Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort (INEEL) Don Karner (ETA) 2004 Fuel Cell Seminar - San Antonio Session 5B - Hydrogen DOE - Advanced Vehicle Testing...

3

FNS Presentation - Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicles Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Operations Federal Network for Sustainability Idaho Falls, Idaho - July 2006 Jim Francfort INL/CON-06-11569 Presentation Outline * Background & Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design & operations * Fuel Dispensing * Hydrogen & HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * Briefly, other AVTA Activities * WWW Information 2 AVTA Background & Goal * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) & the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

4

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

J. Francfort (INEEL)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogen Station & Hydrogen ICE Vehicles Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 INL Alternative Fuel Fleet (318 vehicles) * 79 B20 motor coach buses * 7 Dedicated LNG motor coach buses * 154 Bi-fuel light-duty CNG vehicles * 52 Bi-fuel E85 (85% ethanol)...

6

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing Jim Francfort for Lee Slezak WestStart CALSTART Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Symposium - February 2006 INL/CON-06-01109 Presentation Outline * Background and Goal * Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design and operations * Fuel Dispensing * Prototype Dispenser Testing * Hydrogen and HCNG Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities * WWW Information AVTA Background and Goal * AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program * These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications * AVTA Goal - Provide benchmark data for technology

7

Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Combustion Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Vehicle Testing Activities James Francfort Idaho National Laboratory 2 Paper #2006-01-0433 Presentation Outline Background and goal APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design and operations Fuel dispensing and prototype dispenser Hydrogen (H2) and HCNG (compressed natural gas) internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle testing WWW Information 3 Paper #2006-01-0433 Background Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program These activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) 4 Paper #2006-01-0433 AVTA Goal Provide benchmark data for technology modeling, research and development programs, and help fleet managers and

8

hydrogen pilot plant, H2ICE vehicle testing INL alternative energy vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Hydrogen Pilot Plant, H2ICE Vehicle Testing, & INL Alternative Energy Vehicles (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INL/CON-05-00694 AVTA Presentation Outline * Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design and Operations * Hydrogen internal combustion engine vehicle testing * Oil bypass filter system evaluation * Diesel engine idling testing * INL alternative fuel infrastructure * INL alternative fuel fleet * WWW information APS Alternative Fuel (Alt-Fuel) Pilot Plant - Partners * Arizona Public Service (APS) * Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) * Idaho National Laboratory (INL) * Started operations - 2002 Alt-Fuel Pilot Plant & Vehicle Testing - Objectives * Evaluate the safety & reliability of operating ICE

9

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

10

Hydrogen vehicle fueling station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe a hydrogen vehicle fueling station that receives and stores hydrogen in liquid form and dispenses it either as a liquid or compressed gas. The economics that accrue from the favorable weight and volume advantages of liquid hydrogen support this concept both now and probably for some time to come. The model for liquid transfer to a 120-liter vehicle tank shows that transfer times under five minutes are feasible with pump-assisted transfer, or for pressure transfer with subcooling greater than 1 K. The model for compressed gas transfer shows that underfilling of nearly 30% can occur during rapid filling. Cooling the fill gas to 214 K completely eliminates underfilling.

Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Vehicle Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas. ProductsDeliverables Description: Report Publication Title:...

12

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. , and Ovshinsky, S.R. , A Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Powered byM. , and Stetson, N. , Solid Hydrogen Storage Systems forpaper from Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems, Rochester Hills,

Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traction Battery for the ETX-II Vehicle, EGG-EP-9688, IdahoElectric Vehicle Powertrain (ETX-II) Performance: VehicleDevelopment Program - ETX-II, Phase II Technical Report, DOE

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

16

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen (which would not have to be stored, and which would be distributed locady only). Filling station

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 DOE Hydrogen 1 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and

18

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and

19

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program and

20

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local gasoline taxes ($/gal) This is equal to total motorgasoline tax in cents/mi) Vehicle efficiency parameters: input data 0.89 0.89 Once-through efficiency of electric motor,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced...

22

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about $0.50/gJ to the price of biomass-derived hydrogen (biomass (Larson and Katofsky, 1992). The fuel retati pricebiomass instead of from solar power, the production cost would be much lower (Table 5), and the breakeven gasoline price

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Prospects on fuel economy improvements for hydrogen powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles are the subject of extensive research and development because of their potential for high efficiency and low emissions. Because fuel cell vehicles remain expensive and the demand for hydrogen is therefore limited, very few fueling stations are being built. To try to accelerate the development of a hydrogen economy, some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) in the automotive industry have been working on a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) as an intermediate step. Despite its lower cost, the hydrogen-fueled ICE offers, for a similar amount of onboard hydrogen, a lower driving range because of its lower efficiency. This paper compares the fuel economy potential of hydrogen-fueled vehicles to their conventional gasoline counterparts. To take uncertainties into account, the current and future status of both technologies were considered. Although complete data related to port fuel injection were provided from engine testing, the map for the direct-injection engine was developed from single-cylinder data. The fuel cell system data represent the status of the current technology and the goals of FreedomCAR. For both port-injected and direct-injected hydrogen engine technologies, power split and series Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) configurations were considered. For the fuel cell system, only a series HEV configuration was simulated.

Rousseau, A.; Wallner, T.; Pagerit, S.; Lohse-Bush, H. (Energy Systems)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F-150 16V Hydrogen ICE Conversion - Testing Results (PDF 110 KB) 2003 Ford F-150 Pickup Truck Ford F-150 HydrogenCNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150 (up to 30%...

26

Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

Doyle, T.A.

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydrogen Storage Requirements for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GENERAL MOTORS GENERAL MOTORS HYDROGEN STORAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR FUEL CELL VEHICLES Brian G. Wicke GM R&D and Planning DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop August 14-15, 2002 Argonne National Laboratory General Motors Fuel Cell Vehicles * GM fuel cell vehicle Goal - be the first to profitably sell one million fuel cell vehicles * Fuel cell powerplant must be suitable for a broad range of light-duty vehicles (not just niche) * UNCOMPROMISED performance & reliability are REQUIRED * SAFETY IS A GIVEN * Evolutionary and Revolutionary vehicle designs are included-GM AUTONOMY-as long as the customer is (more than) satisfied GENERAL MOTORS AUTONOMY GENERAL MOTORS AUTONOMY General Motors Fuel Cell Vehicles * Focus on PEM fuel cell technology * Must consider entire hydrogen storage & (unique) fuel delivery systems,

28

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Assessment of Fuel Cell Cars, Massachusettselectric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of PowerTransition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the Potential

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Prof. Jinyang Zheng Director of IPE, Zhejiang University Director of Engineering Research Center for High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education Vice Director of China National Safety Committee of Pressure Vessels Vice President of CMES-P.R. China China Representative of ISO/TC197 and ISO/TC58 U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Development of Vehicles,Dec.10-11,2009, Washington Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG,CNG-H2,H2 Vehicles and Fuels in China Content Hydrogen Production CNG Refueling Station Hydrogen Refueling Station Shanxi HCNG Project U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and

30

Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LemonsR. A. ( 1990) Fuel Cells for Transportation. Jour- DC,M. A. (1992). Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles. Re- koebensteinsolid tember. oxide fuel cell development. Journal of

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Ogden, Joan M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Passenger Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

estimated the cost of both gasoline and methanol onboard fuel processors, as well as the cost of stationary hydrogen fueling system components including steam methane reformers,...

32

Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING INFRASTRUCTURE IN INDIA Prof. L. M. Das Centre for Energy Studies Indian Institute of Technology Delhi INDIA " The earth was not given to us by our parents , it has been loaned to us by our children" Kenyan Proverb Same feeling exists in all societies Our moral responsibility---to handover a safer earth to future generation IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 -:Hydrogen:- Not a Radically New Concept JULES VERNE Mysterious Island (1876) ...." I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it, used singly or together will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light of an intensity of which coal is not capable.........water will be coal of the future" IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 Source: T. Nejat Veziroglu , Hydrogen Energy Technologies, UNIDO

33

Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

Doyle, T.A.

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper for the 2005 National Hydrogen Association conference analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations

38

Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

The existence of memory effect on hydrogen ordering in ice: The effect makes ice attractive  

SciTech Connect

The existence of ferroelectric ice XI with ordered hydrogen in space becomes of interest in astronomy and physical chemistry because of the strong electrostatic force. However, the influence was believed to be limited because it forms in a narrow temperature range. From neutron diffraction experiments, we found that small hydrogen-ordered domains exist at significantly higher temperature and the domains induce the growth of 'bulk' ice XI. The small ordered domain is named 'memory' of hydrogen ordered ice because it is the residual structure of ice XI. Since the memory exists up to at least 111 K, most of ices in the solar system are hydrogen ordered and may have ferroelectricity. The small hydrogen-ordered domains govern the cosmochemical properties of ice and evolution of icy grains in the universe.

Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs offer a sustainable transportation option, provide a cost-competitive alternative for drivers, reduce dependence on imported oil, and enable global economic leadership and job growth.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

Lokshin, Konstantin (Santa Fe, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of battery electric, hydrogen fuel cell and hybrid vehicles in a future sustainable road transport system, Energy Policy

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Introduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keywords: Vehicle characteristics; market penetration; advanced technology vehicles; hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) Purpose Vehicle Choice Model - Estimate market penetration...

45

NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retooling Today's Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy on AddThis.com... Retooling Today's Engines for the Hydrogen Economy Hydrogen-Powered Internal Combustion Engines Gain Momentum in the Quest to

47

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Ice Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the formation of molecular hydrogen on low density and high density amorphous ice surfaces are analyzed using a rate equation model. The activation energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. The more porous morphology of the low density ice gives rise to a broader spectrum of energy barriers compared to the high density ice. Inserting these parameters into the rate equation model under steady state conditions we evaluate the production rate of molecular hydrogen on ice-coated interstellar dust grains.

Hagai B. Perets; Ofer Biham; Giulio Manico; Valerio Pirronello; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Gianfranco Vidali

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydrogen Station & ICE Vehicle Operations and Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

psi (total both tanks) Boost Compressor Main Compressor CNG Output Pilot Plant - CNG Substation Street Service Low Pressure Natural Gas High Pressure Storage (3 levels) Pilot Plant...

49

Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s future commitment to hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles haselimination of the U.S. DOE hydrogen production, deliveryhas recently re-instated hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle

Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.govafdccodesstandardsbasics.html. Find hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure codes...

51

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.govafdccodesstandardsbasics.html. Find hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure...

52

What's a hydrogen blended fueled vehicle?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available for testing. However, development of fuel cell vehicles continues in earnest by vehicle manufacturers and other groups such as DOE's FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies...

53

Battery electric vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Which will  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Battery electric vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Which will be the winner? ICEPT considered are: improved internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) powered by biofuels, battery electric. All three fuels considered (i.e.: biofuels, electricity and hydrogen) are in principle compatible

54

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Polymer and Composite Materials R&D Gaps for Hydrogen Systems Michael Veenstra Ford Motor Company October 17, 2012 1 SAE Fuel Cell Vehicle Committee � Developing vehicle and systems-level, performance- based standards based on best available knowledge. � Cooperating with other organizations to verify current standards and develop new capabilities, when appropriate. � DOE-funded verification testing of methodologies � Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) � CSA America � Overall objective � Use FCVs as current ICEs are used (without restrictions) � Facilitate rapid advances by the industry � Provide a technical basis for national and global requirements 2 SAE FCV ENABLING Standards

57

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles Powered by a Fuel Cell and by Internal Combustion Engine for Canada Project ID: 117 Principal Investigator: Xianguo Li Purpose In this study, a full life cycle analysis of an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) has been carried out. The impact of the material and fuel used in the vehicle on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions is analyzed for Canada. Four different methods of obtaining hydrogen were analyzed; using coal and nuclear power to produce electricity and extraction of hydrogen through electrolysis and via steam reforming of natural gas in a natural gas plant and in a hydrogen refueling station.

58

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of hydrogen vehicles with cryogenic high pressure storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LIQ) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

Aceves, S. M.; Berry, G. D.

1998-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601,...

62

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet on Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology activities at NREL.

Not Available

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles â?? plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

Janice Thomas

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

blends in real time and delivers 15, 20, 30 and 50% hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG), can be found in Hydrogen, CNG, and HCNG Dispenser System - Prototype Report (PDF 409...

68

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is that they can run on pure hydrogen or a blend of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG). That fuel flexibility is very attractive as a means of addressing the widespread lack...

69

The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter Researchers have revealed a new single-stage method for recharging the hydrogen storage compound ammonia borane. March 21, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact

70

Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements, March 2008  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and

71

Hybrid and conventional hydrogen engine vehicles that meet EZEV emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, a time-dependent engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. A The validated engine model is then used to calculate fuel economy and emissions for three hydrogen-fueled vehicles: a conventional, a parallel hybrid, and a series hybrid. All vehicles use liquid hydrogen as a fuel. The hybrid vehicles use a flywheel for energy storage. Comparable ultra capacitor or battery energy storage performance would give similar results. This paper analyzes the engine and flywheel sizing requirements for obtaining a desired level of performance. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignited engines can provide a high fuel economy and Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in the three vehicle configurations being analyzed.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity- Hydrogen Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications (ETA) to construct and operate a hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG) generation and fueling facility in Phoenix, Arizona. The HCNG facility provides pure...

73

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and use (such as in fuel cell and internal combustion engine technologies), to minimize production costs, and to develop methods for hydrogen infrastructure design, construction,...

74

Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commitment to hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles has beenand storage R&D and fuel cell vehicle program, whilepower applications of fuel cells. Congress has recently re-

Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

System Dynamics: HyDIVE(TM) (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Cory Welch at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting focuses on Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution Model.

Welch, C.

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Development and validation of a hybrid electric vehicle with hydrogen internal combustion engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The motivation for the use of hydrogen as fuel is that it is renewable and can reduce emissions. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are still likely… (more)

He, Xiaolai

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Bill Elrick California Fuel Cell Partnership 3/19/2013 The cars are coming HyundaiTucson ix35 FCEV production launch 2/26/13 Daimler/Nissan/Ford joint development announces 2017 launch of affordable FCEV 1/28/13 Toyota partnership with BMW 1/24/2013 Toyota announces sedan-type FCEV launch in 2015 9/24/12 The buses are coming HyundaiTucson ix35 FCEV production launch 2/26/13 Daimler/Nissan/Ford joint development announces 2017 launch of affordable FCEV 1/28/13 Toyota partnership with BMW 1/24/2013 Toyota announces sedan-type FCEV launch in 2015 9/24/12 Fuel Cell Buses too! * CA Roadmap * National Strategy paper CaFCP 2013 Zero emission vehicles in California ZEV Regulation - (www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/zevprog.htm)

80

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle  

SciTech Connect

This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 DOE Hydrogen and 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer

84

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

85

Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSA Standards HPRD1-2009 CSA Standards HPRD1-2009 Temporary Interim Requirement For Pressure Relief Devices For Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers Published - August 2009 3 5.6 General Hydrogen Service Suitability 5.6.1 General. The purpose of this test is to demonstrate suitability of pressure relief devices in hydrogen service. The pressure relief devices will be selected to be in compliance with Section 5.1 and representative of normal production. NOTE: This series of performance tests may not guarantee that all cases and conditions of service will be validated; it is still incumbent on the designer/builder to carefully screen materials of construction for their intended use. Test Method. The general hydrogen service suitability test sequence will be performed on nine devices.

86

Liquid-hydrogen-fueled-vehicle tests. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program for the development of a baseline liquid-hydrogen fueled vehicle and a liquid-hydrogen-refueling system was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on September 30, 1981. This program involved the cooperative efforts of the Laboratory (funded by the US Department of Energy), the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DFVLR) of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the State of New Mexico through the New Mexico Energy Institute (NMEI). The results of the program provide a reference point from which future progress and improvements in liquid-hydrogen on-board storage and refueling capabilities may be measured. The NMEI provided the program a 1979 Buick Century 4-door sedan with 3.8-L (231-in./sup 3/) displacement turbocharged V6 engine and automatic transmission. The DFVLR provided an on-board liquid-hydrogen storage tank and a refueling station. The DFVLR tank, and the engine modifications for operation on hydrogen rather than gasoline, represented readily available, state-of-the-art capabilities when the program began in March 1979. The original tank provided by the DFVLR was replaced with a larger capacity tank, which was fabricated using more advanced cryogenic engineering technology. The vehicle was refueled at least 60 times with liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and the semiautomatic refueling station designed and built by the DFVLR. At the end of program, the engine had been operated for 133 h and the car driven for 3540 km (2200 miles) on hydrogen without any major difficulties. The vehicle obtained 2.4 km/L (5.7 miles/gal) of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L (21 miles/gal) of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis for driving in the high-altitude Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Albuquerque areas. Without refueling, the car had a range of about 274 km (170 miles) with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km (225 miles) with the second tank.

Stewart, W.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Liquid-hydrogen-fueled-vehicle tests. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program for the development of a baseline liquid-hydrogen fueled vehicle and a liquid-hydrogen-refueling system was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on September 30, 1981. This program involved the cooperative efforts of the Laboratory (fundd by the US Department of Energy), the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DFVLR) of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the State of New Mexico through the New Mexico Energy Institute (NMEI). The results of the program provide a reference point from which future progress and improvements in liquid-hydrogen on-board storage and refueling capabilities may be measured. The NMEI provided the program a 1979 Buick Century 4-door sedan with 3.8-L (231-in./sup 3/) displacement turbocharged V6 engine and automatic transmission. The DFVLR provided an on-board liquid-hydrogen storage tank and a refueling station. The DFVLR tank, and the engine modifications for operation on hydrogen rather than gasoline, represented readily available, state-of-the-art capabilities when the program began in March 1979. The original tank provided by the DFVLR was replaced with a larger capacity tank, which was fabricated using more advanced cryogenic engineering technology. The vehicle was refueled at least 60 times with liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and the semiautomatic refueling station designed and built by the DFVLR. At the end of program, the engine had been operated for 133 h and the car driven for 3540 km (2200 miles) on hydrogen without any major difficulties. The vehicle obtained 2.4 km/L (5.7 miles/gal) of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L (21 miles/gal) of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis for driving in the high-altitude Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Albuquerque areas. Without refueling, the car had a range of about 274 km (170 miles) with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km (225 miles) with the second tank.

Stewart, W.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40: October 4, 40: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #340: October 4, 2004 Hydrogen Fuel as a Replacement for Gasoline on

89

Penn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hybrid electric vehicle test platforms. Relevant HHVRL project history includes: · Combined BatteryPenn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI) The Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory (HHVRL) at the Larson Transportation Institute (LTI

Lee, Dongwon

90

Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Ice Nature Bulletin No. 661-A january 7, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE There was a time when ice, cut on frozen ponds and lakes, was transported by fast clipper ships from New England to New Orleans where it was worth its weight in gold. Nowadays this cold brittle colorless substance is commonplace everywhere. Few people, however, know that ice is one of the strangest of all solids; and that, because of its unique properties, life on earth is what it is. Those properties are due to the distinctive structure of a molecule of water, formed of three elemental particles or atoms -- two of hydrogen and one of oxygen -- expressed by the familiar symbol, H2O. The three atoms are held together by two chemical bonds expressed by another symbol, H-O-H. Briefly, the unique properties of water, water vapor, and ice arise from that bonding and the arrangement of electron pairs around the oxygen atom.

91

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Series hybrid vehicles and optimized hydrogen engine design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore, Sandia Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have a joint project to develop an optimized hydrogen fueled engine for series hybrid automobiles. The major divisions of responsibility are: system analysis, engine design and kinetics modeling by LLNL; performance and emission testing, and friction reduction by SNL; computational fluid mechanics and combustion modeling by LANL. This project is a component of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technology, National Hydrogen Program. We report here on the progress on system analysis and preliminary engine testing. We have done system studies of series hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. The impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy are evaluated. Experiments with an available engine at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppm at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid vehicle simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppm to meet the 0.2 g/mile California Air Resources Board ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. We have designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing single cylinder Onan engine. This head currently features 14.8:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Van Blarigan, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Technical and Economic Assessment of Hydrogen and Methanol Poweredd Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to assess and compare the technical and economic status and prospects of hydrogen and methanol powered fuel cell electric vehicles.

Patrick Jung; Chalmers Tekniska Hgskola; Kristian Lindgren; Ingrid Rde

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Paper Conference Paper Analysis of the Hydrogen NREL/CP-540-37903 Infrastructure Needed to March 2005 Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen- Fueled Vehicles Preprint M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the National Hydrogen Association � Annual Hydrogen Conference 2005 � Washington, DC � March 29-April 1, 2005 � NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of

102

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

103

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

batteries and ultracapacitors for electric vehicles. EVS24Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposiumpublications on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicle design. Dr.on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and applicationsand performance. Hybrid vehicles utilizing a load leveling

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacitors fuel-cell hybrid electric vehicle optimizationsize for fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle-Part I, Journalbeen developed for hybrid electric vehicles with an internal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in batteries, ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicleBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle SymposiumBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Measurements of Surface Wave Decay and Directional Spectra in the Marginal Sea Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2003 several autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) missions were carried out under sea ice in the western Bellingshausen Sea. Data from the upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) on the “Autosub” AUV indicate a strongly ...

Daniel R. Hayes; Adrian Jenkins; Stephen McPhail

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), for the production of water (H{sub 2}O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice films between 2.5 and 200 {mu}m, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 {mu}m. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H{sub 2}O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. In the absence of definite H{sub 2}O{sub 2} features, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 {mu}m found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 {mu}m H{sub 2}O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as a percentage of H{sub 2}O, of 9% {+-} 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

Smith, R. G.; Wright, C. M.; Robinson, G. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Charnley, S. B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pendleton, Y. J. [NASA Lunar Science Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Maldoni, M. M., E-mail: r.smith@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: c.wright@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: g.robinson@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: Steven.B.Charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: yvonne.pendleton@nasa.gov [Geoscience Australia, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hybrid vehicle system studies and optimized hydrogen engine design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have done system studies of series hydrogen hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. We have evaluated the impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy. Experiments in an available engine at the Sandia CRF demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppM at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppM to meet the 0.2 g/mile ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. LLNL has designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing Onan engine. This head features 15:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses. Initial testing shows promise of achieving an indicated efficiency of nearly 50% and emissions of less than 100 ppM NO{sub x}. Hydrocarbons and CO are to be measured, but are expected to be very low since their only source is engine lubricating oil. A successful friction reduction program on the Onan engine should result in a brake thermal efficiency of about 42% compared to today`s gasoline engines of 32%. Based on system studies requirements, the next generation engine will be about 2 liter displacement and is projected to achieve 46% brake thermal efficiency with outputs of 15 kW for cruise and 40 kW for hill climb.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicle Evaluation Richard Parish, Leslie Eudy, and Ken Proc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on past experience of developing and evaluating alternative fuel and hybrid electric vehicles, NREL took to evaluating and documenting the performance and operational characteristics of advanced vehicle technologiesHydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicle Evaluation Richard Parish, Leslie Eudy, and Ken Proc National

112

New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles MARCH 7, 2007 Bookmark and Share Nenad Markovic and Vojislav Stamenkovic with the new three-chamber UHV system at Argonne. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have developed an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering - a

113

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique ordinances or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure codes and standards in these categories: * Annual Inspections and Approvals * General Station Requirements * Gaseous Hydrogen Storage, Compression, and Generation Systems * Liquefied Hydrogen Storage Systems

114

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Project Summary Full Title: Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Project ID: 108 Principal Investigator: Matthew Thornton Brief Description: ADVISOR is used to simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. Keywords: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV); vehicle characteristics; vehicle performance; fuel consumption Purpose ADVISOR was designed as an analysis tool to assist the DOE in developing and understanding hybrid electric vehicles through the Hybrid Vehice Propulsion Systems contracts with Ford, GM, and DaimlerChrysler. Performer Principal Investigator: Matthew Thornton Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd.

115

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-van employ compressed hydrogen gas storage. Although the energy density of compressedhydrogen gasis lower,less costly and more energy efficient, refueling canbe accomplished rapidly, and hydrogen canbe produced from~--- - ~ .. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES: A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CASE STUDY Joan

117

ENERGY FORESIGHT NETWORK WORKSHOP: TECHNOLOGIES FOR HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topic 1: Hydrogen and fuel cell technology................................................................................ 5 1. What are the main advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen and fuel cells in transport?...... 5 2. Storage of hydrogen in the vehicles: where we are? What is likely to come out?.................... 6 3. Fuel cells: where we are? What is likely to come out?............................................................ 7

Workpackage Leader Bertr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Technical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to be determined. e Onboard efficiency is the energy efficiency for delivering hydrogen from the storage systemTechnical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles a Storage to the powerplant divided by the total mass/volume of the complete storage system, including all stored hydrogen

119

National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

pipeline safety) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Local Government (zoning, building permits) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS (crashworthiness) EPA (emissions) Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed to prepare for the commercialization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards General FC Vehicle Safety: Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems: Fuel System Components: Containers: Reformers: Emissions: Recycling: Service/Repair: Storage Tanks: Piping: Dispensers: On-site H2 Production: Codes for the Environment: Composite Containers:

120

DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development August 14, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary Clarence H. "Bud" Albright, Jr. today announced the selection of 10 cost-shared hydrogen storage research and development projects, which will receive up to $15.3 million over five years, subject to annual appropriations. These projects are part of President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative that committed $1.2 billion on research and development (R&D) for hydrogen-powered fuel cells. The projects also support the President's Advanced Energy Initiative to reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign energy sources by changing the way we power our cars, homes, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis shows that hybrid and electric cars perform bettercar (4-5 passengers) Fuels Gasoline, CNG, diesel, FT50, methanol, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Hybrids, Hydrogen and other...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

avoided 318 INL Alternative Fuel Vehicles * 79 B20 motor coach buses * 7 Dedicated LNG motor coach buses * 154 Bi-fuel light-duty CNG vehicles * 52 Bi-fuel E85 (85% ethanol)...

123

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles, Energy Policythe Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles, UCD-ITS-RR-per gallon of motor fuel, Defense of oil on average; thus,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market...

125

Fuel Cell Vehicles Enhance NREL Hydrogen Research Capabilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle-Advanced (FCHV-adv) sport utility vehicles on loan from Toyota. Over the next two years the lab will use the FCHVs, also known as fuel cell electric...

126

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James, A cost comparison of fuel-cell and battery electricHowever, battery electric vehicles have lower fuel cost, usebattery-electric vehicles in terms of weight, volume, GHGs and cost,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

ME 5xx: Fuel Cell Vehicles & Hydrogen Infrastructure Instructors: D. Siegel and A. Stefanopoulou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Targets for cost and efficiency Technologies: Coal, natural gas (steam reforming), nuclear energy practicable number of vehicles that can be fueled by hydrogen by 2020 Funding and policy actions needed refill Control and interface with the FC powerplant Chapter 9: Hydrogen Safety / Codes & Standards (1

Stefanopoulou, Anna

130

Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems : applications, properties, and gap analysis.  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Mobility Chains Analysis of Technologies for Passenger Cars and Light-Duty Vehicles Fueled with Biofuels: Application of the GREET Model to the Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) Project Project ID: 82 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Brief Description: The mobility chains analysis estimated the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of various biofuels in light-duty vehicles. Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); ethanol; biofuels; Fischer Tropsch diesel; hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) Purpose The project was a multi-organization, multi-sponsor project to examine the potential of biofuels in the U.S. Argonne was responsible for the well-to-wheels analysis of biofuel production and use.

133

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure and hydrogen res

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Some hydrogen-control considerations for ice-condenser nuclear plants. [PWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposal of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for coping with the problem of accident generated hydrogen gas in its Sequoyah ice-condenser plant was to put in place glow-plug igniters so that any hydrogen that is evolved during an accident could be burnt before accumulating into a dangerously large mass. Since it was desired to install these igniters in the Sequoyah and other plants as quickly as possible, the NRC asked the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to carry out some experiments on these igniters to delineate the region of their applicability.

Hubbard, H.W.; Hammond, R.P.; Zivi, S.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG/Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNG/H2 Vehicles and Fuels in the CNG/H2 Vehicles and Fuels in the United States Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for Safe Deployment of Vehicles Workshop December 2009 2 Overview DOT/NHTSA Mission Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) FMVSS covering alternative fuel vehicles Research supporting new/improved FMVSS for alternative fuel vehicles International Harmonization - Global Technical Regulations 3 Mission Statements DOT Mission Statement Serve the United States by ensuring a safe transportation system that furthers our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people * Safety - Promote the public health and safety by working toward the elimination of transportation-related deaths and injuries NHTSA Mission Statement To reduce deaths, injuries and economic losses resulting from

137

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #204: February 18, 2002 Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 18, 2002 Hydrogen Facts As part of an effort to reduce American dependence on foreign oil, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced on January 9, 2002, a new...

139

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

SciTech Connect

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure a

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Project Summary Full Title: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Previous Title(s): New Generation Mobile Source Emissions Model (NGM) Project ID: 179 Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Brief Description: Estimates emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, multiple pollutants, fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. Keywords: Vehicle; transportation; emissions Purpose Estimate emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, cover a broad range of pollutants, and allow multiple scale analysis, from fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. When fully implemented MOVES will serve as the replacement for MOBILE. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch FCEVs in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020....

142

Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AGENDA AGENDA U. S. Department of Transportation and U.S. Department of Energy Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles December 10-11, 2009 - Washington, DC A workshop to promote exchange of information among experts on compressed natural gas and hydrogen fuels for vehicles and to share lessons learned from deployment of these vehicles in public transit, fleets, and consumer transportation throughout the world. Workshop Objectives: * To coordinate lessons learned by identifying similarities and critical differences between compressed natural gas and hydrogen properties, including CNG-H2 blends, and their industries and applications (e.g., product specifications, tanks, reliability, safety procedures, risk mitigation, and dispensing)

143

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fuel Cell and Battery Electric Vehicles Compared By C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction goals1 . As shown in Figure 1, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV's) and plugin hybrid electric electric vehicle; H2 ICE HEV = hydrogen internal combustion engine hybrid electric vehicle) C.E. Thomas Fuel Cell and Battery Electric Vehicles Compared By C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President H2Gen

145

Hydrogen-bond Dynamics and Fermi Resonance in High-pressure Methane Filled Ice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-pressure, variable temperature infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations on the methane filled ice structure (MH-III) at high pressures are used to investigate the vibrational dynamics related to pressure induced modifications in hydrogen bonding. Infrared spectroscopy of isotopically dilute solutions of H{sub 2}O in D{sub 2}O is employed together with first-principles calculations to characterize proton dynamics with the pressure induced shortening of hydrogen bonds. A Fermi resonance is identified and shown to dominate the infrared spectrum in the pressure region between 10 and 30 GPa. Significant differences in the effects of the Fermi resonance observed between 10 and 300 K arise from the double-well potential energy surface of the hydrogen bond and quantum effects associated with the proton dynamics.

Klug,D.; Tse, J.; Liu, Z.; Hemley, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #205: February 25, 2002 Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on site, such as at an oil refinery, and is not sold on the market. From large-scale production, hydrogen costs 0.32lb if consumed on site. When sold on the market, the cost...

147

Cryogenic, compressed, and liquid hydrogen fuel storage in vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen is the viable energy carrier of future energy and transportation systems due to its clean emissions, light weight, and abundance. Its extremely low volumetric density, however, presents significant challenges to ...

Reyes, Allan B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Vehicle Transportation Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell technology, no connection to electricity grid 4 General Takeaways * CAVs - Unproven technology - Poor environmental performance - High cost * NGVs - Poor environmental performance - Lack of refueling infrastructure - Cheaper fuel cost than ICEs - No direct impact on electric power grid * Hydrogen - Unproven technology

149

Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University; Greene, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Missing short-range interactions in the hydrogen bond of compressed ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining the Lagrangian-Laplace mechanics and the known pressure dependence of the length-stiffness relaxation dynamics, we have determined the critical, yet often-overlooked, short-range interactions in the hydrogen bond of compressed ice. This approach has enabled determination of the force constant, cohesive energy, potential energy of the vdW and the covalent segment at each quasi-equilibrium state as well as their pressure dependence. Evidencing the essentiality of the inter-electron-pair Coulomb repulsion and the segmental strength disparity in determining the asymmetric H-bond relaxation dynamics and the anomalous properties of ice, results confirmed that compression shortens and stiffens the OH bond and meanwhile lengthens and softens the covalent bond.

Chang Q Sun

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Simulation of a hydrogen powered medium size vehicle: application to NEDC cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction of greenhouse effect gases emission is a major source of concern nowadays. Internal combustion engines, as the most widely used power generation mean for transportation represent a large share of such gases, which motivates active research ... Keywords: PEMFC, cell potential, electric vehicle, fuel cell, hydrogen

A. Slimani; N. Ait Messaoudene; H. Abdi; M. W. Naceur

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mitigation of direct containment heating and hydrogen combustion events in ice condenser plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using Sequoyah as a representative plant, calculations have been performed with a developmental version of the CONTAIN computer code to assess the effectiveness of various possible improvements to ice condenser containments in mitigating severe accident scenarios involving direct containment heating (DCH) and/or hydrogen combustion. Mitigation strategies considered included backup power for igniters and/or air return fans, augmented igniter systems, containment venting, containment inerting, subatmospheric containment operation, reduced ice condenser bypass, and primary system depressurization. Various combinations of these improvements were also considered. Only inerting the containment or primary system depressurization combined with backup power supplies for the igniter systems resulted in large decreases in the peak pressures calculated to result from DCH events. Potential hydrogen detonation threats were also assessed; providing backup power for both the igniter systems and the air return fans would significantly reduce the potential for detonations but might not totally eliminate it. Sensitivity studies using the NUREG-1150 PRA methodology indicated that primary system depressurization combined with backup power for both igniters and fans could reduce the contribution to the mean risk potential of the class of events considered by about a factor of three. 7 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Williams, D.C.; Gregory, J.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

James E. Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refueling Infrastructure for Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Prepared under Task No. H278.2350 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

155

Energy Department Awards More Than $7 Million for Innovative Hydrogen Storage Technologies in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy today announced more than $7 million to fund four projects in California, Washington and Oregon to advance hydrogen storage technologies to be used in fuel cell electric vehicles.

156

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, including advances in electric vehicles, engine efficiency, and lightweight materials....

158

Energy Flowchart Scenarios of Future U.S. Energy Use Incorporating Hydrogen Fueled Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This project has adapted LLNL energy flowcharts of historical U.S. energy use drawn from the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) data to include scenarios involving hydrogen use. A flexible automated process for preparing and drawing these flowcharts has also been developed. These charts show the flows of energy between primary sectors of the economy so that a user can quickly understand the major implications of a proposed scenario. The software can rapidly generate a spectrum of U.S. energy use scenarios in the 2005-2050 timeframe, both with and without a transition to hydrogen-fueled transportation. These scenarios indicate that fueling 100% of the light duty fleet in 2050 (318 million 80 mpg-equivalent compressed hydrogen fuel cell vehicles) will require approximately 100 million tonnes (10.7 quads) of H2/year, reducing petroleum use by at least 7.3 million barrels of oil/day (15.5 quads/yr). Linear extrapolation of EIA's 2025 reference projection to 2050 indicates approximate U.S. primary energy use of 180 quads/yr (in 2050) relative to current use of 97 quads/yr (comprising 39 quads/yr of petroleum). Full deployment of 50% efficient electricity generation technologies for coal and nuclear power and improvements in gasoline lightduty vehicle fleet fuel economy to 50 mpg would reduce projected U.S. primary energy consumption to 143 quads/yr in 2050, comprising 58 quads/yr (27 million bbl/day) of petroleum. Full deployment of H2 automobiles by 2050 could further reduce U.S. petroleum dependence to 43 quads/yr. These projections indicate that substantial steps beyond a transition to H2 light-duty vehicles will be necessary to reduce future U.S. petroleum dependence (and related greenhouse gases) below present levels. A flowchart projecting future U.S. energy flows depicting a complete transition by 2050 to compressed hydrogen light-duty vehicles is attached on the following page (corresponding to scenario 7 in the Appendix). It indicates that producing 100 billion kilograms of hydrogen fuel annually (10.7 quads/yr) from a balanced blend of primary energy sources will likely require 16.2 quads of primary energy input, with an additional 0.96 Quads of electricity for hydrogen storage. These energy flows are comparable to or smaller than projected growth in individual primary energy sources over the 2005-2050 timeframe except perhaps the case of windpower.

Berry, G; Daily III, W

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

Conceptual and Scaling Evaluation of Vehicle Traffic Thermal Effects on Snow/Ice-Covered Roads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential thermal effects of traffic on road surface thermal energy balance under frost/snow cover conditions have been largely ignored in meteorological evaluations of road ice deposit conditions. Preliminary exploration of these effects, ...

Joseph M. Prusa; Moti Segal; Bradley R. Temeyer; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Home and Neighborhood Refueling as a New Paradigm for Hydrogen Vehicles Xuping Li and Dr. Joan Ogden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will not be achieved until hydrogen takes a substantial market share as an energy carrier for vehicles. The analysis an appealing hydrogen pathway, especially during the early stage of market penetration. Additionally, home REFUELING METHODOLOGY SUMMARY REFFERENCES Overall, this project aims at informing private and public

California at Davis, University of

162

Production of Hydrogen for Clean and Renewable Source of Energy for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This was a two-year project that had two major components: 1) the demonstration of a PV-electrolysis system that has separate PV system and electrolysis unit and the hydrogen generated is to be used to power a fuel cell based vehicle; 2) the development of technologies for generation of hydrogen through photoelectrochemical process and bio-mass derived resources. Development under this project could lead to the achievement of DOE technical target related to PEC hydrogen production at low cost. The PEC part of the project is focused on the development of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation devices and systems using thin-film silicon based solar cells. Two approaches are taken for the development of efficient and durable photoelectrochemical cells; 1) An immersion-type photoelectrochemical cells (Task 3) where the photoelectrode is immersed in electrolyte, and 2) A substrate-type photoelectrochemical cell (Task 2) where the photoelectrode is not in direct contact with electrolyte. Four tasks are being carried out: Task 1: Design and analysis of DC voltage regulation system for direct PV-to-electrolyzer power feed Task 2: Development of advanced materials for substrate-type PEC cells Task 3: Development of advanced materials for immersion-type PEC cells Task 4: Hydrogen production through conversion of biomass-derived wastes

Deng, Xunming; Ingler, William B, Jr.; Abraham, Martin; Castellano, Felix; Coleman, Maria; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Giolando, Dean; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya. H.; Stuart, Thomas; Vonderembse, Mark

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

164

HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HyDIVE(tm) HyDIVE(tm) (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) model analysis Cory Welch Hydrogen Analysis Workshop, August 9-10 Washington, D.C. Disclaimer and Government License This work has been authored by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) under Contract No. DE- AC36-99GO10337 with the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). The United States Government (the "Government") retains and the publisher, by accepting the work for publication, acknowledges that the Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for Government purposes. Neither MRI, the DOE, the Government, nor any other agency thereof, nor any of their

165

Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results of Research Engine and Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation Thomas Wallner, Henning Lohse-Busch, Henry Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham NHA Annual Hydrogen Conference 2007 San Antonio/Texas March 19 th - 22 nd 2007 DOE-Sponsors: Lee Slezak, Gurpreet Singh Government license The submitted manuscript was developed by the UChicago Argonne LLC as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357 with DOE. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up, nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on

166

Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Attachment 1 Procedure ETA-YTP001 Revision 0 Attachment 1 - Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Acceleration Test Procedure ETA-YTP001 Revision 0 Effective May 15, 2003 Implementation of SAE...

167

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."Transition: Designing a Fuel- Cell Hypercar. ” 8th Annual

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies Program CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion engine Vehicle -- Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle was undertaken to define the requirements to achieve a California Air Resource Board Executive Order for a hydrogenfueled vehicle retrofit kit. A 2005 to 2006 General Motors Company Sierra/Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD pickup was assumed to be the build-from vehicle for the retrofit kit. The emissions demonstration was determined not to pose a significant hurdle due to the non-hydrocarbon-based fuel and lean-burn operation. However, significant work was determined to be necessary for Onboard Diagnostics Level II compliance. Therefore, it is recommended that an Experimental Permit be obtained from the California Air Resource Board to license and operate the vehicles for the durability of the demonstration in support of preparing a fully compliant and certifiable package that can be submitted.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

early will help vehicle manufacturers integrate systems intobased on the locations vehicle manufacturers see potentialto manufacturer, the locations of vehicle placements were

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban...

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

173

Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O'Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs are important to our nation's future because they can: * Play an important role in our portfolio of sustainable transportation options * Provide a cost-competitive, appealing alternative for drivers * Reduce dependence on imported oil and diversify energy sources for transportation * Enable global economic leadership and job growth. Offering a Sustainable Transportation Option Americans have tremendous freedom to travel wherever and whenever they want. Ninety percent of travel in the United States is achieved by automobiles that refuel quickly

175

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Methods for the Storage of Hydrogen in Microspheres,15 th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Yokohama, Japan,Uhlemann, M. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Different Carbon

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: Results of California Drive Clinics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public willing to pay for hydrogen buses? A comparativeon the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy 2007; 32: 4295- 4.

Martin, Elliot W; Shaheen, Susan A; Lipman, T E; Lidicker, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of Hydrogen in Microspheres, 15 th World Hydrogen Energyhydrogen in storage varies between the various energy storagethe energy storage characteristics of the various hydrogen

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen in storage varies between the various energy storagethe energy storage characteristics of the various hydrogenthat the energy densities of hydrogen storage technologies

Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Project Summary Full Title: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Project ID: 123 Principal Investigator: Mark Delucchi Brief Description: AVCEM is an electric and gasoline vehicle energy-use and lifetime-cost model. AVCEM designs a motor vehicle to meet range and performance requirements specified by the modeler, and then calculates the initial retail cost and total private and social lifetime cost of the designed vehicle. Purpose AVCEM designs a motor vehicle to meet range and performance requirements specified by the modeler, and then calculates the initial retail cost and total private and social lifetime cost of the designed vehicle. It can be used to investigate the relationship between the lifetime cost -- the total

182

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid Project Summary Full Title: Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid Project ID: 228 Principal Investigator:...

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Safety...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Center Fuels & Vehicles Biodiesel | Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas |...

184

Simulation of a hydrogen fueled hybrid vehicle using powertrain system analysis toolkit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With shrinking energy reserves, and the rising concerns for the environmental status, the need for fuel efficient and low emission vehicles is increasing day by… (more)

Jean, B. Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydrogen : what fuel cell vehicles and advanced nuclear reactors have in common  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports on two technology and policy issues directly related to hydrogen economy. The first issue concentrates on the end-use application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel, and deals with the following ...

Demirdöven, Nurettin, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and trade - - offs) need to be assessed as part of offs) need to be assessed as part of scenario analysis. What makes hydrogen scenario analysis. What makes hydrogen FCVs FCVs...

187

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a hydrogen-fueled Prius by Texaco Ovonic (References 10-rates permitting the Prius to be tested on the Federal Urbanof the hydrogen-fueled Prius was about 150 miles. Higher

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Grid-Based Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration Carolyn Elam Senior Project Leader - Hydrogen Production Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory Goals for Electrolysis in Hydrogen Fuel Supply * Goal is to supply hydrogen fuel for 20% of the light- duty vehicle fleet - 12 million short tons of hydrogen annually - 450 TWh per year * Must be competitive - With gasoline, assuming FCV will have twice the efficiency of an ICE - With other hydrogen production methods * Net zero impact or reduction in GHG emissions - Compared to Gasoline ICE - 31% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix - Compared to Natural Gas-Derived Hydrogen - 65% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix Goals for Electrolysis (cont.)

189

National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project proceeded generally according to schedule, with most of the work directed at procurement of materials, initiation of equipment fabrication by contractors, and development of educational materials. The first vehicle retrofit was completed in March 1995, and prepared for delivery to DOE`s Energy Technology Engineering Center.

Provenzano, J.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table ES-3: Summaryof Hybrid Vehicle Fuel Economy Results onmal ICE and Series Hybrid Vehicles (t) Vehicle Test Weight (I) Conventional and Series Hybrid Vehicles had same weight,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: NationwideBEVs or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) requirescell vehicle; HEV = Hybrid electric vehicle; ICE = Internal

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720� Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 � the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle � Fueling Infrastructure of the � Interstate Clean Transportation � Corridor Project � April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates � Santa Monica, California � NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation

194

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles without energy storage.hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) without energy storage (hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) without energy storage

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

196

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Home and Neighborhood Refueling for Hydrogen Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on simulation and detailed analyses of home and neighborhood refueling tri-generation for Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCV) can be facilitated by a home refueling/ tri-generation system

California at Davis, University of

198

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Foreseeing the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders' Perspectives and Models of New Technology Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Associates (2005). Hybrid Vehicle Market Share Expectedsales Year Number of new hybrid vehicles sold Number of newsold Market share of hybrid vehicles It can be observed that

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FORESEEING THE MARKET FOR HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: STAKEHOLDERS’ PERSPECTIVES AND MODELS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Associates (2005). Hybrid Vehicle Market Share Expectedsales Year Number of new hybrid vehicles sold Number of newsold Market share of hybrid vehicles It can be observed that

Collantes, Gustavo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Stakeholders' Perspectives on Hydrogen Policy: A Factor Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Battery electricengine vehicles Hydrogen hybrid electric vehicles Hydrogenplug-in hybrid electric vehicles Fuel-cell vehicles

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

STAKEHOLDERS’ PERSPECTIVES ON HYDROGEN POLICY: A FACTOR ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Battery electricengine vehicles Hydrogen hybrid electric vehicles Hydrogenplug-in hybrid electric vehicles Fuel-cell vehicles

Collantes, G O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

NIST Transient Flow Standard for Vehicle Refueling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Today, hydrogen-fueled demonstration vehicles are refueled from ... However, hydrogen dispenser manufacturers have found ... gas as a vehicle fuel of ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydrogen (H2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen (H2) Hydrogen (H2) Historical Records from Ice Cores Deuterium Record from Dome C, Antarctica Continuous Measurements Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE,...

207

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

557 * November 2010 557 * November 2010 NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Teams: Hydrogen Education, Melanie Caton; Market Transformation, Michael Ulsh Accomplishment: NREL started using its Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H 2 ICE) bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. As the first national laboratory to receive such a bus, NREL

208

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle and Fuel Systems with the GREET Model - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Michael Wang (Primary Contact), Amgad Elgowainy, Jeongwoo Han and Hao Cai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) ESD362 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Phone: (630) 252-2819 Email: mqwang@anl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2009 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Evaluate environmental benefits of hydrogen fuel * cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) with various renewable hydrogen production pathways relative to baseline gasoline pathways. Conduct vehicle-cycle analysis of hydrogen FCEVs. *

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Electricity...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Help Alternative Fuels Data Center Fuels & Vehicles Biodiesel | Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel...

211

Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory 21st Century Automotive Challenge April 17-19, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric and hybrid cars in the American consumer marketplace." Competition participants included teams vehicle technology you need to match your lifestyle ­ electric, solar electric, hybrid, pluggable hybrid the electric utility grid. Sound impossible, or eons in the future? As part of the 21st Century Automotive

Lee, Dongwon

212

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biogas Resources Characterization Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power...

214

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery- powered electric vehicles, approaches the breadth and magnitude of hydrogen’s public good benefits. What History

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNG,CNG-H2 Vehicles and Fuels CNG,CNG-H2 Vehicles and Fuels in India December 10-11, 2009 Ambrish Mishra Director (Marketing Operations) Oil Industry safety Directorate Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas Government Of India email : ambrish.mishra@gov.in OISD 2 1. Refineries: 17 PSU + 3 Private 2. POL Storage (PSU): More than 400 3. LPG storage and Bottling Plant (PSU): 179 4. Others Gas processing Plants of GAIL and ONGC OISD 3 Major Statutory Authorities and Norms 1. Petroleum and Safety Organization (PESO) A) Petroleum rules under Petroleum Act (1934) by MOPN&G B) Various Rules (Gas Cylinder Rules and SMPV etc) under the Explosives Act under Ministry of Commerce and Industry C)To exercise some provision of Environment Act 2. Chief Inspector of Factories of Respective State A) Factories Rules under Factories Act of Ministry of Labour

216

The Hydrogen Policy Survey: Descriptive Statistics of the Study Sample and Their Policy Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles Gasolineplug-in hybrid electric vehicles Battery electric vehiclesvehicles Hydrogen hybrid electric vehicles Hydrogen plug-in

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

THE HYDROGEN POLICY SURVEY: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF THE STUDY SAMPLE AND THEIR POLICY PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles Gasolineplug-in hybrid electric vehicles Battery electric vehiclesvehicles Hydrogen hybrid electric vehicles Hydrogen plug-in

Collantes, G O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The threat posed by climate change and the striving for security of energy supply are issues high on the political agenda these days. Governments are putting strategic plans in motion to decrease primary energy use, take carbon out of fuels and facilitate modal shifts. Taking a prominent place in these strategic plans is hydrogen as a future energy carrier. A number of manufacturers are now leasing demonstration vehicles to consumers using hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H{sub 2}ICEs) as well as fuel cell vehicles. Developing countries in particular are pushing for H{sub 2}ICEs (powering two- and three-wheelers as well as passenger cars and buses) to decrease local pollution at an affordable cost. This article offers a comprehensive overview of H{sub 2}ICEs. Topics that are discussed include fundamentals of the combustion of hydrogen, details on the different mixture formation strategies and their emissions characteristics, measures to convert existing vehicles, dedicated hydrogen engine features, a state of the art on increasing power output and efficiency while controlling emissions and modeling.

Verhelst, S.; Wallner, T.; Energy Systems; Ghent Univ.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Workshop Notes from "Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles" Workshop, December 10-11, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy and S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Transportation Workshop Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles Workshop Notes December 10-11, 2009 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) hosted a workshop to exchange information among experts from China, India, and the U.S. on compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen (H 2 ) fuels for vehicles and to share lessons learned from deployment of these vehicles in public transit, fleets, and consumer transportation throughout the world. The workshop had five major objectives, and the success of the workshop in addressing these objectives is summarized below. 1. Coordinate lessons learned by identifying similarities and critical

220

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Gopal [HD Systems

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H 2 FCVs, plug- in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power.markets using primarily hybrid vehicles in fleet and otherin hybrid, Plug-out hybrid, Vehicle-to-grid power, Vehicular

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Markets for Hybrid Electric Vehicles," University ofof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

225

Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delaware’s membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Evolution of Sustainable Personal Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ready Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle. D.O.E. Challenge X,FCHEV- fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle GHG- greenhouseuser interface HEV- hybrid electric vehicle ICE- internal

Jungers, Bryan D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) accomplishments in showcasing a Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) bus at The Taste of Colorado festival in Denver. NREL started using its U.S. Department of Energy-funded H2ICE bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. In September 2010, NREL featured the bus at The Taste of Colorado. This was the first major outreach event for the bus. NREL's educational brochure, vehicle wrap designs, and outreach efforts serve as a model for other organizations with DOE-funded H2ICE buses. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Education Group and Market Transformation Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cell Vehicles Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by...

229

Hydrogen  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

230

Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most about the vehicle. Hydrogen Vehicle Manufacturers:Hydrogen vehicle manufacturers share the same concerns asmanufacturers have similar systems in without the vehicle

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Estimating the impact on fuel tax revenues from a changing light vehicle fleet with increased advanced internal combustion engine vehicles and electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advanced fuel economies in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel… (more)

Hall, Andrea Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: A Portfolio of Power-Trains for Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Portfolio of Power-Trains for Europe A Portfolio of Power-Trains for Europe Project Summary Full Title: A Portfolio of Power-Trains for Europe: A Fact-Based Analysis Project ID: 266 Principal Investigator: Brief Description: This study reports the results of a factual evaluation of battery electric vehicles, fuel cell electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and internal combustion engine vehicles for the European market based on proprietary industry data. Keywords: Alternative fuel vehicles (AFV); Fuel cell vehicles (FCV); Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV); Costs; Greenhouse gases (GHG); Emissions; Battery electric vehicles (BEV); Internal combustion engine (ICE); Hydrogen Purpose A group of companies, government organisations and a non-governmental organization - the majority with a specific interest in fuel cell

233

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

236

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives for • Avoided electricity costs due to self- fuel cell installation/operation or generation hydrogen dispensing • Avoided natural gas

Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Improving Costs and Efficiency of PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles by ...  

Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower emissions. Running the vehicle’s motor on hydrogen rather than gasoline ...

240

Learn More About the Fuel Economy Label for Gasoline Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different text and icons in the labels for other vehicles: Diesel Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Flexible-Fuel Vehicle: Gasoline-Ethanol (E85)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways, excerpt from 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

89 89 FY 2007 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program Objectives Develop understanding of how a hydrogen production infrastructure for H 2 fuel cell (FC)/ internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles might develop in the U.S. Quantify production methods under consistent cost and state-of-technology assumptions. Analyze infrastructure development under dynamic conditions over time. Determine factors that will drive infrastructure development. Define role of externalities such as policy and technology advancement. Develop a computational model to aid in the analysis. Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers from the Systems Analysis section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and

242

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

PLEASE DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE WITHOUT PERMISSION OF AUTHOR CASE STUDY OF DEVELOPING A HYDROGEN VEHICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell type" steam methane reformers. Figure 1.9b. Delivered Hydrogen cost from onsite reforming using small scale "conventional" and "fuel cell type" steam methane reformers. Figure 1.10 Cost of hydrogen

244

Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Plug-in Electric Vehicles Ethanol Fuel Cells Hydrogen Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) Natural Gas Particulate Matter Vehicle Emissions Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S....

245

Prospects for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current state-of- the-art of electric vehicles (EVs) with examples of recently developed prototype vehicles - Electric G-Van, Chrysler TEVan, Eaton DSEP and Ford/GE ETX-II. The acceleration, top speed and range of these electric vehicles are delineated to demonstrate their performance capabilities, which are comparable with conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. The prospects for the commercialization of the Electric G-van and the TEVan and the improvements expected from the AC drive systems of the DSEP and ETX-II vehicles are discussed. The impacts of progress being made in the development of a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus and advanced EVs on the competitiveness of EVs with ICE vehicles and their potential for reduction of air pollution and utility load management are postulated.

Patil, P.G. (Research and Development, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Div., U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24-35 (1990). G. Barker, CNG Consultant, Norwalk CompanyEconomic Evaluation of CNG Fleet Conversion and Operation,"and has found that dragging a CNG (compressed natural gas)

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or estimates of regenerative energy recovery: Estimates offraction is equal to regenerative energy returned all thethe amount of regenerative energy available might exceed the

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of oil (fraction of oil cost of gasoline ICEV) Ratio ofCost of oil (fraction of oil cost of gasoline ICEV) Electricas excluding tires, oil, accessories, and costs covered by

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Storage Systems," Proceedings of the 26th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Vol. 3, American Nuclear

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gesellschaft fur Physikalische Chemie 9: 902-912 (1990). T.Gesellschaft fur Physikalische Chemie 9: 956-960 (1990). K.Gesellschaft fur Physikalische Chemie J. -M. Leger and C.

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Demand for Electric Cars," Journal of EconometricsInfrastructure for an All-Electric Car Fleet, ResearchImpact of Future Use of Electric Cars in the Los Angeles

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. ) Off-peak hydroelectricity Biomass gasification^c Assuming that off-peak hydroelectricity at existing sites

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dragging a CNG (compressed natural gas) cylinder from thecylinders for compressed-natural gas for 10,000 cycles,assume that for a compressed-natural-gas station, the cost

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Fueled 3 kWe SOFC Generator Test Results,"a design for a monolithic SOFC stack with an energy density

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life (based on total battery capacity) 0.90 In-use batterylife (based on total battery capacity, including any energy58.8 Nominal battery discharge capacity, to provide driving

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

half of the potential biomass supply would be required.45 eJ of potential biomass supply were demanded by energythe total biomass primary energy supply would be required;

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen...

258

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), drawing on the experience and expertise of both research organizations. The goal of this study was to assess selected hydrogen technologies for potential application to transportation and power generation. Specifically, this study evaluated scenarios for deploying hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. One study objective was to identify the most promising near-term and long-term hydrogen vehicle technologies based on performance, efficiency, and emissions profiles and compare them to traditional vehicle technologies. Hydrogen vehicle propulsion may take many forms, ranging from hydrogen or hythane fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) to fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. This study attempted to developed performance and emissions profiles for each type (assuming a light duty truck platform) so that effective deployment strategies can be developed. A second study objective was to perform similar cost, efficiency, and emissions analysis related to hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the Southeast. There will be many alternative approaches for the deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, ranging from distributed hydrogen production to centralized production, with a similar range of delivery options. This study attempted to assess the costs and potential emissions associated with each scenario. A third objective was to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen fuel cell technologies for stationary power generation and to identify the advantages and limits of different technologies. Specific attention was given to evaluating different fuel cell membrane types. A final objective was to promote the use and deployment of hydrogen technologies in the Southeast. This effort was to include establishing partnerships with industry as well promoting educational and outreach efforts to public service providers. To accomplish these goals and objectives a work plan was developed comprising 6 primary tasks: • Task 1 - Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light-Duty Vehicles – The PSAT powertrain simulation software was used to evaluate candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicle technologies for near-term and long-term deployment in the Southeastern U.S. • Task 2 - Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles - An investigation was conducted into the emissions and efficiency of light-duty internal combustion engines fueled with hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) blends. The different fuel blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. • Task 3 - Economic and Energy Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - Expertise in engineering cost estimation, hydrogen production and delivery analysis, and transportation infrastructure systems was used to develop regional estimates of resource requirements and costs for the infrastructure needed to deliver hydrogen fuels to advanced-technology vehicles. • Task 4 –Emissions Analysis for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - The hydrogen production and delivery scenarios developed in Task 3 were expanded to include analysis of energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with each specific case studies. • Task 5 – Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Power Generation - The purpose of this task was to assess the performance of different fuel cell types (specifically low-temperature and high temperature membranes) for use in stationary power generation. • Task 6 – Establishment of a Southeastern Hydrogen Consortium - The goal of this task was to establish a Southeastern Hydrogen Technology Consortium (SHTC) whose purpose would be to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Sensitivity Analysis of H2-Vehicles' Market Prospects, Costs and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Greene (Primary Contact), Zhenhong Lin, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1310 Email: dlgreene@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Project Start Date: October, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market shares of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles * (FCVs) under varying market conditions using the Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) model.

260

The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H[2]Sim) technical description.  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen has the potential to become an integral part of our energy transportation and heat and power sectors in the coming decades and offers a possible solution to many of the problems associated with a heavy reliance on oil and other fossil fuels. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H2Sim) was developed to provide a high level, internally consistent, strategic tool for evaluating the economic and environmental trade offs of alternative hydrogen production, storage, transport and end use options in the year 2020. Based on the model's default assumptions, estimated hydrogen production costs range from 0.68 $/kg for coal gasification to as high as 5.64 $/kg for centralized electrolysis using solar PV. Coal gasification remains the least cost option if carbon capture and sequestration costs ($0.16/kg) are added. This result is fairly robust; for example, assumed coal prices would have to more than triple or the assumed capital cost would have to increase by more than 2.5 times for natural gas reformation to become the cheaper option. Alternatively, assumed natural gas prices would have to fall below $2/MBtu to compete with coal gasification. The electrolysis results are highly sensitive to electricity costs, but electrolysis only becomes cost competitive with other options when electricity drops below 1 cent/kWhr. Delivered 2020 hydrogen costs are likely to be double the estimated production costs due to the inherent difficulties associated with storing, transporting, and dispensing hydrogen due to its low volumetric density. H2Sim estimates distribution costs ranging from 1.37 $/kg (low distance, low production) to 3.23 $/kg (long distance, high production volumes, carbon sequestration). Distributed hydrogen production options, such as on site natural gas, would avoid some of these costs. H2Sim compares the expected 2020 per mile driving costs (fuel, capital, maintenance, license, and registration) of current technology internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (0.55$/mile), hybrids (0.56 $/mile), and electric vehicles (0.82-0.84 $/mile) with 2020 fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) (0.64-0.66 $/mile), fuel cell vehicles with onboard gasoline reformation (FCVOB) (0.70 $/mile), and direct combustion hydrogen hybrid vehicles (H2Hybrid) (0.55-0.59 $/mile). The results suggests that while the H2Hybrid vehicle may be competitive with ICE vehicles, it will be difficult for the FCV to compete without significant increases in gasoline prices, reduced predicted vehicle costs, stringent carbon policies, or unless they can offer the consumer something existing vehicles can not, such as on demand power, lower emissions, or better performance.

Jones, Scott A.; Kamery, William; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.; Lutz, Andrew E.; Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H[2]Sim) technical description.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has the potential to become an integral part of our energy transportation and heat and power sectors in the coming decades and offers a possible solution to many of the problems associated with a heavy reliance on oil and other fossil fuels. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H2Sim) was developed to provide a high level, internally consistent, strategic tool for evaluating the economic and environmental trade offs of alternative hydrogen production, storage, transport and end use options in the year 2020. Based on the model's default assumptions, estimated hydrogen production costs range from 0.68 $/kg for coal gasification to as high as 5.64 $/kg for centralized electrolysis using solar PV. Coal gasification remains the least cost option if carbon capture and sequestration costs ($0.16/kg) are added. This result is fairly robust; for example, assumed coal prices would have to more than triple or the assumed capital cost would have to increase by more than 2.5 times for natural gas reformation to become the cheaper option. Alternatively, assumed natural gas prices would have to fall below $2/MBtu to compete with coal gasification. The electrolysis results are highly sensitive to electricity costs, but electrolysis only becomes cost competitive with other options when electricity drops below 1 cent/kWhr. Delivered 2020 hydrogen costs are likely to be double the estimated production costs due to the inherent difficulties associated with storing, transporting, and dispensing hydrogen due to its low volumetric density. H2Sim estimates distribution costs ranging from 1.37 $/kg (low distance, low production) to 3.23 $/kg (long distance, high production volumes, carbon sequestration). Distributed hydrogen production options, such as on site natural gas, would avoid some of these costs. H2Sim compares the expected 2020 per mile driving costs (fuel, capital, maintenance, license, and registration) of current technology internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (0.55$/mile), hybrids (0.56 $/mile), and electric vehicles (0.82-0.84 $/mile) with 2020 fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) (0.64-0.66 $/mile), fuel cell vehicles with onboard gasoline reformation (FCVOB) (0.70 $/mile), and direct combustion hydrogen hybrid vehicles (H2Hybrid) (0.55-0.59 $/mile). The results suggests that while the H2Hybrid vehicle may be competitive with ICE vehicles, it will be difficult for the FCV to compete without significant increases in gasoline prices, reduced predicted vehicle costs, stringent carbon policies, or unless they can offer the consumer something existing vehicles can not, such as on demand power, lower emissions, or better performance.

Jones, Scott A.; Kamery, William; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.; Lutz, Andrew E.; Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis - DOE Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conditions, using multiple sites, varying climates, and a variety of hydrogen sources. Analyze detailed fuel cell and hydrogen data from * vehicles and infrastructure to...

263

Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel...

264

National Hydrogen Association Conference - March 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: - ICE's burning advanced fuels, such as 100% hydrogen & hydrogenCNG-blended (HCNG) fuels - Hybrid electric, pure electric, & hydraulic drive systems APS...

265

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Recharging and Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Near-

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

NMR Study of Borohydrides for Hydrogen Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is great interest today in developing a hydrogen economy, and hydrogen powered vehicles to replace vehicles powered by fossil fuels. This presents many challenges… (more)

Shane, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

271

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower emissions. Running the vehicle’s motor on hydrogen rather than ...

273

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

consumption and lower emissions by using advanced vehicle technologies, such as: hydrogen fuel cells, plug-in hybrid technology, hybrid technology, diesel technology and other...

276

Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Solicitations to Active Solicitations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on AddThis.com... Active Solicitations To explore current financial opportunity solicitations, click on the opportunity titles in the table below. To sort the list, click on the arrows in the column headings. Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research and Development for Hydrogen Storage

277

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Hydrogen Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Analyzing the Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability in the Transition to Hydrogen Vehicles Project ID: 281 Principal Investigator: David Greene Brief Description: This analysis was focused on the role that combined heat and hydrogen power (CHHP) could play in increasing hydrogen refueling availability during the transition to hydrogen vehicles. Keywords: Stationary fuel cell; hydrogen; plug-in hybrid electric vehicle; hydrogen fuel cell vehicle; combined heat, hydrogen and power; internal combustion engine Performer Principal Investigator: David Greene Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

278

Understanding the effects and infrastrcuture needs of plug-in electric vehicle (pev) charging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) are any vehicle that uses electricity to propel the vehicle, potentially in combination with other fuels like gasoline, diesel or hydrogen.… (more)

Davis, Barbara Morgan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Neutron spectroscopy of high-density amorphous ice.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vibrational spectra of high-density amorphous ice (hda-ice) for H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O samples were measured by inelastic neutron scattering. The measured spectra of hda-ice are closer to those for high-pressure phase ice-VI, but not for low-density ice-Ih. This result suggests that similar to ice-VI the structure of hda-ice should consist of two interpenetrating hydrogen-bonded networks having no hydrogen bonds between themselves.

Kolesnikov, A. I.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand for special-performance vehicles, 1975--2025  

SciTech Connect

In the research for alternatives to the internal combustion engine (ICE), UCLLL developed several concepts for alternative energy storage and propulsion systems for passenger cars and light trucks. These conceptual designs include technologies such as battery electric systems, hydrogen-powered systems, and the quasi-electric-drive hybrid (a battery/flywheel hybrid) with a small ICE for range extension). These alternative technologies, referred to as special-performance vehicles (SPVs), may be inferior to the ICE either in acceleration or range (or both). Capital and operating costs for the vehicles span a wide range. UCLLL determined from an engineering standpoint the difference between the cost and performance of the SPVs and ICEs. However, they required a long-range forecast of the marketability of SPVs, i.e., the number and type of each of the alternative technologies that would be sold in a given year, and the annual vehicle miles that each type would travel (VMT). UCLLL needed to know how these estimates of market penetration would respond to alternative assumptions regarding fuel prices, capital and operating cost, total auto ownership forecasts, and demographic characteristics of the American people. Cambridge Systematics (CS) prepared long-range forecasts of the VMT operated by each SP vehicle type in each of four years: 1975, 1985, 2000, and 2025. CS also made market forecasts of SPV use in light-truck applications (under 10,000 lbs.) and made regional ton-mile forecasts for heavy trucks for use in UCLLL energy consumption and flow models. UCLLL provided national aggregate forecasts of variables such as population, auto ownership, per capita income, VMT, TM, and other variables needed in the study.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: U.S. Postal Service  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Full-Size Electric Vehicles Basics Specifications & Test Procedures Testing Reports Special Projects Neighborhood...

284

NREL: Learning - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Photo of the front and part of the side of a bus parked at the curb of a city street with tall buildings in the background. This diesel hybrid electric bus operated by the Metropolitan Transit Authority, New York City Transit, was part of a test study that recently investigated the fuel efficiency and reliability of these buses. Credit: Leslie Eudy Today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) range from small passenger cars to sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and large trucks. Though they often look just like conventional vehicles, HEVs usually include an electric motor as well as a small internal combustion engine (ICE). This combination provides greater fuel economy and fewer emissions than most conventional ICE vehicles do. HEVs are powered by two energy sources: an energy conversion unit, such as

285

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

286

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Basics Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

287

THE SPITZER ICE LEGACY: ICE EVOLUTION FROM CORES TO PROTOSTARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d Legacy ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 3}OH:NH{sub 3}:CH{sub 4}:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H{sub 2}O of CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and the component of CO{sub 2} mixed with H{sub 2}O typically vary by ice components, XCN, and CH{sub 3}OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN{sup -} identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are constrained by comparing ice inventories toward different types of protostars and background stars, through ice mapping, analysis of cloud-to-cloud variations, and ice (anti-)correlations. Based on the analysis, the first ice formation phase is driven by hydrogenation of atoms, which results in an H{sub 2}O-dominated ice. At later prestellar times, CO freezes out and variations in CO freezeout levels and the subsequent CO-based chemistry can explain most of the observed ice abundance variations. The last important ice evolution stage is thermal and UV processing around protostars, resulting in CO desorption, ice segregation, and the formation of complex organic molecules. The distribution of cometary ice abundances is consistent with the idea that most cometary ices have a protostellar origin.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Boogert, A. C. Adwin [IPAC, NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van den Broek, Saskia; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bottinelli, Sandrine [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (CESR), CNRS-UMR 5187, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

NIST: Neutron Tomography of Hydrogen Storage Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Future hydrogen fuel cell vehicles will require hydrogen storage vessels that ... will require understanding the coupled heat and mass transport system ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

NIST: Neutron Imaging Facility - Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage. Ultimately if a fuel cell vehicle is to function efficiently it must have an efficient means of storing and delivering hydrogen. ...

290

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Blog Bioenergy Buildings Geothermal Government Energy Management Homes Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Manufacturing Solar Vehicles Water Wind Blog Archive Recent...

291

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

292

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for vehicle refueling and compressed natural gas (CNG)for CNG vehicles, aswell as CNG/hydrogen blends (City of Las Vegas, 2002). Clean

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hybrid Vehicle Technology - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Batteries * Batteries * Modeling * Testing Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Hybrid Vehicle Technology revolutionize transportation Argonne's Research Argonne researchers are developing and testing various hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and their components to identify the technologies, configurations, and engine control strategies that provide the best combination of high fuel economy and low emissions. Vehicle Validation Argonne also serves as the lead laboratory for hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) and technology validation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). HIL is a

294

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/GeneratorFuel Cell Deployment and Hydrogen Infrastructure, WorldwideOffice (2005), “Florida Hydrogen Business Partnership,”

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline could provide fuel for vehicle refueling stations and hydrogen-based DG projects along its current length,

Lipman, Timothy; Kammen, Daniel; Ogden, Joan; Sperling, Dan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind ... challenges and discuss potential solutions to support the successful global commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell elect ...

297

An Energy Evolution: Alternative Fueled Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen #12;5 What is best for society? · Hybrid electric vehicles? (HEVs) · Plug-in hybrids? (PHEVs) Gasoline HEVs Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Gasoline PHEVs Ethanol PHEVs #12;11 Fuel Cell) · Biofuels? · Fuel cell electric vehicles? (FCEVs) · Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) ... .or all

298

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Alternative Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a number of alternative and advanced vehicles—or vehicles that run on alternative fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles:

303

Fuel processing for fuel cell powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of auto companies have announced plans to have fuel cell powered vehicles on the road by the year 2004. The low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells to be used in these vehicles require high quality hydrogen. Without a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, these vehicles need to convert the available hydrocarbon fuels into a hydrogen-rich gas on-board the vehicle. Earlier analysis has shown that fuel processors based on partial oxidation reforming are well suited to meet the size and weight targets and the other performance-related needs of on-board fuel processors for light-duty fuel cell vehicles (1).

Ahmed, S.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Lee, S. H. D.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fuel Efficient Vehicle Tax Incentives Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Credits AFVs include vehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), hydrogen, or any liquid at least 85% methanol by...

305

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in-depth information about biodiesel, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane, as well as the vehicles that use these fuels and the infrastructure used to deliver...

306

Resistance to Hydrogen Embrittlement and Behavior of Hydrogen in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fuel cell vehicles, high-pressure hydrogen gas is stored in a container consisting of aluminum liner and surrounding fiber-reinforced plastic layer.

307

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considered.) 4. Gaseous hydrogen generated at the refueling station from natural gas by steam methane reforming, stored as a compressed gas at 5000 psi and dispensed to the vehicle...

308

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Early Market Transition of Fuel Cell Vehicles Macro-System Model Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Water for Hydrogen Pathways 2010 A Portfolio...

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Hydrogen is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research is under way to make hydrogen vehicles practical for widespread use.

310

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation given at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006, discusses potential future hydrogen demand and the infrastructure needed to support hydrogen vehicles.

Melendez, M.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,”Year 2006 UCD—ITS—RR—06—04 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Photo of an electric car plugged in and charging. Learn more about exciting technologies and ongoing research in alternative and advanced vehicles-or vehicles that run on fuels other than traditional petroleum. Alternative Vehicles There are a variety of alternative vehicle fuels available. Learn more about: Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane Vehicles Also learn about: Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Emissions Basics Alternative Fuels There are a number of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Learn more about the following types of vehicles: Biodiesel Electricity Ethanol Hydrogen Natural Gas

313

Hydrogen, CNG, and HHCNG Dispenser System - Prototye Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Hydrogen, CNG, and HCNG Dispenser System - Prototype Report TECHNICAL REPORT Don Karner Scott...

314

Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) Place Rochester Hills, Michigan Zip 48309 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Vehicles Product It commercializes hydrogen storage technology based on metal-hydrides for portable and stationary power systems as well as fuel-cell vehicles. References Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) is a company located in Rochester Hills, Michigan . References

315

CLEAN HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FOR 3-WHEEL TRANSPORTATION IN INDIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean burning, non-polluting transportation fuel. It is also a renewable energy carrier that can be produced from non-fossil fuel resources such as solar, wind and biomass. Utilizing hydrogen as an alternative fuel for vehicles will diversify the resources of energy, and reduce dependence on oil in the transportation sector. Additionally, clean burning hydrogen fuel will also alleviate air pollution that is a very severe problem in many parts of world, especially major metropolitan areas in developing countries, such as India and China. In our efforts to foster international collaborations in the research, development, and demonstration of hydrogen technologies, through a USAID/DOE cost-shared project, Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.,(www.ovonic.com) a leading materials and alternative energy company, in collaboration with Bajaj Auto Limited, India's largest three-wheeler taxi manufacturer, has successfully developed and demonstrated prototype hydrogen ICE three-wheelers in the United States and India. ECD's proprietary Ovonic solid-state hydrogen storage technology is utilized on-board to provide a means of compact, low pressure, and safe hydrogen fuel. These prototype hydrogen three-wheelers have demonstrated comparable performance to the original CNG version of the vehicle, achieving a driving range of 130 km. The hydrogen storage system capable of storing 1 kg hydrogen can be refilled to 80% of its capacity in about 15 minutes at a pressure of 300 psi. The prototype vehicles developed under this project have been showcased and made available for test rides to the public at exhibits such as the 16th NHA annual meeting in April 2005, Washington, DC, and the SIAM (Society of Indian Automotive Manufacturers) annual conference in August 2005, New Delhi, India. Passengers have included members of the automotive industry, founders of both ECD and Bajaj, members of the World Bank, the Indian Union Minister for Finance, the President of the Asia Development Bank, members of USAID, USDOE and many other individuals, all of whom have had praise for the vehicle and the technology. The progress made through this phase I work and the importance of hydrogen three-wheelers has also resulted in extensive press coverage by the news media around the world.

Krishna Sapru

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methods for using water produced by the fuel cells,"by ice formed from water produced in the stack reactions.and allows liquid water produced at the cathode to leave the

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles:Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure. Annu. Rev. Energybuilding up hydrogen infrastructure that are guided by the

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hawaii hydrogen power park Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy source. (Barrier V-Renewable Integration) Hydrogen storage & distribution system. (Barrier V fueled vehicle hydrogen dispensing system. Demonstrate hydrogen as an energy carrier. Investigate Electrolyzer ValveManifold Water High Pressure H2 Storage Fuel Cell AC Power H2 Compressor Hydrogen Supply O2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

322

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A critical element to the success of new propulsion technologies that enable reductions in fuel use is the integration of component thermal management technologies within a viable vehicle package. Vehicle operation requires vehicle thermal management systems capable of balancing the needs of multiple vehicle systems that may require heat for operation, require cooling to reject heat, or require operation within specified temperature ranges. As vehicle propulsion transitions away from a single form of vehicle propulsion based solely on conventional internal combustion engines (ICEs) toward a wider array of choices including more electrically dominant systems such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), new challenges arise associated with vehicle thermal management. As the number of components that require active thermal management increase, so do the costs in terms of dollars, weight, and size. Integrated vehicle thermal management is one pathway to address the cost, weight, and size challenges. The integration of the power electronics and electric machine (PEEM) thermal management with other existing vehicle systems is one path for reducing the cost of electric drive systems. This work demonstrates techniques for evaluating and quantifying the integrated transient and continuous heat loads of combined systems incorporating electric drive systems that operate primarily under transient duty cycles, but the approach can be extended to include additional steady-state duty cycles typical for designing vehicle thermal management systems of conventional vehicles. The work compares opportunities to create an integrated low temperature coolant loop combining the power electronics and electric machine with the air conditioning system in contrast to a high temperature system integrated with the ICE cooling system.

Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Archimedean Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

Kari Eloranta

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refueling and compressed natural gas (CNG) for CNG vehicles,Natural Gas Reformer Reformate Hydrogen Hydrogen CompressedNatural gas Air Recycled Reformate MCFC or SOFC Fuel Cell Reformate Hydrogen Compressed

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogenCNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in...

328

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Analysis of the Transition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David L. Greene Keywords: Infrastructure; fuel cell vehicles (FCV); hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; costs Purpose Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

329

Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truck distribution Gas station Fig. 5. Integrated naturalTruck distribution Gas station Vehicle operation Fig. 7.gas extraction, hydrogen production, hydrogen delivery, refueling stations,

Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2CAS Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decisions and actions of drivers; hydrogen fueling station investors; combined heat, hydrogen, and power system owners; and vehicle original equipment manufacturers are modeled....

331

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

332

Energy Basics: Propane Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

333

Energy Basics: Alternative Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

334

Energy Basics: Alternative Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles: Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

335

EERE: Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Office and initiatives, using efficient vehicles, and access vehicle and fuel information. Photo of a ethanol and biodiesel fueling station Photo of three big-rig...

336

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Well-to-Wheels Analysis of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Pathways in Shanghai Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Hydrogen Based Fuel-Cell Vehicle Pathways in...

337

Hydrogen Use and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USE AND SAFETY USE AND SAFETY The lightest and most common element in the universe, hydrogen has been safely used for decades in industrial applications. Currently, over 9 million tons of hydrogen are produced in the U.S. each year and 3.2 trillion cubic feet are used to make many common products. They include glass, margarine, soap, vitamins, peanut butter, toothpaste and almost all metal products. Hydrogen has been used as a fuel since the 1950s by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. space program. Hydrogen - A Safe, Clean Fuel for Vehicles Hydrogen has another use - one that can help our nation reduce its consumption of fossil fuels. Hydrogen can be used to power fuel cell vehicles. When combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, hydrogen generates electricity used

338

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

339

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

340

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the batteries, and to power accessories like the air condi- tioner and heater. Hybrid electric cars can exceed#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 8: FUEL CELL HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES CONTENTS 8.1 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES .................................................................................. 8-1 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nanoengineering-Enabled Solid-State Hydrogen Uptake and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle applications, has always been hydrogenated and dehydrogenated in the ... Opacified, Reinforced Aerogel for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric ...

343

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Electric Power ResearchT, Simpson A. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle energy storageincluding BEVs, hybrid electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of an Efficient Hybrid Energy Storage System (HESS) for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The popularity of the internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has contributed to global warming problem and degradation of air quality around the world. Furthermore, the… (more)

Zhuge, Kun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Modeling, simulation, and analysis of series hybrid electric vehicles for fuel economy improvement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) combines a conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) propulsion system with an electric propulsion system. In a series HEV, an electric… (more)

Khandaker, Masuma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Distributed H{sub 2} Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

Almlie, Jay

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: July 23, 2001 5: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on

348

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Transition to Hydrogen Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project Summary Full Title: A Smooth Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project ID: 87 Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Brief Description: This project contrasts the options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Keywords: Infrastructure; costs; hydrogen production Purpose The case for hydrogen-powered transportation requires an assessment of present and prospective methods for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen. This project examines one potential pathway: on-site production of hydrogen to fuel light-duty vehicles. Performer Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

349

Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Observation of Negative Ion Resonances in Amorphous Ice via Low-Energy (5{endash}40 eV) Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The {ital D}{sub 2}({sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub {ital g}}, {ital v}=0{endash}2, {ital J}=0{endash}2) desorbates produced during low-energy (5{endash}40 eV) electron-beam irradiation of amorphous D{sub 2}O ice were monitored using resonance-enhanced laser ionization spectroscopy. We attribute the structure in the D{sub 2} yield as a function of the incident electron energy to core-excited negative ion resonances. These resonances, or the excited states produced after electron autodetachment, decay via molecular elimination to yield {ital D}{sub 2}({sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub {ital g}}) directly. D{sub 2} is observed with {ital v}=0 or 2 but not {ital v}=1, suggesting a symmetry propensity in the excitation or decay of the resonances. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Kimmel, G.A.; Orlando, T.M. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrogen Filling Station  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrogen Filling Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Model-Based Validation of Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Control Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen fuel cell technology has emerged as an efficient and clean alternative to internal combustion engines for powering vehicles, and hydrogen powertrains will aid in… (more)

Wilhelm, Erik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The hydrogen hybrid option  

SciTech Connect

The energy efficiency of various piston engine options for series hybrid automobiles are compared with conventional, battery powered electric, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell hybrid automobiles. Gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen are considered for these hybrids. The engine and fuel comparisons are done on a basis of equal vehicle weight, drag, and rolling resistance. The relative emissions of these various fueled vehicle options are also presented. It is concluded that a highly optimized, hydrogen fueled, piston engine, series electric hybrid automobile will have efficiency comparable to a similar fuel cell hybrid automobile and will have fewer total emissions than the battery powered vehicle, even without a catalyst.

Smith, J.R.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sidescan Sonar Imagery of the Winter Marginal Ice Zone Obtained from an AUV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Arctic under-ice sidescan sonar imagery from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) has been obtained in the winter marginal ice zone of the East Greenland Current at 73°00?N, 11°47?W, using a Maridan Martin 150 vehicle operated from R/...

P. Wadhams; J. P. Wilkinson; A. Kaletzky

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

Stottler, Gary

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Project Summary Full Title: Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Scenario Analysis Project ID: 189 Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Keywords: Hydrogen fueling; infrastructure; fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose This analysis estimates the spatial distribution of hydrogen fueling stations necessary to support the 5 million fuel cell vehicle scenario, based on demographic demand patterns for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and strategy of focusing development on specific regions of the U.S. that may have high hydrogen demand. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 Telephone: 303-275-4479

358

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Washington, DC July 13, 2005 JoAnn Milliken DOE Hydrogen Program Planning U.S. Energy Dependence is Driven By Transportation * The U.S. imports 55% of its oil; expected to grow to 68% by 2025 under the status quo. * Transportation accounts for 2/3 of the 20 million barrels of oil our nation uses each day. * Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles will help in the near -mid term; a replacement for petroleum is needed for the long-term. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Million barrels per day Marine Rail Actual Projection Cars Air Light Trucks Heavy Vehicles U.S. Production Off-Road Projection Hydrogen Provides a Solution Producing hydrogen from domestic resources, including renewable, nuclear, and coal

359

Ice Storm Database and Ice Severity Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical icing information has several valuable uses in overhead transmission line ice loading design and research. Previously, this type of information was neither readily available nor easily acquired. This report describes the creation of an electronic ice storm database and regional ice severity maps for the United States.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Hybrid and Vehicle Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Modeling & Simulation Integration & Validation Benchmarking Parasitic Loss Reduction Propulsion Systems Advanced Vehicle Evaluations Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban...

362

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid...

363

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

364

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles Toyota Urban Electric Vehicle Urban electric vehicles (UEVs) are regular passenger vehicles with top speeds of about 60 miles per hour (mph) and a...

365

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project ID: 200 Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Keywords: Costs; vehicle characteristics Purpose HyDIVE permits rigorous analysis of the interdependence between hydrogen fuel vehicle demand growth and hydrogen fueling station coverage. Performer Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-4436 Email: cory_welch@nrel.gov Additional Performers: PA Government Services Period of Performance Start: October 2006 End: December 2007 Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Vehicle Options

366

HICEV AMERICA: HYDROGEN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HICEV AMERICA: HICEV AMERICA: HYDROGEN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE VEHICLE (HICEV) TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Revision 0 November 1, 2004 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications HICEV America Vehicle Specification i TABLE OF CONTENTS Minimum Vehicle Requirements 1 1. Regulatory Requirements 7 2. Chassis 8 3. Vehicle Characteristics 10 4. Drive System 11 5. Vehicle Performance 12 6. Hydrogen Fuel Storage System (HFSS) 14 7. Additional Vehicle Systems 17 8. Documentation 18 Appendices Appendix A - Vehicle Data 19 Appendix B - FMVSS Certification Methodology 26 DB12/7/04 HICEV America Vehicle Specification 2 MINIMUM VEHICLE REQUIREMENTS The HICEV America Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technology to provide for independent assessment of hydrogen fueled, internal

367

Equity Evaluation of Vehicle Miles Traveled Fees in Texas Lisa Larsen, EIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced technology vehicles (plug-in hybrids, extended range electric vehicles or hydrogen ICEVs+ vehicles are plug-in hybrid or hydrogen internal combustion engine vehicles Under the CARB zero to station owners Government could offer incentives such as investment tax credits to offset a significant

Burris, Mark W.

368

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

369

Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Steam Methane Reforming Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation Coal Gasification Biomass Combustion Engines Hybrid Vehicles Onboard Storage Onboard Reforming Refueling Options Where possible

370

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

371

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: CASCADE Refueling Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liss Brief Description: Calculate sizing, fueling, and tradeoff issues for compressed gas fueling stations. Keywords: Natural gas; hydrogen; vehicle; refueling; storage;...

372

Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report identifies a minimum infrastructure that could support the introduction of hydrogen vehicles and develops and evaluates transition scenarios supported by this infrastructure.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Our nation's energy security depends on the efficiency of our transportation system and on which fuels we use. Transportation in the United States already consumes much more oil than we produce here at home and the situation is getting worse. Domestic oil production has been dropping steadily for over 20 years, and experts predict that by 2025, about 70% of our oil will be imported. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Vehicle Technologies Office supports research and development (R&D) that will lead to new technologies that reduce our nation's dependence on imported oil, further decrease vehicle emissions, and serve as a bridge from today's conventional powertrains and fuels to tomorrow's hydrogen-powered hybrid fuel cell vehicles. The Vehicle Technologies Office also supports implementation programs that help to transition alternative fuels and vehicles into the marketplace, as well as collegiate educational activities to help encourage engineering and science students to pursue careers in the transportation sector. Following are some of the activities that complement the Vehicle Technologies Office's mission.

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

375

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and fuel cells offer great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary fuel cell technol vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated in addition to hydrogen fuel for local demonstration fuel cell vehicles. As advanced vehicles begin to enter

376

Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Solicitations Active Solicitations To explore current financial opportunity solicitations, click on the opportunity titles in the table below. To sort the list, click on the arrows in the column headings. Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research and Development for Hydrogen Storage Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10/29/2013 01/17/2014 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells RFI: Light Duty Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Financing Strategies Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 12/11/2013 01/31/2014 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Hydrogen Delivery Technologies Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 11/14/2013 02/14/2014 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000826

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

379

Learn More About the Fuel Economy Label for Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicles Electric Vehicles Learn More About the New Label Electric Vehicle Fuel Economy and Environment Label Vehicle Technology & Fuel Fuel Economy Comparing Fuel Economy to Other Vehicles You Save Fuel Consumption Rate Estimated Annual Fuel Cost Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas Rating CO2 Emissions Information Smog Rating Details in Fine Print QR Code Fueleconomy.gov Driving Range Charge Time 1. Vehicle Technology & Fuel The upper right corner of the label will display text and a related icon to identify it as a vehicle that is powered by electricity. You will see different text and icons on the labels for other vehicles: Gasoline Vehicle Diesel Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Flexible-Fuel Vehicle: Gasoline-Ethanol (E85)

380

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Storing Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE News Release - DOE Completes Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2004 DOE Completes HydrogenCNG Blended Fuels Performance and Emissions Vehicle Testing The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, has...

383

Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

Garetson, Thomas

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation prepared for the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Conference that describes the spring 2008 results for DOE's Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

A study in hybrid vehicle architectures : comparing efficiency and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of performance and efficiencies for four vehicle power architectures; the internal combustion engine (ICE), the parallel hybrid (i.e. Toyota Prius), the serial hybrid (i.e. Chevrolet Volt), ...

Cotter, Gavin M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The diffusion of H{sub 2} in hexagonal ice at low temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have studied the diffusive motion of hydrogen in D{sub 2}O ice by measuring the quasielastic scattering and estimating the single particle diffusion coefficient of hydrogen.

Strauss, H.L.; Chen, Z. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Loong, C.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hydrogen Data Book from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Data Book contains a wide range of factual information on hydrogen and fuel cells (e.g., hydrogen properties, hydrogen production and delivery data, and information on fuel cells and fuel cell vehicles), and it also provides other data that might be useful in analyses of hydrogen infrastructure in the United States (e.g., demographic data and data on energy supply and/or infrastructure). ItÆs made available from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center along with a wealth of related information. The related information includes guidelines for DOE Hydrogen Program Analysis, various calculator tools, a hydrogen glossary, related websites, and analysis tools relevant to hydrogen and fuel cells. [From http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/cocoon/morf/hydrogen

388

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects by Performing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performing Organization Performing Organization Below are hydrogen analyses and analytical models grouped by performing organization. A B D E F G I L M N O P R S T U W A Aalborg University Wind Power Integration Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Ceramic Membrane Reactors for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Anhui University of Technology Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Pathways in Shanghai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Vehicle Introduction Decisions (AVID) Model AirCRED Model All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Consumer Adoption and Infrastructure Development Including Combined Hydrogen, Heat, and Power Cost Implications of Hydrogen Quality Requirements

389

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

390

Hearing on the Use of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology in the National Park Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE USE OF HYDROGEN FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY IN THE NATIONALON THE USE OF HYDROGEN FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY IN THE NATIONALon hydrogen and hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technologies and

Eggert, Anthony

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration.

Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

393

Glossary Term - Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuteron Previous Term (Deuteron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron) Electron Dry Ice A block of dry ice sublimating on a table. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide...

394

Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight August 19, 2013 Automakers have made steady progress reducing the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020. A recent Denver Post article highlights the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's contribution to the progress that automakers have made in getting their fuel cell electric vehicles ready for production. "When I started working on fuel cells in the '90s, people said it was a good field because a solution would always be five years away," said Brian Pivovar, who leads NREL's fuel cell research. "Not anymore." The article references a variety of NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell

396

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

StreetSmart : modeling vehicle fuel consumption with mobile phone sensor data through a participatory sensing framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle energy efficiency has become a priority of governments, researchers, and consumers in the wake of rising fuels costs over the last decade. Traditional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles are particularly ...

Oehlerking, Austin Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

codes and standards for buildings, components, systems, and vehicles. NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell research supports the Fuel Cell Technologies Office at the U.S. Department of...

399

Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Just the Basics to Just the Basics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Just the Basics Technology Overviews Biodiesel Combustion Diesel Engine Hybrid and Plug-in Electric Vehicles Ethanol Fuel Cells Hydrogen Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane)

400

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fueling station HFSS High-flux solar simulator HFV Hydrogen-fueled vehicle HGEF Hawaii Gateway Energy Center XIV. Acronyms, Abbreviations and Definitions XIV-10 DOE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

402

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

403

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

405

Energy Basics: Propane Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

gasoline vehicles. Dedicated propane vehicles are designed to run only on propane; bi-fuel propane vehicles have two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use...

406

Flex-fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Stations that Sell E85 (Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center AFDC) Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV) Cost Calculator (compare costs for operating your vehicle...

407

Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Timothy Patterson (Primary Contact), V. Srinivasamurthi, T. Skiba UTC Power Corp. 195 Governor's Highway South Windsor, CT 06074 Phone: (860) 727-2274 Email: timothy.patterson@utcpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000468 Subcontractors: * United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT * Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

408

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

409

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles What's New 2013 BRP Commander Electric (PDF 195KB) A Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) is technically defined as a Low Speed Vehicle (LSV)...

410

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Vehicles SuperShuttle CNG Van Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas,...

411

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

412

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEVAmerica Baseline Performance Testing 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega 2009 NEVAmerica Baseline...

413

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Systems Hybrid and vehicle systems research provides an overarching vehicle systems perspective to the technology research and development (R&D) activities of...

414

Hydrogen Purity Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Association Compressed Gas Association Roger A. Smith Technical Director April 26, 2004 Hydrogen Purity Standard Compressed Gas Association 2 Compressed Gas Association ‹ 150 Members „ Industrial Gas Companies „ Equipment Manufacturers „ Other Gas Industry Associations „ Other SDOs ‹ Manufacturers, Fillers, Distributors, and Transporters of Industrial and Medical Gases Compressed Gas Association 3 Hydrogen Activities ‹ Committees „ Hydrogen Fuel Technology „ Bulk Distribution Equipment „ Hazardous Materials Codes „ Gas Specifications „ Cylinders, Valves & PRD's ‹ International „ Europe (EIGA) „ Japan (JIGA) „ Asia (AIGA) „ United Nations Compressed Gas Association 4 Hydrogen Purity Standard ‹ Draft hydrogen purity standard for stationary fuel cells and ICE's in 10 months

415

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Results of two Reports from the National Research Council Joan Ogden and Mike11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug Ramage DOE Light-Duty Vehicle Workshop July 26, 2010 #12;22 COMMITTEE ON ASSESSMENT OF RESOURCE NEEDS

416

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

417

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

418

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

419

Energy Basics: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

420

Energy Basics: Natural Gas Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Energy's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence describe a significant advance- 1 - Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances March 21, 2012 Drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter A significant advance in hydrogen storage could make hydrogen a more

Kurien, Susan

422

Vehicle Technologies Office: Closed Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed Solicitations Closed Solicitations Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells- Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Request for Information (RFI) on performance, durability, and cost targets for fuel cells designed for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) and Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) applications Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 05/28/2009 06/30/2009 Vehicle Technologies- Vehicle Technologies Recovery Act - Systems Level Technology Development, Integration,and Demonstration for Efficient Class 8 Trucks (SuperTruck) and Advanced Technology Powertrains For Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 06/09/2009 09/09/2009 Crosscutting U.S. China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 03/30/2010 05/21/2010

423

Hydrogen as a zero-emission, high-efficiency fuel: Uniqueness, experiments and simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop an engine design capability based on the KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions for an experimental engine over a wide range of ignition timings. The NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board.

Johnson, N.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program.

Markel, T.; Pesaran, A.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.; Tataria, H.; Duong, T.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy?s Energy Storage Program.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.; Tataria, H.; Duong, T.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid gasoline-electric vehicles (HEVs), “plug-in” HEVs, and advanced batter y-powered electric vehicles—

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Compare Fuel Cell Vehicles Side-by-Side  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recently Tested Vehicles Recently Tested Vehicles Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) are not yet for sale in the United States. However, manufacturers are producing small fleets of FCVs for evaluation and have estimated the fuel economy of some vehicles using EPA test procedures. Fuel economy estimates and other information for recently tested vehicles are provided below. 2012 Honda FCX Clarity Honda FCX Clarity 2012 Mercedes-Benz F-Cell Mercedes F-Cell Fuel Economy and Driving Range Fuel Economy (miles/kg) Note: One kg of hydrogen is roughly equivalent to one gallon of gasoline. Hydrogen 60 Combined 60 City 60 Hwy Hydrogen 52 Combined 52 City 53 Hwy Range (miles) 240 190 Vehicle Characteristics Vehicle Class Midsize Car Small Station Wagon Motor DC Brushless 100kW DC Permanent Magnet (brushless) Type of Fuel Cell Proton Exchange Membrane Proton Exchange Membrane

429

Hydrogen Energy Data Book | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Energy Data Book Hydrogen Energy Data Book Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Energy Data Book Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset Website: hydrogen.pnl.gov/cocoon/morf/hydrogen/article/103 References: Program Website[1] Logo: Hydrogen Energy Data Book The Hydrogen Energy Data Book provides statistics related to hydrogen energy and contains a wide range of factual information on hydrogen and fuel cells (e.g., hydrogen properties, hydrogen production and delivery data, and information on fuel cells and fuel cell vehicles), and it also provides other data that might be useful in analyses of hydrogen

430

Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities in Key Activities in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on AddThis.com... Key Activities Mission, Vision, & Goals Plans, Implementation, & Results Organization & Contacts National Laboratories Budget Partnerships Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or

431

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 of 5 Page 1 of 5 VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Nissan Leaf VIN: JN1AZ0CP5BT000356 Class: Mid-size Seatbelt Positions: 5 Type: EV Motor Type: Three-Phase, Four-Pole Permanent Magnet AC Synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 80 kW/280 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 10,390 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Battery Manufacturer: Automotive Energy Supply Corporation Type: Lithium-ion - Laminate type Cathode/Anode Material: LiMn 2 O 4 with LiNiO 2 /Graphite Pack Location: Under center of vehicle Number of Cells: 192 Cell Configuration: 2 parallel, 96 series Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.8 V Nominal System Voltage: 364.8 V Rated Pack Capacity: 66.2 Ah Rated Pack Energy: 24 kWh Max. Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.2 V Min. Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 2.5 V

432

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E27C177982 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

433

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E87C172351 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

434

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z07S838122 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

435

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

436

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2WD VIN 1FMYU95H75KC45881 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 70 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Features: Four wheel drive Regenerative...

437

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4AR144757 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

438

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z37S813344 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

439

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4WD VIN 1FMCU96H15KE18237 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 70 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Features: Four wheel drive Regenerative...

440

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

Box, W.D.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle VIN:19XFB5F57CE002590 Class: Compact Seatbelt Positions: 5 Type: Sedan CARB 2 : AT-PZEV EPA CityHwyCombined 3 : 273832 MPGe Tires Manufacturer:...

442

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Project ID: 201 Principal Investigator: Romesh Kumar Keywords: Lifecycle costs; fuel cells; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR) Purpose Assess the influence of different contaminants and their concentration in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification. Performer Principal Investigator: Romesh Kumar Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Address: 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Telephone: 630-252-4342 Email: kumar@cmt.anl.gov Period of Performance Start: October 2005 End: September 2010 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

443

Hydrogen Electrolyzer R&D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide, significant RD investments continue in key areas towards realizing a hydrogen economy. Growing concerns over carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and dependence on imported fossil fuels are the biggest drivers for investments in the hydrogen energy carrier option, where the primary application is fuel for transportation. While plug-in hybrids and all electric vehicles are near-term solutions, hydrogen represents a renewable fuel energy carrier with long-term potential either as a range extender or a...

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing (Batteries and Fuel Economies)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Hybrid Electric Vehicle Energy Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery and Fuel Economy Testing Donald Karner a , James Francfort b a Electric Transportation Applications 401 South 2nd Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85003, USA b Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Abstract The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, has conducted testing of advanced technology vehicles since August, 1995 in support of the AVTA goal to provide benchmark data for technology modeling, and research and development programs. The AVTA has tested over 200 advanced technology vehicles including full size electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, and hydrogen internal combustion engine powered vehicles.

445

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 1: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project ID: 78 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; costs; methanol; hydrogen fueling Purpose As the DOE considers both direct hydrogen and reformer-based fuel cell vehicles, it is vital to have a clear perspective of the relative infrastructure costs to supply each prospective fuel (gasoline, methanol, or hydrogen). Consequently, this analysis compares these infrastructure costs as well as the cost to remove sulfur from gasoline (as will most likely be required for use in fuel cell systems) and the cost implications for several hydrogen tank filling options. This analysis supports Analysis

446

Aging of Accreted Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of annealing in accreted ice has been investigated for artificially grown ice deposits after 100 days of storage in a deep freeze unit. Cross sections of the cylindrical deposits have been cut and replicated soon after growth and ...

F. Prodi; L. Levi

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice nuclei Small particles around which ice particles form. Categories Cloud Properties...

448

Anemometry in Icing Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of wind measurements in icing conditions is discussed, and wind tunnel calibrations as well as field comparisons are presented for three heated anemometers that use different measuring principles. It is pointed out that ice-free ...

Lasse Makkonen; Pertti Lehtonen; Lauri Helle

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Stability of ferroelectric ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the stability conditions of the ferroelectric ice of the Cmc21 structure, which has been considered, for decades, one of the most promising candidates of the low temperature proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih. It turned out that the Cmc21 structure is stable only with a certain amount of dopant and the true proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih remains to be found at lower temperature. Implication for spin ice is mentioned.

Iitaka, Toshiaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Study of Adaptive and Optimizing Behavior for Electric Vehicles Based on Interactive Simulation Games and Revealed Behavior of Electric Vehicle Owners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressednatural gas vehicles (CNG) having ranges of 50 to200 miles. A few hundred CNG ownersare experienced with slowctric, hydrogen,methanol,CNG, ethanol. Theprimary reason for

Turrentine, Thomas; Lee-Gosselin, Martin; Kurani, Kenneth; Sperling, Daniel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

TransForum vxny - Hydrogen Engine Evaluation Using MATT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through the use of an Argonne-developed test platform, researchers have devised new combustion strategies for hydrogen-powered vehicles that come one step closer to...

455

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8020: Reduction in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction in Fuel Consumption with Fuel Cell Vehicles Update to: 5018 Originator: Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 29, 2008 Item: A hydrogen-powered fuel...

456

The National Renewable Energy Laboratorys Hydrogen Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; market transformation; and education. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and...

457

NREL: Energy Analysis - Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Solar Vehicles and Fuels Research Wind Market Analysis Policy Analysis Sustainability Analysis Key Activities Models & Tools Data &...

458

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Sensitivity Analysis of H2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Greene Brief Description: This project seeks to understand market prospects, costs, and benefits of light-duty hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and their sensitivity to...

459

In-situ Chemistry Mapping of Hydrogen Storage Materials by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first case, sodium alanate based hydrogen storage is a vehicle-scale candidate system developed by Sandia/GM. Neutron scattering was used to ...

460

Certification Testing and Demonstration of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as alternatives to today's petroleum-powered vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles can use the advanced technology of electric vehicles to improve environmental quality and energy security, while providing the range it provides a 640-km (400-mile) range in a 34 km/liter (80 mpg) hybrid vehicle or fuel cell vehicle. Storing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan An Integrated Strategic Plan for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[plug-in hybrid electric vehicles] and BEVs [battery- electric vehicles], and · The transition, and advanced vehicle technologies activities and reiterated DOE's portfolio approach to light-duty vehicles to hydrogen as a major transportation fuel utilized in fuel cell electric vehicles. ...The fuel cell

462

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

463

A Simplified Integrated Model for Studying Transitions to a Hydrogen Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

654. Mintz, M. , et al. , Hydrogen: On the Horizon of Just aa Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles: A SouthernInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 1999. 24: p. 709-

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN: 1G1RD6E48BUI00815 Class: Compact Seatbelt Positions: 4 Type 2 : Multi-Mode PHEV (EV, Series, and Power-split) Motor Type: 12-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 111 kW/370 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 9500 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Generator Type: 16-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 55 kW/200 Nm Max. Generator Speed: 6000 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Battery Manufacturer: LG Chem Type: Lithium-ion Cathode/Anode Material: LiMn 2 O 4 /Hard Carbon Number of Cells: 288 Cell Config.: 3 parallel, 96 series Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.7 V Nominal System Voltage: 355.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 45 Ah Rated Pack Energy: 16 kWh Weight of Pack: 435 lb

465

DOE News Release - DOE Completes Testing on Three Hydrogen Fueled...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miles on 100 percent hydrogen gas and blends of hydrogen gas and compressed natural gas (CNG). The vehicles were fueled at the Arizona Public Service (APS) Alternative Fuel Pilot...

466

FCT Systems Analysis: 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure to someone by E-mail Share FCT Systems Analysis: 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

467

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Hydrogen Program New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This project will develop a small appliance for refueling hydrogen vehicles by the homeowner that is low cost and uses inexpensive off-peak electricity to produce hydrogen from...

468

Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With hydrogen gaining acceptance as an energy carrier for fuel cell vehicles and stationary fuel cell applications, a new community of hydrogen users is emerging and continues to grow. With this growth has come the need to spread the word about safe practices for handling, storing, and using hydrogen. Like all energy forms, hydrogen can be used safely through proper procedures and engineering techniques. However, hydrogen involves a degree of risk that must be respected, and the importance of avoiding complacency or haste in the safe conduct and performance of projects involving hydrogen cannot be overstated. To encourage and promote the safe use of hydrogen, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed and continues to enhance two software tools in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program: the Hydrogen Safety Best Practices online manual (www.H2BestPractices.org) and the Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned database (www.H2Incidents.org).

Fassbender, Linda L.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Alternative Vehicle Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a number of alternative and advanced vehicles—or vehicles that run on alternative fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles:

470

Vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Vehicles Sector List of Vehicles Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

471

Vehicles News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energy-department-announces-45-million-advance-next-generation Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies

472

Development of a proof-of-concept hybrid electric fuel cell vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for fuel-efficient vehicles is on the rise due to the rising costs of gasoline and increasing environmental concerns. Zero tailpipe emission vehicles that run on electricity or hydrogen lack infrastructure to have a significant impact

Peter Strahs; Jordan Weaver; Luis Breziner; Christophe Garant; Keith Shaffer; Georgiy Diloyan; Parsaoran Hutapea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A hybrid vehicle evaluation code and its application to vehicle design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hybrid vehicle simulation model, which can be applied to many of the vehicles currently being considered for low pollution and high fuel economy. The code operates interactively, with all the vehicle information stored in data files. The code calculates fuel economy for three driving schedules, time for 0-96 km/h at maximum acceleration, hill climbing performance, power train dimensions, and pollution generation rates. This report also documents the application of the code to a hybrid vehicle that operates with a hydrogen internal combustion engine. The simulation model is used for parametric studies of the vehicle. The results show the fuel economy of the vehicle as a function of vehicle mass, aerodynamic drag, engine-generator efficiency, flywheel efficiency, and flywheel energy and power capacities.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

475

Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.

Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Project Summary Full Title: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures and Potential Impacts from an Emergent Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Project ID: 250 Principal Investigator: David Reichmuth Brief Description: Sandia National Laboratories is using a system dynamics approach to simulate the interaction of vehicle adoption and infrastructure for hydrogen, electricity, natural gas, and gasoline. Purpose It is envisioned that the transition to hydrogen vehicles will begin by taking advantage of the existing infrastructure for natural gas. This project will study the impact of hydrogen vehicles on demand for natural gas, electricity, and gasoline. The impact of existing energy infrastructures on hydrogen infrastructure growth will also be considered.

477

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles Ford Think Neighbor A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is a four-wheeled vehicle that has a top speed of 20-25 miles per hour (mph). It is larger...

478

VEHICLE DETAILS, BATTERY DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 VEHICLE DETAILS, BATTERY DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details Base Vehicle: 2011 Nissan Leaf VIN: JN1AZ0CP5BT000356 Propulsion System: BEV Electric Machine: 80 kW...

479

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

Box, W.D.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

Box, W.D.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen ice vehicle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vehicle Smart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This article explores criteria necessary for reliable communication between electric vehicles (EVs) and electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE). Data will demonstrate that a G3-PLC system has already met the criteria established by the automotive and utility industries. Multiple international tests prove that a G3-PLC implementation is the optimal low-frequency solution. A similar version of this article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Power Systems Design magazine. For the first time, electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are building a viable market of mobile electrical energy consumers. Not surprisingly, new relationships between electricity providers (the utility companies) and automobile owners are emerging. Many utilities already offer, or are planning to offer, special tariffs, including fixed monthly rates, to EV owners. EVs impose new dynamics and demands on the electrical supply itself. There is, in fact, a symbiotic relationship developing between the EV and energy provider. Because of their large storage capacity, often 10kVH, EVs draw currents of 80A or greater over a period of hours. This strains electrical grid components, especially low-voltage transformers which can overheat and fail while serving consumers ' homes. Meanwhile, the EVs ' electrical storage capacity can also reverse the current flow. It can then supply power back to the grid, thereby helping the utilities to meet demand peaks without starting up high-carbon-output diesel generators. To enable this new dynamic relationship, the EV and the energy provider must communicate. The utility must be able to authenticate the individual vehicle, and bidirectional communications is needed to support negotiation of power flow rates and direction. To

Jim Leclare; Principal Member; Technical Staff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Permitting Hydrogen Facilities Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy The objective of this U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Permitting Web site is to help local permitting officials deal with proposed hydrogen fueling stations, fuel cell installations for telecommunications backup power, and other hydrogen projects. Resources for local permitting officials who are looking to address project proposals include current citations for hydrogen fueling stations and a listing of setback requirements on the Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicle Data Center Web site. In addition, this overview of telecommunications fuel cell use and an animation that demonstrates telecommunications site layout using hydrogen fuel cells for backup power should provide helpful

483

Hydrogen spillover: Its "diffusion" from catalysis to hydrogen storage community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on catalyst sites followed by surface diffusion (spillover) to a carbon support was first reported for Pt-carbon catalysts (Robell, 1964) and was soon accepted as a valid step of numerous catalytic reactions. However, the concept of metal-assisted hydrogen storage (Schwarz, 1988) based on spillover entered much later the hydrogen community (Lueking and Yang, 2002) and is gaining recognition slowly as an alternate approach for enhancing hydrogen storage capacity of microporous materials for fuel-cell powered vehicles. This talk will analyze the significance and limits of the spillover mechanism for adsorptive storage of hydrogen, with examples of enhanced hydrogen uptake on Pd-containing activated carbon fibers. Evidence of the atomic nature of spilt-over hydrogen will be presented based on experimental results from inelastic neutron spectroscopy studies. Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy under contract with UT-Battelle, LLC.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are designed to carry two or four passengers. Click here for more information About Urban Electric Vehicles (PDF 128KB) Vehicle Testing Reports Ford THINK City Ford Thnk...

485

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that feature one or more advanced technologies, including: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technologies Extended range electric vehicle technologies Hybrid electric, pure...

486