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Sample records for hydrogen infrastructure transition

  1. Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

  2. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure."A global survey of hydrogen energy research, development andof Engineering (2004). the Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  3. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure."A global survey of hydrogen energy research, development andof Engineering (2004). the Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  4. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Presentation on Hydrogen...

  5. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

  6. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

  7. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    17. Parker, N. , Using Natural Gas Transmission PipelineANALYZING NATURAL GAS BASED HYDROGEN INFRASTRUCTURE –distribution infrastructure (natural gas and electricity)

  8. The transition to hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and infrastructure requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Ramback, G.D.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-03-20

    Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range with emissions below one-tenth the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being considered in California as Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicles. These vehicles can also be manufactured with increased but not excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining optimized engines and other advanced components, the overall vehicle efficiency should approach 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to the 3.1 cents/km U.S. vehicle operators pay today while using conventional automobiles. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

  9. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    L. , Tarquin, A. Engineering Economy, 5th Edition, McGrawof Engineering (2004). the Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  10. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    L. , Tarquin, A. Engineering Economy, 5th Edition, McGrawof Engineering (2004). the Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  11. Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

    2008-03-01

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure and hydrogen res

  12. Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements, March 2008

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and

  13. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project 2009 DOE...

  14. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Solicitation Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project...

  15. Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    2008-08-01

    This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

  16. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ���¢��������real-world���¢������� retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation���¢��������s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products���¢�������� Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user���¢��������s fueling experience.

  17. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionto centralized hydrogen production. One key question thatCalifornia, Davis Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam

  18. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities Workshop Agenda Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

  19. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure...

  20. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" held on November 18, 2014. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and...

  1. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report...

  2. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003...

  3. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  4. Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

  5. CU-ICAR Hydrogen Infrastructure Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Leitner; David Bodde; Dennis Wiese; John Skardon; Bethany Carter

    2011-09-28

    The goal of this project was to establish an innovation center to accelerate the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' an infrastructure of vehicles, fuel resources, and maintenance capabilities based on hydrogen as the primary energy carrier. The specific objectives of the proposed project were to: (a) define the essential attributes of the innovation center; (b) validate the concept with potential partners; (c) create an implementation plan; and (d) establish a pilot center and demonstrate its benefits via a series of small scale projects.

  6. Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Challenges NOW, DOE, and NEDO December 12, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "International Hydrogen Infrastructure...

  7. Sandia Energy - Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergyGeoscienceInfrastructure Home

  8. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles...

  9. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles...

  10. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    to International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (November 2005).05—28 Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: StorageImplementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage

  11. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for...

  12. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Presentation by Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas,...

  13. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the...

  14. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE" held on December 16,...

  15. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar," originally presented on March 10, 2015.

  16. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Presentation by NREL's...

  17. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues This presentation by Bill Elrick...

  18. FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

  19. Webinar March 10: 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar March 10: 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Webinar March 10: 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar March 4, 2015 -...

  20. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challenges to delivering hydrogen for use as a widespread energy carrier, and the research goals for hydrogen delivery.

  1. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, March 10, at 8 a.m. EDT, the Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a webinar to summarize the 2nd international information exchange on the hydrogen refueling infrastructure challenges and potential solutions to support the successful global commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles.

  2. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challen

  3. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects Fact Sheet. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel...

  4. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 addresses the following technical barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells Photoelectrodes ." #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 2

  5. Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOE HydrogenProduction Hydrogen

  6. Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.

    2007-05-17

    This presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis.

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Technology, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Hydrogen Fueling...

  8. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Spirk, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-09-01

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2010.

  9. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  10. Hydrogen Strategies: an Integrated Resource Planning Analysis for the Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigneri, Attilio

    2005-01-01

    concepts and knowledge in hydrogen energy systems and theirInternational Hydrogen Energy Congress and Exhibition IHECthe Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures Attilio

  11. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Scott Staley

    2010-03-31

    This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

  12. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stottler, Gary

    2012-02-08

    General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

  13. H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An in-depth comparative analysis of promising infrastructure options for hydrogen delivery and distribution to refueling stations from central, semi-central, and distributed...

  14. DOE Announces Webinars on Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 18: Live Webinar on Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Webinar Sponsor: Fuel Cell Technologies Office The Energy Department will present a...

  15. Potential Role of Exergy in Analysis of Hydrogen Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the potential role of exergy (second-law) analysis, as a complementary tool for economic assessments of hydrogen infrastructures.

  16. Deadline Extended for RFI Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from interested stakeholders regarding strategies for a robust market introduction of hydrogen supply, infrastructure, and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). This input will...

  17. MODELING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM WITH CO2 SEQUESTRATION Joan M. Ogden demand centers and CO2 sequestration sites. MODEL OF A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM WITH CO2 Production of hydrogen (H2) from fossil fuels with capture and sequestration of CO2 offers a route toward

  18. Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies to Enable Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies to Enable Fuel Cell Vehicles Prof. Joan Ogden University Most important insight from STEPS research: A portfolio approach combining efficiency, alt fuels;Cluster Strategy => GOOD FUELING CONVENIENCE W/ SPARSE EARLY NETWORK (

  19. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolley, George S

    2010-06-29

    An agent-based model of the transition to a hydrogen transportation economy explores influences on adoption of hydrogen vehicles and fueling infrastructure. Attention is given to whether significant penetration occurs and, if so, to the length of time required for it to occur. Estimates are provided of sensitivity to numerical values of model parameters and to effects of alternative market and policy scenarios. The model is applied to the Los Angeles metropolitan area In the benchmark simulation, the prices of hydrogen and non-hydrogen vehicles are comparable. Due to fuel efficiency, hydrogen vehicles have a fuel savings advantage of 9.8 cents per mile over non-hydrogen vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles account for 60% of new vehicle sales in 20 years from the initial entry of hydrogen vehicles into show rooms, going on to 86% in 40 years and reaching still higher values after that. If the fuel savings is 20.7 cents per mile for a hydrogen vehicle, penetration reaches 86% of new car sales by the 20th year. If the fuel savings is 0.5 cents per mile, market penetration reaches only 10% by the 20th year. To turn to vehicle price difference, if a hydrogen vehicle costs $2,000 less than a non-hydrogen vehicle, new car sales penetration reaches 92% by the 20th year. If a hydrogen vehicle costs $6,500 more than a non-hydrogen vehicle, market penetration is only 6% by the 20th year. Results from other sensitivity runs are presented. Policies that could affect hydrogen vehicle adoption are investigated. A tax credit for the purchase of a hydrogen vehicle of $2,500 tax credit results in 88% penetration by the 20th year, as compared with 60% in the benchmark case. If the tax credit is $6,000, penetration is 99% by the 20th year. Under a more modest approach, the tax credit would be available only for the first 10 years. Hydrogen sales penetration then reach 69% of sales by the 20th year with the $2,500 credit and 79% with the $6,000 credit. A carbon tax of $38 per metric ton is not large enough to noticeably affect sales penetration. A tax of $116 per metric ton makes centrally produced hydrogen profitable in the very first year but results in only 64% penetration by year 20 as opposed to the 60% penetration in the benchmark case. Provision of 15 seed stations publicly provided at the beginning of the simulation, in addition to the 15 existing stations in the benchmark case, gives sales penetration rates very close to the benchmark after 20 years, namely, 63% and 59% depending on where they are placed.

  20. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    safety standard as a regulation. 30 1Q, 2004With industry and code officials, develop templates and NFPA to develop first-order continuing education for code officials. 3 Date (FY Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes & Standards #12;Hydrogen Codes & Standards: Goal & Objectives Goal

  1. Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet on Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology activities at NREL.

  2. A smooth transition to hydrogen transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Schock, R.N.

    1995-04-14

    The goal of this work is to examine viable near-term infrastructure options for a transition to hydrogen fueled vehicles and to suggest profitable directions for technology development. The authors have focused in particular on the contrasting options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Delivered costs have been estimated using best available industry cost and deliberately conservative economic assumptions. The sensitivities of these costs have then been examined for three small-scale scenarios: (1) electrolysis at the home for one car, and production at the small station scale (300 cars/day), (2) conventional alkaline electrolysis and (3) steam reforming of natural gas. All scenarios assume fueling a 300 mile range vehicle with 3.75 kg. They conclude that a transition appears plausible, using existing energy distribution systems, with home electrolysis providing fuel costing 7.5 to 10.5{cents}/mile, station electrolysis 4.7 to 7.1{cents}/mile, and steam reforming 3.7 to 4.7{cents}/mile. The average car today costs about 6{cents}/mile to fuel. Furthermore, analysis of liquid hydrogen delivered locally by truck from central processing plants can also be competitive at costs as low as 4{cents}/mile. These delivered costs are equal to $30 to $70 per GJ, LHV. Preliminary analysis indicates that electricity transmission costs favor this method of distributing energy, until very large (10 GW) hydrogen pipelines are installed. This indicates that significant hydrogen pipeline distribution will be established only when significant markets have developed.

  3. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scandinavian Hydrogen Highway Partnership (SHHP) includes member countries Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, as well as collaboration with Iceland. Target of 300...

  4. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-05-01

    This is a presentation about the Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demo, a 7-year project and the largest single FCEV and infrastructure demonstration in the world to date. Information such as its approach, technical accomplishments and progress; collaborations and future work are discussed.

  5. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given by Todd Ramsden of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cngh2workshop13ramsden.p...

  6. Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure PON-11-609 Attachment F Local Health Impacts Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure PON-11-609 Attachment F ­ Local Health Impacts Information Air Quality Percentage of population under 5 years and over 65 years of age #12;Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure PON-11

  7. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentp Hydrogen Fuel

  8. Technology Validation of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Their Hydrogen Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2013-10-22

    This presentation summarizes NREL's analysis and validation of fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technologies.

  9. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department ofBusinessCEA90:2:09California EnergyFuelHydrogen

  10. Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat IsHeavy-Duty

  11. Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station Location Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Carlton

    2009-01-01

    the transit operations and capital costs for various stationwill help yield greater capital cost coverage than they

  12. Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station Location Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Numerous route and station options Strong real estate marketreal estate market Transit friendly constituents Numerous route and station options

  13. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    A KEY LINK TO A HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE?"a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?is assessed based on neat hydrogen fuel input rather than

  14. ASME/SRNL Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASME/SRNL Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop Overview of ASME Hydrogen Codes and Standards Development John Koehr, ASME 9:30 am Material and Component #12;ASME/SRNL Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop

  15. Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Presentation by Paul Leiby of Oak...

  16. Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy 2003 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  17. Appendix G - GPRA06 hydrogen, fuel cells, and infrastructure technologies (HFCIT) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The target markets for the Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) program include transportation (cars and light trucks) and stationary (particularly residential and commercial) applications.

  18. Data Management Plan for The Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Data Management Plan describes how DOE will handle data submitted by recipients as deliverables under the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  19. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Questions and Answers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions and answers from the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003, in Southfield, Michigan.

  20. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Supporting Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Supporting information and objectives for the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003 in Southfield, Michigan.

  1. Hydrogen Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2014-04-01

    The presentation summarizes key challenges in financing hydrogen infrastructure and reviews analysis tools available to inform investment decisions and reduce financial risks.

  2. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  3. ME 5xx: Fuel Cell Vehicles & Hydrogen Infrastructure Instructors: D. Siegel and A. Stefanopoulou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    and design of on board hydrogen storage systems. Hydrogen generation and distribution technologies Press) 5. Hydrogen Fuel: Production, Transport, and Storage (R. Gupta, CRC Press) 6. Mobility 2030ME 5xx: Fuel Cell Vehicles & Hydrogen Infrastructure Instructors: D. Siegel and A. Stefanopoulou

  4. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section VII. Conversion Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fluid dynamics and evaluated fuel/air mixing. (Collaboration with NASA Glenn.) · Formed collaborationHydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 603 Section VII. Conversion Devices #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 604 #12

  5. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version September 11, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-09-01

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2009.

  6. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    impact of improved hydrogen storage may be through makingand M. Gardiner, Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies andReducing the liquid hydrogen storage dewar cost has only a

  7. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -van employ compressed hydrogen gas storage. Although the energy density of compressedhydrogen gasis lower,less costly and more energy efficient, refueling canbe accomplished rapidly, and hydrogen canbe produced from~--- - ~ .. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY Joan

  8. Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

    2005-01-01

    Strategies For Developing Hydrogen Energy Systems With CO 2International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, vol. 24, pp.Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,”

  9. TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

    2005-01-01

    Strategies For Developing Hydrogen Energy Systems With CO 2International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, vol. 24, pp.Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,”

  10. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

    2012-08-01

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

  11. List of Attendees at the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstation and Pre-Solicitation Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This list of attendees represents those that attended the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstation and Pre-Solicitation Meeting pre-solicitation meeting in Detroit, Michigan, on March 19, 2003.

  12. Webinar: Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project," originally presented on November 18, 2014.

  13. Pre-solicitation Meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given to attendees of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project pre-solicitation meeting held in Detroit, Michigan, on March 19, 2003.

  14. Webinar: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00...

  15. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

  16. Hydrogen Transition (HyTRANS) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase Demonstration HydrogenClean CoalTransition

  17. Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems : applications, properties, and gap analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2013-10-01

    This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

  18. A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

    2009-01-01

    coal-based hydrogen production with CCS can signi?cantly reduce transportation-related CO 2 emissions at a relatively low infrastructure cost

  19. SunLine Transit Agency, Hydrogen Powered Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-02-01

    This paper provides preliminary results from an evaluation by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory of hydrogen-powered transit buses at SunLine Transit Agency.

  20. Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oil, the Department today announced a 1.4 million investment to Wallingford- based Proton Energy Systems to collect and analyze performance data for hydrogen fueling stations...

  1. Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California lessonsmelainafinal.pdf More Documents & Publications Refueling...

  2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Technoeconomic Analysis ­ Hydrogen from biomass via gasification and pyrolysis: 1994, 1997, 2000, 2004 ­ Hydrogen ­ Life cycle assessment of wind/electrolysis: 2001, 2004 ­ Life cycle assessment of biomass gasification assessment (now in Biomass Program) ­ Keith Wipke: ADVISOR (now leading tech validation project) · Current

  3. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop in Washington, DC, on January 26, 2006. Attendees included automobile and energy company...

  4. Analysis of combined hydrogen, heat, and power as a bridge to a hydrogen transition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalik, M.; Stephan, C.

    2011-01-18

    Combined hydrogen, heat, and power (CHHP) technology is envisioned as a means to providing heat and electricity, generated on-site, to large end users, such as hospitals, hotels, and distribution centers, while simultaneously producing hydrogen as a by-product. The hydrogen can be stored for later conversion to electricity, used on-site (e.g., in forklifts), or dispensed to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Argonne has developed a complex-adaptive-system model, H2CAS, to simulate how vehicles and infrastructure can evolve in a transition to hydrogen. This study applies the H2CAS model to examine how CHHP technology can be used to aid the transition to hydrogen. It does not attempt to predict the future or provide one forecast of system development. Rather, the purpose of the model is to understand how the system works. The model uses a 50- by 100-mile rectangular grid of 1-square-mile cells centered on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The major expressways are incorporated into the model, and local streets are considered to be ubiquitous, except where there are natural barriers. The model has two types of agents. Driver agents are characterized by a number of parameters: home and job locations, income, various types of 'personalities' reflective of marketing distinctions (e.g., innovators, early adopters), willingness to spend extra money on 'green' vehicles, etc. At the beginning of the simulations, almost all driver agents own conventional vehicles. They drive around the metropolitan area, commuting to and from work and traveling to various other destinations. As they do so, they observe the presence or absence of facilities selling hydrogen. If they find such facilities conveniently located along their routes, they are motivated to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle when it becomes time to replace their present vehicle. Conversely, if they find that they would be inconvenienced by having to purchase hydrogen earlier than necessary or if they become worried that they would run out of fuel before encountering a facility, their motivation to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle decreases. At vehicle purchase time, they weigh this experience, as well as other factors such as social influence by their peers, fuel cost, and capital cost of a hydrogen vehicle. Investor agents build full-service hydrogen fueling stations (HFSs) at different locations along the highway network. They base their decision to build or not build a station on their (imperfect) estimates of the sales the station would immediately generate (based on hydrogen-powered vehicle traffic past the location and other factors), as well as the growth in hydrogen sales they could expect throughout their investment horizon. The interaction between driver and investor agents provides the basis for growth in both the number of hydrogen vehicles and number of hydrogen stations. For the present report, we have added to this mix smaller, 'bare-bones' hydrogen dispensing facilities (HDFs) of the type that owners of CHHP facilities could provide to the public. The locations of these stations were chosen to match existing facilities that might reasonably incorporate CHHP plants in the future. Unlike the larger commercial stations, these facilities are built according to exogenously supplied timetables, and no attempt has been made to model the financial basis for the facilities. Rather, our objective is to understand how the presence of these additional stations might facilitate the petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. We discuss a base case in which the HDFs are not present, and then investigate the effects of introducing HDFs in various numbers; according to different timetables; with various production capacities; and with hydrogen selling at prices above, equal to, and below the commercial stations selling price. We conclude that HDFs can indeed be helpful in accelerating a petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. Placed in areas where investors might not be willing to install large for-profit HFSs, HDFs can serve as a bridge until demand for hydrogen increases to the point where l

  5. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report AAS Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 619 Acronyms A Amp AES Auger Electron Spectroscopy AFC Alkaline Fuel Cell AFV Alternative Fuel Vehicle Ag Silver AHC Ad/Germanium a-SiC Amorphous Silicon Carbide ASNT The American Society for Nondestructive Testing ATDC After Top

  6. United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-03-06

    This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  7. Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLake Paiute ReservationResourcesMarch2 DOE Hydrogen

  8. State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2StandardFOA2-002 State Energy|

  9. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High HydrogenInvited Guests

  10. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High HydrogenInvited GuestsOption

  11. A toolkit for integrated deterministic and probabilistic assessment for hydrogen infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina; Tchouvelev, Andrei V.

    2014-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in using Quantitative Risk Assessment [QRA] to help improve the safety of hydrogen infrastructure and applications. Hydrogen infrastructure for transportation (e.g. fueling fuel cell vehicles) or stationary (e.g. back-up power) applications is a relatively new area for application of QRA vs. traditional industrial production and use, and as a result there are few tools designed to enable QRA for this emerging sector. There are few existing QRA tools containing models that have been developed and validated for use in small-scale hydrogen applications. However, in the past several years, there has been significant progress in developing and validating deterministic physical and engineering models for hydrogen dispersion, ignition, and flame behavior. In parallel, there has been progress in developing defensible probabilistic models for the occurrence of events such as hydrogen release and ignition. While models and data are available, using this information is difficult due to a lack of readily available tools for integrating deterministic and probabilistic components into a single analysis framework. This paper discusses the first steps in building an integrated toolkit for performing QRA on hydrogen transportation technologies and suggests directions for extending the toolkit.

  12. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section III. Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    verification and validation tests based on NGV2- 2000, modified for high pressure hydrogen · Supply fully system under NGV 3.1 standards · Designed and developed industry's first hydrogen 10,000 psi (700 bar) in

  13. Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Grasman

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan ranging from governmental organizations, for-profit to and non-profit entities. All vehicles were equipped with a data acquisition system that automatically collected statistically relevant data for submission to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), which monitored the progress of the fuel cell vehicles against the DOE technology validation milestones. The Mercedes Team also provided data from Gen-II vehicles under the similar operations as Gen I vehicles to compare technology maturity during program duration.

  14. Sunline Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides an update on the evaluation results for hydrogen and CNG-fueled buses opertating at SunLine Transit Agency in California.

  15. Webinar November 18: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00 to 1:00 Eastern Standard Time (EST).

  16. Dissociation and dissociative phase transition in dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2012-01-15

    A simple physical model is proposed for dissociating dense fluid hydrogen. We propose that free dissociated atoms interact via quantum electron-electron exchange analogously to the interaction in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. The density dependence of a hydrogen atom's binding energy in such a quasi-liquid is calculated. It is shown that the transition from the molecular fluid to liquid hydrogen is a first-order phase transition. The critical parameters of the transition are determined: P{sub c} = 72 GPa, T{sub c} = 10500 K, and {rho}{sub c} = 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}. The possibility of the metastable existence of atomic liquid hydrogen in a dissociated molecular fluid under decreased pressure is established.

  17. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of EnergySummary: The FirstInfrastructure

  18. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

  19. HyPro: A Financial Tool for Simulating Hydrogen Infrastructure Development, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian D. James, Peter O. Schmidt, Julie Perez

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes a multi-year Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI) project to study the build-out of hydrogen production facilities during the transition from gasoline internal combustion engine vehicle to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The primary objectives of the project are to develop an enhanced understanding of hydrogen production issues during the transition period (out to 2050) and to develop recommendations for the DOE on areas of further study. These objectives are achieved by conducting economic and scenario analysis to predict how industry would provide the hydrogen production, delivery and dispensing capabilities necessary to satisfy increased hydrogen demand. The primary tool used for the analysis is a custom created MatLab simulation tool entitled HyPro (short for Hydrogen Production). This report describes the calculation methodology used in HyPro, the baseline assumptions, the results of the baseline analysis and several corollary studies. The appendices of this report included a complete listing of model assumptions (capital costs, efficiencies, feedstock prices, delivery distances, etc.) and a step-by-step manual on the specific operation of the HyPro program. This study was made possible with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation|Infrastructure (D2SA)

  1. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfraredInfrastructure

  2. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egor Babaev; Asle Sudbo; N. W. Ashcroft

    2004-10-18

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report an analysis based on topological arguments of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  3. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  4. SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a protoype fuel cell bus, a prototype hydrogen hybrid interal combustion engine bus, and five new compressed natural gas buses.

  5. SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Results Update This report provides an update on the evaluation results for hydrogen and CNG-fueled buses opertating at SunLine Transit Agency in California. 42080.pdf More...

  6. Magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Akio

    The magic wavelength for an optical lattice for hydrogen atoms that cancels the lowest order ac Stark shift of the 1S-2S transition is calculated to be 513 nm. The magnitudes of the ac Stark shift ?E = ?119 Hz/(kW/cm[superscript ...

  7. Magic Wavelength for Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The magic wavelength for an optical lattice for hydrogen atoms that cancels the first order AC Stark shift of 1S-2S transition is calculated to be 513 nm. The amount of AC Stark shift $ \\Delta E = -1.19$ kHz/(10kW/cm$^2$) and the slope $d\\Delta E/d \

  8. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  9. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  10. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  11. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  12. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  13. Dynamics in Behavioral Response to Fuel-Cell Vehicle Fleet and Hydrogen Infrastructure: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Martin, Elliot; Lipman, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    the Accep- tance of Hydrogen Fuel. International Journal oftechnolo- gies, such as hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs)because of learning. Hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs)

  14. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    GHG emissions from coal gasification plants without carboncapital cost of one coal gasification plant at size of 1,200capital cost of one coal gasification central plant without

  15. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    GHG emissions from coal gasification plants without carboncapital cost of one coal gasification plant at size of 1,200capital cost of one coal gasification central plant without

  16. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    cost of travel time), CO2 cost, and discount rate, HITunit cost time value fcn CO2 cost discount rate transitionat stage t, the total CO2 cost or environmental disbenefit E

  17. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    cost of travel time), CO2 cost, and discount rate, HITunit cost time value fcn CO2 cost discount rate transitionat stage t, the total CO2 cost or environmental disbenefit E

  18. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    example, its Texaco coal gasifier costs $173 million withcan estimate the Texaco coal gasifier for one plant at 1,500

  19. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    example, its Texaco coal gasifier costs $173 million withcan estimate the Texaco coal gasifier for one plant at 1,500

  20. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    shown in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

  1. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01

    shown in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

  2. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop, October 18-19, 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL : Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R. comp.; Ahmed, S. comp.

    2012-02-21

    The overall objective of the Workshop was to identify opportunities for accelerating the use of both natural gas (NG) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as motor fuels and in stationary power applications. Specific objectives of the Workshop were to: (1) Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status/state-of-the-art of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure; (2) Identify key challenges (including non-technical challenges, such as permitting, installation, codes, and standards) preventing or delaying the widespread deployment of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure. Identify synergies between NG and H{sub 2} fuels; and (3) Identify and prioritize opportunities for addressing the challenges identified above, and determine roles and opportunities for both the government and industry stakeholders. Plenary speakers and panel discussions summarized the current status of the NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure, technology for their use in transportation and stationary applications, and some of the major challenges and opportunities to more widespread use of these fuels. Two break-out sessions of three groups each addressed focus questions on: (1) infrastructure development needs; (2) deployment synergies; (3) natural gas and fuel cell vehicles (NGVs, FCVs), specialty vehicles, and heavy-duty trucks; (4) CHP (combined heat and power), CHHP (combined hydrogen, heat, and power), and synergistic approaches; and (5) alternative uses of natural gas.

  3. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  4. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Duleep, Gopal

    2013-06-01

    Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

  5. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen.

  6. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen.

  7. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen On April...

  8. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Agenda...

  9. Defect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolk, Norman H.

    Defect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon G in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). These measurements suggest that the density of neutral defects is much of the corresponding transition energies are determined and agree with two models proposed to describe the density

  10. The President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Gasification of biomass Reforming of renewable liquids Photoelectrochemical Photobiological Thermochemical criteria and greenhouse gas emissions. Coal Only with carbon capture & sequestration Gasification process Biomass *Transition only #12;Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Technologies put on an Accelerated

  11. A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

    2009-01-01

    gaseous and liquid hydrogen storage tech- nologies are giveninclude compressors, hydrogen storage and dispensing. In thein the analysis. Hydrogen production and storage Hydrogen

  12. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  13. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  14. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle and

  15. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle and pipeline

  16. Investigation of the hydrogen release incident at the AC Transit Emeryville Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Aaron P.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Levin, Jamie [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA] [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA; Butler, Dennis [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA] [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the investigation of the release of approximately 300kg of hydrogen at the AC Transit Facility in Emeryville, CA. The hydrogen release was avoidable in both the root cause and contributing factors. The report highlights the need for communication in all phases of project planning and implementation. Apart from the failed valve, the hydrogen system functioned as designed, venting the hydrogen gas a safe distance above surrounding structures and keeping the subsequent fire away from personnel and equipment. The Emeryville Fire Department responded appropriately given the information provided to the Incident Commander. No injuries or fatalities resulted from the incident.

  17. A National Vision of America's Transition to a Hydrogen Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cells and batteries is that energy is not recharged and stored in fuel cells as it is in batteries. Fuel cells receive their energy from the hydrogen or similar fuel that is...

  18. A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

    2009-01-01

    2025 Scenario analysis for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and2025 Scenario analysis for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles andat ?ve steady-state hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (HFCV) market

  19. Dynamics in Behavioral Response to a Fuel Cell Vehicle Fleet and Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Martin, Elliot; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    the Acceptance of Hydrogen Fuel. International Journal oftechnologies, such as hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) andof an exploratory F-Cell hydrogen fuel vehicle fleet study,

  20. Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed Gas Service Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed...

  1. California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  2. Synthesis of transition-metal phosphides from oxidic precursors by reduction in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan Jie [Department of Catalytic Chemistry and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Wang Yao [Liaoning Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Technology and Equipments, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Qin Minglei; Yang Ying [Department of Catalytic Chemistry and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Li Xiang [Department of Catalytic Chemistry and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Technology and Equipments, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Wang Anjie, E-mail: ajwang@dlut.edu.c [Department of Catalytic Chemistry and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Technology and Equipments, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-06-15

    A series of transition metal phosphides, including MoP, WP, CoP, Co{sub 2}P, and Ni{sub 2}P, were synthesized from their oxidic precursors by means of hydrogen plasma reduction under mild conditions. The effects of reduction conditions, such as metal to phosphorus molar ratio, power input, and reduction time, on the synthesis of metal phosphides were investigated. The products were identified by means of XRD characterization. It is indicated that metal phosphides were readily synthesized stoichiometrically from their oxides in hydrogen plasma under mild conditions. - Graphical abstract: Metal phosphides were obtained stoichiometrically from their oxidic precursors by hydrogen plasma reaction under mild conditions.

  3. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN ENERGY STATION CONCEPTS: ARE 'Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are “the concept of the “hydrogen energy station”(H 2 E-Station).

  4. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    gasification, coal gasification, natural gas reforming, andgasification and then coal gasification with carbon captureproduction of H2 via coal gasification with CCS C-SMR, C-

  5. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    including biomass gasification, coal gasification, naturalSMR, electrolysis and biomass gasification, respectively C-coal gasification and biomass gasification, respectively [2

  6. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

  7. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Dooley, et al. A CO2 Storage Cost Curve for North America.by technology 1 , CO2 pipeline diameter and costs are aof liquefaction electricity. Costs of CO2 pipeline are

  8. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    C/kg H2 for SMR, coal gasification and biomass gasification,SMR, electrolysis and biomass gasification, respectively C-including biomass gasification, coal gasification, natural

  9. Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOE Hydrogen andPiping

  10. Phase transition into the metallic state in hypothetical (without molecules) dense atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2013-10-15

    A simple physical model of the metal-dielectric (vapor-liquid) phase transition in hypothetical (without molecules) atomic hydrogen is proposed. The reason for such a transition is the quantum collective cohesive energy occurring due to quantum electron-electron exchange similar to the cohesive energy in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. It is found that the critical parameters of the transition are P{sub c} ? 41000 atm, ?{sub c} ? 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}, and T{sub c} ? 9750 K.

  11. Leveraging infrastructure : sustainable bus rapid transit route planning in Beirut, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabti, Jumana M., 1976-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis applies the concepts of urban design, public transportation planning, economic development, and sustainability, to the routing and site plan of a two-kilometer bus rapid transit (BRT) line segment into downtown ...

  12. A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

    2009-01-01

    Infrastructure design and capital cost At each marketdesign, associated capital cost, and levelized cost ofstations (1500 kg/day) Costs Total capital cost (billion

  13. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W. Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, “Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy,” requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment [types] in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: • Replacement effects of new goods and services • International competition • Workforce training requirements • Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials • Rates of market penetration of technologies • Regional variations based on geography • Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration’s National Energy Policy and the Department’s Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America’s future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the employment impacts of a hydrogen transformation on international competitiveness are investigated and reported.

  14. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California fry.pdf More Documents & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles...

  15. Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J.

    2003-08-24

    The U.S. transportation sector is almost totally dependent on liquid hydrocarbon fuels, primarily gasoline and diesel fuel from conventional oil. In 2002, the transportation sector accounted for 69 percent of the U.S. oil use; highway vehicles accounted for 54 percent of the U.S. oil use. Of the total energy consumed in the U.S., more than 40 percent came from oil. More significantly, more than half of this oil is imported and is projected by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) to increase to 68 percent by 2025 [1]. The supply and price of oil have been dictated by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2002, OPEC accounted for 39 percent of world oil production and this is projected by the EIA to increase to 50 percent in 2025. Of the world's oil reserves, about 80 percent is owned by OPEC members. Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets four times in the past 30 years (1973-74, 1979-80, 1990-1991, and 1999- 2000) and with each came either a recession or slowdown in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the United States. In addition, these market upheavals have cost the U.S. approximately $7 trillion (in 1998 dollars) in total economic costs [2]. Finally, it is estimated that military expenditures for defending oil supplies in the Middle East range from $6 billion to $60 billion per year [3] and do not take into account the costs of recent military operations in Iraq (i.e., Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003). At the outset of his administration in 2001, President George W. Bush established the National Energy Policy Development (NEPD) Group to develop a national energy policy to promote dependable, affordable, and environmentally sound energy for the future in order to avert potential energy crises. In the National Energy Policy report [4], the NEPD Group urges action by the President to meet five specific national goals that America must meet--''modernize conservation, modernize our energy infrastructure, increase energy supplies, accelerate the protection and improvement of the environment, and increase our nation's energy security.'' It is generally recognized that energy security can be achieved partially by reducing importation of oil from sources that are less politically stable.

  16. Hydrogen, Fuel Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - fossil fuels like natural gas and coal; renewable energy sources such as solar radiation, wind them. This initiative was chosen not only because of the energy security benefits associated environmental benefits in both transportation and stationary markets. Energy Security America's transportation

  17. Your company may be looking to transition existing datacenter infrastructure (primarily physical and virtualized environments) to deliver a private cloud to your business. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Your company may be looking to transition existing datacenter infrastructure (primarily physical datacenter investments and skill sets to deliver a private cloud today. Pooling and dynamic allocation of datacenter resources. With Virtual Machine Manager, you can pool and virtualize your compute, network

  18. Liquid–solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-28

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in an ?85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid–solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ?4?K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  19. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fuelin

  20. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  1. Future Smart Energy -Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Summer School 2014, Aalborg, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    storage Hydrogen safety Hydrogen distribution Applications Transportation Stationary Portable Concluding Why fuel cells? Fuel cell types Fuel and infrastructure Hydrogen production Hydrogen storage Hydrogen History Why fuel cells? Fuel cell types Fuel and infrastructure Hydrogen production Hydrogen storage

  2. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    DOE's Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress estimates the employment effects of a transformation of the U.S. economy to the use of hydroge

  3. First Principles Based Simulation of Reaction-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen Storage and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-31

    This major part of this proposal is simulating hydrogen interactions in the complex metal hydrides. Over the period of DOE BES support, key achievements include (i) Predicted TiAl3Hx as a precursor state for forming TiAl3 through analyzing the Ti-doped NaAlH4 and demonstrated its catalytic role for hydrogen release; (ii) Explored the possibility of forming similar complex structures with other 3d transition metals in NaAlH4 as well as the impact of such complex structures on hydrogen release/uptake; (iii) Demonstrated the role of TiAl3 in hydriding process; (iv) Predicted a new phase of NaAlH4 that links to Na3AlH6 using first-principles metadynamics; (v) Examined support effect on hydrogen release from supported/encapsulated NaAlH4; and (vi) Expanded research scope beyond hydrogen storage. The success of our research is documented by the peer-reviewed publications.

  4. Effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on employment in the United States Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-07-01

    DOE's Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress estimates the employment effects of a transformation of the U.S. economy to the use of hydrogen in the 2020 to 2050 timeframe. This report fulfills requirements of section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  5. Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Associate Location: San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Associate Location: San Diego Basic Functions Center an Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Associate that has a passion for sustainability, the environment, and accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy! The Alternative Fuel Infrastructure

  6. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Ce

  7. Penn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    : · Vehicle integration and control expertise; · Alternative fuel infrastructure including hydrogen, LNG/Ultra-Capacitor Energy Storage System for Transit Vehicles for DARPA and US DOT · Conversion of Hybrid Vehicles Fueling Station Vehicle Testing Infrastructure Fuel Cell & Energy Storage Systems Research, Education

  8. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center is Helping to Facilitate the Transition to a New Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center (HTSC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses a systems engineering and integration approach to hydrogen research and development to help the United States make the transition to a new energy future - a future built on diverse and abundant domestic renewable resources and integrated hydrogen systems. Research focuses on renewable hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and market transformation. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and heat for homes and offices. This flexibility, combined with our increasing demand for energy, opens the door for hydrogen power systems. HTSC collaborates with DOE, other government agencies, industry, communities, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders to promote a clean and secure energy future.

  9. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    uncertain commitment to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by U.S.Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations,” West Sacramento,Cell Partnership, “Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Station

  10. Effects Of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report to Congress Hydrogen Policy and...

  11. Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier: Outlook for 2010, 2030, and 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M

    2004-01-01

    of the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Stuttgart,Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,”Infrastructure for a Fossil Hydrogen Energy System with CO 2

  12. hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  13. Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase...

  14. Safety Training for the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, Linda L.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Akers, Bret M.

    2006-04-11

    PNNL and the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training and Education Center are helping to prepare emergency responders and permitting/code enforcement officials for their respective roles in the future Hydrogen Economy. Safety will be a critical component of the anticipated hydrogen transition. Public confidence goes hand in hand with perceived safety to such an extent that, without it, the envisioned transition is unlikely to occur. Stakeholders and the public must be reassured that hydrogen, although very different from gasoline and other conventional fuels, is no more dangerous. Ensuring safety in the hydrogen infrastructure will require a suitably trained emergency response force for containing the inevitable incidents as they occur, coupled with knowledgeable code officials to ensure that such incidents are kept to a minimum. PNNL and HAMMER are, therefore, designing a hydrogen safety training program, funded by DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program, and modeled after the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s multi-tiered approach to hazardous materials training. Capabilities under development at HAMMER include classroom and long-distance (i.e., satellite and internet broadcast) learning, as well as life-size, hands-on hydrogen burn props for “training as real as it gets.” This paper presents insights gained from the early emergency response hydrogen safety training courses held in 2005 and current plans for design and construction of a number of hydrogen burn props.

  15. Hawai`i Hydrogen Power Park The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has promoted the vision that the transition to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai`i Hydrogen Power Park Background The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has promoted the vision that the transition to a hydrogen economy will begin with small-scale Distributed Generation (DG) systems fueled by hydrogen. In addition to providing stationary power, these systems may also have

  16. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    also novel new on-site hydrogen storage systems. In relationfunding for R&D on hydrogen storage, production and deliveryfor fuel cells and hydrogen storage), fuel cell durability,

  17. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? ”distributed power and hydrogen fuel efforts. We sug- gestefforts to promote hydrogen, fuel cells and advanced energy

  18. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings from the DOE sponsored Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can...

  19. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? ”impact on hydrogen price. Hydrogen fuel costs can be reducedindustrial purposes. Hydrogen fuel costs ($/kg) are higher

  20. Green Infrastructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tildwell, J.

    2011-01-01

    SWM, Green Buildings, Energy Forum, Texas Smartscape) ? Deteriorating Roadways ? ASCE Report Card on Texas Infrastructure for 2008 identified roads as the #1 infrastructure concern ? Congestion ? DFW congestion is growing over 45% faster than...? ? ASCE Sustainability ? Greenroads ? Green Streets ? SmartCode ? New York High Performance Infrastructure Guidelines ? Institute of Transportation Engineers ? American Public Works Association ? ?and many more. Planning ? City and Regional...

  1. Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure...

  2. Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure...

  3. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

    2005-11-01

    The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

  4. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  5. Technical Breakthrough Points and Opportunities in Transition Scenarios for Hydrogen as Vehicular Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; James, B.; Perez, J.; Spisak, A.

    2011-12-01

    This technical reports is about investigating a generic case of hydrogen production/delivery/dispensing pathway evolution in a large population city, assuming that hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) will capture a major share of the vehicle market by the year 2050. The range of questions that are considered includes (i) what is the typical succession of hydrogen pathways that minimizes consumer cost? (ii) what are the major factors that will likely influence this sequence?

  6. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    commitment to hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles has beenand storage R&D and fuel cell vehicle program, whilepower applications of fuel cells. Congress has recently re-

  7. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , vehicles can still drive with gasoline/diesel derived from tar sand, oil shale, and coal derived liquids

  8. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    managers in the development of work plans for fiscal year (FY) 2004. The tables below list the projects & Delivery: FUNDING Project Number Project, Performing Organization Avg. Score Con- tinued Discon- tinued Project Completed Summary Comment 1 H2 from Biomass: Catalytic Reforming of Pyrolysis Vapors, NREL 3.28 v

  9. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development managers in the development of work plans for fiscal year (FY) 2004. The tables below list & Delivery: FUNDING Project Number Project, Performing Organization Avg. Score Con tinued Discon tinued Project Completed Summary Comment 1 H2 from Biomass: Catalytic Reforming of Pyrolysis Vapors, NREL 3.28 v

  10. Transportation Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure New Technologies * Potential need for dual-use casks * DOE should look toward industry & international communities for innovations * Industry unclear about delivery...

  11. Integrated technical and economic assessments of transport and storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Transportation will be a major market for hydrogen because of its great size and the value of energy at the wheels of a vehicle in comparison to its heating value. Hydrogen also offers important potential efficiency gains over hydrocarbon fuels. However, hydrogen end-use technologies will not develop without a reliable hydrogen supply infrastructure. By the same token, reliable infrastructures will not develop without end-use demand. Our task is to analyze the costs of various infrastructure options for providing hydrogen, as the number of vehicles serviced increased from very small numbers initially, to moderate numbers in the mid-term and to determine if a smooth transition may be possible. We will determine viable market sizes for transport and storage options by examining the technologies and the capital and operating costs of these systems, as well as related issues such as safety, construction time, etc. The product of our work will be data based scenarios of the likely transitions to hydrogen fuel, beginning with small and progressing to larger numbers of vehicles. We are working closely with the suppliers of relevant technologies to (1) determine realistic component costs, and (2) to assure availability of our analyses to business. Preliminary analyses indicate that the cost of transport and storage is as important as production cost in determining the cost of hydrogen fuel to the consumer, and that home electrolysis and centrally processed liquid hydrogen may provide hydrogen in the initial stages.

  12. A National Vision of America's Transition to a Hydrogen Economy - To 2030 and Beyond

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    On November 15-16, 2001, in response to recommendations within the National Energy Policy, DOE organized a meeting of 50 visionary business leaders and policy makers to formulate a National Hydrogen V

  13. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    new partnerships? H2-FCV Roadmap Report - FINAL December 21,Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: ACalifornia, Davis H2-FCV Roadmap Report - FINAL December 21,

  14. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  15. Social infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurlbaum, Ryan E. (Ryan Edward)

    2013-01-01

    Current urbanization patterns and aging transportation infrastructures have marginalized millions of US citizens. The result is that 4 .5 million US residents live within 100 meters of a four-lane highway' and have become ...

  16. First-row transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    through the electro- chemical reduction of water is a key component of many clean energy technologies.1­4 State-of-the-art hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts contain noble metals such as Pt the potential to lower the overall capital cost.12 Research efforts have therefore been directed to search

  17. Hydrogen Codes and Standards (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohi, J.

    2006-05-01

    Presented at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006.

  18. Safety, codes and standards for hydrogen installations :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Aaron P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-04-01

    Automakers and fuel providers have made public commitments to commercialize light duty fuel cell electric vehicles and fueling infrastructure in select US regions beginning in 2014. The development, implementation, and advancement of meaningful codes and standards is critical to enable the effective deployment of clean and efficient fuel cell and hydrogen solutions in the energy technology marketplace. Metrics pertaining to the development and implementation of safety knowledge, codes, and standards are important to communicate progress and inform future R&D investments. This document describes the development and benchmarking of metrics specific to the development of hydrogen specific codes relevant for hydrogen refueling stations. These metrics will be most useful as the hydrogen fuel market transitions from pre-commercial to early-commercial phases. The target regions in California will serve as benchmarking case studies to quantify the success of past investments in research and development supporting safety codes and standards R&D.

  19. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

  20. Kinetics of Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction Class H + H-C(sp3): First-Principles Predictions Using the Reaction Class Transition State Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    -principles predictions using more rigorous methodologies. I. Introduction Hydrogen abstractions of hydrocarbons carriers in thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons. Despite its significance, there are only about 10 of the conventional transition state theory (TST) to analyze available experimental rate constants and to propose

  1. Energy Balance in the Solar Transition Region. IV. Hydrogen and Helium Mass Flows With Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Fontenla; E. H. Avrett; R. Loeser

    2001-09-24

    In this paper we have extended our previous modeling of energy balance in the chromosphere-corona transition region to cases with particle and mass flows. The cases considered here are quasi-steady, and satisfy the momentum and energy balance equations in the transition region. We include in all equations the flow velocity terms and neglect the partial derivatives with respect to time. We present a complete and physically consistent formulation and method for solving the non-LTE and energy balance equations in these situations, including both particle diffusion and flows of H and He. Our results show quantitatively how mass flows affect the ionization and radiative losses of H and He, thereby affecting the structure and extent of the transition region. Also, our computations show that the H and He line profiles are greatly affected by flows. We find that line shifts are much less important than the changes in line intensity and central reversal due to the effects of flows. In this paper we use fixed conditions at the base of the transition region and in the chromosphere because our intent is to show the physical effects of flows and not to match any particular observations. However, we note that the profiles we compute can explain the range of observed high spectral and spatial resolution Lyman alpha profiles from the quiet Sun. We suggest that dedicated modeling of specific sequences of observations based on physically consistent methods like those presented here will substantially improve our understanding of the energy balance in the chromosphere and corona.

  2. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, Harold T. Wight, Gregory Dreier, Ken Borland, Nicholas

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

  3. Hydrogen as a near-term transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.D.

    1995-06-29

    The health costs associated with urban air pollution are a growing problem faced by all societies. Automobiles burning gasoline and diesel contribute a great deal to this problem. The cost to the United States of imported oil is more than US$50 billion annually. Economic alternatives are being actively sought. Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range (>480 km) with emissions well below the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being required in California. These vehicles can also be manufactured without excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining engine and other component efficiencies, the overall vehicle efficiency should be about 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to what US vehicle operators pay today. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing low-cost, large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus can be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

  4. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/GeneratorFuel Cell Deployment and Hydrogen Infrastructure, WorldwideOffice (2005), “Florida Hydrogen Business Partnership,”

  5. Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of...

  6. Hydrogen Data Book from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Hydrogen Data Book contains a wide range of factual information on hydrogen and fuel cells (e.g., hydrogen properties, hydrogen production and delivery data, and information on fuel cells and fuel cell vehicles), and it also provides other data that might be useful in analyses of hydrogen infrastructure in the United States (e.g., demographic data and data on energy supply and/or infrastructure). ItĆs made available from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center along with a wealth of related information. The related information includes guidelines for DOE Hydrogen Program Analysis, various calculator tools, a hydrogen glossary, related websites, and analysis tools relevant to hydrogen and fuel cells. [From http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/cocoon/morf/hydrogen

  7. The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    potential for huge energy and environmental improvements.Cannon, eds, The Hydrogen Energy Transition, Elsevier Press,about environmental and energy threats. The hydrogen debate

  8. RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES Roadmap 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, David

    RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR FRANCE Roadmap 2008 #12;INTRODUCTION European research infrastructures and development, benefiting to Europe's economy and competitiveness. This roadmap for the research infrastructures....................................................................................................6 3. The roadmap: existing and already decided RIs and others at the planning stage

  9. INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY DELIVERY & ENERGY RELIABILITY Real Time Monitoring of Energy Infrastructure Status Patrick Willging, PE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability #12;INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY

  10. Nancy Garland DOE Hydrogen Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Garland DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Operation at Sub- Freezing Temperatures DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives Sub-Freezing Temperature Effects on Fuel Cells Workshop Phoenix AZ February 1-2, 2005 #12;Hydrogen Fuel Initiative The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program

  11. Hydrogen powered bus

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-22

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  12. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01

    function is to provide hydrogen fuel for vehicles, this goala Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? ”impact on hydrogen price. Hydrogen fuel costs can be reduced

  13. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    hybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofof the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & theof battery electric, hydrogen fuel cell and hybrid vehicles

  14. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2004 Progress Report II.E.2 Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to commercialization Technical Barriers The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program Multi Optimization: Continued optimization of materials and device designs to demonstrate high

  15. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

  16. Proceedings of the 2001 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE Hydrogen...

  17. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-26

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  18. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

  19. Final Project Report: DOE Award FG02?04ER25606 Overlay Transit Networking for Scalable, High Performance Data Communication across Heterogeneous Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micah Beck; Terry Moore

    2007-08-31

    As the flood of data associated with leading edge computational science continues to escalate, the challenge of supporting the distributed collaborations that are now characteristic of it becomes increasingly daunting. The chief obstacles to progress on this front lie less in the synchronous elements of collaboration, which have been reasonably well addressed by new global high performance networks, than in the asynchronous elements, where appropriate shared storage infrastructure seems to be lacking. The recent report from the Department of Energy on the emerging 'data management challenge' captures the multidimensional nature of this problem succinctly: Data inevitably needs to be buffered, for periods ranging from seconds to weeks, in order to be controlled as it moves through the distributed and collaborative research process. To meet the diverse and changing set of application needs that different research communities have, large amounts of non-archival storage are required for transitory buffering, and it needs to be widely dispersed, easily available, and configured to maximize flexibility of use. In today's grid fabric, however, massive storage is mostly concentrated in data centers, available only to those with user accounts and membership in the appropriate virtual organizations, allocated as if its usage were non-transitory, and encapsulated behind legacy interfaces that inhibit the flexibility of use and scheduling. This situation severely restricts the ability of application communities to access and schedule usable storage where and when they need to in order to make their workflow more productive. (p.69f) One possible strategy to deal with this problem lies in creating a storage infrastructure that can be universally shared because it provides only the most generic of asynchronous services. Different user communities then define higher level services as necessary to meet their needs. One model of such a service is a Storage Network, analogous to those used within computation centers, but designed to operate on a global scale. Building on a basic storage service that is as primitive as possible, such a Global Storage Network would define a framework within which higher level services can be created. If this framework enabled a variety of more specialized middleware and supported a wide array of applications, then interoperability and collaboration could occur based on that common framework. The research in Logistical Networking (LN) carried out under the DOE's SciDAC program tested the value of this approach within the context of several SciDAC application communities. Below we briefly describe the basic design of the LN storage network and some of the results that the Logistical Networking community has achieved.

  20. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    The New 12- Cylinder Hydrogen Engine in the 7 Series: The Hinjected turbocharged hydrogen engine could potentially

  1. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  2. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    obligation Denmark MID-directive Annex MI-002 applies also for automotive gas meters Norway and Sweden OIML R139 is applicable on voluntary basis Activities to make or adjust...

  3. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment of EnergyDemonstrationDepartmentOilNEDO, and DOE |

  4. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | DepartmentVery1, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen5,March

  5. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy ResourcesCRED:CalendarResourcesPowerFuel

  6. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentpDepartment of Energy

  7. Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentpDepartment ofStrategies

  8. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM MDepartment of

  9. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1Activity

  10. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. Department of Energy |June

  11. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashersGenSysContractors |Department

  12. Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9,

  13. Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobsFelixContracts |UniversityDepartment

  14. Financing infrastructure projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eid, Serge Emile

    2008-01-01

    Infrastructure is of great importance to the development and economic growth of communities. Due to the increased demand on sophisticated infrastructure, governments' budgets are not anymore able to satisfy this growing ...

  15. National Environmental Information Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture Contributing to the Australian Government National Plan for Environmental Information initiative #12;National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture v1.1 Environmental Information Programme Publication Series

  16. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia, and reactorsystemoverviews. Training in Action: Gulf Nuclear Energy InfrastructureInstitute In2011,SandiateamedwiththeNuclearSecurity energy safety, security,safeguards,andnonproliferation. Training Sandia National Laboratories experts

  17. On the phase between pressure and heat release fluctuations for propane/hydrogen flames and its role in mode transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speth, Raymond L.

    This paper presents an experimental investigation into mode-transitions observed in a 50-kW, atmospheric pressure, backward-facing step combustor burning lean premixed C[subscript 3]H[subscript 8]/H[subscript 2] fuel ...

  18. Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Title: Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Authors: Naumov, Ivan I. ;...

  19. Sandia Energy - More California Gas Stations Can Provide Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More California Gas Stations Can Provide Hydrogen than Previously Thought, Sandia Study Says Home Infrastructure Security Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News &...

  20. Webinar November 6: 2014 and 2015 Hydrogen Student Design Contest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scoring Tool, a Student Design Contest for Hydrogen Infrastructure, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells...

  1. NREL: News - NREL, Sandia Team to Improve Hydrogen Fueling Infrastruct...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    714 NREL, Sandia Team to Improve Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure April 30, 2014 A new project led by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia...

  2. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation energy options for consumers. Through H2USA, industry and government partners will...

  3. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers in developing transportation policies; energy audits and efficiency studies for Oberlin-area businesses and Oberlin College; identification of barriers to residential energy efficiency and development of programming to remove these barriers; mapping of the solar-photovoltaic and wind-energy supply chains in northwest Ohio; and opportunities for vehicle sharing and collaboration among the ten organizations in Lorain County from the private, government, non-profit, and educational sectors. With non-grant funds, organizations have begun or completed projects that drew on the findings of the studies, including: creation of a residential energy-efficiency program for the Oberlin community; installation of energy-efficient lighting in Oberlin College facilities; and development by the City of Oberlin and Oberlin College of a 2.27 megawatt solar photovoltaic facility that is expected to produce 3,000 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, 12% of the College’s yearly power needs. Implementation of these and other projects is evidence of the economic feasibility and technical effectiveness of grant-supported studies, and additional projects are expected to advance to implementation in the coming years. The public has benefited through improved energydelivery systems and reduced energy use for street lighting in Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; new opportunities for assistance and incentives for residential energy efficiency in the Oberlin community; new opportunities for financial and energy savings through vehicle collaboration within Lorain County; and decreased reliance on fossil fuels and expanded production of renewable energy in the region. The dissemination conference and the summary report developed for the conference also benefited the public, but making the findings and recommendations of the regional studies broadly available to elected officials, city managers, educators, representatives of the private sector, and the general public.

  4. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators | DepartmentMeeting AgendaReadiness Workshop |

  5. An Integrated Assessment of the Impacts of Hydrogen Economy on Transportation, Energy Use, and Air Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Loughlin, Daniel H.; Shay, Carol; Gage, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    BProspects for building a hydrogen energy infrastructure,[case study,[ Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, vol. 24, pp. 709–1999. U.S. Department of Energy, Hydrogen, fuel cells and

  6. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu˛?, Ni˛? and Co˛? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highlymore »active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).« less

  7. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, Wenqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ramirez, Pedro J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Univ. Central De Venezuela, Caracas (Venesuela); Stachiola, Dario [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brito, Joaquin L. [Inst. Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu˛?, Ni˛? and Co˛? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  8. HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, E

    2009-03-02

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

  9. Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

    2005-09-01

    Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

  10. An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

    2010-01-01

    of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & theover time to bring hydrogen fuel to cost competitivenessDavis INTRODUCTION Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles offer the

  11. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    SUPPORTING URBAN GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Researchers: Jenny Caldwell Catherine Cruz-Ortiz Craig Dsouza are supported at the master's and doctoral levels. #12;Supporting Urban Green Infrastructure Researchers: Jenny's Water Resources Agency, for providing information and guidance in the completion of this research. #12

  12. NGV industry infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Current natural gas vehicle (NGV) technology faces a number of problems that must be overcome before vehicles powered by compressed natural gas become accepted in the US. Among these impediments are regulatory uncertainties, codes, standards and the NGV industry infrastructure itself. The marketing/supply infrastructure necessary to support the NGV industry is described.

  13. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research shows that changes in infrastructure prompt changes in behavior (for better or worse). Federal agencies can modify their infrastructure to promote sustainability-oriented behavior change, ideally in ways that make new behaviors easier and more desirable to follow than existing patterns of behavior.

  14. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy reliability and Security) (web link) program to demonstrate: · Cyber-securityEnergy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W to enhance the nation's security

  15. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?°C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?°C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?°C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  16. Hydrogen cars have zero emissions at the tailpipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    · Hydrogen cars have zero emissions at the tailpipe · Hydrogen cars can be engineered to have a range similar to that of gasoline cars · Construction, operation, and maintenance of a hydrogen infrastructure would provide jobs · Hydrogen fuel cells have a higher "tank to wheel' efficiency than gasoline

  17. HYDROGEN COMMERCIALIZATION: TRANSPORTATION FUEL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    APOLONIO DEL TORO

    2008-05-27

    Since 1999, SunLine Transit Agency has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop and test hydrogen infrastructure, fuel cell buses, a heavy-duty fuel cell truck, a fuel cell neighborhood electric vehicle, fuel cell golf carts and internal combustion engine buses operating on a mixture of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG). SunLine has cultivated a rich history of testing and demonstrating equipment for leading industry manufacturers in a pre-commercial environment. Visitors to SunLine's "Clean Fuels Mall" from around the world have included government delegations and agencies, international journalists and media, industry leaders and experts and environmental and educational groups.

  18. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Comparative Assessment of Fuel Cell Cars, Massachusettselectric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of PowerTransition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the Potential

  19. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  20. Information and Communications Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communications Utilization and Performance________________________ 20 5.3 Systems Support Utilization and Performance ____________________________ 21 5.4 Radio Communications Systems Utilization and Performance of the communications infrastructure and information systems used during this time period. It addresses resources

  1. INFRASTRUCTURE BUSINESS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    COMMUNIQUÉ Australia's Infrastructure Imperative: Getting more value for taxpayer dollars #12;Communiqué. The symposium theme, Getting More Value for Taxpayer Dollars, is one which SMART identified was well overdue

  2. Smarter Physical Infrastructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlett, D.

    2013-01-01

    Infrastructure Unleashing Information Technology in the Built Environment David Bartlett, IBM Vice President, Smarter Physical Infrastructure ESL-IC-13-10-57 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec..., Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 BMS/metering integration, HVAC sensors/metering point integration, Lighting, Perimeter pre-heat, Chiller optimization, Advanced analytics, Dashboard for energy, carbon, maintenance, space, etc ? 3.3M sq ft , 1950...

  3. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  4. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

  5. Status of U.S. FCEV and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration Project (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2011-03-01

    Presented at the Japan Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Demonstration Project (JHFC), 1 March 2011, Tokyo, Japan. This presentation summarizes the status of U.S. fuel cell electric vehicles and infrastructure learning demonstration project.

  6. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    44646-2.pdf More Documents & Publications SunLine Transit Agency, Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus:...

  7. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    2007). Natural Gas (CNG / LNG / GTL) Natural gas, which iscompressed (CNG) or liquefied (LNG) form Chapter 5 Transportthe hydrogen section. CNG and LNG combustion characteristics

  8. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    cleaner direct- injection turbocharged (TDI) diesels and theinjection. Mercedes’ M271 turbocharged direct injectionthat a direct injected turbocharged hydrogen engine could

  9. LNG infrastructure and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgash, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Sound engineering principals have been used by every company involved in the development of the LNG infrastructure, but there is very little that is new. The same cryogenic technology that is used in the manufacture and sale of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen infrastructure is used in LNG infrastructure. The key component of the refueling infrastructure is the LNG tank which should have a capacity of at least 15,000 gallons. These stainless steel tanks are actually a tank within a tank separated by an annular space that is void of air creating a vacuum between the inner and outer tank where superinsulation is applied. Dispensing can be accomplished by pressure or pump. Either works well and has been demonstrated in the field. Until work is complete on NFPA 57 or The Texas Railroad Commission Rules for LNG are complete, the industry is setting the standards for the safe installation of refueling infrastructure. As a new industry, the safety record to date has been outstanding.

  10. NuclearHydrogen Oil and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Policy NuclearHydrogen Transport Education Oil and gas Distribution Society Supply Ecology Demand Hydrogen 08 Policy and society 10 Environment 11 Transport 12 Manufacturing 14 Oil and gas 15 Nuclear 16 and infrastructure, and broaden our methods of generation. Our declining reserves of oil and gas must be repla

  11. DOE Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence: Center Highlights and NREL Activities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, J. L.; Curtis, C.; Davis, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Gennett, T.; Heben, M. J.; Jones, K. M.; Kim, Y.-H.; Parilla, P. A.; Simpson, L. J.; Whitney, E. S.; Zhang, S. B.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Presented at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006.

  12. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Introducing hydrogen as an energy carrier would involve major changes in the country's energy and vehicle fleet infrastructure. Technical challenges, costs, and risk will be...

  13. Sandia Energy - Portable Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit to Provide Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portable Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit to Provide Green, Sustainable Power to Honolulu Port Home Infrastructure Security Energy Surety Energy Transportation Energy Facilities Partnership...

  14. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Senario Analysis...

  15. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis...

  16. SunLine Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet). SunLine Expands Horizons...

  17. Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Project (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB:...

  18. Alternative Fuels in Public Transit: A Match Made on the Road

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01

    Brochure addressing alternative fuel modes of transportation for public transit, challenges, fuels, infrastructure, cast studies, guidance, and resources.

  19. Transitioning to Biofuels: A System-of-Systems Perspective; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.

    2008-06-01

    Using the existing fuel supply chain infrastructure as a framework, this paper discusses a vision for transitioning to a larger biofuels industry and the challenges associated with a massive market and infrastructure transformation.

  20. Developing strategies for resource-constrained transit growth through increased private sector involvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Michael A. (Michael Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    Many transit agencies are facing budgetary, institutional, physical infrastructure, and vehicle constraints, which all tend to restrict agency service growth. This research proposes strategies that allow transit agencies ...

  1. Infrastructure Assurance Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    years, the use of natural gas is projected to grow by 50% -- making security of this resourceInfrastructure Assurance Center NGFast: rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks Assurance Center Our nation relies on natural gas to meet about 22% of its energy needs. Within the next 10

  2. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    include: right Sized reactor, Supercritical Co2 Gas Fast reactor, Compact Sodium Fast reactor, and infrastructure problems. vision all of our reactor designs employ a concurrent engineering approach, and prometheus Space reactor. all of these reactor designs exist only on paper and have been produced as concepts

  3. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Infrastructure #12;2 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING This publication focuses on just a few of the incredible College of Engineering faculty and students who are conducting research related, and students in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working collaboratively to develop

  4. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1670P Ensuring the Safe Containment

  5. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  6. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W the computational, physics

  7. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security ExCEptIonal SErvICE In thE natIonal IntErESt Sandia owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-7809W to enhance the nation's security

  8. Sandia Energy - Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute Class of 2012 Kicks Off with 20 Students from the Gulf Cooperation Council Home Energy Assurance Infrastructure Security Infrastructure...

  9. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

  10. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 24, 2015, from 1:00pm – 2:30pm EDT, EPA's Green Infrastructure Program will launch our 2015 Webcast Series with the webinar Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities. This webinar aims to...

  11. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  12. Presented by Petascale System Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _Infrastructure_SC10 Visualization and data analysis resources Hardware · Everest Powerwall ­ 30 ft by 8 ft 35

  13. Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

    2010-07-29

    The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operator’s garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The station’s efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce on–site hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

  14. INFRASTRUCTURE Engineering and Physical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    the vital research that underpins this development. The UK Government Strategy for National Infrastructure and resilient infrastructure supplying water, energy, communications, transport systems and waste systems. Infrastructure is a broad topic and is relevant to other sectors including Healthcare, Renewable and Clean Energy

  15. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dreportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E...

  16. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection...

  17. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities...

  18. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  19. Angular distributions in the elastic scattering and rotational excitation of molecular hydrogen by atomic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Dalgarno, A.

    1975-08-01

    The effective close-coupling method of Rabitz is tested and used to calculate the angular distributions of the elastic and inelastic scattering of molecular hydrogen in collision with atomic hydrogen when rotational transitions may occur...

  20. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  1. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  2. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  3. National Infrastructure Protection Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgram |(Upstate New York) |Infrastructure Protection

  4. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Buses: Interim EvaluationECMT, 2007). Natural Gas (CNG / LNG / GTL) Natural gas,It may be stored in compressed (CNG) or liquefied (LNG) form

  5. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  6. Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has promoted the vision that the transition to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). The objective of the PICHTR project was developing and testing the use of wind and solar power to power small demonstration program we used the electricity generated by the wind turbine and solar array to powerHawaii Hydrogen Power Park Background The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has promoted

  7. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  8. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

  9. Utilities building NGV infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Gas utilities across the US are aggressively pursuing the natural gas vehicle market by putting in place the infrastructure needed to ensure the growth of the important market. The first annual P and GJ NGV Marketing Survey has revealed many utilities plant to build and continue building NGV fueling facilities. The NGV industry in the US is confronting a classic chicken-or-egg quandary. Fleet operators and individual drivers are naturally unwilling to commit to a natural gas vehicle fuel until sufficient fueling facilities are in place, yet service station operators are reluctant to add NGV refueling capacity until enough CNG vehicles are on the road to create demand. The future of the NGV market is bright, but continued research and product improvements by suppliers as well as LDCs is needed if the potential is to be fulfilled. Advances in refueling facilities must continue if the market is to develop.

  10. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  11. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  12. Hydrogen: Fueling the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisch, Jennifer

    2007-02-27

    As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen storage will be highlighted in this seminar.

  13. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    experienced and participated in two transitions from `science to compliance,'(WIpp and YM) like those and characterization program and design validation experiments for Waste Isolation pilot plant (WIpp) · Development of the conceptual design for WIpp seal systems · humid-air corrosion testing of advanced alloys in support of waste

  14. Hydrogen Safety

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  15. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  16. Hydrogen Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  17. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos da Silva dos Santos; Elso Drigo Filho; Regina Maria Ricotta

    2015-02-09

    In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  19. Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    held the Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles workshop in Washington, D.C., on September 9, 2014....

  20. Infrastructure and Operations Improvement Project Director |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure and Operations Improvement Project Director Supervisor(s): Adam Cohen, COO, Director's Office Staff: ENG 08 Requisition Number: 1500151 The Infrastructure and...

  1. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric...

  2. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere...

  3. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV...

  4. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

  5. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February 25-26, 2010 Sacramento, CA IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February 25-26, 2010 Sacramento, CA...

  6. Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive MAP in PDF, all Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa Infrastructure Country...

  7. Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administrati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    term needs. The Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Operations develops and executes NNSA's infrastructure investment, maintenance, and operations programs and policies....

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Evaluation to determine whether Infrastructure...

  9. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  10. Parking Infrastructure and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

    2011-01-01

    understand the full cost of parking. ? Nicholas Santero andLY L I T T L E A B O U T how parking infrastructure affectsBecause abundant free parking encourages solo driving and

  11. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  12. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report IV.F Photoelectrochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure TechnologiesDOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report 13 IV.F Photoelectrochemical IV.F.1 High-Efficiency Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: · AP. Materials Efficiency · AQ

  13. H2FIRST: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FCTO directly in support of H2USA, a public-private partnership co-launched by DOE and industry in 2013. H2FIRST Project Objective The H2FIRST objective is to ensure that fuel...

  14. Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    innovation and help the industry bring these technologies into the marketplace at lower cost. "As part of an all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of...

  15. Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency · Cons: Impurity removal · Applications: Military and space Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) · Pros growth of 59% over the past three years. More than 12,000 new units were shipped in 2007 0 5 10 15 20 25

  16. Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and government partners will focus on identifying actions to encourage early adopters of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) by conducting coordinated technical and market...

  17. Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the natural environment by NREL researchers, are able to perform the WGS reaction at ambient temperatures operation at 5-L scale Operate bioreactor at P=10 atm; Measure shift kinetics of Rx. gelatinosus Evaluate

  18. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating DepartmentOIRVI4136Contracts7019 UnlimitedProject

  19. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPowerScenario AnalysisFuel CellFuel for

  20. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPowerScenario AnalysisFuel CellFuel for(FCEVs)

  1. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase

  2. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSites KDFNational FuelDepartment ofDepartmentof Energyof

  3. NREL, Sandia Team to Improve Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:News Releases |NREL Technology6NREL's|||Releases |

  4. Material Testing Priorities for Hydrogen (H2) Infrastructure | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine &Massachusetts StateFacilitiesOverviewof

  5. NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX FOrigin ofAllen LichvarAREVA NOPRDepartmentof4

  6. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First GasHighDepartment of

  7. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets and Barriers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First GasHighDepartment ofto

  8. Policy Option for Hydrogen Vehicles and Infrastructure | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,an R7-CompatiblePlaying7 DATE: July(EPEAT)

  9. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet & Infrastructure Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment of Energy Contractor019

  10. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment of Energy Contractor019Project

  11. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment of Energy Contractor019ProjectProject |

  12. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment of Energy

  13. Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at 1 Table of ContentsAnEnergyRollout in Southern

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cells Backup Infrastructure Cleanly and Quietly | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof EnergyResearch TriangleThroughclean fuelof

  15. Deadline Extended for RFI Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure and FCEVs |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis,DepartmentAbove on the left is K-25, at OakDepartment

  16. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeep January 2012 PURPOSE ThisProject |

  17. Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership on Clean Energys o u t h eApplicationsDepartment

  18. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - BuildingofDepartment ofHowdoSeason:

  19. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentp

  20. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentpDepartment of

  1. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTION BY PEMof

  2. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM M

  3. Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM MDepartment

  4. Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM

  5. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003 Merit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1Activityfrom

  6. FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111, 2015EnergyEnergyTechnologies Program |

  7. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashersGenSysContractors

  8. H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-TankDepartment

  9. H2USA Accomplishments Push Hydrogen Infrastructure Forward | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |Reference Station Design Task

  10. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy Loftus Global Leader, Sustainable4Issues |

  11. Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearchEnergy TestTestingTesting,Department

  12. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure Basics | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate Webinar SlidessHydraulicEnergy

  13. Webinar March 10: 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE.Projects atWe Want It&Web6: H2 RefuelWebinar

  14. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing RadiationSNAC

  15. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMO PeerServices6 DOEDepartment of Energy

  16. H2FIRST: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting Oversight CommitteeandEnergyPub.

  17. DOE Announces Webinars on Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Technology,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us »Buildings Resource, and More |EnergyEnergy

  18. Sandia Energy - Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportationVideos HomePowerH2FIRST

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanolAFDCHydrogen Printable

  20. Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due Date Adv. FossilMethods forNuclearFuel

  1. DOE Has Issued Request for Information Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominate an employee forThisMillion toUse of) Go toand

  2. UV pumping of hyperfine transitions in the light elements, with application to 21-cm hydrogen and 92-cm deuterium lines from the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Chuzhoy; Paul R. Shapiro

    2006-06-30

    We present new analytic calculations of the coupling between ultraviolet resonance photons and the population of the hyperfine states in the light elements (H, D, He3+) which include several previously neglected physical processes. Among these are the backreaction of resonant scattering on the pumping radiation, the scattering of Ly_beta photons and the effect of local departure from pure Hubble flow. The application of the new treatment to the redshifted hydrogen 21 and deuterium 92 cm lines from the high-redshift universe results in an amplitude correction of up to an order of magnitude. We further show that the standard assumption that ultraviolet pumping drives the spin temperature towards the kinetic temperature does not hold for deuterium, whose spin temperature is generally negative.

  3. 2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2012-11-01

    The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

  4. Speeding the transition: Designing a fuel-cell hypercar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.D.; Moore, T.C.; Lovins, A.B.

    1997-12-31

    A rapid transformation now underway in automotive technology could accelerate the transition to transportation powered by fuel cells. Ultralight, advanced-composite, low-drag, hybrid-electric hypercars--using combustion engines--could be three- to fourfold more efficient and one or two orders of magnitude cleaner than today`s cars, yet equally safe, sporty, desirable, and (probably) affordable. Further, important manufacturing advantages--including low tooling and equipment costs, greater mechanical simplicity, autobody parts consolidation, shorter product cycles, and reduced assembly effort and space--permit a free-market commercialization strategy. This paper discusses a conceptual hypercar powered by a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It outlines the implications of platform physics and component selection for the vehicle`s mass budget and performance. The high fuel-to-traction conversion efficiency of the hypercar platform could help automakers overcome the Achilles` heel of hydrogen-powered vehicles: onboard storage. Moreover, because hypercars would require significantly less tractive power, and even less fuel-cell power, they could adopt fuel cells earlier, before fuel cells` specific cost, mass, and volume have fully matured. In the meantime, commercialization in buildings can help prepare fuel cells for hypercars. The promising performance of hydrogen-fueled PEMFC hypercars suggests important opportunities in infrastructure development for direct-hydrogen vehicles.

  5. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines and Related Technologies Course Manual...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo of hydrogen-powered bus. Produced by College of the Desert and SunLine Transit Agency with funding from the U.S. Federal Transit Administration, this course manual features...

  6. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

  7. Tera-node Network Technology (TASK 4) Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA) final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Postel, John; Bannister, Joe

    2000-03-15

    The TNT project developed software technologies in scalable personal telecommunications (SPT), Reservation Protocol 2 (RSVP2), Scalable Computing Infrastructure (SCOPE), and Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA). SPT = developed many innovative protocols to support the use of videoconferencing applications on the Internet. RSVP2 = developed a new reference model and further standardization of RSVP. SCOPE = developed dynamic resource discovery techniques and distributed directory services in support of resource allocation for large distributed systems and computations. NIA = provided policy, operational, and support to the transitioning Internet.

  8. Participant List for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Participant List for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on January 31, 2007 Participant List for the 2010-2025 Scenario...

  9. NISTIR 7823 Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by providing technical leadership for the Nation's measurement and standards infrastructure. ITL develops tests of management, administrative, technical, and physical standards and guidelines for the cost-effective security Michaela Iorga Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards

  10. Campus Energy Infrastructure Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Campus Energy Infrastructure Steam Turbine Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural,000 lbs/hr (with duct fire) Steam Turbine Chiller 2,000 tons Campus Heat Load 60 MMBtu/hr (average) Campus-hours) Generator Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller

  11. QER- Comment of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Sir/Madam, The Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association (CHFCA) was pleased to participate in the September 18, 2014 special dialogue on the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) that was held in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. At this time, we understand the QER is seeking to provide a multiyear roadmap that focuses on energy infrastructure with specific attention on the transmission, storage and distribution (TS&D) systems that make up North America’s oil, gas and electricity infrastructure.

  12. Participatory infrastructure monitoring : design factors and limitations of accountability technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offenhuber, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigates practices of participatory infrastructure monitoring and their implications for the governance of urban infrastructure services. By introducing the concept of infrastructure legibility, the ...

  13. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  14. Florida State University Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Document developed by: Information Technology Services Network Infrastructure Division #12;Florida State University ­ ITS Telecommunications Infrastructure Standards 2 INTRODUCTION ........3 REVISION HISTORY Information Technology Services Network & Communications Technology Division 644 W. Call Street Tallahassee

  15. Road Infrastructure and Climate Change in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinowsky, Paul

    Climate change is a potential threat to Vietnam’s development as current and future infrastructure will be vulnerable to climate change impacts. This paper focuses on the physical asset of road infrastructure in Vietnam ...

  16. National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture Consultation Draft Contributing to the Australian Government National Plan for Environmental Information initiative #12;National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture: Consultation Draft Environmental Information

  17. The Electricity and Transportation Infrastructure Convergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Electricity and Transportation Infrastructure Convergence Using Electrical Vehicles Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;The Electricity and Transportation Infrastructure Convergence Using Electrical

  18. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SERIES SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES LNEC/NESDE Main activities · Seismic action characterization studies, seismic hazard and seismic risk · Seismic assessment of structures

  19. Office of National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  20. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop Introduction EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Introduction Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer...

  1. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berscheid, Alan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  2. Towards Collaborative Robots for Infrastructure Security Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    , infrastructure security and monitoring of sensitive national security sites (e.g. nuclear facilities, powerTowards Collaborative Robots for Infrastructure Security Applications Yi Guo School of Electrical.madhavan@nist.gov Abstract-- We discuss techniques towards using collaborative robots for infrastructure security

  3. Subangstrom Crystallography Reveals that Short Ionic Hydrogen Bonds, and Not a His-Asp Low-Barrier Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agard, David

    Subangstrom Crystallography Reveals that Short Ionic Hydrogen Bonds, and Not a His-Asp Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bond, Stabilize the Transition State in Serine Protease Catalysis Cynthia N. Fuhrmann, Matthew D that destabilizes the His57-Ser195 hydrogen bond, preventing the back-reaction. In both structures the His57-Asp102

  4. Develop Improved Materials to Support the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Michael C. Martin

    2012-07-18

    The Edison Materials Technology Center (EMTEC) solicited and funded hydrogen infrastructure related projects that have a near term potential for commercialization. The subject technology of each project is related to the US Department of Energy hydrogen economy goals as outlined in the multi-year plan titled, 'Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan.' Preference was given to cross cutting materials development projects that might lead to the establishment of manufacturing capability and job creation. The Edison Materials Technology Center (EMTEC) used the US Department of Energy hydrogen economy goals to find and fund projects with near term commercialization potential. An RFP process aligned with this plan required performance based objectives with go/no-go technology based milestones. Protocols established for this program consisted of a RFP solicitation process, white papers and proposals with peer technology and commercialization review (including DoE), EMTEC project negotiation and definition and DoE cost share approval. Our RFP approach specified proposals/projects for hydrogen production, hydrogen storage or hydrogen infrastructure processing which may include sensor, separator, compression, maintenance, or delivery technologies. EMTEC was especially alert for projects in the appropriate subject area that have cross cutting materials technology with near term manufacturing and commercialization opportunities.

  5. Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines. B31 Hydrogen...

  6. Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

  7. Modelling Hydrogen Reduction and Hydrodeoxygenation of Oxygenates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Cheah, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, we have studied the reduction of nickel oxide and biomass derived oxygenates (catechol, guaiacol, etc.) in hydrogen. Both the kinetic barrier and thermodynamic favorability are calculated with respect to the modeled reaction pathways. In early-stage reduction of the NiO(100) surface by hydrogen, the pull-off of the surface oxygen atom and simultaneous activation of the nearby Ni atoms coordinately dissociate the hydrogen molecules so that a water molecule can be formed, leaving an oxygen vacancy on the surface. In hydrogen reaction with oxygenates catalyzed by transition metals, hydrogenation of the aromatic carbon ring normally dominates. However, selective deoxygenation is of particular interest for practical application such as biofuel conversion. Our modeling shows that doping of the transition metal catalysts can change the orientation of oxygenates adsorbed on metal surfaces. The correlation between the selectivity of reaction and the orientation of adsorption are discussed.

  8. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Hyunju; Pandit, Arka; Crittenden, John; Xu, Ming; Perrings, Charles; Wang, Dali; Li, Ke; French, Steve

    2010-10-01

    The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  9. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. QER Public Meeting in Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities QER Public Meeting in Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and...

  11. CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN FUELLED VEHICLES by Katherine Aminta Muncaster of Research Project: Can Hydrogen Win?: Exploring Scenarios for Hydrogen Fuelled Vehicles Report No.: 459 explored the conditions under which hydrogen might succeed in Canada's transportation sector in a carbon

  12. Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOE HydrogenProduction Hydrogen is

  13. Compressible Solution Properties of Amorphous Polystyrene-block-Polybutadiene, Crystalline Polystyrene-block-Poly(Hydrogenated Polybutadiene) and Their Corresponding Homopolymers: Fluid-Fluid, Fluid-Solid and Fluid-Micelle Phase Transitions in Propane and Propylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy; Winoto, Winoto; Radosz, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Polystyrene, polybutadiene, hydrogenated polybutadiene, and styrene diblock copolymers of these homopolymers can form homogenous solutions in compressible solvents, such as propane and propylene, which separate into two bulk phases upon reducing pressure. The cloud and micellization pressures for homopolymer and diblock copolymers are generally found to be higher in propane than in propylene, except for hydrogenated polybutadiene and polystyrene-block-(hydrogenated polybutadiene). Hydrogenated polybutadiene homopolymers and copolymers exhibit relatively pressure-independent crystallization and melting observed in both propane and propylene solutions.

  14. infrastructure

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feedholiday |hpc2/%2A en

  15. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation|

  16. Excavating L.A. : urban design futures of new transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizuhara, Midori

    2013-01-01

    After decades of planning, recent voter approved tax initiatives have enabled Los Angeles to expand its mass transit infrastructure. Fast tracked construction projects of subway and light rail lines will connect areas of ...

  17. Hydrogen Strategies: an Integrated Resource Planning Analysis for the Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigneri, Attilio

    2005-01-01

    power plants. The distributed electrolyzer refueling stationfeaturing IMET1000 serie electrolyzers. The capacity ofkg H2 Capital cost data Electrolyzer Total Aux. TOTAL AUSD

  18. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section II. Hydrogen Production and Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 (303) 384-7705, fax: (303) 384-6363, e-mail: ed_wolfum@nrel.gov DOE Technology Development Manager: Roxanne Danz (202) 586-7260, fax: (202) 586-9811, e-mail: Roxanne. · Successfully operated trickle-bed bioreactors with volumes of 1L and 5L, and showed that the performance

  19. Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn OverviewCoalAnalysisHeatConference

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Experience with the German Hydrogen Fuel Project," HydrogenHydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  1. Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier: Outlook for 2010, 2030, and 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M

    2004-01-01

    sites used for energy infrastructure today might remain inenergy is small, hydrogen will be delivered by truck from centralized plants, similar to today’energy efficiency of a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle might be 2-3 times that of today’

  2. Hydrogen Technology Validation

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

  3. The Hype About Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2006-01-01

    another promising solution for hydrogen storage. However,storage and delivery, and there are safety issues as well with hydrogen

  4. Resilient Infrastructure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigning Resilient Infrastructure: The Argonne

  5. Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  6. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop: Final Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators | DepartmentMeeting Agenda |Overview DOEDOE

  7. Hydrogen Transition Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM M aSensitivityStudy

  8. Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Our goal is to establish the codes and standards necessary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Hydrogen Pipeline Safety METALS Our goal is to establish the codes and standards necessary the transition to large scale hydrogen distribution. · NIST is working with DOT, DOE, ASME, British Petroleum (BP

  9. Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Our goal is to establish the codes and standards necessary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Pipeline Safety METALS Our goal is to establish the codes and standards necessary the transition to large-scale hydrogen distribution. · NIST is working with DOT, DOE, ASME, British Petroleum (BP

  10. From theoretical promise to observational reality : calibration, foreground subtraction, and signal extraction in hydrogen cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Adrian Chi-Yan

    2012-01-01

    By using the hyperfine 21 cm transition to map out the distribution of neutral hydrogen at high redshifts, hydrogen cosmology has the potential to place exquisite constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters, as well ...

  11. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  12. Water Transport Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - transportation) · Develop a better understanding of the effects of freeze/thaw cycles and operation ­ Help guideWater Transport Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure understanding of water transport in PEM Fuel Cells (non-design-specific) · Evaluate structural and surface

  13. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  14. Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL...

  15. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Backsplash for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA...

  16. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C...

  17. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Report Breakout session...

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Evaluation to determine whether the...

  19. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of...

  20. Hydrogen Cryomagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    induction of 2-3 Tesla made from MgB2 superconductors indirectly cooled by LH2, besides the energy efficiency, the new technique generates a homogeneous heat distribution within the metal, so that any local overheating is avoided. As an aside... SMES device in combination with Vanadium Redox-flow Batteries as a generation reserve to regulate variations of power generation demand [25]. The use of liquid hydrogen is capable of enabling the superconducting industry as it is facing resource...

  1. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Craig M. (Kailua, HI); Zidan, Ragaiy A. (Honolulu, HI)

    2002-01-01

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  2. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen transport and storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The future use of hydrogen to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, and fuel vehicles will require the creation of a distribution infrastructure of safe, and cost-effective transport and storage. Present storage methods are too expensive and will not meet the performance requirements of future applications. Transport technologies will need to be developed based on the production and storage systems that come into use as the hydrogen energy economy evolves. Different applications will require the development of different types of storage technologies. Utility electricity generation and home and office use will have storage fixed in one location--stationary storage--and size and weight will be less important than energy efficiency and costs of the system. Fueling a vehicle, however, will require hydrogen storage in an ``on-board`` system--mobile storage--with weight and size similar to the gasoline tank in today`s vehicle. Researchers are working to develop physical and solid-state storage systems that will meet these diverse future application demands. Physical storage systems and solid-state storage methods (metal hydrides, gas-on-solids adsorption, and glass microspheres) are described.

  3. Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  4. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennebach, M; Dax, A; Fuhrmann, H; Gotta, D; Gruber, A; Hirtl, A; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Markushin, V E; Hassani, A J Rusi el; Simons, L M; Trassinelli, M; Zmeskal, J

    2014-01-01

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be $\\epsilon_{1s}=7.086\\,\\pm\\,0.007(stat)\\,\\pm\\,0.006(sys)$\\,eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate resolution bent crystal Bragg spectrometer.

  5. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hennebach; D. F. Anagnostopoulos; A. Dax; H. Fuhrmann; D. Gotta; A. Gruber; A. Hirtl; P. Indelicato; Y. -W. Liu; B. Manil; V. E. Markushin; A. J. Rusi el Hassani; L. M. Simons; M. Trassinelli; J. Zmeskal

    2014-12-17

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be $\\epsilon_{1s}=7.086\\,\\pm\\,0.007(stat)\\,\\pm\\,0.006(sys)$\\,eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer with bent crystals.

  6. Hydrogen delivery technology rRoadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen holds the long-term potential to solve two critical problems related to the energy infrastructure: U.S. dependence on foreign oil and U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants. The U.S. transportation sector is almost completely reliant on petroleum, over half of which is currently imported, and tailpipe emissions remain one of the country’s key air quality concerns. Fuel cell vehicles operating on hydrogen produced from domestically available resources – including renewable resources, coal with carbon sequestration, or nuclear energy – would dramatically decrease greenhouse gases and other emissions, and would reduce dependence on oil from politically volatile regions of the world. Clean, domestically-produced hydrogen could also be used to generate electricity in stationary fuel cells at power plants, further extending national energy and environmental benefits.

  7. Hydrogen atom in rotationally invariant noncommutative space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. P. Gnatenko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2014-11-03

    We consider the noncommutative algebra which is rotationally invariant. The hydrogen atom is studied in a rotationally invariant noncommutative space. We find the corrections to the energy levels of the hydrogen atom up to the second order in the parameter of noncommutativity. The upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is estimated on the basis of the experimental results for 1s-2s transition frequency.

  8. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation The...

  9. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  10. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of...

  11. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  12. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage &...

  13. Securing the information infrastructure for EV charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poll, Erik

    Securing the information infrastructure for EV charging Fabian van den Broek1 , Erik Poll1 , and B for the information exchanges in the infrastructure for EV charging being tri- alled in the Netherlands, which. Key words: EV charging, congestion management, end-to-end security, smart grids 1 Introduction

  14. Scanning the Technology Energy Infrastructure Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    -free electricity; banking and finance depends on the robustness of electric power, cable, and wireless infrastructures and increased demand for high-quality and reliable electricity for our digital economy is becoming, and algorithmic develop- ments. Keywords--Critical infrastructure protection, electric power grid, emergency

  15. PEV Infrastructure Needs UC Davis Policy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ,000 sales in 2012, ramp up to 20,000/yr in 2013 2012 Honda Fit EV 2012 Tesla Model S Infrastructure needs vary PEVs Available in 2012 Increasing Battery size, PHEV - BEV #12;5 PEV Charging Infrastructure · Tesla · Toyota Regional Government · CAPCOA, Sonoma · BAAQMD · SCAQMD Utilities · LADWP · PG&E · SCE

  16. Hydrogen Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentpDepartmentHydrogen: Over

  17. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Smol, Robert (East Patchogue, NY); Farber, Gerald (Elmont, NY); Naphtali, Leonard M. (Washington, DC)

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  18. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today outside of cost, derive from excessive false positives and false negatives arising from signal drift and unstable sensor baseline; both of these problems necessitate the need for unacceptable frequent calibration.

  19. Systems analysis of hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermelee, A.; Beller, M.; D'Acierno, J.

    1981-11-01

    The potential for hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines is analyzed for a specific site from both mid-term (1985) and long-term perspectives. The concept of supplementing natural gas with the addition of hydrogen in the existing gas pipeline system serves to provide a transport and storage medium for hydrogen while eliminating the high investment costs associated with constructing separate hydrogen pipelines. This paper examines incentives and barriers to the implementation of this concept. The analysis is performed with the assumption that current developmental programs will achieve a process for cost-effectively separating pure hydrogen from natural gas/hydrogen mixtures to produce a separable and versatile chemical and fuel commodity. The energy systems formulation used to evaluate the role of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure is the Reference Energy System (RES). The RES is a network diagram that provides an analytic framework for incorporating all resources, technologies, and uses of energy in a uniform manner. A major aspect of the study is to perform a market analysis of traditional uses of resources in the various consuming sectors and the potential for hydrogen substitution in these sectors. The market analysis will focus on areas of industry where hydrogen is used as a feedstock rather than for its fuel-use opportunities to replace oil and natural gas. The sectors of industry where hydrogen is currently used and where its use can be expanded or substituted for other resources include petroleum refining, chemicals, iron and steel, and other minor uses.

  20. ISMS for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure 1 Information Security Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    ISMS for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure 1 Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure Online Services Security and Compliance Executive summary This paper describes the Microsoft Cloud Infrastructure and Operations (MCIO) Information Security Management System (ISMS) program

  1. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION Database: Architecture and implementation #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN Conclusions #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES 3 SERIES Concluding

  2. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION platform for distributed hybrid testing #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN? Celestina Overview Implementation Validation Next steps #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  3. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental-TA Project #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Partners (Users) · METU Ragueneau · SCHOECK (Germany): Steffen Scheer, Seref Diler #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  4. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES · Numerical Simulations #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Project

  5. Fuel Cells in Transit Buses Transit buses are widely viewed as one of the best strategies for commercializing fuel cells for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cells in Transit Buses Summary Transit buses are widely viewed as one of the best strategies for commercializing fuel cells for vehicles and transitioning to a hydrogen economy. Many advantages have been identified regarding the use of transit buses as fuel cell platforms. For example: · Transit buses have well

  6. Solar Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, C.; Sutin, N.; Turner, J.

    1996-09-01

    This panel addressed different methods for the photoassisted dissociation of water into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen. Systems considered include PV-electrolysis, photoelectrochemical cells, and transition-metal based microheterogeneous and homogeneous systems. While none of the systems for water splitting appear economically viable at the present time, the panel identified areas of basic research that could increase the overall efficiency and decrease the costs. Common to all the areas considered was the underlying belief that the water-to-hydrogen half reaction is reasonably well characterized, while the four-electron oxidation of water-to-oxygen is less well understood and represents a significant energy loss. For electrolysis, research in electrocatalysis to reduce overvoltage losses was identified as a key area for increased efficiency. Non-noble metal catalysts and less expensive components would reduce capital costs. While potentially offering higher efficiencies and lower costs, photoelectrochemical-based direct conversion systems undergo corrosion reactions and often have poor energetics for the water reaction. Research is needed to understand the factors that control the interfacial energetics and the photoinduced corrosion. Multi-photon devices were identified as promising systems for high efficiency conversion.

  7. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

  8. Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Luis W.

    1956-01-01

    t No. W - 7 4 0 5 -eng-48 ,LIQUID HYDROGEN EUSBLE CHA,MBEEZSand 3erkeley to iind if liquid hydrogen could be used as thethat supezheated 'liquid hydrogen could be made to boil

  9. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    1096 (1990). S. Furuhama, "Hydrogen Engine Systems for LandGelse, "The Mercedes-Benz Hydrogen Engine for Application inI do assume that the hydrogen engines would run ultra lean,

  10. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) Base Plan, a comprehensive risk management framework that defines critical infrastructure protection (CIP) roles and...

  11. Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Presented at...

  12. SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY Based on the finding of a growing potential...

  13. Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure Decision Making Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure Decision Making May 22, 2015 -...

  14. taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramani, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

  15. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and...

  16. Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) The Year-in-Review (YIR): 2012 Energy...

  17. NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014 1. Introduction This companion Roadmap to the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity ("the

  18. DOE Awards Contract for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Infrastructure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Infrastructure Support Services DOE Awards Contract for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Infrastructure Support Services June 17, 2015 - 5:45pm...

  19. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop The Advanced Manufacturing Office...

  20. Transforming the U.S. Energy Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible and economic in the world. On the other hand, the U.S. energy infrastructure is excessively reliant on foreign sources of energy, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG). This report presents a Technology Based Strategy to achieve a full transformation of the U.S. energy infrastructure that corrects these negative factors while retaining the positives.