National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrogen ice vehicle

  1. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  2. Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort

    2005-03-01

    The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

  3. Hydrogen Material Compatibility for Hydrogen ICE | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pm04smith.pdf (1.52 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Materials Compatibility for the H-ICE Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Vehicle ...

  4. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  5. economic hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    economic hydrogen fuel cell vehicles - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future ...

  6. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and ...

  7. AVTA: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures HICEV Technical ...

  8. Prospects on fuel economy improvements for hydrogen powered vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousseau, A.; Wallner, T.; Pagerit, S.; Lohse-Bush, H.

    2008-01-01

    Fuel cell vehicles are the subject of extensive research and development because of their potential for high efficiency and low emissions. Because fuel cell vehicles remain expensive and the demand for hydrogen is therefore limited, very few fueling stations are being built. To try to accelerate the development of a hydrogen economy, some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) in the automotive industry have been working on a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) as an intermediate step. Despite its lower cost, the hydrogen-fueled ICE offers, for a similar amount of onboard hydrogen, a lower driving range because of its lower efficiency. This paper compares the fuel economy potential of hydrogen-fueled vehicles to their conventional gasoline counterparts. To take uncertainties into account, the current and future status of both technologies were considered. Although complete data related to port fuel injection were provided from engine testing, the map for the direct-injection engine was developed from single-cylinder data. The fuel cell system data represent the status of the current technology and the goals of FreedomCAR. For both port-injected and direct-injected hydrogen engine technologies, power split and series Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) configurations were considered. For the fuel cell system, only a series HEV configuration was simulated.

  9. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. tv_05_sell.pdf (8.4 MB) More Documents & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Accelerating Alternatives for Minnesota Drivers Lean Gasoline System Development

  10. Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Fuel cell vehicles and fueling stations PDF icon ...

  11. Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation This animation demonstrates the multiple safety systems in hydrogen-fueled ...

  12. Hydrogen behavior in ice condenser containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundstroem, P.; Hongisto, O.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1995-09-01

    A new hydrogen management strategy is being developed for the Loviisa ice condenser containment. The strategy relies on containment-wide natural circulations that develop, once the ice condenser doors are forced open, to effectively produce a well-mixed behavior, and a correspondingly slow rise in hydrogen concentration. Levels can then be kept low by a distributed catalytic recombiner system, and (perhaps) an igniter system as a backup, while the associated energy releases can be effectively dissipated in the ice bed. Verification and fine-tuning of the approach is carried out experimentally in the VICTORIA facility and by associated scaling/modelling studies. VICTORIA represents an 1/15th scale model of the Loviisa containment, hydrogen is simulated by helium, and local concentration measurements are obtained by a newly developed instrument specifically for this purpose, called SPARTA. This paper is focused on experimental results from several key experiments that provide a first delineation of key behaviors.

  13. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Accelerating Alternatives for Minnesota Drivers Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car HYDROGEN TO THE ...

  14. Policy Option for Hydrogen Vehicles and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Stefan Unnasch at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007.

  15. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  16. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  17. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Williams

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on

  19. Dispensing Hydrogen Fuel to Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery » Dispensing Hydrogen Fuel to Vehicles Dispensing Hydrogen Fuel to Vehicles Photo of a person dispensing hydrogen into a vehicle fuel tank The technology used for storing hydrogen onboard vehicles directly affects the design and selection of the delivery system and infrastructure. In the near term, 700 bar gaseous onboard storage has been chosen by the original equipment manufacturers for the first vehicles to be released commercially, and 350 bar is the chosen pressure for

  20. Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokshin, Konstantin; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-05-13

    The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

  1. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (318.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Electric

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Availability Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Electric Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Electric Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Electric Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Electric Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative

  3. Policy Option for Hydrogen Vehicles and Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stefan Unnasch (408) 517-1563 Unnasch.stefan@tiaxllc.com Daniel Rutherford, Ph.D. (408) 517-1555 Rutherford.daniel@tiaxllc.com Policy Options for Hydrogen Vehicles and Infrastructure January 31, 2007 TIAX, LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 TIAXLLC.com © 2006 TIAX LLC Posted with permission from TIAX Summary based on NREL Task Order NO. KACX-4-44452-02 Policy Options for Hydrogen Vehicles Presentation Outline 1 1 Background 2 Study methodology 3 Policy options for early

  4. Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Prof. Jinyang Zheng Director of IPE, Zhejiang University Director of Engineering Research Center for High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education Vice Director of China National Safety Committee of Pressure Vessels Vice President of CMES-P.R. China China Representative of ISO/TC197 and ISO/TC58 U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons

  5. Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING INFRASTRUCTURE IN INDIA Prof. L. M. Das Centre for Energy Studies Indian Institute of Technology Delhi INDIA " The earth was not given to us by our parents , it has been loaned to us by our children" Kenyan Proverb Same feeling exists in all societies Our moral responsibility---to handover a safer earth to future generation IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 -:Hydrogen:- Not a Radically New Concept JULES VERNE Mysterious Island (1876) ...." I believe that

  6. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  7. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  8. Hydrogen hybrid vehicle engine development: Experimental program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Blarigan, P.

    1995-09-01

    A hydrogen fueled engine is being developed specifically for the auxiliary power unit (APU) in a series type hybrid vehicle. Hydrogen is different from other internal combustion (IC) engine fuels, and hybrid vehicle IC engine requirements are different from those of other IC vehicle engines. Together these differences will allow a new engine design based on first principles that will maximize thermal efficiency while minimizing principal emissions. The experimental program is proceeding in four steps: (1) Demonstration of the emissions and the indicated thermal efficiency capability of a standard CLR research engine modified for higher compression ratios and hydrogen fueled operation. (2) Design and test a new combustion chamber geometry for an existing single cylinder research engine, in an attempt to improve on the baseline indicated thermal efficiency of the CLR engine. (3) Design and build, in conjunction with an industrial collaborator, a new full scale research engine designed to maximize brake thermal efficiency. Include a full complement of combustion diagnostics. (4) Incorporate all of the knowledge thus obtained in the design and fabrication, by an industrial collaborator, of the hydrogen fueled engine for the hybrid vehicle power train illustrator. Results of the CLR baseline engine testing are presented, as well as preliminary data from the new combustion chamber engine. The CLR data confirm the low NOx produced by lean operation. The preliminary indicated thermal efficiency data from the new combustion chamber design engine show an improvement relative to the CLR engine. Comparison with previous high compression engine results shows reasonable agreement.

  9. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    As nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs offer a sustainable transportation option, provide a cost-competitive alternative for drivers, reduce dependence on imported oil, and enable global economic leadership and job growth.

  10. Hydrogen Materials Compatibility for the H-ICE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  11. Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Fuel cell vehicles and fueling stations 20080910_state_regional_vision.pdf (780.66 KB) More Documents & Publications Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations Innovation and Coordination at the Callifornia Fuel Cell Partnership FCEVs and Hydrogen in California

  12. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  13. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California

  14. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California

  15. Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation (Text Version) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation (Text Version) Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation (Text Version) Hydrogen fueled vehicles have multiple safety systems that detect and prevent the accidental release of hydrogen. There are sensors that detect leaks, a computer that monitors fuel flow, and an excess flow shut-off valve. Hydrogen tanks also have a pressure release device, much like those on natural gas water heaters in our homes. If a leak is

  16. NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

  17. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Download the webinar slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Hydrogen Refueling Protocols," held February 22, 2013. Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar Slides (3.49 MB) More Documents & Publications Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and

  18. Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (FCEVs) | Department of Energy for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs) Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs) Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs)" held on June 24, 2014. Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs) Webinar Slides (3.28 MB) More Documents

  19. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues | Department of Energy Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues This presentation by Bill Elrick of the California Fuel Cell Partnership was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop on March 19, 2013. csd_workshop_2_elrick.pdf (1004.25 KB) More Documents & Publications FCEVs and Hydrogen in California Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and

  20. Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fueling Infrastructure in China Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of Zhejiang University at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cng_h2_workshop_10_zheng.pdf (1.35 MB) More Documents & Publications Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Overview of DOE - DOT December 2009 CNG and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop

  1. The sticking of atomic hydrogen on amorphous water ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeraghattam, Vijay K.; Manrodt, Katie; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: lewis@physast.uga.edu

    2014-07-20

    Using classical molecular dynamics, we have simulated the sticking and scattering process of a hydrogen atom on an amorphous ice film to predict the sticking probability of hydrogen on ice surfaces. A wide range of initial kinetic energies of the incident hydrogen atom (10 K-600 K) and two different ice temperatures (10 K and 70 K) were used to investigate this fundamental process in interstellar chemistry. We report here the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen as a function of incident kinetic energy, gas temperature, and substrate temperature, which can be used in astrophysical models. The current results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies that have reported a wide range in the sticking coefficient.

  2. Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles using gasoline-powered internal combustion engines (ICEs).

  3. Highlighting Hydrogen: Hawaii's Success with Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offers Opportunity Nationwide | Department of Energy Highlighting Hydrogen: Hawaii's Success with Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Offers Opportunity Nationwide Highlighting Hydrogen: Hawaii's Success with Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Offers Opportunity Nationwide September 11, 2014 - 2:38pm Addthis A fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) in Hawaii. Engineers from Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory identified a new way to launch economically viable hydrogen fueling

  4. Performance Status of Hydrogen Stations and Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, Sam; Kurtz, Jennifer; Ainscough, Chris; Peters, Michael; Jeffers, Matt; Saur, Genevieve

    2015-11-18

    NREL presented evaluation results on the performance status of hydrogen stations and fuel cell vehicles at the 2015 Fuel Cell Seminar in Long Beach, California.

  5. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Presentation by Michael Veenstra, Ford Motor Company, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Polymer and ...

  6. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Polymer and Composite Materials R&D Gaps for Hydrogen Systems Michael ... SAE J2594 Design for recycling PEM fuel cell system 09-2003 Perf. ...

  7. Analyzing the Sensitivity of Hydrogen Vehicle Sales to Consumers' Preferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The success of hydrogen vehicles will depend on consumer behavior as well as technology, energy prices and public policy. This study examines the sensitivity of the future market shares of hydrogen-powered vehicles to alternative assumptions about consumers preferences. The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies model was used to project future market shares. The model has 1,458 market segments, differentiated by travel behavior, geography, and tolerance to risk, among other factors, and it estimates market shares for twenty advanced power-train technologies. The market potential of hydrogen vehicles is most sensitive to the improvement of drive train technology, especially cost reduction. The long-run market success of hydrogen vehicles is less sensitive to the price elasticity of vehicle choice, how consumers evaluate future fuel costs, the importance of fuel availability and limited driving range. The importance of these factors will likely be greater in the early years following initial commercialization of hydrogen vehicles.

  8. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Fuels in China | Department of Energy Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of Zhejiang University at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cng_h2_workshop_4_zheng.pdf (2.28 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Overview of DOE - DOT December 2009 CNG and Hydrogen Fuels

  9. Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Refueling Infrastructure in India Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India Presentation given by L.M. Das of the India Institute of Technology at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cng_h2_workshop_11_das.pdf (7.37 MB) More Documents & Publications Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program in India Overview of Indian Hydrogen Program and Key Safety Issues of Hydrogen Fuel

  10. AVTA: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procedures | Department of Energy Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures HICEV Technical Specifications (127.53 KB) HICEV America Test Sequence (71.27 KB) ETA-HITP01 Implementation of SAE Standard J1263 - Road Load Measurements and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coast Down Techniques (114.28 KB) ETA-HITP02 Implementation of SAE Standard J1666 May93 - HICE Vehicle

  11. Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

    2005-12-31

    technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

  12. The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter The drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter Researchers have revealed a new single-stage method for recharging the hydrogen storage compound ammonia borane. March 21, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials Los

  13. Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. pressurerelief_compressedcontainers_ostw.pdf (117.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Fueling Components Testing and Certification CSA International Certification Discussion Hydrogen Technology Workshop U.S. Department of Energy Onboard

  14. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) | Department of Energy Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen. 48609.pdf (2.52 MB) More Documents

  15. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Systems Analysis 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure ...

  16. Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts | Department of Energy Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential Impacts Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential Impacts 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2004_deer_heywood.pdf (261.78 KB) More Documents & Publications An Energy Evolution:Alternative Fueled Vehicle Comparisons Fuel Cell and Battery Electric Vehicles Compared WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty

  17. NREL Efforts Push Hydrogen Vehicles Further Along - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efforts Push Hydrogen Vehicles Further Along November 17, 2015 Woman stands outside in front of a podium next to a hydrogen fueling pump. NREL Associate Laboratory Director Barb Goodman at the dedication ceremony for the new hydrogen fueling station at NREL. Photo by Ellen Jaskol The inaugural National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day, held in October, was too new for Hallmark to make a card for the occasion. But at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the day was cause

  18. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  19. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  20. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601, ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about ...

  2. 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting | Department of Energy DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 18-22, 2009 h4> Arlington, Virginia Monday, May 18, 2009 Plenary Session Poster Presentations Tuesday, May 19, 2009 Oral Presentations Poster Presentions Wednesday, May 20, 2009 Oral Presentations Thursday, May 21, 2009 Oral

  3. 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting | Department of Energy 11 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 9-13, 2011 Washington, D.C. Monday, May 9, 2011 Joint Plenary Session Plenary Session Poster Presentations Tuesday, May 10, 2010 Oral Presentations Poster Presentions Wednesday, May 11, 2011 Oral Presentations Poster

  4. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles.

  5. Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet on Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology activities at NREL.

  6. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluations NREL's technology validation team analyzes hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) operating in a real-world setting to identify the current status of the technology, compare it to Department of Energy (DOE) performance and durability targets, and evaluate progress between multiple generations of technology, some of which will include commercial FCEVs for the first time. Current fuel cell electric vehicle evaluations build on the

  7. Integrated analysis of hydrogen passenger vehicle transportation pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.; Lomax, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles will reduce local air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and oil imports. Other alternative vehicles such as gasoline- or methanol-powered fuel cell vehicles, natural gas vehicles and various hybrid electric vehicles with internal combustion engines may also provide significant environmental and national security advantages. This report summarizes a two-year project to compare the direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicle with other alternatives in terms of estimated cost and estimated societal benefits, all relative to a conventional gasoline-powered internal combustion engine vehicle. The cost estimates used in this study involve ground-up, detailed analysis of the major components of a fuel cell vehicle system, assuming mass production in automotive quantities. The authors have also estimated the cost of both gasoline and methanol onboard fuel processors, as well as the cost of stationary hydrogen fueling system components including steam methane reformers, electrolyzers, compressors and stationary storage systems. Sixteen different vehicle types are compared with respect to mass production cost, local air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CSA Standards HPRD1-2009 Temporary Interim Requirement For Pressure Relief Devices For Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel Containers Published - August 2009 3 5.6 General Hydrogen Service Suitability 5.6.1 General. The purpose of this test is to demonstrate suitability of pressure relief devices in hydrogen service. The pressure relief devices will be selected to be in compliance with Section 5.1 and representative of normal production. NOTE: This series of performance tests may not guarantee that

  9. Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Thomas

    2010-05-31

    The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles ?? plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

  10. Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements, March 2008

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and

  11. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

  12. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

  13. Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations This document establishes the California Fuel Cell Partnership's current consensus vision of next steps for vehicles and hydrogen stations in California. 200707_complete_vision_deployment.pdf (239.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles FCEVs and Hydrogen in California

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office May 26 th , 2016 Presenter: Karen Swider-Lyons : US Naval Research Laboratory DOE Host: Pete Devlin : Market Transformation Manager, FCTO 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Question and Answer * Please type your questions into the question box 2 U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Karen Swider-Lyons US Naval Research Laboratory Code

  15. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  16. Evaluation of Hydrogen Storage System Characteristics for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M.; Day, K.; Brooker, A.

    2010-05-01

    This poster presentation demonstrates an approach to evaluate trade-offs among hydrogen storage system characteristic across several vehicle configurations and estimates the sensitivity of hydrogen storage system improvements on vehicle viability.

  17. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  18. Technology Validation of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Their Hydrogen Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2013-10-22

    This presentation summarizes NREL's analysis and validation of fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technologies.

  19. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles This table lists the technical targets for onboard hydrogen storage for light-duty vehicles in the FCT Program's Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Technical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles (170.63 KB) More Documents & Publications Target Explanation Document:

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Electric Hybrid Truck & Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Houston-Galvelston Area Council at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Electric Hybrid Truck & Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Houston-Galvelston Area Council at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about hydrogen fuel...

  2. Control method for high-pressure hydrogen vehicle fueling station dispensers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kountz, Kenneth John; Kriha, Kenneth Robert; Liss, William E.

    2006-06-13

    A method for quick filling a vehicle hydrogen storage vessel with hydrogen, the key component of which is an algorithm used to control the fill process, which interacts with the hydrogen dispensing apparatus to determine the vehicle hydrogen storage vessel capacity.

  3. Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 2008 report from Oak Ridge National Laboratory summarizes the results of analyses funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and fueling infrastructure in response to the requirements of Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences Report, The Hydrogen Economy, published in 2004.

  4. Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Webinar | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Webinar Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Webinar Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles" held on May 26, 2016. Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles Webinar Slides (5.47 MB) More Documents & Publications Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  6. Parameter study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale prototype hydrogen storage system as part of a Work For Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. For the current work, we have continued our evaluation of the GM Demonstration System to provide learning to DOE's hydrogen storage programs, specifically the new Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. Baseline refueling data during testing for GM was taken over a narrow range of optimized parameter values. Further testing was conducted over a broader range. Parameters considered included hydrogen pressure and coolant flow rate. This data confirmed the choice of design pressure of the Demonstration System, but indicated that the system was over-designed for cooling. Baseline hydrogen delivery data was insufficient to map out delivery rate as a function of temperature and capacity for the full-scale system. A more rigorous matrix of tests was performed to better define delivery capabilities. These studies were compared with 1-D and 2-D coupled multi-physics modeling results. The relative merits of these models are discussed along with opportunities for improved efficiency or reduced mass and volume.

  7. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  8. Series hybrid vehicles and optimized hydrogen engine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.; Van Blarigan, P.

    1995-05-10

    Lawrence Livermore, Sandia Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have a joint project to develop an optimized hydrogen fueled engine for series hybrid automobiles. The major divisions of responsibility are: system analysis, engine design and kinetics modeling by LLNL; performance and emission testing, and friction reduction by SNL; computational fluid mechanics and combustion modeling by LANL. This project is a component of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technology, National Hydrogen Program. We report here on the progress on system analysis and preliminary engine testing. We have done system studies of series hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. The impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy are evaluated. Experiments with an available engine at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppm at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid vehicle simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppm to meet the 0.2 g/mile California Air Resources Board ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. We have designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing single cylinder Onan engine. This head currently features 14.8:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses.

  9. Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements, March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L.; Leiby, Paul N.; James, Brian; Perez, Julie; Melendez, Margo; Milbrandt, Anelia; Unnash, Stefan; Rutherford, Daniel; Hooks, Matthew

    2008-03-14

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself.

  10. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  11. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  14. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-16

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

  15. HYDROGEN-DEUTERIUM EXCHANGE IN PHOTOLYZED METHANE-WATER ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Amanda S.; Hodyss, Robert; Johnson, Paul V.; Willacy, Karen; Kanik, Isik

    2009-09-20

    Previous work has concluded that H-D exchange occurs readily in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons frozen in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) irradiated with ultraviolet light. Here, we examine H-D exchange in methane-water ices following exposure to ultraviolet radiation and analyze the products formed as a result. We find that H-D exchange also occurs in methane-water ices by means of ultraviolet photolysis. Exchange proceeds through a radical mechanism that implies that almost all organic species will undergo significant H-D exchange with the matrix in water ices exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Given sufficient energetic processing of the ice, the H/D ratio of an ice matrix may be transferred to the organic species in the ice.

  16. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Bill Elrick California Fuel Cell Partnership 3/19/2013 The cars are coming HyundaiTucson ix35 FCEV production launch 2/26/13 Daimler/Nissan/Ford joint development announces 2017 launch of affordable FCEV 1/28/13 Toyota partnership with BMW 1/24/2013 Toyota announces sedan-type FCEV launch in 2015 9/24/12 The buses are coming HyundaiTucson ix35 FCEV production launch 2/26/13 Daimler/Nissan/Ford joint development announces 2017

  17. Fuel Efficiency Potential of Hydrogen Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ft007_sluder_2012_o.pdf (1.85 MB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Department of Energy

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and

  18. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

  19. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure | Department of Energy Systems Analysis » 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Introducing hydrogen as an energy carrier would involve major changes in the country's energy and vehicle fleet infrastructure. Technical challenges, costs, and risk will be highest in the near-term, when markets are very small and the technology and infrastructure are immature.

  20. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Final List of Attendees | Department of Energy Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Final List of Attendees scenario_analysis_attendees.pdf (431.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Participant List for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on January 31,

  1. DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations. View

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting | Department of Energy 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 14-18, 2012 Washington, D.C. Monday, May 14, 2012 Plenary Session Poster Presentations Tuesday, May 15, 2012 Oral

  3. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  4. Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T.

    1997-12-31

    All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

  5. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ti007erickson2011o.pdf (383.09

  6. Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    establishes the California Fuel Cell Partnership's current consensus vision of next steps for vehicles and hydrogen stations in California. 200707completevisiondeployment....

  7. Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007.

  8. H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles Easier

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than Ever | Department of Energy H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles Easier than Ever H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles Easier than Ever December 29, 2014 - 10:15am Addthis A fuel cell electric vehicle is refueled with hydrogen at the National Wind Technology Center in Colorado. The H2 Refuel H-Prize is challenging America’s innovators to develop systems that make it easier and more convenient to fuel hydrogen vehicles. | Photo

  9. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell ...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy  at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about Hydrogen and Fuel...

  11. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical paper on the development of a hydrogen reformer, vehicle refueling facility, and PEM fuel cell for Las Vegas, NV presented at the 2002 Annual Hydrogen Review held May 6-8, 2002 in Golden, CO.

  12. Hybrid vehicle system studies and optimized hydrogen engine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.

    1995-04-26

    We have done system studies of series hydrogen hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. We have evaluated the impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy. Experiments in an available engine at the Sandia CRF demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppM at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppM to meet the 0.2 g/mile ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. LLNL has designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing Onan engine. This head features 15:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses. Initial testing shows promise of achieving an indicated efficiency of nearly 50% and emissions of less than 100 ppM NO{sub x}. Hydrocarbons and CO are to be measured, but are expected to be very low since their only source is engine lubricating oil. A successful friction reduction program on the Onan engine should result in a brake thermal efficiency of about 42% compared to today`s gasoline engines of 32%. Based on system studies requirements, the next generation engine will be about 2 liter displacement and is projected to achieve 46% brake thermal efficiency with outputs of 15 kW for cruise and 40 kW for hill climb.

  13. New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories, supported by the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices, recently released the workshop report “Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles.” Held in September 2014, the workshop considered common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen and natural gas as transportation fuels.

  14. Hydrogen Materials Compatibility for the H-ICE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This presentation by Mark Allendorf of Sandia National Laboratories gives an overview of the organization and scientific activities of the Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC). Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium (14.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization Effort Near-term Fuel Cell Applications in Japan Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Industrially Viable Battery

  15. Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vision for Rollout of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations July 2008 California Fuel Cell Partnership 3300 Industrial Blvd, Suite 1000 West Sacramento, CA 95691 916-371-2870 www.cafcp.org This document establishes CaFCP's current consensus vision of next steps for vehicles and hydrogen stations in California. This consensus vision does not necessarily represent the organizational views or individual commitments of CaFCP members. CaFCP Vision Document Overview Fuel cell vehicles and

  16. EERE Success Story-PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies EERE Success Story-PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies July 26, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Through multiple projects, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is improving the performance and decreasing the cost of hydrogen fuel production and fuel cell technologies. PNNL's research is developing new materials-like a durable, high-performance cathode support-and improving the manufacturing processes by

  17. HICEV America: Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle (HICEV...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... or under any vehicle structure. (25) Fuel storage tank ... vent pipe where relative motion between the two can ... Vehicles should not be susceptible to externally generated ...

  18. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  19. 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monday, May 18, 2009 Plenary Session (available on the DOE Hydrogen Program Web site) Poster Presentations Technology Validation Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project Egelton Southeast ...

  20. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Download the webinar slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Hydrogen Refueling Protocols," held February 22, 2013. Hydrogen Refueling ...

  1. R&D Needs for Global Technical Regulations for Hydrogen Vehicle Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Needs for Global Technical Regulations for Hydrogen Vehicle Systems R&D Needs for Global Technical Regulations for Hydrogen Vehicle Systems These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_nguyen.pdf (658.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4

  2. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ti02erickson.pdf (788.94

  3. H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A fuel cell electric vehicle is refueled with hydrogen at the National Wind Technology Center in Colorado. The H2 Refuel H-Prize is challenging Americas innovators to develop ...

  4. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Cory Welch at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C.

  5. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Excellence | Department of Energy 09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ti_02_erickson.pdf (788.94

  6. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina

  7. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the

  8. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory S. McQueen and J. Brinch Energetics Incorporated Sacramento, California April 3, 2008 Proceedings NREL/BK-560-43669 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Workshop Proceedings M.W. Melaina

  9. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique ordinances or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at

  10. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation | Department of Energy 1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation group_1_summary.pdf (138.27 KB) More Documents & Publications 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2

  11. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation | Department of Energy 2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Senario Analysis Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation group_2_summary.pdf (82.13 KB) More Documents & Publications 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1

  12. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected

  13. United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-03-06

    This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  14. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  15. Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems : applications, properties, and gap analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2013-10-01

    This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

  16. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  17. DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development August 14, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary Clarence H. "Bud" Albright, Jr. today announced the selection of 10 cost-shared hydrogen storage research and development projects, which will receive up to $15.3 million over five years, subject to annual

  18. Cryotank for storage of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vehicle drove 650 miles on one liquid 10 kilogram H 2 fill 8 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Automobiles - BMW will incorporate cryotank into their fuel cell test ...

  19. Fuel Cell Vehicles Enhance NREL Hydrogen Research Capabilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expanded research, development, and testing activities will help advance fuel cell electric vehicle technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has acquired four ...

  20. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG/Hydrogen Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) and the 1998 Global Agreement 30 contracting parties, including: Canada, China, the EC, India, Japan, and South Africa. ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overview Ward Technology Integration Smith and Bezanson Vehicle & Systems Simulation ... Liang ORNL Next Generation Inverter Smith General Motors Air Cooled Traction Drive ...

  2. Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Promoting fuel cell vehicle commercialization as a means of moving towards a sustainable energy future, increasing energy efficiency and reducing or eliminating air pollution and ...

  3. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  5. Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal agencies, state agencies, hydrogen providers, energy companies, technology developers, national labs, academia, and other trade associations or non-profit organizations. ...

  6. Pressure Relief Devices for Compressed Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (117.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Fueling Components Testing and Certification CSA International Certification Discussion Hydrogen Technology Workshop U.S. Department of ...

  7. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation by NREL's Cory Welch at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel ... Refueling Infrastructure 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Agenda for August 9 - ...

  8. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This presentation by Bill Elrick of the California Fuel Cell Partnership was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop on March 19, 2013. ...

  9. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  10. 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), advanced vehicle technologies projects funded by VTO and the Fuel Cell...

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office May 26 th , 2016 Presenter: Karen Swider-Lyons : US Naval Research Laboratory DOE ...

  12. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  13. Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    H2USA, a public-private partnership, was co-launched by DOE and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation energy options for consumers. Through...

  14. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG/Hydrogen Vehicles and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Barbara Hennessey and Nha Nguyen at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cngh2workshop5hennessey.pdf (1.99 MB) More Documents & Publications ...

  15. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ambrish Mishra of India's Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cngh2workshop3mishra.pdf (71.95 KB) More ...

  16. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Dean Fry, BP April 3, 2008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 UNITED STATES Department of Energy Infrastructure Lessons Learned Fueling Station Location and Customer Selection Coordination between the OEM and Hydrogen Station Developer is crucial for optimal selection of sites / customers ISSUE Suboptimal site selection has resulted in low station utilization SOLUTIONS Clear understanding /

  17. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles Revised May 2015 This target explanation is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Fiat Chrysler Automotive, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America,

  18. Evaluation of the hydrogen-fueled rotary engine for hybrid vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salanki, P.A.; Wallace, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The hydrogen-fueled engine has been identified as a viable power unit for ultra-low emission series-hybrid vehicles. The Wankel engine is particularly well suited to the use of hydrogen fuel, since its design minimizes most of the combustion difficulties. In order to evaluate the possibilities offered by the hydrogen fueled rotary engine, dynamometer tests were conducted with a small (2.2 kW) Wankel engine fueled with hydrogen. Preliminary results show an absence of the combustion difficulties present with hydrogen-fueled homogeneous charge piston engines. The engine was operated unthrottled and power output was controlled by quality governing, i.e. by varying the fuel-air equivalence ratio on the lean side of stoichiometric. The ability to operate with quality governing is made possible by the wide flammability limits of hydrogen-air mixtures. NO{sub x} emissions are on the order of 5 ppm for power outputs up to 70% of the maximum attainable on hydrogen fuel. Thus, by operating with very lean mixtures, which effectively derates the engine, very low NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved. Since the rotary engine has a characteristically high power to weight ratio and a small volume per unit power compared to the piston engine, operating a rotary engine on hydrogen and derating the power output could yield an engine with extremely low emissions which still has weight and volume characteristics comparable to a gasoline-fueled piston engine. Finally, since engine weight and volume affect vehicle design, and consequently in-use vehicle power requirements, those factors, as well as engine efficiency, must be taken into account in evaluating overall hybrid vehicle efficiency.

  19. Parking heater and method using hydrides in motor vehicles powered by hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchner, H.; Saufferer, H.

    1980-07-29

    A method for parking heating of at least the passenger compartment of motor vehicles operated at least partially on hydrogen and having a hydride reservoir, wherein the hydride reservoir is a Lt/Ht hydride combination, comprising supplying the heat capacity of the Ht reservoir, present after the engine is shut off or produced by charging with hydrogen, at least partially to the passenger compartment.

  20. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    pipeline safety) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Local Government (zoning, building permits) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS (crashworthiness) EPA (emissions) Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed to prepare for the commercialization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen. National Template: Hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Greene, David L

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

  2. TEST: DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations.

  3. DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Storage for Onboard Vehicle Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a request for information to obtain feedback and input from stakeholders on strategies and potential pathways for cost reduction and performance improvements of composite overwrapped pressure vessel systems for compressed hydrogen storage for onboard vehicle applications.

  4. Hydrogen Infrastructure for the Next Generation of Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy This feasibility report assesses the technical and economic feasibility of developing a vacant, undeveloped General Services Administration-owned property into an income-producing site equipped with a hydrogen fueling station and a covered 175-stall parking structure with roof-top solar panels. According to the analysis, the proposed station will enable the third-party owner to combine income streams by selling excess solar power back to the grid, leasing the covered

  5. Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Leiby, Paul Newsome; James, Brian; Perez, Julie; Melendez, Margo; Milbrandt, Anelia; Unnasch, Stefan; Rutherford, Daniel; Hooks, Matthew

    2008-03-01

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and

  6. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles: Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles October 29, 2015 Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (This page intentionally left blank) Section title Unt utaerest in pos eum quo con et iii ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR COLD AND CRYOGENIC HYDROGEN STORAGE APPLICATIONS IN FUEL CELL ELECTRIC VEHICLES Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

  7. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  8. Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Technology PDF icon 2004deerheywood.pdf More Documents & Publications An Energy Evolution:Alternative Fueled Vehicle Comparisons WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical ...

  9. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  10. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Paul

    2012-05-31

    This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davis's existing GATE centers have become the campus's research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

  11. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  12. Energy Flowchart Scenarios of Future U.S. Energy Use Incorporating Hydrogen Fueled Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G; Daily III, W

    2004-06-03

    This project has adapted LLNL energy flowcharts of historical U.S. energy use drawn from the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) data to include scenarios involving hydrogen use. A flexible automated process for preparing and drawing these flowcharts has also been developed. These charts show the flows of energy between primary sectors of the economy so that a user can quickly understand the major implications of a proposed scenario. The software can rapidly generate a spectrum of U.S. energy use scenarios in the 2005-2050 timeframe, both with and without a transition to hydrogen-fueled transportation. These scenarios indicate that fueling 100% of the light duty fleet in 2050 (318 million 80 mpg-equivalent compressed hydrogen fuel cell vehicles) will require approximately 100 million tonnes (10.7 quads) of H2/year, reducing petroleum use by at least 7.3 million barrels of oil/day (15.5 quads/yr). Linear extrapolation of EIA's 2025 reference projection to 2050 indicates approximate U.S. primary energy use of 180 quads/yr (in 2050) relative to current use of 97 quads/yr (comprising 39 quads/yr of petroleum). Full deployment of 50% efficient electricity generation technologies for coal and nuclear power and improvements in gasoline lightduty vehicle fleet fuel economy to 50 mpg would reduce projected U.S. primary energy consumption to 143 quads/yr in 2050, comprising 58 quads/yr (27 million bbl/day) of petroleum. Full deployment of H2 automobiles by 2050 could further reduce U.S. petroleum dependence to 43 quads/yr. These projections indicate that substantial steps beyond a transition to H2 light-duty vehicles will be necessary to reduce future U.S. petroleum dependence (and related greenhouse gases) below present levels. A flowchart projecting future U.S. energy flows depicting a complete transition by 2050 to compressed hydrogen light-duty vehicles is attached on the following page (corresponding to scenario 7 in the Appendix). It indicates that producing

  13. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monday, February 14, 2011 - Compressed Hydrogen Storage Purpose: Identify strategies and R&D needs for lowering the cost of high pressure hydrogen storage systems. Meeting scope includes the on-board system including but limited to its design, materials of construction, manufacturing processes and operating specifications. The meeting scope does not include the refueling infrastructure, such as hydrogen dispensing, compression and cooling, nor the vehicle powertrain, such as fuel cell, ICE

  14. Production of Hydrogen for Clean and Renewable Source of Energy for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xunming; Ingler, William B, Jr.; Abraham, Martin; Castellano, Felix; Coleman, Maria; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Giolando, Dean; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya. H.; Stuart, Thomas; Vonderembse, Mark

    2008-10-31

    This was a two-year project that had two major components: 1) the demonstration of a PV-electrolysis system that has separate PV system and electrolysis unit and the hydrogen generated is to be used to power a fuel cell based vehicle; 2) the development of technologies for generation of hydrogen through photoelectrochemical process and bio-mass derived resources. Development under this project could lead to the achievement of DOE technical target related to PEC hydrogen production at low cost. The PEC part of the project is focused on the development of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation devices and systems using thin-film silicon based solar cells. Two approaches are taken for the development of efficient and durable photoelectrochemical cells; 1) An immersion-type photoelectrochemical cells (Task 3) where the photoelectrode is immersed in electrolyte, and 2) A substrate-type photoelectrochemical cell (Task 2) where the photoelectrode is not in direct contact with electrolyte. Four tasks are being carried out: Task 1: Design and analysis of DC voltage regulation system for direct PV-to-electrolyzer power feed Task 2: Development of advanced materials for substrate-type PEC cells Task 3: Development of advanced materials for immersion-type PEC cells Task 4: Hydrogen production through conversion of biomass-derived wastes

  15. Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Current and Anticipated FCEVs Jason Marcinkoski U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Question and Answer * Please type your question into the question box hydrogenandfuelcells.energy.gov 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Fueling for Current and Anticipated FCEVs Jason Marcinkoski U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office C A L I F O R N I A E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program

  16. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of ...

  17. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell

  18. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  19. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  20. Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O'Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

    2012-09-01

    Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

  1. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob

    2014-01-29

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

  2. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

  3. hydrogen-fueled transportation systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  4. Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  5. Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

    2013-10-01

    Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

  6. Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicles, and the fuel it takes to power them, are an essential part of our American infrastructure and economy. The Energy Department works to develop transportation technologies that will reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  7. vehicles

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for NNSA.

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogbay-area-national-labs-team-tackle-...

  8. vehicles

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for NNSA.

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge http:nnsa.energy.govblogbay-area-national-labs-team-tackle-long...

  9. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen.

  10. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG/Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Barbara Hennessey and Nha Nguyen at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009

  11. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop: "An Automaker's Views on the Transition to Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seminar 2008 Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop "An Automaker's Views on the Transition to Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles" Phoenix, AZ 27 October 2008 Britta Gross General Motors - Hydrogen and Electrical Infrastructure Gas-Friendly to Gas-Free Gas-Friendly to Gas-Free Project Driveway: 100 Fuel Cell Vehicles in LA, NYC, WDC Project Driveway: 100 Fuel Cell Vehicles in LA, NYC, WDC 15 High Volume Is Key! High Volume Is Key! Fuel Cell Commercialization Overview

  12. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Senario Analysis Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation PDF icon ...

  13. 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation PDF icon ...

  14. Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum measurement of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp in several configurations: Application to photodesorption of CO ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Wu, C.-Y. R.; Chuang, K.-J.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Nuevo, M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2014-01-20

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H{sub 2} molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H{sub 2} inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H{sub 2} versus H{sub 2} seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF{sub 2} versus CaF{sub 2}). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H{sub 2} molecular emission ranges.

  16. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Greenville Avenue Room Omni Dallas Hotel 555 S Lamar St, Dallas, TX 75202 Thursday, October 29, 2015 8:00 AM - 12:30 PM http://www.thecamx.org/other-meetings-events/ (under "Co-Located Meetings" tab) Organized by U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy - Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Workshop Agenda: 8:00 The DOE H 2

  17. Process for cooling the passenger compartments of vehicles with hydrogen-consuming engines by mechanical refrigerating procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernauer, O.; Holzt, H.P.; Lenz, H.

    1984-04-10

    A process for cooling a passenger compartment of a vehicle equipped with a hydrogen-consuming engine by mechanical refrigeration involves compressing a gaseous coolant, condensing the resulting compressed and heated gaseous coolant with heat removal to liquefy the coolant, and evaporating the liquefied coolant under the action of a pressure relief valve so that the cold generated during the pressure relief is used to cool the passenger compartment. This process is improved by removing additional heat from the compressed coolant by passing the coolant through a metal hydride cooler.

  18. EERE Success Story-PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Through multiple projects, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is improving the performance and decreasing the cost of hydrogen fuel production and fuel cell technologies. ...

  19. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Ambrish Mishra of India's Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009

  20. Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720 Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates Santa Monica, California

  1. EERE Success Story—Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    H2USA, a public-private partnership, was co-launched by DOE and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation energy options for consumers. Through...

  2. R&D Needs for Global Technical Regulations for Hydrogen Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpvnguyen.pdf (658.17 KB) More Documents ...

  3. Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels workshop hosted by the U.S. departments of Energy and Transportation on December 10-11, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

  4. hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  5. hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  6. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  9. Advanced Vehicle Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  10. Advanced Vehicle Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  14. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with

  15. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies ...

  16. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen On April ...

  17. Hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhelst, S.; Wallner, T.; Energy Systems; Ghent Univ.

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by climate change and the striving for security of energy supply are issues high on the political agenda these days. Governments are putting strategic plans in motion to decrease primary energy use, take carbon out of fuels and facilitate modal shifts. Taking a prominent place in these strategic plans is hydrogen as a future energy carrier. A number of manufacturers are now leasing demonstration vehicles to consumers using hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H{sub 2}ICEs) as well as fuel cell vehicles. Developing countries in particular are pushing for H{sub 2}ICEs (powering two- and three-wheelers as well as passenger cars and buses) to decrease local pollution at an affordable cost. This article offers a comprehensive overview of H{sub 2}ICEs. Topics that are discussed include fundamentals of the combustion of hydrogen, details on the different mixture formation strategies and their emissions characteristics, measures to convert existing vehicles, dedicated hydrogen engine features, a state of the art on increasing power output and efficiency while controlling emissions and modeling.

  18. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Duleep, Gopal

    2013-06-01

    Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

  19. Clean Cities Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment Clean Cities Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit...

  20. Distance-dependent radiation chemistry: Oxidation versus hydrogenation of CO in electron-irradiated H2O/CO/H2O ices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Monckton, Rhiannon J.; Koehler, Sven; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2014-11-26

    Electron-stimulated oxidation of CO in layered H2O/CO/H2O ices was investigated with infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) as function of the distance of the CO layer from the water/vacuum interface. The results show that while both oxidation and reduction reactions occur within the irradiated water films, there are distinct regions where either oxidation or reduction reactions are dominant. At depths less than ~ 15 ML, CO oxidation dominates over the sequential hydrogenation of CO to methanol (CH3OH), and CO2 is the major product of CO oxidation, consistent with previous observations. At its highest yield, CO2 accounts for ~45% of all the reacted CO. Another oxidation product is identified as the formate anion (HCO2-). In contrast, for CO buried more than ~ 35 ML below the water/vacuum interface, the CO-to-methanol conversion efficiency is close to 100%. Production of CO2 and formate are not observed for the more deeply buried CO layers, where hydrogenation dominates. Experiments with CO dosed on pre-irradiated ASW samples suggest that OH radicals are primarily responsible for the oxidation reactions. Possible mechanisms of CO oxidation, involving primary and secondary processes of water radiolysis at low temperature, are discussed. The observed distance-dependent radiation chemistry results from the higher mobility of hydrogen atoms that are created by the interaction of the 100 eV electrons with the water films. These hydrogen atoms, which are primarily created at or near the water/vacuum interface, can desorb from or diffuse into the water films, while the less-mobile OH radicals remain in the near-surface zone resulting in preferential oxidation reactions there. The diffusing hydrogen atoms are responsible for the hydrogenation reactions that are dominant for the more deeply buried CO layers.

  1. Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delaware’s membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

  2. developing viable solid-state materials to store hydrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced vehicle testing and...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle Systems

  5. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) range from small passenger cars to sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and large trucks. Though they often look just like conventional vehicles, HEVs usually include an electric motor as well as a small internal combustion engine (ICE). This combination provides greater fuel economy and fewer emissions than most conventional ICE vehicles do. Photo of the front and part of the side of a bus parked at the curb of a city street with

  6. Hydrogen Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency » Vehicles » Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Watch this video to find out how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. Learn more about hydrogen and fuel cell technology basics. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric...

  8. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt066vsskarner2011

  9. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt066vsskarner2012

  10. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt072vssmackie2011o.pdf (335.31 KB

  11. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen ... a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. ...

  12. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL/TM-2013/222 Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Revised July 2013 1 Prepared by David L. Greene Oak Ridge National Laboratory Gopal Duleep HD Systems 1 This is a revised version of the paper originally published in June 2013. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web

  13. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  14. The New ICE Age | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The New ICE Age The New ICE Age Provides overview of internal combustion engine powertrain developments for the heavy truck market deer12_gruden.pdf (1.84 MB) More Documents & Publications The New ICE Age The New ICE Age Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty Vehicles

  15. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  16. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Vehicle Mass Impact on Vehicle Losses and Fuel Economy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  2. Vehicle Mass Impact on Vehicle Losses and Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. Gasoline Ultra Fuel Efficient Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. ANSI Electric Vehicle Standards Roadmap

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  5. Gasoline Ultra Fuel Efficient Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. Gasoline Ultra Fuel Efficient Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  7. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), drawing on the experience and expertise of both research organizations. The goal of this study was to assess selected hydrogen technologies for potential application to transportation and power generation. Specifically, this study evaluated scenarios for deploying hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. One study objective was to identify the most promising near-term and long-term hydrogen vehicle technologies based on performance, efficiency, and emissions profiles and compare them to traditional vehicle technologies. Hydrogen vehicle propulsion may take many forms, ranging from hydrogen or hythane fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) to fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. This study attempted to developed performance and emissions profiles for each type (assuming a light duty truck platform) so that effective deployment strategies can be developed. A second study objective was to perform similar cost, efficiency, and emissions analysis related to hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the Southeast. There will be many alternative approaches for the deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, ranging from distributed hydrogen production to centralized production, with a similar range of delivery options. This study attempted to assess the costs and potential emissions associated with each scenario. A third objective was to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen fuel cell technologies for stationary power generation and to identify the advantages and limits of different technologies. Specific attention was given to evaluating different fuel cell membrane types. A final objective was to promote the use and deployment of hydrogen technologies in the Southeast. This effort was to include establishing partnerships with industry as well promoting educational and outreach efforts to public

  8. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  9. Advanced Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  10. Advanced Vehicle Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.