analyze potential combinations of activities in terms of predicted contribution to long-term performance; and (3) analyze cost, duration, and performance tradeoffs. SPM results were the basis for recommendations to DOE/CAO in May 1995 for prioritization within the WIPP project. This paper presents a summary of the SPM implementation, key results, and lessons learned.

Boak, D.M.; Prindle, N.H.; Lincoln, R.; Mendenhall, F.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bills, R.A [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Milestones for disposal of radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on March 26, 1999, was the culmination of a regulatory assessment process that had taken 25 years. National policy issues, negotiated agreements, and court settlements during the first 15 years of the project had a strong influence on the amount and type of scientific data collected up to this point. Assessment activities before the mid 1980s were undertaken primarily (1) to satisfy needs for environmental impact statements, (2) to satisfy negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico, or (3) to develop general understanding of selected natural phenomena associated with nuclear waste disposal. In the last 10 years, federal compliance policy and actual regulations were sketched out, and continued to evolve until 1996. During this period, stochastic simulations were introduced as a tool for the assessment of the WIPP's performance, and four preliminary performance assessments, one compliance performance assessment, and one verification performance assessment were performed.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 7: Appendix GCR Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the second part of the geological characterization report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Both hydrology and geochemistry are evaluated. The following aspects of hydrology are discussed: surface hydrology; ground water hydrology; and hydrology drilling and testing. Hydrologic studies at the site and adjacent site areas have concentrated on defining the hydrogeology and associated salt dissolution phenomena. The geochemical aspects include a description of chemical properties of geologic media presently found in the surface and subsurface environments of southeastern New Mexico in general, and of the proposed WIPP withdrawal area in particular. The characterization does not consider any aspect of artificially-introduced material, temperature, pressure, or any other physico-chemical condition not native to the rocks of southeastern New Mexico.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Milestones for disposal of radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Since its identification as a potential deep geologic repository in about 1973, the regulatory assessment process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico has developed over the past 25 years. National policy issues, negotiated agreements, and court settlements over the first half of the project had a strong influence on the amount and type of scientific data collected. Assessments and studies before the mid 1980s were undertaken primarily (1) to satisfy needs for environmental impact statements, (2) to develop general understanding of selected natural phenomena associated with nuclear waste disposal, or (3) to satisfy negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico. In the last third of the project, federal compliance policy and actual regulations were sketched out, but continued to evolve until 1996. During this eight-year period, four preliminary performance assessments, one compliance performance assessment, and one verification performance assessment were performed.

Rechard, R.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The effect of stratigraphic dip on brine inflow and gas migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The natural dip of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 111, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas-migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Current models, including those in WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, assume a perfectly horizontal repository and stratigraphy. With the addition of buoyancy forces due to the dip, brine and gas flow patterns can be affected. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate up dip. This scoping study has used analytical and numerical modeling to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas-migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Sensitivities to interbed permeabilities, two-phase curves, gas-generation rates, and interbed fracturing were studied.

Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A new Rankine cycle for hydrogen-fired power generation plants and its exergetic efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel power generation cycle is proposed in this paper taking hydrogen as fuel and using steam generated by hydrogen firing as working fluid. The progress of the development work and side issues such as the application of hydrogen combustion turbines to environmentally clean fossil fuel power plants for early commercialisation of the system are reviewed. We propose the hydrogen-fired Rankine cycle as similar to (C) type developed earlier by Hisadome et al. and Sugishita et al. and then making a new design of it by increasing the performance characteristics and efficiencies with (reheating, regenerative and recuperation) of the working fluid of the bottoming cycle respectively, and in this case we present two types (C1 and C2). In the case of type C2 the cycle is called the ''New Rankine Cycle''. These cycles are also compared with the Rankine cycle of type (C) for hydrogen-fired to show the advantages of the performance characteristics of the new design at which the highest value of exergetic efficiency reaches 63.58% as HHV at 1700°C of the combustor discharge temperature. These cycles are analysed through thermodynamics, particularly by exergy analysis, and the performance characteristics of the cycles are also studied.

Mohammed Ghiyath Soufi; Terushige Fujii; Katsumi Sugimoto; Hitoshi Asano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pilot plant investigation of N{sub 2}O emissions including the effect of long term operation in circulating FBC  

SciTech Connect

A pilot plant test program was conducted at CANMET to study the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) from circulating fluidized bed combustors using the same coal and similar limestones as those to be used with the 165 MWe CFBC boiler owned and operated by Nova Scotia Power Incorporated (NSPI). The feedstocks examined during this trial were Devco Prince coal and the Windsor Group and Calpo limestones, the fuel and potential sorbents for NSPI`s 165 MWe CFBC plant. Twelve tests were first carried out with the first test series (TS1) using CANMET`s 0.8 MWt pilot-scale CFBC. Later, three additional tests were conducted (test series TS2), to study the effect of long term operation on the emissions of N{sub 2}O from CFBC and generate ash for an ash utilization study under a separate program. The key parameters studied were: temperature, secondary air to primary air ratio and elevation of the secondary air injection level on N{sub 2}O emissions as well as sulfur capture, combustion efficiency and NO{sub x} and CO levels. The N{sub 2}O emissions ranged from 51 to 117 ppm (or 32 to 72 mg/MJ). As expected, temperature was the dominant influence on N{sub 2}O emissions. In addition, longer term operation (80 to 100 h) had no significant effect on N{sub 2}O emissions. Despite a change in limestones and a significant change in limestone utilization, the N{sub 2}O emissions were equivalent in the two test series. Neither was any significant correlation established by way of multilinear regression between N{sub 2}O and other emissions for the two test series (i.e., SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO or O{sub 2}).

Desai, D.L.; Anthony, E.J.; Lau, I. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Andrews, N. [Nova Scotia Power Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Operation of the Wilsonville solvent-refined coal pilot plant: startup, calibration, and initial operation of the H-oil ebullated-bed hydrotreater unit. Technical evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents initial operating data and analyses for the H-Oil Ebullated-Bed Hydrotreater (HTR) unit at the Wilsonville Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. The focus of the report is on the initial period when the HTR unit operated with catalyst (May to June 1981). Additional data relates to the problems and adjustments during pre-operational testing (December 1980 to April 1981), solvent-SRC circulation testing (April to May 1981), and equipment repairs (July 1981). During the first two runs with catalyst (American Cyanamid HDS-1442B), the R1235 Reactor was operated at 756/sup 0/F and 825/sup 0/F. Equal amounts of hydrotreater solvent and deashed SRC were blended to make up the HTR unit feed. At these conditions, SRC conversion was 30 and 53%, respectively, and 82 and 88% of the sulfur was removed from the SRC feed. The total solvent yield was 26 and 39% of the SRC for the two temperatures, 756 and 825/sup 0/F, respectively. Most of the preasphaltenes were converted (less than 0.5% in the solid product). Hydrogen consumption was estimated to be 3 to 4% of the feed SRC. The quality of the HTR solvent was evaluated in short and long microautoclave tests (80% and 80 to 88% THF conversion, respectively) and the values obtained were consistently higher than those for SRC unit solvent. It was noted that the HTR unit solvent gave higher results by the long test than the short test, whereas the opposite is true for SRC unit solvent.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel pyrochlore-based proton conductors were identified, synthesized and characterized. They exhibited conductivity as high as 0.03 S/cm at 900 C. Long-term stability under CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was also demonstrated. In the area of membrane fabrication by plasma spray processing, the initial results showed that the pyrochlore materials could be processed in a spray torch. Although leak-tight membranes were obtained, cracking, most likely due to differences in thermal expansion, remained a problem. More modeling and experimental work can be used to solve this problem. Finally the techno-economic analyses showed that the ITN ICCM approach for separating H{sub 2} is comparable to conventional pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology in efficiency and economics. Enhanced membrane flux and lower operating temperatures may make the ICCM approach superior to PSA.

Michael Schwartz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Multi-Pollutant Emissions Control: Pilot Plant Study of Technologies for Reducing Hg, SO3, NOx and CO2 Emissions  

SciTech Connect

A slipstream pilot plant was built and operated to investigate technology to adsorb mercury (Hg) onto the existing particulate (i.e., fly ash) by cooling flue gas to 200-240 F with a Ljungstrom-type air heater or with water spray. The mercury on the fly ash was then captured in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). An alkaline material, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}), is injected into flue gas upstream of the air heater to control sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), which prevents acid condensation and corrosion of the air heater and ductwork. The slipstream was taken from a bituminous coal-fired power plant. During this contract, Plant Design and Construction (Task 1), Start Up and Maintenance (Task 2), Baseline Testing (Task 3), Sorbent Testing (Task 4), Parametric Testing (Task 5), Humidification Tests (Task 6), Long-Term Testing (Task 7), and a Corrosion Study (Task 8) were completed. The Mercury Stability Study (Task 9), ESP Report (Task 11), Air Heater Report (Task 12) and Final Report (Task 14) were completed. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on Public Outreach (Task 15), are discussed in detail in this final report. Over 90% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 200-210 F at the ESP inlet; baseline conditions with 290 F flue gas gave about 26% removal. Mercury removal is sensitive to flue gas temperature and carbon content of fly ash. At 200-210 F, both elemental and oxidized mercury were effectively captured at the ESP. Mg(OH){sub 2} injection proved effective for removal of SO{sub 3} and eliminated rapid fouling of the air heater. The pilot ESP performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions. Mercury volatility and leaching tests did not show any stability problems. No significant corrosion was detected at the air heater or on corrosion coupons at the ESP. The results justify larger-scale testing/demonstration of the technology. These conclusions are presented and discussed in two presentations given in July and September of 2005 and are included in Appendices E and F.

Michael L. Fenger; Richard A. Winschel

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

Not Available

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment Hydrogen Production with CO2 Capture, Volume 1: Baseline State of the Art Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Production with CO 2 Capture Volume 1: Baseline State-of- the-Art Plants August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1434 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

338

Dynamical safety assessment of hydrogen production nuclear power plants using system dynamics method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants for hydrogen production are investigated in the aspect of nuclear safety. The non-linear dynamical safety assessment is introduced for the analysis of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) which is used for hydrogen production as well as electricity generation. The dynamical algorithm is adjusted for the safety assessment with an easier and reliable output. A feedback of power increase affects to the temperature decrease. The top event of the event is power and temperature stable. It is affected by the human factor, poison, and some other physical variables. There are several factors including the economic and safety factors which are considered for the reliability of the modelling simulations. Using the system dynamics (SD) method, the event quantification is performed for the event flows, stocks, and feedback by the single and double arrow lines.

Taeho Woo; Soonho Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota lignite-fired power plants have shown a limited ability to control mercury emissions in currently installed electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), dry scrubbers, and wet scrubbers (1). This low level of control can be attributed to the high proportions of Hg{sup 0} present in the flue gas. Speciation of Hg in flue gases analyzed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) information collection request (ICR) for Hg data showed that Hg{sup 0} ranged from 56% to 96% and oxidized mercury ranged from 4% to 44%. The Hg emitted from power plants firing North Dakota lignites ranged from 45% to 91% of the total Hg, with the emitted Hg being greater than 85% elemental. The higher levels of oxidized mercury were only found in a fluidized-bed combustion system. Typically, the form of Hg in the pulverized and cyclone-fired units was dominated by Hg{sup 0} at greater than 85%, and the average amount of Hg{sup 0} emitted from North Dakota power plants was 6.7 lb/TBtu (1, 2). The overall objective of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is to develop and evaluate advanced and innovative concepts for controlling Hg emissions from North Dakota lignite-fired power plants by 50%-90% at costs of one-half to three-fourths of current estimated costs. The specific objectives are focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in wet and dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in ESPs and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The scientific approach to solving the problems associated with controlling Hg emissions from lignite-fired power plants involves conducting testing of the following processes and technologies that have shown promise on a bench, pilot, or field scale: (1) activated carbon injection (ACI) upstream of an ESP combined with sorbent enhancement, (2) Hg oxidation and control using wet and dry scrubbers, (3) enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel (TDF) and oxidizing catalysts, and (4) testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter insert.

Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Mike J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang; Jill M. Zola

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Performance study of a pilot-scale low-temperature multi-effect desalination plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A 30 t/d low-temperature multi-effect evaporation seawater desalination (LT-MED) system was designed based on the mathematical model, and the corresponding pilot device was constructed in Tianjin, China. Whole-process tests were carried out, and the effects of key operating parameters, including motive steam pressure, maximum operating temperature, temperature difference, spray density, non-condensing gas extraction method, and steam ejector flow, on desalination performance were analyzed. Results showed that the device successfully met product water design requirements; total dissolved solids were less than 5 mg/L. Water production initially increased as motive steam pressure increased, then stabilized when pressure exceeded 21% of the design value. Water production reached its maximum when heat transfer temperature difference and spray density ranged from 3 °C to 4 °C and from 240 L/(m h) to 300 L/(m h), respectively. Unlike in parallel mode, water production increased by 3.64% when vacuum pumping was operated in series mode. Water production and gain output ratio increased, and system energy consumption reduced when a thermo-vapor compressor was introduced. The results provide a useful reference for the design of other large-scale seawater desalination systems.

Chun-hua Qi; Hou-jun Feng; Qing-chun Lv; Yu-lei Xing; Nan Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of the technology for preparing and storing hydrogen with the use of nanostructured materials for an autonomous integrated wind power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of investigations into the design of an operating prototype of the power plant for the production and accumulation of hydrogen. ... of hydrogen with subsequent generation of an e...

Ya. B. Danilevich; V. A. Zhabrev; V. D. Goncharov…

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Analysis of plant invasion into the Barstow 10 MWe pilot STPS  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the invading vegetation within the heliostat field of Solar One was conducted during 1983 and 1984. Vegetation analyses included floristic inventories and quantification of plant density, diversity, and aboveground biomass. An attempt was made to assess present and potential operational/safety problems associated with vegetation presence. The invading vegetation was floristically and structurally dissimilar from an adjacent open control site. The invading flora was composed of weedy annuals, whereas the open desert was characterized by native perennial forbs. Several trends emerged: (1) green biomass of ephemerals and newly germinated woody plants was highest in the control site in spring but in the heliostat field in the summer; (2) species diversity was highest in the heliostat field; (3) average plant size was greater in the heliostat field; and (4) plant development and phenology shifted in the heliostat field, resulting in delayed senescence of plants into the dry season relative to the control site. Heliostat stow position and washing influenced the spatial pattern of vegetation. The direct effects of shading and perhaps water addition influenced vegetation presence and structure to a greater degree than did clearing and surface disturbances. The presence of vegetation caused operational and/or safety problems on the site, as the heliostat field was manually cleared or treated with herbicides during each year of the study. The primary problem appears to be tumbleweed, Salsola iberica, which grew abundantly. This growth, which was greatest near the base of each heliostat, prevented access to control boxes and provided possible cover for poisonous snakes. 19 references, 7 figures, 8 tables.

Smith, S.D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Collection and conversion of silicon furnace waste gas into higher value products: Phase 3, 6 MW pilot plant dc closed furnace technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operation of a 6 MW, closed dc furnace for smelting silicon was the primary focus of Phase 3. A 6 MW, dc closed furnace pilot plant was built in East Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. The furnace is equipped with world`s most modern automatic control system used to control and monitor the process variables and operational data. This control system is suitable for commercial applications and could be used with either closed or open dc furnaces for smelting silicon or ferrosilicon. The construction was started in September 1990, and the facility was operational within 18 months. Following successful commissioning of the pilot plant in June 1992, twelve smelting test campaigns were conducted through November 1994.

Dosaj, V.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Radiological health review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2. DOE/EIS-0026  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from the proposed Federal radioactive Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, in order to protect the public health and safety and ensure that there is minimal environmental degradation. Analyses are conducted of reports issued by the US DOE and its contractors, other Federal agencies and other organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico – August 25, 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On August 25, 2004, an employee of Washington TRU Solution, LLC (WTS) sustained a head injury when he was struck by a C-clamp and rope attachment that broke loose from a piece of metal vent line that was being dragged. This occurred as part of the development and recovery of an existing drift for underground disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

346

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Can we talk? Communications management for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a complex nuclear waste management project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Nuclear Waste Management Program is pursuing for DOE an option for permanently disposing radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories. Included in the Program are the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project for US defense program mixed waste the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) for spent power reactor fuel and vitrified high-level waste, projects for other waste types, and development efforts in environmental decision support technologies. WIPP and YMP are in the public arena, of a controversial nature, and provide significant management challenges. Both projects have large project teams, multiple organization participants, large budgets, long durations, are very complex, have a high degree of programmatic risk, and operate in an extremely regulated environment requiring legal defensibility. For environmental projects like these to succeed, SNL`s Program is utilizing nearly all areas in PMI`s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to manage along multiple project dimensions such as the physical sciences (e.g., geophysics and geochemistry; performance assessment; decision analysis) management sciences (controlling the triple constraint of performance, cost and schedule), and social sciences (belief systems; public participation; institutional politics). This discussion focuses primarily on communication challenges active on WIPP. How is the WIPP team meeting the challenges of managing communications?`` and ``How are you approaching similar challenges?`` will be questions for a dialog with the audience.

Goldstein, S.A.; Pullen, G.M.; Brewer, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records Package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is planned as the first mined geologic repository for transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by defense programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Before disposing of waste at the WIPP, the DOE must evaluate compliance with the United states Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Standard, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191, US EPA, 1985). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating long-term performance against criteria in Subpart B of the Standard. Performance assessment'' as used in this report includes analyses for the Containment Requirements ({section} 191.13(a)) and the Individual Protection Requirements ({section} 191.15). Because proving predictions about future human actions or natural events is not possible, the EPA expects compliance to be determined on the basis of specified quantitative analyses and informed, qualitative judgment. The goal of the WIPP performance-assessment team at SNL is to provide as detailed and thorough a basis as practical for the quantitative aspects of that decision. This report summarizes SNL's late-1990 understanding of the WIPP Project's ability to evaluate compliance with Subpart B. 245 refs., 88 figs., 23 tabs.

Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P.; Anderson, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Swift, P.N. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Baker, B.L. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Bean, J.E. Jr.; McCurley, R.D.; Rudeen, D.K. (New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Beyeler, W.; Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V.; Sch

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs.

Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L. (eds.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Systems analysis, long-term radionuclide transport, and dose assessments, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico, September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This study supports the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and has two main objectives. First, it describes current ideas about the characteristics and potential impacts of the disturbed-rock zone (DRZ) known to develop with time around excavations at the WIPP horizon. Second, it presents new calculations of radionuclide migration within and from the WIPP repository for steady-state undisturbed conditions and for two cases that consider human intrusion into the repository. At the WIPP, the presence of a DRZ has been confirmed by geophysical studies, gas-flow tests, and direct observations. The DRZ will allow gas or brine from waste-emplacement panels to bypass panel seals and flow into adjacent portions of the underground workings unless preventive measures are taken. Revised calculations of the undisturbed performance of the repository indicate that no radionuclides will be released into the Culebra Dolomite within the regulatory period of 10,000 years. The human-intrusion calculations included here assume a connection between the WIPP repository, an occurrence of pressurized brine within the underlying Castile Formation, and the overlying Culebra Dolomite. 61 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs.

Lappin, A.R.; Hunter, R.L.; Davies, P.B.; Borns, D.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Reeves, M.; Pickens, J. (Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (USA)); Iuzzolino, H.J. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Laboratory measurements of gas flow along a pressurized grout/membrane/halite interface for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory gas-flow tests has been performed on interfaces comprised of concrete, very low-density polyethylene membrane, and halite. These tests were conducted to (1) evaluate whether a meaningful test can be run to quantify the effectiveness of a membrane, and (2) aid in the design of an Alcove Gas Barrier at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), where membranes of this type are being considered for use at the interface between the concrete or grout of the gas barrier structure and the surrounding halite. Over 400 longitudinal transient-flow and steady-state radial-flow tests have been completed. However, it is not clear from these tests that the test results can be meaningfully applied to the full-scale Alcove Gas Barrier configuration because the measured permeabilities are several orders of magnitude higher than the meter-scale in situ concrete seal tests conducted at the WIPP as part of the Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests. Results show that the membranes decrease gas permeability along the concrete/halite interface by one to two orders of magnitude to below 10{sup {minus}15} m{sup 2} for the simplified test configurations. 28 refs., 11 figs., 16 tabs.

Ucpirti, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Finley, R.E.; George, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effect of explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy on brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Stratigraphic units of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room horizon includes various layers of halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, clay, and anhydrite. Current models, including those used in the WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, employ a ``composite stratigraphy`` approach in modeling. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact that an explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy around the repository may have on fluid flow compared to the simplified ``composite stratigraphy`` models currently employed. Sensitivity of model results to intrinsic permeability anisotropy, interbed fracturing, two-phase characteristic curves, and gas-generation rates were studied. The results of this study indicate that explicit representation of the stratigraphy maintains higher pressures and does not allow as much fluid to leave the disposal room as compared to the ``composite stratigraphy`` approach. However, the differences are relatively small. Gas migration distances are also different between the two approaches. However, for the two cases in which explicit layering results were considerably different than the composite model (anisotropic and vapor-limited), the gas-migration distances for both models were negligible. For the cases in which gas migration distances were considerable, van Genuchten/Parker and interbed fracture, the differences between the two models were fairly insignificant. Overall, this study suggests that explicit representation of the stratigraphy in the WIPP PA models is not required for the parameter variations modeled if ``global quantities`` (e.g., disposal room pressures, net brine and gas flux into and out of disposal rooms) are the only concern.

Christian-Frear, T.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect

Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

Robinson, K.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant shaft sealing system compliance submittal design report. Volume 2 of 2: Appendix E  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a shaft sealing design for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. The system is designed to limit entry of water and release of contaminants through the four existing shafts after the WIPP is decommissioned. The design approach applies redundancy to functional elements and specifies multiple, common, low-permeability materials to reduce uncertainty in performance. The system comprises 13 elements that completely fill the shafts with engineered materials possessing high density and low permeability. Laboratory and field measurements of component properties and performance provide the basis for the design and related evaluations. Hydrologic, mechanical, thermal, and physical features of the system are evaluated in a series of calculations. These evaluations indicate that the design guidance is addressed by effectively limiting transport of fluids within the shafts, thereby limiting transport of hazardous material to regulatory boundaries. Additionally, the use or adaptation of existing technologies for placement of the seal components combined with the use of available, common materials assure that the design can be constructed.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Seismic Response of a Deep Underground Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground nuclear waste repository certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ,(EPA) to store transuranic defense-related waste contaminated by small amounts of radioactive materials. Located at a depth of about 655 meters below the surface, the facility is sited in southeastern New Mexico, about 40 Department of Energy underground facilities, waste disposal. kilometers east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The U.S. (DOE) managed the design and construction of the surface and and remains responsible for operation and closure following The managing and operating contractor for the DOE at the WIPP, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, maintains two rechmiant seismic monitoring systems located at the surface and in the underground. This report discusses two earthquakes detected by the seismic monitoring system, one a duratior magnitude 5.0 (Md) event located approximately 60 km east-southeast of the facility, and another a body-wave magnitude 5.6 (rob) event that occurred approximately 260 kilometers to the south-southeast.

Sanchez, P.E.

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Permeability of natural rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during damage evolution and healing  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive transuranic wastes. Four vertical shafts provide access to the underground workings located at a depth of about 660 meters. These shafts connect the underground facility to the surface and potentially provide communication between lithologic units, so they will be sealed to limit both the release of hazardous waste from and fluid flow into the repository. The seal design must consider the potential for fluid flow through a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that develops in the salt near the shafts. The DRZ, which forms initially during excavation and then evolves with time, is expected to have higher permeability than the native salt. The closure of the shaft openings (i.e., through salt creep) will compress the seals, thereby inducing a compressive back-stress on the DRZ. This back-stress is expected to arrest the evolution of the DRZ, and with time will promote healing of damage. This paper presents laboratory data from tertiary creep and hydrostatic compression tests designed to characterize damage evolution and healing in WIPP salt. Healing is quantified in terms of permanent reduction in permeability, and the data are used to estimate healing times based on considerations of first-order kinetics.

Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies.

Matthews, Mark L.; Eriksson, Leif G.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

Chemical, biomedical and ecological studies of SRC-I materials from the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant: a status report  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses studies performed with solvent refined coal (SRC) materials obtained from the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant during operation in the SRC-I mode. The development of analytical methodology is presented as well as results obtained from the application of these methods to light oil (LO), wash solvent (WS) and process solvent (PS). Results of cellular and animal studies with LO, WS and PS are included, along with a description of methods for the generation and characterization of LO and PS aerosols, and for exposing rats, mice and guinea pigs to these aerosols. The effects of SRC-I product on seed germination and plant growth which have also been studied are discussed. The SRC-I product, feed coal and the mineral residue have been analyzed for organic and inorganic constituents. The higher-boiling-point material, PS, exhibited significant mutagenic activity in the Ames assay; LO and WS were inactive. Process solvent also caused transformation of cultured Syrian hamster embryo cells. Additional chemical fractionation studies suggest that primary aromatic amines are major determinants of the observed mutagenic activity. Skin-painting studies with SRC-II naphtha, heavy distillate, shale oil and petroleum crude indicate a good correlation between the results of the cellular assays and skin carcinogenesis in mice. Wash solvent was more toxic after oral administration to rats than was light oil or process solvent. The effects of LO, WS and PS on development were studied after administration to pregnant rats. The tissue distribution of a number of components of PS was studied after oral administration of PS to rats. The effect of SRC-I product on the germination and growth of barley was investigated by mixing or layering the product with soil and placing the mixture in a field lysimeter.

Mahlum, D.D. (ed.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing Jim Francfort for Lee Slezak WestStart CALSTART Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Symposium - February 2006 INL/CON-06-01109 Presentation Outline * Background and Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design and operations * Fuel Dispensing * Prototype Dispenser Testing * Hydrogen and HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * WWW Information AVTA Background and Goal * AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

362

Status of planned change requests for the waste isolation pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

At the submittal of the initial abstract to the Waste Management Symposium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) had submitted and contemplated submitting a total of four planned change requests (PCRs) for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action before March of 2009. That date is the regulatory deadline for submitting the second Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA-2009) to the EPA. The Panel Closure PCR has subsequently been withdrawn in favor of postponing a final decision until after sufficient data has been obtained from the monitoring of hydrogen and methane in waste-filled rooms. A proposal to change a set of performance assessment (PA) parameters and a conceptual model has been removed from consideration due to schedule constraints. These parameters were the shear strength of the waste and the extent and evolution of the disturbed rock zone surrounding the rooms. A PCR was submitted to the EPA in April 2006 to reduce the mass of magnesium oxide (MgO) that must be emplaced in the repository. The EPA is currently reviewing the information submitted by DOE. A PCR was submitted to the EPA in November 2007 to allow emplacement of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste in shielded containers on the floor of the repository. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Gross, M. [MG Enterprises, San Rafael, CA (United States); Thompson, B. [Golder Associates, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States); Kouba, St. [Washington Group International, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Receiver subsystem analysis report (RADL Item 4-1). 10-MWe Solar Thermal Central-Receiver Pilot Plant: solar-facilities design integration  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented of those thermal hydraulic, structural, and stress analyses required to demonstrate that the Receiver design for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant will satisfy the general design and performance requirements during the plant's design life. Recommendations resulting from those analyses and supporting test programs are presented regarding operation of the receiver. The analyses are limited to receiver subsystem major structural parts (primary tower, receiver unit core support structure), pressure parts (absorber panels, feedwater, condensate and steam piping/components, flash tank, and steam mainfold) and shielding. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

SciTech Connect

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant proposed pilot pump-and-treat project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On March 23, 1992, R.C. Sleeman of the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office requested that a Groundwater Corrective Actions Team be assembled to evaluate the technical merit of and the need to implement a proposed groundwater pump-and-treat demonstration project for the Northwest contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In addition to other suggestions, the Team recommended that further characterization data be obtained for the plume. In the Fall of 1993 additional, temporary well points were installed so that groundwater samples from the shallow groundwater system and the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) could be obtained to provide a three-dimensional view of groundwater contamination in the region of the plume. The results indicate that pure-phase DNAPL (trichloroethylene [TCE]) probably are present in the source area of the plume and extend in depth to the base of the RGA. Because the DNAPL likely will represent a source of a dissolved phase plume for decades it is essential that source containment take place. The Team recommends that although effective hydraulic containment can be achieved, other alternatives should be considered. For example, recent advances in emplacing low permeability barrier walls to depths of 100 to 150 ft make it possible to consider encirclement of the source of the Northwest plume.

Bodenstein, G.W.; Bonczek, R.R.; Early, T.O.; Huff, D.D.; Jones, K.S.; Nickelson, M.D.; Rightmire, C.T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

SciTech Connect

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Unresolved issues for the disposal of remote-handled transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to dispose of 176,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. The envisioned inventory contains approximately 6 million cubic feet of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste and 250,000 cubic feet of remote handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste. CH TRU emits less than 0.2 rem/hr at the container surface. Of the 250,000 cubic feet of RH TRU waste, 5% by volume can emit up to 1,000 rem/hr at the container surface. The remainder of RH TRU waste must emit less than 100 rem/hr. These are major unresolved problems with the intended disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP. (1) The WIPP design requires the canisters of RH TRU waste to be emplaced in the walls (ribs) of each repository room. Each room will then be filled with drums of CH TRU waste. However, the RH TRU waste will not be available for shipment and disposal until after several rooms have already been filled with drums of CH TRU waste. RH TRU disposal capacity will be loss for each room that is first filled with CH TRU waste. (2) Complete RH TRU waste characterization data will not be available for performance assessment because the facilities needed for waste handling, waste treatment, waste packaging, and waste characterization do not yet exist. (3) The DOE does not have a transportation cask for RH TRU waste certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues are discussed along with possible solutions and consequences from these solutions. 46 refs.

Silva, M.K.; Neill, R.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- Volume I, August 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) and emergency management programs at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This volume discusses the results of the review of the WIPP ES&H programs. The results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program are discussed in Volume II of this report, and the combined results are discussed in a summary report. As discussed throughout this report, the ISM program at WIPP is generally effective. Although improvements are warranted in some areas, the current programs have contributed to overall effective ES&H performance and a good safety record at WIPP. Section 2 of this volume provides an overall discussion of the results of the review of the WIPP ES&H programs, including positive aspects and weaknesses. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of CBFO and WTS management of the ES&H programs. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team composition. Appendix B identifies the specific finding that requires corrective action and follow-up. Appendix C presents the results of the review of selected guiding principles of ISM. Appendix D presents the results of the review of the CBFO and WTS feedback and continuous improvement processes. The results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for the selected WIPP activities are discussed in Appendix E.

371

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is currently constructing the Waste Isolation Pilot near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The full-scale pilot plant will demonstrate the feasibility of the safe disposal of defense-related nuclear waste in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2160 feet below the surface. WIPP will provide for the permanent storage of 25,000 cu ft of remote-handled (RH) transuranic waste and 6,000,000 cu ft of contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste. This paper covers the major mechanical/structural design considerations for the waste hoist and its hoist tower structure. The design of the hoist system and safety features incorporates state-of-the-art technology developed in the hoist and mining industry to ensure safe operation for transporting nuclear waste underground. Also included are design specifications for VOC-10 monitoring system.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

WASTE HYDROGEN PIPELINES MONITORING IN MODERN POWER PLANT Pawel Gsior, Jerzy Kaleta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for combustion generators (leading technology), and the second one use purified hydrogen for fuel cells of four supply gas pipelines (one with pure hydrogen to the fuel cell and three others with waste hydrogen and constructed. Two energetic technologies were applied. First use hydrogen and hydrocarbons as a fuel

Boyer, Edmond

374

10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant heliostat and beam characterization system evaluation, November 1981-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

Test and evaluation results for the heliostats and beam characterization system at the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant are described in this report. Southern California Edison operated and maintained the plant during the five years covered by this evaluation. Therefore, the results represent what can be expected from a large number of heliostats that are operated over a long period of time in a power plant environment. The heliostats and beam characterization system were evaluated for their ability to meet performance and survival requirements. Heliostat evaluation results are reported for mirror soiling rates, mirror corrosion, wind loads, availability, maintenance requirements, tracking accuracy, beam quality, component temperatures, and operating power requirements. The heliostat beam characterization system accuracy is given for the measurement of beam quality, heliostat tracking accuracy, and power in the reflected beam. The heliostat technical specifications and design description are provided, and a detailed design description of the beam characterization system is included. 41 refs.

Mavis, C.L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Performance Confirmation Strategies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - A Historical Perspective from an Operating Disposal Facility - 12248  

SciTech Connect

Performance confirmation is an important element of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. Performance confirmation was first used during the early WIPP site characterization phase to focus experimental activities that address the development of probabilistic repository performance models and to address stakeholder assurance needs. The program is currently used to analyze the conditions of the repository and its surroundings to ensure that the basis for the repository's long-term radioactive waste containment predictions is valid. This basis is related to the parameters, assumptions, conceptual and numerical models that are used to predict or validate the potential radioactive waste containment performance of the system. The concept of performance confirmation for the WIPP is one that has evolved since the first repository work was initiated decades ago and plays an important role in assuring adequate repository performance both now and in the long-term. The WIPP mission has progressed from a pilot project to an operational disposal facility and will progress to eventual site closure when disposal operations are completed. Performance confirmation is an important part of each of these progressions. The concept of disposing radioactive waste in a geologic repository today involves a complete understanding of many technical, political, regulatory, societal and economic elements. Many of these elements overlap and solving all relevant issues necessary to site, operate and decommission a disposal facility should be done with knowledge of each element's requirements and impacts. Performance confirmation is one tool that can help to coordinate many of these elements into a program that actively investigates what is thought to be adequately understood about the system and what information is lacking. A performance confirmation program is used to determine ways to challenge and verify those areas that are thought to be understood and to find ways to understand those areas that are not well understood. Performance confirmation programs have been used twice at WIPP, first during site characterization and PA development and later in a Compliance Monitoring program. At first, only certain technical aspects of the system were deemed important because it was a scientifically-based, government project. Early site characterization work was design to gather information about the geology and hydrology of the area and the mechanical properties of the natural barrier. The information would be used in a PA to determine the long-term containment performance of the disposal system. A performance confirmation element was used to identify the sensitive elements of the system that were certain, well understood or justified and those that were not. It identified experimental and analytical programs that could be used to reduce uncertainty, confirm sensitive assumptions and provide useful data. This performance confirmation program provided data to justify the adequacy of the information used in PA to demonstrate compliance with EPA's containment requirements. Performance confirmation will continue to be used in the post-closure period for at least 30 years and likely up to the end of the 100-year institutional controls period. As the technical basis for the repository matures throughout the operational period, the currently planned post-closure monitoring program will need to be reassessed prior to implementation. However, the intent of the program will be the same as it was for the previous programs, to ensure the ultimate goal of the repository. This goal is to safely isolate waste from the accessible environment and ensure public and environmental safety. (authors)

Wagner, Steve [John Hart and Associate for Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Two Approaches to the Geologic Disposal of Long-Lived Nuclear Waste: Yucca Mountain, Nevada and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A key component of the US energy program is to provide for the safe and permanent isolation of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived radioactive waste produced through programs related to national defense and the generation of electric power by nuclear utilities. To meet this challenge, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a multi-faceted approach to the geologic disposal of long-lived nuclear wastes. Two sites are being developed or studied as current or potential deep geologic repositories for long lived radioactive wastes, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico and Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Levich, R. A.; Patterson, R. L.; Linden, R. M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REVIEW AND PLAN NARRATIVE 14 GOAL 1: Greenhouse Gas Reduction 14 1.1 28% Scope 1 & 2 GHG reduction by FY 2020 from a FY 2008 baseline 14 1.2 13% Scope 3 GHG Reduction 19 GOAL...

378

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with additional sampling. Sampling is being done on air, soil, surface water and sediment, and vegetation. Air Sampling Sampling for airborne radioactive particles helps...

379

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

duct dampers are large "butterfly" valves that are designed to close and cut off the air flow through the exhausters. However, the valves do not fully seal the exhaust ducts...

380

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Technical Assistance Team of experts from across its national laboratories to review photos and video, as well as samples of debris, taken by entry teams in order to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

revised to analyze and address all nuclear safety issues. A formal operational readiness review is included in the Recovery Plan that will be conducted prior to returning to full...

382

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

383

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information for the General Public Source: EPA Website Plutonium Source: EPA Website Americium Source: EPA Website General WIPP Facts Why WIPP? The Remote-Handled Transuranic...

384

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contamination deep in the lungs. This is an excellent method for detecting Americium 241. Eighty-six whole body counts were completed as part of the monitoring of WIPP...

385

Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect

Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

Piyush Sabharwal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development of autonomous solar hydrogen power plant of capacity to 5 kW  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results of developing a pilot project concerning the water thermal decomposition cycle at 700°C in a reactor located at the concentrator focus are presented. Steam is generated and the mixture of wate...

A. A. Abdurakhmanov; A. Sh. Khodzhaev; M. A. Mamatkosimov…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization (40 CFR {section} 761.75[c])  

SciTech Connect

This initial report is being submitted pursuant to Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section} 761.75(c) to request authorization to allow the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) which are duly regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Approval of this initial report will not affect the disposal of TRU or TRU mixed wastes that do not contain PCBs. This initial report also demonstrates how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets or exceeds the technical standards for a Chemical Waste Landfill. Approval of this request will allow the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose of approximately 88,000 cubic feet (ft3) (2,500 cubic meters [m3]) of TRU wastes containing PCBs subject to regulation under the TSCA. This approval will include only those PCB/TRU wastes, which the TSCA regulations allow for disposal of the PCB component in municipal solid waste facilities or chemical waste landfills (e.g., PCB remediation waste, PC B articles, and bulk PCB product waste). Disposal of TRU waste by the DOE is congressionally mandated in Public Law 102-579 (as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997, Pub. L. 104-201, referred to as the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act [LWA]). Portions of the TRU waste inventory contain hazardous waste constituents regulated under 40 CFR Parts 260 through 279, and/or PCBs and PCB Items regulated under 40 CFR Part 761. Therefore, the DOE TRU waste program must address the disposal requirements for these hazardous waste constituents and PCBs. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing hazardous waste constituents, the owner/operators received a Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) on October 27, 1999. The permit allows the disposal of TRU wastes subject to hazardous waste disposal requirements (TRU mixed waste). Informational copies of this permit and other referenced documents are available from the WIPP website. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing PCBs, the owner/operators are hereby submitting this initial report containing information required pursuant to the Chemical Waste Landfill Approval requirements in 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c). Although WIPP is defined as a miscellaneous unit and not a landfill by the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, WIPP meets or exceeds all applicable technical standards for chemical waste landfills by virtue of its design and programs as indicated in the Engineering Report (Attachment B). The layout of this initial report is consistent with requirements (i.e., Sections 2.0 through 12.0 following the sequence of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[c][i] -[ix] with sections added to discuss the Contingency and Training Plans; and Attachment B of this initial report addresses the requirements of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][1] through [9] in this order). This initial report includes a description of three proposed changes that will be subject to ''conditional approval.'' The first will allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) PCB/TRU waste at WIPP. The second will allow the establishment of a central confirmation facility at WIPP. The third will allow for an increase in contact-handled Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization DOE/WIPP 02-3196 (CH) waste storage capacities. These proposed changes are discussed further in Section 3.3 of this initial report. ''Conditional approval'' of these requests would allow these activities at WIPP contingent upon: - Approval of the HWFP modification (NMED) and Compliance Certification Application (CCA) change request (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA]) - Inspection of facility prior to implementing the change (if deemed necessary by the EPA) - Written approval from the EPA This initial report also includes the following three requests for waivers to the technical requirements for Chemical Waste Landfills pursuant to 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c)(4): - Hydrologic Conditions (40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][3]) - Monitoring Systems (40 CFR {sect

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production from Existing Nuclear Power Plants Using Alkaline Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

The mid-range industrial market currently consumes 4.2 million metric tons of hydrogen per year and has an annual growth rate of 15% industries in this range require between 100 and 1000 kilograms of hydrogen per day and comprise a wide range of operations such as food hydrogenation, electronic chip fabrication, metals processing and nuclear reactor chemistry modulation.

Dana R. Swalla

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 5, 2014 March 2014 Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Haul Truck Fire at the...

391

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable energy to be transported via hydrogen to a demand center for transportation use.

393

Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) (6/23/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action Transuranic (TRU) waste is waste that contains alpha particle-emitting radionuclides with atomic numbers greater than uranium (92) and half-lives greater than 20 years, in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste. Some TRU wastes are mixed with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (referred to as PCB-commingled TRU waste). PCBs exist in DOE's TRU waste as mixtures of synthetic organic chemicals with physical properties ranging from oily liquids to waxy solids. Exposure to PCBs can result in adverse health effects. For example, PCBs in blood or in fatty tissue as a result of inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption may cause reproductive effects,

394

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for two-phase flow in the vicinity of the repository in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Undisturbed conditions  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results obtained in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant are presented for two-phase flow the vicinity of the repository under undisturbed conditions. Techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, examination of scatterplots, stepwise regression analysis, partial correlation analysis and rank transformation are used to investigate brine inflow, gas generation repository pressure, brine saturation and brine and gas outflow. Of the variables under study, repository pressure is potentially the most important due to its influence on spallings and direct brine releases, with the uncertainty in its value being dominated by the extent to which the microbial degradation of cellulose takes place, the rate at which the corrosion of steel takes place, and the amount of brine that drains from the surrounding disturbed rock zone into the repository.

HELTON,JON CRAIG; BEAN,J.E.; ECONOMY,K.; GARNER,J.W.; MACKINNON,ROBERT J.; MILLER,JOEL D.; SCHREIBER,JAMES D.; VAUGHN,PALMER

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of the process used to assess the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed repository for transuranic wastes that is located in southeastern New Mexico. The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive flasks (40 CFR 191). Much has been written about the individual building blocks that comprise the foundation of PA theory and practice, and that WIPP literature is well cited herein. However, the present approach is to provide an accurate, well documented overview of the process, from the perspective of the mechanical steps used to perform the actual PA calculations. Specifically, the preliminary stochastic simulations that comprise the WIPP PAs of 1990, 1991. and 1992 are summarized.

Rechard, R.P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated (NG), contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated; however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Constructing probability distributions of uncertain variables in models of the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: The 1990 performance simulations  

SciTech Connect

A five-step procedure was used in the 1990 performance simulations to construct probability distributions of the uncertain variables appearing in the mathematical models used to simulate the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP's) performance. This procedure provides a consistent approach to the construction of probability distributions in cases where empirical data concerning a variable are sparse or absent and minimizes the amount of spurious information that is often introduced into a distribution by assumptions of nonspecialist. The procedure gives first priority to the professional judgment of subject-matter experts and emphasizes the use of site-specific empirical data for the construction of the probability distributions when such data are available. In the absence of sufficient empirical data, the procedure employs the Maximum Entropy Formalism and the subject-matter experts' subjective estimates of the parameters of the distribution to construct a distribution that can be used in a performance simulation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Tierney, M.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Borehole closure and test zone volume determination program for brine-permeability test results within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground facility  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, hydrologic characterization in closed sections of boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has relied on measurements of pressure and temperature to establish the permeability of the host geological formations. There were no provisions for monitoring tool compliance and salt creep resulting from borehole closure. The new permeability test tool used to characterize the WIPP underground facility has been equipped with a series of sensors to measure the movement of the tool with respect to the borehole and borehole wall movement. A FORTRAN program can interpret the output data from each test and calculate the change in borehole radius, test zone length, and test zone volume. These values provide a correlation of fluid compressibility and tool compliance with the permeability results derived from the test data. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Jensen, A.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Regulatory issues for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant long-term compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR 191B and 268  

SciTech Connect

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), specifically the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), and the Land Disposal Restrictions (40 CFR 268) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper provides background information on the regulations, describes the SNL WIPP PA Departments approach to developing a defensible technical basis for consistent compliance evaluations, and summarizes the major observations and conclusions drawn from the 1991 and 1992 PAs.

Anderson, D.R.; Marietta, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Higgins, P.J. Jr. [USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Integration Office

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen pilot plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid defense wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated CH waste to be shipped to the WIPP are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot-plant-heliostat experiences, November 1981-February 1983. Monograph series, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The heliostat design, installation, and operating experiences and the test and evaluation program are reported for the Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant at Barstow, California. Operating and maintenance experiences and preliminary test results are reported from November 1981 through February 1983. Installation of the 1818 heliostats was made over a 10-month period with no major problems. Initial checkout of the heliostats was completed in nine days which included making minor software changes. Performance of the control system, including safe control of reflected light, and the heliostat structure and drives has been verified during the first year of operation. Heliostat-maintenance requirements have been less than anticipated and can be accomplished with 160 manhours per month. Problems with evaluation instrumentation and mirror corrosion have occurred and they have been solved or are being evaluated.

Mavis, C.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Solvent refined coal process: operation of the solvent refined coal pilot plant, Wilsonville, Alabama. First quarter report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the operating conditions and test results obtained during the first quarter of 1981 at the six ton per day solvent refined coal (SRC-I) pilot plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. The plant operated for approximately two-thirds of the period with a scheduled shutdown, from 22 February to 17 March, accounting for most of the downtime. Kentucky 9 coal from the Fies mine was processed throughout the period. The following potential process improvements and tests were evaluated in the respective process units. SRC Unit: Low severity run tests to evaluate SRC reactor conditions for two-stage liquefaction; process solvent quality studies while simulating demonstration plant conditions with low quality process solvent (anthracene oil); operation of the new, reduced volume and residence time, V103 High Pressure Separator; Evaluation of the hot separator mode of operation; and adjustment of the T102 Vacuum Column operation to determine if it can produce a combined trays 3 and 8 stream that would be an acceptable process solvent (95% boiling at over 450/sup 0/F). CSD Unit: Steam stripping of SRC and LSRC to reduce product-related DAS losses; and ambient and cryogenic SRC sampling comparisons for DAS determination tests. Pressure checking of the hydrotreater unit was completed, and the Dowtherm system was placed in service. Solvent circulation was initiated in the unit as efforts continued to verify equipment performance.

Lewis, H.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Formation of graphene quantum dots by “Plantinghydrogen atoms at a graphene nanoribbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different technological approaches for creating graphene quantum dots by the adsorption of hydrogen ... occur both at convex portions of a distorted graphene nanoribbon and in the structure formed by two distorte...

L. A. Chernozatonskii; A. A. Artyukh; D. G. Kvashnin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A pilot reactor study to determine operational factors of the commercial hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst to produce ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A pilot plant test was carried out using a catalyst from the refinery hydrotreater unit to process blend feed of 70 vol% Light Gas Oil – LGO & 30 vol% hydrotreated Gas Oil – HDT GO to produce 8 ppm ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD) product. The impact of changes in process conditions have been studied for catalyst deactivation rate and hydrogen consumption. Test results shown that refinery unit can process such blend feed to reach 8 ppm sulphur product by an increase of the reactor bed temperature. However due to higher aromatic content in the blend feed as compare to reference feed LGO, moderate increase in hydrogen consumption was also observed. Catalyst performance was evaluated at 55/42/32 bar hydrogen partial pressure (PPH2) to determine catalyst deactivation rate and hydrogen consumption, targeting ULSD product. A decrease of PPH2 from 52 bar (which is current operating condition) to 32 bar resulted in reduction of H2 consumption but also shows decrease of catalyst cycle length due to higher deactivation rate. Pilot plant test shows that by contriving computational methods and analysis techniques for hydrogen balance & catalyst deactivation rate from the pilot plant test data, it becomes possible to predict catalyst performance in commercial unit.

Nilesh Chandak; Adel Al Hamadi; Mohamed Yousef; Abdulhamid Mohamed; Kazuhiro Inamura; Mikael Berthod

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Interim report Assessment of Baseline and Advanced Hydrogen Production Plants Case 1-1 Baseline Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) Hydrogen Plant With CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 CAPTURE READY COAL POWER PLANTS DOE/NETL-2007/1301 Final Report April 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

409

Analysis of the fluid-pressure responses of the Rustler Formation at H-16 to the construction of the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site  

SciTech Connect

The construction of the air-intake shaft (AIS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in 1987 and 1988 initiated fluid-pressure responses which were used to estimate the hydrologic properties of the Culebra Dolomite, Magenta Dolomite, and Forty-niner Members of the Rustler Formation. Fluid-pressure responses were monitored with downhole transducers. The AIS pilot hole,remained open and draining to the underground facility for about three months. The pilot hole was then upreamed from the underground facility to land surface. The pilot hole was drilled and reamed using a bentonite-mud-based brine as a drilling fluid. The well-test simulator GTFM was used to analyze the fluid-pressure responses of the Culebra and Magenta dolomites and the Forty-niner claystone. A cement-invasion skin was used in simulating the Culebra dolomite's drilling/reaming period. A mud-filter-cake skin was used to create reduced wellbore pressures in simulating the pilot-hole drilling/reaming periods of the Magenta dolomite and Forty-niner claystone. 26 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs.

Alvis, J.D.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of the Conceptual Models for Chemical Conditions and Hydrology Used in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations specify that the DOE must demonstrate on a sound basis that the WIPP disposal system will effectively contain long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides within its boundaries for 10,000 years following closure. In 1996, the DOE submitted the ''40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' (CCA) to the EPA. The CCA proposed that the WIPP site complies with EPA's regulatory requirements. Contained within the CCA are descriptions of the scientific research conducted to characterize the properties of the WIPP site and the probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted to predict the containment properties of the WIPP disposal system. In May 1998, the EPA certified that the TRU waste disposal at the WIPP complies with its regulations. Waste disposal operations at WIPP commenced on March 28, 1999. The 1996 WIPP PA model of the disposal system included conceptual and mathematical representations of key hydrologic and geochemical processes. These key processes were identified over a 22-year period involving data collection, data interpretation, computer models, and sensitivity studies to evaluate the importance of uncertainty and of processes that were difficult to evaluate by other means. Key developments in the area of geochemistry were the evaluation of gas generation mechanisms in the repository; development of a model of chemical conditions in the repository and actinide concentrations in brine; selecting MgO backfill and demonstrating its effects experimentally; and determining the chemical retardation capability of the Culebra. Key developments in the area of hydrology were evacuating the potential for groundwater to dissolve the Salado Formation (the repository host formation), development of a regional model for hydrologic conditions, development of a stochastic, probabilistic representation of hydraulic properties in the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation; characterization of physical transport in the Culebra, and the evaluation of brine and gas flow in the Salado. Additional confidence in the conceptual models used in the 1996 WIPP PA was gained through independent peer review in many stages of their development.

LARSON, KURT W.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Lessons Learned from Characterization, Performance Assessment, and EPA Regulatory Review of the 1996 Actinide Source Term for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of transuranic waste from defense activities. In 1996, the DOE submitted the Title 40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The CCA included a probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted by Sandia National Laboratories to establish compliance with the quantitative release limits defined in 40 CFR 191.13. An experimental program to collect data relevant to the actinide source term began around 1989, which eventually supported the 1996 CCA PA actinide source term model. The actinide source term provided an estimate of mobile dissolved and colloidal Pu, Am, U, Th, and Np concentrations in their stable oxidation states, and accounted for effects of uncertainty in the chemistry of brines in waste disposal areas. The experimental program and the actinide source term included in the CCA PA underwent EPA review lasting more than 1 year. Experiments were initially conducted to develop data relevant to the wide range of potential future conditions in waste disposal areas. Interim, preliminary performance assessments and actinide source term models provided insight allowing refinement of experiments and models. Expert peer review provided additional feedback and confidence in the evolving experimental program. By 1995, the chemical database and PA predictions of WIPP performance were considered reliable enough to support the decision to add an MgO backfill to waste rooms to control chemical conditions and reduce uncertainty in actinide concentrations, especially for Pu and Am. Important lessons learned through the characterization, PA modeling, and regulatory review of the actinide source term are (1) experimental characterization and PA should evolve together, with neither activity completely dominating the other, (2) the understanding of physical processes required to develop conceptual models is greater than can be represented in PA models, (3) experimentalists should be directly involved in model and parameter abstraction and simplification for PA, and (4) external expert review should be incorporated early in a project to increase confidence long before regulatory reviews begin.

Larson, K.W.; Moore, R.C.; Nowak, E.J.; Papenguth, H.W.; Jow, H.

1999-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Abstract--A novel methodology for economic evaluation of hydrogen storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: hydrogen efficiency of electrolyzer (kg/MWh) d : hydrogen efficiency of fuel cell (kg/MWh) O : oxygen hydrogen production (kg) dischargeV : fuel cells hydrogen consumption (kg) hsellV : hydrogen exchange capacity (MW) STG Vmax : maximum storage level (kg) STGDISCH Pmax : maximum fuel cell power (MW) STGDISCH

Cañizares, Claudio A.

413

Renewable Energy Pilot Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Other Policy Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission In June 2010, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (LPSC) unanimously approved a Renewable Energy Pilot Program for the state. The final implementation plan was adopted in November 2010. The goal of the pilot program is to determine whether a renewable portfolio standard is suitable for Louisiana. The pilot program has two major components: the Research

414

DOE/EIS-0026-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for The Disposal of Certain Rocky Flats Plutonium-Bearing Materials at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (11/08/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis For Disposal of Certain Rocky Flats Supplement Analysis For Disposal of Certain Rocky Flats Plutonium-Bearing Materials at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to revise its approach for managing approximately 0.97 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing materials (containing about 0.18 MT of surplus plutonium) located at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). DOE is proposing to repackage and transport these materials for direct disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Several DOE environmental impact statements (EISs) discuss the potential impacts from different proposed alternatives for the storage and disposition of surplus plutonium and waste containing surplus plutonium. These EISs evaluated and presented the potential impacts for

415

Investigation of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plants for power, heat, syngas, and hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology for determination of technical and economic efficiency of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CCCP) with low-pressure ... steam-gas generator and continuous flow gasifier at combined pro...

V. E. Nakoryakov; G. V. Nozdrenko; A. G. Kuzmin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

417

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 5: Appendices D and D, DEF, FAC  

SciTech Connect

This plan serves to describe the objectives of decommissioning for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), identifies the elements necessary to accomplish the decommissioning, and defines the steps to execute those elements in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The plan provides a strategy for progressing from the final actions of the Disposal Phase, through the Decontamination and Decommissioning Phase, and into the initiation of the Long-Term Monitoring Phase. This plan describes a sequence of events for decontamination of the WIPP facilities and structures used to manage and contain TRU and TRU mixed waste during the receipt and emplacement operations. Alternative methods of decontamination are provided where practical. The methods for packaging and disposal of the waste generated (derived waste) during this process are discussed. The best available technology at the time of this plan`s development, may become outmoded by future technology and alternative strategies. If alternative technologies are identified the affected stakeholder(s), the Secretary of the Interior and the State will be consulted prior to implementation.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers  

SciTech Connect

The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Wicks, G.G. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 8: Appendices HYDRO, IRD, LTM, NUTS, PAR, PMR, QAPD, RBP  

SciTech Connect

Geohydrologic data have been collected in the Los Medanos area at the US Department of Energy`s proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico since 1975 as part of a study evaluating the feasibility of storing defense-associated nuclear wastes within the bedded salt of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Drilling and hydrologic testing have identified three principal water-bearing zones above the Salado Formation and one below that could potentially transport wastes to the biosphere if the proposed facility were breached. The zones above the Salado are the contact between the Rustler and Salado Formations and the Culebra and Magenta Dolomite Members of the Rustler Formation of Permian age. The zone below the Salado Formation consists of channel sandstones in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Determinations of hydraulic gradients, directions of flow, and hydraulic properties were hindered because of the negligible permeability of the water-bearing zones. Special techniques in drilling, well completion, and hydraulic testing have been developed to determine the hydrologic characteristics of these water-producing zones.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z